Guillaume le Gros, VI duc d'Aquitaine et comte IV de Poitiers

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Guillaume 'le Gros' de Poitou, VI duc d'Aquitaine et comte IV de Poitou

Birthdate:
Death: December 15, 1038 (33-34)
Place of Burial: bur Poitiers, Priory of St Nicholas
Immediate Family:

Son of William V, duke of Aquitaine and Almode de Limoges, Countess of Charroux & La Marche, duchess of Aquitaine
Husband of Eustachie de Montreuil
Father of Marguerite de Poitou, dame de Saintes and Inés de Aquitania
Half brother of Guillaume VIII Geoffroy d'Aquitaine, VIII duc d'Aquitaine et Vl comte de Poitou; Pierre Guillaume 'l'Aigret' ou 'le Hardi' d'Aquitaine, VII Duc d'Aquitaine, V Comte de Poitou; Agnes of Poitou; Adelais de Fezensac; Odo (Eudes) d'Aquitaine, Duc d'Aquitaine & Gascogne, comte de Poitou and 2 others

Occupation: Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William IV) between 1030 and his death
Managed by: Private User
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About Guillaume le Gros, VI duc d'Aquitaine et comte IV de Poitiers

GUILLAUME de Poitou

  • Son of Duke Guillaume V & his first wife Almode de Limoges, Countess of Charroux & La Marche, duchess of Aquitaine

