Gorboduc ap Cynfarch, Brenin Lloegria, Prydain

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Records for Gorboduc ap Cynfarch

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Gorboduc ap Cynfarch, Brenin Lloegria, Prydain

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Britain
Death: Died in Britain
Immediate Family:

Son of Cynfarch . ap Seisyll, Brenin Lloegria, Prydain and NN . NN
Husband of Judon . NN
Father of Porrex ap Gorboduc, Brenin Lloegria, Prydain and Ferrex ap Gorboduc

Managed by: Douglas John Nimmo
Last Updated:

About Gorboduc ap Cynfarch, Brenin Lloegria, Prydain

It is not certain that Gorbuduc is the son of Kimarcus. Gorbudouc's wife was named Judon.

The Welsh Gwrfyw “Digu” “Wledic”, called “digu” meaning “The Un-loved”, the Count of Britain, which office was that of army commander, that is, the chief-of-staff of the country’s entire armed-forces, a senior British prince, was offered the British Crown by the British Army shortly after the departure of the Roman Army [for the third time], in 418, and is sometimes reckoned to have been Britain’s first Dark Age King. Gorboduc had a long career in Roman military service in Britain before his elevation to the British throne. He was appointed “Count of Britain” (army-commander) in Year 394 by the Roman Governor Chrysanthus, and served successive governors in that office. These years were later figured by medieval writers into the years of his reign as king, hence the confusion in the number of his regnal years. His reign as king, though brief, was a time of rapid and great change. It was a chaotic period in British History characterized by social strife, a complete breakdown of law and order, and the collapse of the country’s economy. Meanwhile, Gorboduc had become senile in his old age and was unable to give the country any leadership. His regime was totally ineffective. The authority of the country’s central government came to be generally ignored by the country’s regional rulers, and power gradually drifted into their hands, who, called “tyrants”, began warring among themselves in regional conflicts. Then, there was also the need to defend the country from seaborne raids by the Picts, Saxons, and Irish. These “barbarians” pressed on the “civilized” Britons from all sides. They ravaged the country and partially destroyed the country’s food supply which brought the country to the brink of total collapse. Too, there was famine, pestilence, and disease everywhere. The death of King Gorboduc passed away almost unnoticed by the country which during his reign had sunk by degrees into decay and chaos. The story of Gorboduc, his wife, Judon, and their twin sons, Porrex and Ferrex, was dramatized by Thomas Sackville in his play “Gorboduc”, first performed in a theatre production in 1562, which was the first English historical drama. [http://www.angelfire.com/ego/et_deo/darkage.wps.htm]

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