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Gibson Gibson

Also Known As: "Gibby", "Gibson Gibson", "Gbby", ""Gibson Gibson""
Birthdate:
Birthplace: James City County, Virginia, Colonial America
Death: 1727 (58-59)
Charles City County, Virginia, Colonial America
Place of Burial: Charles City, Charles City County, Virginia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Gibson and Elizabeth Gibson (Chavis)
Husband of Frances Gibson
Father of Mary Smith, /Paspaghe; Gilbert Gibson, Sr.; Edward Gibson; Hannah Denham; John Gibson and 6 others
Brother of Habburd Gibson, Sr,

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Gibson Gibson

http://www.choicemn.com/trees/gibson-tullis/4259.html

http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Gibson_Gowen.htm


Will of Gibby Gibson of Charles City County, Virginia "very weak'. My riding horse to be sold to pay Col. Lightfoot.

To Hannah Dennam, my negro boy Jack, for life, and then to my son Gibby Gibson. To wife Francis: my negro girl Vicky, for life, and then to my daughter Fran: Smith. To my son in law George Smith, 2 negroes - Sovilaty and Jin. To Hannah Dennam, my negro boy Peter for life and then to my daughter Fran Smith. To my son Edward Gibson, my negro Judey, my wearing clothes, carpenters tools, and coopers tools To George Smith, 2 sheets, 2 blankets and a rugg. To Tabitha Rollinson, negro girl Nanny. George Smith to take care of my cattle and they are to be divided equally between my wife and granddaughter Sarah Smith. To wife my two working Horses and hoggs.

Rest of my estate to George Smith and he to be executor ,

Dated 2 March 1726/7

Witt: Benja. Moody, Robert Cade,(*) James Blankes

Signed: Gibby(G) Gibson

Codicil: Negro boy Peter given in will to Hannah Dennam and then to Frances Smith, is to go to my son George Gibson 3 March 1726/27

Wit: by above Moody and Cade Recorded 3 May 1727

Presented by George Smith and proved by above Blanks and Cade. Col. Fran's Lightfoot,(**) Security.

(*) Robert Cade was the witness on will of Gibby Gibson 1727 in Charles City County, Virginia. This is likely Robert Cade who married Susannah Crump, son Stephen Crump Cade born September 17, 1715 St Peters Parish, New Kent County, Virginia. Stephen Crump Cade resided in lived in Edgecombe, Dobbs, and was Sheriff of Johnston Co. in 1757, married to Mary Wadill and Mary Gibson and died in Robeson Co., North Carolina in 1783. His son John Cade married to Elizabeth Adair, daughter of the Indian trader and author Doctor James Adair of Robeson County, North Carolina. Elizabeth's sister, Agnes married to John Gibson who is said to have been killed by Indians near Nashville in 1790. (**) See Francis Lightfoot and Gideon and John Gibson in Bertie County, North Carolina below

http://www.historical-melungeons.com/gibsonnotes.html https://www.ancestry.com/mediaui-viewer/tree/19708784/person/18008538683/media/0d3c5bbe-4618-4965-8863-4cfa33c83cf5?_phsrc=NAY1230&_phstart=successSource

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Edmund Howell was his godfather.

Edmund Howell -- 23 Dec. 1679

To my only son, William Howell my whole estate with some exceptions. to my godson Gibson, son of Thomas Gibson To godson Henry Baker. Makes George Foster Exec. and gives him the care of son until he is 21 years old, If son die, his inheritance to Henry Baker, George Foster Thomas Ironmonger his children.

Wit: Thos. Pittman, Sr., John Moring. Prob. 9 Oct. 1679

i. Jane, born say 1662-5, married Morris Evans [Lynchburg Chancery file 1821-033].


Gibson “Gibby” Gibson BIRTH unknown DEATH 1727 BURIAL Hula - Mikulas Family Cemetery Charles City County, Virginia, USA MEMORIAL ID 124774383 · View Source

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/124774383/gibson-gibson


Gibby Gibson BIRTH unknown DEATH unknown BURIAL Sand Point Cemetery (Defunct) Charles City, Charles City County, Virginia, USA MEMORIAL ID 46512243 · View Source


MEMORIAL PHOTOS 0 FLOWERS 2 Sand Point Cemetery - Charles City County, Virginia "Here Lyes the Body of Gibby Gibson" VIRGINIA VITAL RECORDS, from the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Vol. 28, pages: 70-72, The William and Mary College Quarterly and Tyler's Quarterly, page: 13