Project MedLands AQUITAINE

GUILLAUME de Poitou, son of GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou] & his wife Emma de Blois ([969]-Maillezais 31 Jan 1030, bur Maillezais, Abbaye de Saint-Pierre). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmum" as son of "Willelmum" (son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ") and his wife "filiam Tetbaldi Campenensis…Emmam"[406]. "Vuillelmus dux Aquitanorum" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély for the soul of "…filios meo Vuilelmo…" by charter dated [971][407]. "Willelmus Aquitanorum comes et dux et uxor mea Hemma et filius noster equivocus Willelmus" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated Dec 992[408]. His mother retained custody of Guillaume during her separation from his father, but returned him to Poitiers in May 988[409]. "Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[410]. He succeeded his father in 993 as GUILLAUME V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME III Comte de Poitou. He summoned a council at Poitiers in 1000 which decided that future disputes should be settled by justice not recourse to arms[411]. Duke Guillaume enjoyed close relations with Emperor Heinrich II, with whom he exchanged gifts[412]. Rebels in Italy, opposed to the election of Konrad II King of Germany in 1024, offered the throne of Italy to Duke Guillaume, who refused the offer[413]. Duke Guillaume maintained an active correspondence with leading churchmen, men of science and political leaders and established a library for which he commissioned the transcription of manuscripts[414]. He abdicated in favour of his eldest son in 1029 and became a monk at the Abbey of Maillezais[415]. married firstly ([997]%29 as her second husband, ADALMODE de Limoges, widow of AUDEBERT I Comte de La Marche et du Périgord, daughter of GERAUD Vicomte de Limoges & his wife Rothilde de Brosse (-after 1005). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Aldebertus frater [Helias Petragoricensi comite]" married "sorore Widonis vicecomitis"[416]. Ademar records the second marriage of "Adalmode coniuge…Aldeberti" to Duke William[417]. The Chronicle of Petrus Malleacensis records that Adalmodis was wife of Boson Comte du Périgord and daughter of "Candida", for whom Duke Guillaume promised to expand "fluvium Rhodanum Regni" in return for marrying her daughter[418], but this is not consistent with the other sources. According to the Chronicle of Maillezais, Adalmode was the daughter of Adelaide d'Anjou (presumably by her first husband Etienne de Brioude/Gévaudan), and also widow of Boson Comte du Périgord (brother of Comte Audebert I, whom he survived by several years). Thierry Stasser has shown that this is incorrect[419]. After her first husband was killed, Adalmode sought refuge in the château de Rochemeaux but was forced to surrender by Poitevin forces[420]. married secondly (1011 before 10 Mar) SANCHA [Brisca] de Gascogne, daughter of GUILLAUME SANCHE Duke of Gascony & his wife Urraca de Navarra (-before 1018). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Briscam" as sister of "dux Santii", when recording her marriage to "Willelmi ducis" after the death of the latter's first wife[421]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent names "sororem Sancii Ducis Gasconiæ, nomine Briscam" as second wife of Duke Guillaume, in a later paragraph recording the death of "Sancia conjuge Guillermi ducis"[422]. "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Willelmi filii eius, Odoni filii eius, Prisca comitisse" subscribed the charter dated to [1012/18] under which "Ugo Liziniacensis domnus" donated property to St Cyprien, Poitiers[423]. An agreement between the abbots of Jumièges and Bougeuil concerning an exchange of land in Poitou, by charter dated [13 Apr/4 Apr] 1012, is subscribed by "Richardus…filius Ricardi principi magni…Vuillelmus Pictavorum comes et uxor Prisca…"[424].
married thirdly (1019) as her first husband, AGNES de Mâcon, daughter of OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comt%C3%A9] & his first wife Ermentrude de Roucy ([990/95]-Saintes 10 Nov 1068, bur Poitiers, Priory of Saint-Nicolas). Agnes is named as daughter of "Ermentrudis" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that she was mother of "Wido"[425]. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus…Pictauensis" married one of the daughters of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" & his wife[426]. "Agnes comitissa filia Ottonis cognomento Willelmi comitis Matiscensis, uxor…Wilelmi ducis Aquitanorum" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1020][427]. She married secondly (1 Jan 1032, repudiated [1049/52]%29 Geoffroy "Martel" d'Anjou (-9 Nov 1067), who later succeeded as Geoffroy II Comte d'Anjou. The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Gaufredus Martellus Andegavensis comes" married "Agnetem comitissam Pictavensem" incestuously in 1032[428]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1032 Kal Jan" of "Gaufridus comes, Agnetem comitissam incesto", indirectly indicating her origin in a later passage which records the marriage "1043 XII Nov" of "Hainricus imperator [et] filiam Agnetis comitissæ"[429]. Her origin is clarified by the Chronicæ Sancti Albini which records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis"[430]. Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou & his wife founded the abbey of La Trinité de Vendôme by charter dated 31 May 1040, signed by "Goffridi comitis Andegavorum, Agnetis conjugis suæ…"[431]. A powerful personality, she succeeded in defeating her stepson Duke Eudes and installed her own son as Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou. Regent of Aquitaine for her son 1039-1044. She arranged her daughter's marriage with Emperor Heinrich III in 1043 and lived at the imperial court after this time. "Goffredus…comes atque Agnes…uxor" donated property to the monks of La Trinité, Vendôme by charter dated 6 Jan 1049 subscribed by "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Goffredi pueri fratris illius"[432]. "Gaufredus Andegavorum comes…uxor mea Agnes" made a donation to the priory of Saint-Nicholas de Poitiers by undated charter which also names "eius [Agnetis] filii comites…Pictavenses"[433]. A charter dated to [1060/67] recites a prior donation to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by "Hildegardis comitissa", who retained a life interest in the property which, after the death of the donor, was sold in turn to "Agneti comitissa" (recording her divorce from "comitum Gaufridum"), "comitem Gaufridum…Gaufridi nepotem" and finally "fratre eius Fulconi" who restituted it to the abbey[434]. After her separation from her second husband, in 1047 she founded the abbey of Notre-Dame de Saintes, where she became a nun in 1068[435]. "Agnes" founded the abbey of Saint-Nicolas at Poitou with the consent of "ambobus filiis Guillelmi et Gauffrido" by charter dated [1050][436]. "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus" confirms in his charter dated [1058/68] that "mea mater Agnes…frater meus Guillelmus" were both buried in the priory of Saint-Nicolas de Poitiers[437]. The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Agnes comitissa"[438].