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/46512243/gibby-gibson


Gibson Gibson was born about 1660 in Virginia Colony, the likely son of Elizabeth Chavis (aka Chevers) and Thomas Gibson, according to researcher Paul Heinegg. He first appears in Virginia legal records when he was released from his unlawful apprenticeship to Thomas Barber on 28 March 1672 after his mother, Elizabeth Chavis, successfully petitioned the General Court of Virginia to release her "son." He would have been about 12 years old. He married Frances Lightfoot in 1683. Their children were: Mary Smith (wife of George Smith), Gibby/Gilbert Jr, Edward, Hannah, George, Frances Smith (wife of George Smith), Tabitha Rollinson (wife of George Rollinson/Rawlinson of York County), and John. Gibson owned at least 150 acres of land as well as Negro slaves (ref his will dated 2 Mar 1726/7). In 1704 he was called "Gibey" Gibson when he was listed with 150 acres in Quit Rent Rolls of James City County, Virginia. In a deed of gift on 7 Sept 1726, he ("Gibby Gilbert, planter") gave two "Negro" boys named Simon and Civility to his daughter Mary Smith during her lifetime and at her death to Mary's children: Tom, Lightfoot, Sarah, Mary, Elizabeth, Rebecca and Ann. His children were: Gibby Gilbert Jr, Edward, Hannah, George, Frances Smith (wife of George Smith), ?Tabitha Rollinson (wife of George Rollinson (Rawlinson of York County). (Source: Heinegg, Paul. FREE AFRICAN AMERICANS of NORTH CAROLINA, VIRGINIA, and SOUTH CAROLINA: From the Colonial Period to About 1820 (Baltimore, Maryland, Clearfield Company by Genealogical Publishing Company, 5th Edition, 2005) Volume I, pp. 523-534, "GIBSON FAMILY."

Notes from Geni.com: Gibson Gibson's dad Thomas is probably the Thomas Gibson buried with him. Edmund Howell and Thomas Gibson both fought in Bacon's Rebellion in 1676. [If so, likely out of duress, given the historical perpective]. Edmund Howell was Gibson Gibson's godfather, as stated in Edmund's will. Edmund also states that Gibson Gibson is the son of Thomas Gibson. Howell was from Surry County, VA (was south of the James River and was originally part of Jamestown, as well). Howell gave a deposition, shortly after Bacon's Rebellion, stating that Thomas Gibson (I assume this is Gibson Gibson' father) was about 30 years of age, being born in the mid 1640's.

BURIAL Sandy Point - Charles City County, Virginia "Here Lyes the Body of Gibby Gibson" VIRGINIA VITAL RECORDS, from the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Vol. 28, pages: 70-72, The William and Mary College Quarterly and Tyler's Quarterly, page: 13 •ID: I09 7638

There is an area of Charles City County called "Sandy Point". It is a point of land bounded by the James and Chickahominy rivers. According to "80% Heaven Bound" by Sherry Brown Tyler, "It would be most difficult to determine at which place on Sandy Point many of the burials took place." It is BELIEVED that Francis Gibson and Gibby Gibson are buried somewhere in Sandy Point, but an exact location is not known. INFORMATION PROVIDED BY CONTRIBUTOR TOM DUDLEY

Hula-Mikula Family Cemetery "This small family cemetery is in the middle of a field about 50 yards off a dirt road. A total of 5 tombstones exist. All tombstones were photographed on 7 Feb 2014 and are entered here." (SOURCE: Ancestry.com, Find-a-Grave Index)

RACIAL BACKGROUND

From Geni.com (Record for Thomas Gibson managed by Thomas Gibson) FPOC 1668 COLLINS, SMITH, WARREN, HURLE, SHIPP, GIBSON, WILLIAMS, CLEMENTS, HOWELL, Godfather of Gibby Gibson List of Free Persons of Color in Charles City, Virginia dated 10 June 1668. A List of ye Tythables from ye Colledge to Smiths forte taken up by Mr Thos Warren. "Tho. Hurle Joh. Shipp Tho Gibson" & 1 negro, 04 Translated: Thomas Hurle John Shipp Thomas Gibson, continuing a list of tithables from ye Collins' and Smiths fort taken up by Mr Thomas Warren. "Geo. Foster and Thos. Williams" 02 "Thos North 01 "John Clemons" 01 "Edmond Howell", 01 Thomas Gibson is a father of one Gibson Gibson and therefore husband of Elizabeth Chaves. Elizabeth was married to Thomas and the Peter) Edmond Howell is a godfather to Gibson Gibson. See 23 Dec 1679 & 28 March 1672 Translated: Thomas Warren, George Foster, Thomas Williams, Edmond Howell.