Duke Guillaume V & his first wife ADALMODE de Limoges had [two children]:

1. GUILLAUME de Poitou ([1004]-15 Dec 1038, bur Maillezais, Abbaye de Saint-Pierre). Ademar names "Willelmum" son of "Willelmi ducis" by his previous wife before he married "Briscam"[439]. "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Willelmi filii eius, Odoni filii eius, Prisca comitisse" subscribed the charter dated to [1012/18] under which "Ugo Liziniacensis domnus" donated property to St Cyprien, Poitiers[440]. "Willelmi comitis et abbatis, eius filii Willelmi…Odonis…" subscribed the charter dated 3 Aug 1016 under which "Guilelmus…dux Aquitaniensium" granted rights to Saint-Hilaire de Poitier[441]. His father refused on his behalf an offer of the throne of Italy in 1025 made by rebels against Konrad II King of Germany[442]. "Willelmus Pictavorum comes et dux Aquitanorum…filius Guillelmi comitis" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated [1023/26] subscribed by "Willelmi comitis, Willelmi patris eius"[443], the order of names in the subscription suggesting that some sharing of power took place between Duke Guillaume V and his son before the death of the former. He succeeded his father in 1029 as GUILLAUME VI "Pinguis/le Gros/le Gras" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME IV Comte de Poitou, de Saintonge and de Guyenne. The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent records that "Guillermus Pinguis filiorum eius maior natu" succeeded his father[444]. Geoffroy "Martel" d'Anjou (married to Duke Guillaume's stepmother) declared war on Poitou. At the battle of Mont-Couer 20 Sep 1033, he captured Duke Guillaume who was released end-1036 following the intervention of his wife on payment of a large ransom[445]. It is incorrect, as stated by William of Malmesbury, that Duke Guillaume survived his release by only three days[446]. Rodolfus Glaber records the death of "Willelmus…Pictavorum comes" in the same year as Emperor Konrad II [1038], recalling that he had been released and sent home for a great ransom three years after his capture in battle by Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou[447]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent records that "Guillermi Comitis" (husband of Eustachie) was buried "cum patre apud Malliacum"[448]. married (before 20 Jul 1031) EUSTACHIE, daughter of --- (-after 1038, bur Notre Dame de Poitiers)…Willelmi comitis, Eustachie…" subscribed a charter dated 1030 or 1031 under which "Raingardis" donated property "in pago Pictavo et in vicaria Ygrandinse in villa…Targiacus" to St Cyprien[449]. Eustachie is named with her husband in the records of a lawsuit while Robert I King of France still reigned[450]. "…Willelmi comitis Pictavensi…Eustachiæ comitissæ, Alæ comitissæ sororem Willelmi comitis" subscribed a charter dated 5 Dec [1031/33] under which "Willelmus Engelbertus et Willelmus filius Ansemi, nomine Lambertum, et sororem eius…Abba" donated property to Saint-Maixent[451]. "Eusthacia comitissa per mandatum domni mei Willelmi ducis" who was "positus in captione" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated [1033/36] subscribed by "domni Willelmi comitis [despite his absence in captivity] Eustachiæ comitissæ, domni Hisemberti, Ala comitissæ…"[452]. Eustachie's origin is unknown. According to Richard, the theory that she was Eustachie de Montreuil, daughter of Berlay [III] de Montreuil & his [first] wife is unsupported by primary sources[453]. The same author emphasises that, if the Montreuil origin is correct, Eustachie could not have been the daughter of Berlay [III]'s wife Grace, who married secondly in [1052] Geoffroy II "Martel" Comte d'Anjou, while "still young", but he does not cite his source for this last observation. The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent records that "Eustachia uxore Guillermi Comitis" was buried "apud S. Mariam Pictavis"[454].

Duke Guillaume VI & his wife Eustachie de Montreuil had [one possible] child:

  • a) AGNES de Poitou Agnes was the daughter of Duke Guillaume VI according to Szabolcs de Vajay, although he cites no source in support of this[455]. According to Richard, Duke Guillaume VI died childless[456]. Agnes is shown as the possible daughter of Duke Guillaume VII "l'Aigret" in Europäische Stammtafeln[457], marrying Pierre I Comte de Savoie as her second husband although she would have been only about six years old at the time of her supposed first marriage with Ramiro King of Aragon. From an onomastic point of view, it is surprising that a daughter of Duke Guillaume VI would have been named Agnes, a name which appears to have been introduced into the family of the Comtes de Poitou only after the third marriage of Duke Guillaume V to Agnes de Mâcon. The primary source which confirms her marriage to King Ramiro has not yet been identified. m ([1054]%29 as his second wife, RAMIRO I King of Aragon, illegitimate son of SANCHO III King of Navarre & his mistress Sancha de Aibar (Aibar [1008]-killed in battle Graus 8 May 1063, bur Monastery of San Juan de la Peña).]
    * 2. ALIX ([1005/10]-after [1033/36]). "…Willelmi comitis Pictavensi…Eustachiæ comitissæ, Alæ comitissæ sororem Willelmi comitis" subscribed a charter dated 5 Dec [1031/33] under which "Willelmus Engelbertus et Willelmus filius Ansemi, nomine Lambertum, et sororem eius…Abba" donated property to Saint-Maixent[458]. "Eusthacia comitissa per mandatum domni mei Willelmi ducis" who was "positus in captione" donated property to Saint-Maixent with the consent of "sororis eiusdem principi" by charter dated [1033/36] subscribed by "domni Willelmi comitis [despite his absence in captivity] Eustachiæ comitissæ, domni Hisemberti, Ala comitissæ…"[459]. The editor of this compilation suggests that "Ala comitissa" was Agnes, daughter of Duke Guillaume V & his third wife, who later married Emperor Heinrich III[460]. This seems unlikely to be correct. None of Duke Guillaume VI's half-brothers subscribed any of his charters and it seems surprising if his half-sister Agnes would have been included. "Ala" presumably held some semi-official role at court during the absence of her brother in captivity, shown by the fact that she is recorded as having consented to the donation made under the second charter. As Agnes would have been under ten years old at the time, this provides another indication of the unlikelihood that she and “Ala” were the same person. In addition, Agnes is not recorded as having subscribed any of the charters of her own full brothers. It is more probable that Alix was a full sister of Duke Guillaume VI who is otherwise unrecorded. It is possible that she is referred to as "comitissa" as the wife of an unidentified "comes". No example has been found in this family of an unmarried daughter of the Duke of Aquitaine using the title, although it could have been used on an exceptional basis if the hypothesis concerning her function at court is correct. If Alix was married, it is probable that she was a widow at the time of the charters, to explain her presence at the court of her brother without any husband being named. She presumably died soon after these charters as no further record of her has been found. [married ---. As explained above, it is not certain that Alix was married. If she was married, there is no indication of her husband's name.]

Duke Guillaume V & his second wife SANCHA [Brisca] de Gascogne had two children:

  • 3. EUDES de Poitou (-killed in battle Mauzé 10 Mar 1039, bur Maillezais, Abbaye de Saint-Pierre). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Odonem" as son of "Willelmi ducis" and his wife "Briscam"[461]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent names "Odonem et Tetbaudum" as the two sons of Duke Guillaume and "sororem Sancii Ducis Gasconiæ, Briscam", specifying that Thibaut "puer mortuus est"[462]. "Willelmus Pictavorum comes et dux Aquitaniæ" donated property to Saint-Maixent for the souls of "filii mei Willelmi atque Odoni atque Tetbaudi" by charter dated [1013/22][463]. "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Willelmi filii eius, Odoni filii eius, Prisca comitisse" subscribed the charter dated [1012/18] under which "Ugo Liziniacensis domnus" donated property to St Cyprien, Poitiers[464]. "Willelmi comitis et abbatis, eius filii Willelmi…Odonis…" subscribed the charter dated 3 Aug 1016 under which "Guilelmus…dux Aquitaniensium" granted rights to Saint-Hilaire de Poitier[465]. He succeeded his maternal uncle as Duke of Gascony in 1032. It appears to be incorrect, as asserted by Richard, that Eudes only succeeded as Duke of Gascony in 1036 after the death of "Bérenger d'Angoulême"[466]. It is probable that the latter person never existed but was invented to explain the charter dated to [1060] under which "Auriol Garsies de Navarra" granted property in Gascony which he held "ex comite Berlengerio" to Garcia Arnaud Vicomte de Dax, Jaurgain suggesting that "comes Berlenger" can in fact be identified as Berenguer Ramon I Comte de Barcelona who happened to own some property in Gascony[467]. An undated charter records the donation by "Santius…comes" to Bordeaux Saint-Seurin and the confirmation after his death by his successor "eius nepos…Odo", signed by "Centullus de Bearnt, Arnaldus Aquensis, Willelmus Lup, Aichelmus Guillelmi, Andro Auriohl"[468]. He succeeded his half-brother in 1038 as EUDES Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou. He was killed while asserting his rights to Poitou against his stepmother and half-brother[469]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records that "Odo comes" was killed and buried "in Malliaco" with his father and brother[470].
  • 4. THIBAUT de Poitou (-young). The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent names "Odonem et Tetbaudum" as the two sons of Duke Guillaume and "sororem Sancii Ducis Gasconiæ, Briscam", specifying that Thibaut "puer mortuus est"[471]. "Willelmus Pictavorum comes et dux Aquitaniæ" donated property to Saint-Maixent for the souls of "filii mei Willelmi atque Odoni atque Tetbaudi" by charter dated [1013/22][472]. He is named in a charter of the Abbey of Saint-Maixent, dated to after his mother's death and before his father's remarriage[473].