According to Heinegg, the Gibsons were dark skinned as early as 1680's and were sometimes referred to as melungeons which generally refers to people with a mixture of three racial origins: West European, Native American and African. Some of the most prominent surnames that have been claimed as potentially associated with a Melungeon identity include Bowling (Bolin), Bunch, Chavis (Chavez), Collins, Epps, Evans, Fields, Francisco, Gibson, Gill, Goins, Goodman, Minor, Mise, Moore, Mullins, Osborn(e), Phipps, Reeves (Rives, Rieves, Reeves, Reaves) SOURCE: Heinegg, Paul.

The Melungeon group may have formed initially on the boundary of English settlement (including early Hanover and Louisa County in the 1720's), then migrated into the Piedmont of Virginia/North Carolina and across the Blue Ridge into the New River Valley of Tennessee and Virginia. Some of these familes went to South Carolina and are associated with the people known as Brass Ankles. They then went on to Louisiana and became known as Redbones. As more settlers moved south along the Wilderness Road, the Melungeons were squeezed out of the valley bottomlands and forced to occupy thinner soils on mountain ridges - though the evidence shows that the early Melungeon settlers purchased their lands first, before choosing to occupy them. (source: http://www.virginiaplaces.org/population/melungeon.html)

Melungeon physical traits include dark hair and skin with light-colored eyes; stark contrasts within a single family of skin and hair color; American Indian features; and a particular type of bump or ridge at the back of the head (usually just above the neck). This information can be found on several websites including https://www.familytreemagazine.com/premium/the-mystery-of-the-melungeons/

Portuguese especially may have been involved in these mixtures as they were the sole purveyors of slaves from Angola Colony in western Africa to the Virginia Colony and Americas in the early 1600's which might explain a DNA link from the Iberian peninsula. Shipwrecked Portuguese sailors and unions with dark-skinned women (African or Native American) resulted in a children known as melungeons. Descendents of these unions were sometimes found to have several darker-skinned children with light eyes.

Will dated 2 Mar 1726 and proved on 3 Mar 1726: (source: FamilySearch) Will of Gibby Gibson of Charles City Co. , My riding horse to be sold to pay Col. Lightfoot. To Hannah Dennam, my negro boy Jack, for life, and then to my son Gibby Gibson. To wife Fran: my negro girl Vicky, for life, and then to my daughter Fran: Smith To my son in law George Smith, 2 negroes - Sovilaty and Jin. To Hannah Dennam, my negro boy Peter for life and then to my daughter Fran Smith To my son Edward Gibson, my negro Judey, my wearing clothes, carpenters tools, and coopers tools To George Smith, 2 sheets, 2 blankets and a rugg To Tabitha Rollinson, negro girl Nanny. George Smith to take care of my cattle and they are to be divided equally between my wife and granddaughter Sarah Smith. To wife my two working Horses and hoggs. Rest of my estate to George Smith and he to be executor, Dated 2 March 1726/7 Witt: Benja. Moody, Robert Cade, James Blankes Signed: Gibby(G) Gibson Codicil: Negro boy Peter given in will to Hannah Dennam and then to Frances Smith, is to go to my son George Gibson 3 March 1726/27 Wit: by above Moody and Cade Recorded 3 May 1727 Presented by George Smith and proved by above Blanks and Cade. Col. Fran's Lightfoot, Security

BURIAL Sandy Point - Charles City County, Virginia "Here Lyes the Body of Gibby Gibson" VIRGINIA VITAL RECORDS, from the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Vol. 28, pages: 70-72, The William and Mary College Quarterly and Tyler's Quarterly, page: 13 •ID: I09 7638

There is an area of Charles City County called "Sandy Point". It is a point of land bounded by the James and Chickahominy rivers. According to "80% Heaven Bound" by Sherry Brown Tyler, "It would be most difficult to determine at which place on Sandy Point many of the burials took place." It is BELIEVED that Francis Gibson and Gibby Gibson are buried somewhere in Sandy Point, but an exact location is not known. INFORMATION PROVIDED BY CONTRIBUTOR TOM DUDLEY

Hula-Mikula Family Cemetery "This small family cemetery is in the middle of a field about 50 yards off a dirt road. A total of 5 tombstones exist. All tombstones were photographed on 7 Feb 2014 and are entered here." (SOURCE: Ancestry.com, Find-a-Grave Index)

Gibson Gibson was born about 1660 in Virginia Colony, the son of a white indentured servant, Elizabeth Chevers (aka Chavis), and Thomas Gibson, according to researcher Paul Heinegg. His father was listed as a Free Person of Color in 1668 Jamestown, Virginia Colony. Both Africans and Native Americans were called persons of color with no designation as to which race at that time in Virginia history. His mother was Irish so Gibson Gibson would racially be considered a mulatto and still listed as a person of color. He first appears in Virginia legal records when he was released from his unlawful apprenticeship to Thomas Barber on 28 March 1672 after his mother, Elizabeth Chavis, successfully petitioned the General Court of Virginia to release her "son." He would have been about 12 years old. He married Frances Lightfoot in 1683. Their children were: Mary Smith (wife of George Smith), Gibby Jr (aka Gilbert), Edward, Hannah, George, Frances Smith (wife of George Smith), Tabitha Rollinson (wife of George Rollinson/Rawlinson of York County), and John. Gibson owned at least 150 acres of land as well as Negro slaves* (ref his will dated 2 Mar 1726/7). (source: Heinegg, Paul, FREE AFRICAN AMERICANS OF NORTH CAROLINA, VIRGINIA, AND SOUTH CAROLINA: From the Colonial Period to About 1820 (Baltimore, Maryland, Clearfield Company by Genealogical Publishing Co., Fifth Edition, 2005), Vol. I, pp. 523-534 GIBSON FAMILY. Record for Gibson Gibson born c1660 likely son of Elizabeth CHAVIS and his descendants)

  • Note: In 1661, Virginia passed its first law allowing any free person the right to own slaves. ... Among laws affecting slaves was one of 1662, which said that children born in the colony would take the social status of their mothers, regardless of who their fathers were (partus sequitur ventrem).

In 1704 he was called "Gibey" Gibson when he was listed with 150 acres in Quit Rent Rolls of James City County, Virginia. In a deed of gift on 7 Sept 1726, he ("Gibby Gibson, planter") gave two "Negro" boys named Simon and Civility to his daughter Mary Smith during her lifetime and at her death to Mary's children: Tom, Lightfoot, Sarah, Mary, Elizabeth, Rebecca and Ann. (Source: Heinegg, Paul)

Notes from www.Geni.com: Gibson Gibson's dad Thomas is probably the Thomas Gibson buried with him. Edmund Howell and Thomas Gibson both fought in Bacon's Rebellion* in 1676. Edmund Howell was Gibson Gibson's godfather, as stated in Edmund's will and which also states that Gibson Gibson is the son of Thomas Gibson. Howell was from Surry County, VA (was south of the James River and was originally part of Jamestown, as well). Howell gave a deposition, shortly after Bacon's Rebellion, stating that Thomas Gibson (Gibson' father) was about 30 years of age, being born in the mid 1640's. (Heinegg puts his birth about 1660.)

  • Bacon's Rebellion was an armed rebellion in September 1676 by Virginia settlers led by Nathaniel Bacon against the rule of Governor William Berkeley. It was the first rebellion in the American colonies in which discontented frontiersmen took part; a similar uprising in Maryland took place later that year. Bacon's militia captured Jamestown and burned it to the ground. Although Bacon died of fever a month later and the rebellion fell apart, Virginia's wealthy planters were shaken by the fact that a rebel militia that united white and black servants and slaves had destroyed the colonial capital. Their distrust of the poor, especially of indentured servants (many participated in Bacon's Rebellion), grew. This actually resulted in the growth of the slave trade as they sought a more reliable, controllable, permanent labor source than indentured servants. (source: Wikipedia)

BURIAL (Souce: Ancestry.com. U.S. Find A Grave Index 1600's - Current) Sandy Point - Charles City County, Virginia "Here Lyes the Body of Gibby Gibson" VIRGINIA VITAL RECORDS, from the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Vol. 28, pages: 70-72, The William and Mary College Quarterly and Tyler's Quarterly, page: 13 •ID: I09 7638

There is an area of Charles City County called "Sandy Point". It is a point of land bounded by the James and Chickahominy rivers. According to "80% Heaven Bound" by Sherry Brown Tyler, "It would be most difficult to determine at which place on Sandy Point many of the burials took place." It is BELIEVED that Francis Gibson and Gibby Gibson are buried somewhere in Sandy Point, but an exact location is not known. (source: INFORMATION PROVIDED BY CONTRIBUTOR TOM DUDLEY to Ancestry.com. U.S. Find A Grave Index 1600s-Current)

Hula-Mikula Family Cemetery "This small family cemetery is in the middle of a field about 50 yards off a dirt road. A total of 5 tombstones exist. All tombstones were photographed on 7 Feb 2014 and are entered here." (SOURCE: Ancestry.com, Find-a-Grave Index)

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Gibson Gibson's Timeline

1668
1668
James City County, Virginia, Colonial America
1684
1684
1686
1686
Virginia
1688
1688
1690
1690
1690
1695
1695
North Carolina, United States
1699
1699
1700
1700
1700
Lancaster County, Virginia, United States