Duke Guillaume V & his third wife AGNES de Mâcon had four children

According to Europäische Stammtafeln[474], a fifth child Adelais married firstly Géraud [I] "Trencaléon" Comte d'Armagnac and secondly Arnaud [II] Vicomte de Lomagne, but this is clearly impossible chronologically given the death of Comte Géraud in [1014].

  • 5. PIERRE de Poitou (1023-1058, bur Poitiers, Priory of St Nicholas). The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent names "Petrum cognomina Acerrimum et Gaufredum qui Wido vocatus est" as the twin sons of Duke Guillaume and his third wife Agnes[475]. He adopted the name GUILLAUME, "Willelmus filii mei" being named in the charter of his mother Agnes dated 1031[476]. . He succeeded his half-brother in 1039 as GUILLAUME VII "Acerrimus/l'Aigret" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME V Comte de Poitou, under the regency of his mother until 1044. Geoffroy II "Martel" Comte d'Anjou (formerly Duke Guillaume's stepfather) invaded Poitou in 1053[477]. "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus" confirms in his charter dated [1058/68] that "mea mater Agnes…frater meus Guillelmus" were both buried in the priory of Saint-Nicolas de Poitiers[478]. married (1051) ERMESINDE, daughter of --- (-after 1062). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Ermenseldim" as the wife of "Guillelmus Pictavorum dux et comes"[479]. The Chronicon Vindocinense records that "comes…Willelmus Pictavorum" married in 1051 but does not name his wife[480]. "Ermensendis uxoris eius" subscribed the charter of "Willelmus Aquitanorum dux, comes autem Pictavorum" dated [1050][481]. "W dux Aquitanorum…germano illius Gauzfrido" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated 20 Dec [1045] subscribed by "W ducis sueque coniugis Hermensendis, Agnetis comitisse…"[482]. "[Name omitted]…comitis" donated property to Saint-Maixent "pro anime sue salute ac matris sue Agnetis ac venerabilis Ermensedis uxoris suæ" by undated charter subscribed by "Goffridi comitis"[483]. Settipani suggests[484] that Ermesinde may have been the daughter of Bernard II Comte de Bigorre & his first wife Clémence, based solely on onomastics. She became a nun at Rome with her sister-in-law Empress Agnes[485].

Duke Guillaume VII & his wife had one child:

  • a) AGNES de Poitou ([1052]-after 18 Jun 1089). Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 26 Oct 1078 under which "Agnes filia quondam Guillelmi Pictaviensis comitis et relicta…marchionis Petri" donated property to Pinerolo[486]. Agnes´s father is not identified more precisely in any document which has so far been found. However, the reference to "quondam" in the 26 Oct 1078 charter excludes Guillaume VIII Duke of Aquitaine who was still alive at that date. Duke Guillaume VI is also probably excluded as her father, as Agnes would have been over 26 years old at the time of her marriage if she had been his daughter (he died in 1038, see above). This seems improbable given the usual age of marriage of noble girls at 12 to 15 at the time. Duke Guillaume VII is therefore left as the most likely candidate to be Agnes´s father. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[487], Agnes was the widow of Ramiro I King of Aragon. Szabolcs de Vajay[488] states that the wife of King Ramiro was the daughter of Guillaume VI Duke of Aquitaine not of Duke Guillaume VII, although no source is cited to support this. From an onomastic point of view, it is surprising that a daughter of Duke Guillaume VI would have been named Agnes. The name appears only in the family of the Comtes de Poitou after the third marriage of Duke Guillaume V with Agnes de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comt%C3%A9], whereas Duke Guillaume VI was the son of Duke Guillaume V's first marriage. "Adalegida cometissa filia Maginfredi marchionis et relicta quond. Oddonis idemque marchionis" donated property to the monastery at Taurini, in the presence of "domne Agnetis comitissæ, filiæ Wilelmi comitis et relictæ quondam Petri marchionis", for the souls of "Maginfredi patris, Adalrici Astensis episcopi patrui, Berthæ matris et Petri marchionis filii predictæ comitissæ Adalegidæ", by charter dated 4 Jul 1079[489]. "Adalasia comitissa cum nuru sua Agneta et filia eius Agnete" donated property to "ecclesiæ S. Mariæ…Astensis episcopatus" by charter dated 18 Jun 1089[490]. married (1064) PIERRE I Comte de Savoie, son of ODDON Comte de Chablais & his wife Adelaida di Susa ([1047/49]-killed 9 Aug 1078).
    * 6. GUY de Poitou' (1023-Chizé near Niort, Poitou 25 Sep 1086, bur Poitiers, église abbatiale de Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf). The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent names "Petrum cognomina Acerrimum et Gaufredum qui Wido vocatus est" as the twin sons of Duke Guillaume and his third wife Agnes[491]. "Wido" is named as son of Agnes (daughter of "Ermentrudis") in the Continuator of Flodoard[492]. He adopted the first name GEOFFROY, "Gausfredus filii mei" being named in the charter of his mother Agnes dated 1031[493]. He adopted the first name GUILLAUME when he succeeded his brother in 1058 as GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou.
  • 7. AGNES de Poitou ([1025]-Rome 14 Dec 1077, bur Rome, St Peter's). Herimannus names her "Agnetam, Willehelmi Pictaviensis filiam" when recording her marriage[494]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis"[495]. She was crowned empress with her husband at Rome 25 Dec 1046. She was regent during the minority of her son from 1056. Her husband's old adviser, Gerhard von Eichstätt by then Pope Victor II, who was in Germany when her husband died, remained in Germany until spring 1057 as the chief adviser of Agnès and ensured a smooth transition of power[496]. She also installed herself as AGNES Duchess of Bavaria in 1056, until 1061 when she appointed Otto von Northeim as duke. In 1062, Anno II Archbishop of Köln kidnapped her son King Heinrich IV and took him from Kaiserswerth to Köln. Agnès resigned as regent and went to Rome[497]. According to the Preface of Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores, "Agnes imperatrix eius [Chunigundis imperatricis] consanguinea, obiit Idus Decembris"[498], although the exact relationship between Agnes and Empress Kunigund (widow of Emperor Heinrich II) has not been traced. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "XIX Kal Jan" of "Agnes imperatrix"[499]. The necrology of Speyer records the death "XIX Kal Jan" of "Agnes imperatrix"[500]. married (Ingelheim 20 Nov 1043) as his second wife, HEINRICH III King of Germany, son of Emperor KONRAD II King of Germany & his wife Gisela of Swabia (Ostrebeck 28 Oct 1017-Burg Bodfeld im Harz 5 Oct 1056, bur Speyer Cathedral).
  • 8. [BEATRIX de Poitou (-[1109]). Beatrix is named as one of the children of Duke Guillaume V & his third wife in Europäische Stammtafeln[501] but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been found. She is not named among the children of Duke Guillaume V by Richard[502]. If she was the daughter of Duke Guillaume, it seems surprising that she was married to a relatively obscure local nobleman, especially in light of the high profile marriage of her supposed sister Agnes. married RAYMOND de Melgueil, son of BERNARD [III] Comte de Melgueil & his wife Adela --- (-before 1079).]
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