Henry Robert Hughe Willis

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Henry Robert Hughe Willis

Also Known As: "Henry", "Henry Robert Hughe", "Henry Robert Hughe Willis"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Devizes, Wiltshire, England (United Kingdom)
Death: July 11, 1714 (85)
Westbury, Nassau County, New York, Colonial America
Immediate Family:

Son of Henry Benjamin Willis and Katherine Willis
Husband of Mary Rose Willis (Peace)
Father of Elizabeth Alice Zane; William Willis; Henry Willis; John Austin Willis; Sarah Titus and 4 others
Brother of Sarah Willis; Alice Willis; Catherine Willis; Elizabeth Amour and Margery Willis

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Henry Robert Hughe Willis

• persecuted for his faith in both England and the New York Colony

http://longislandgenealogy.com/ligwillis.html

He lived in the town of Devizes, Wiltshire, until 1667, the year after the great fire of London, when he removed thither. About 1675 he and his family, except his daughter Mary who came later, emigrated to America, apparently by way of Philadelphia, Pa.. In 1683 he bought 50 acres of land at Foster’s Meadow, Queens County, NY

Reference for him and his immediate family:

Bunker: Long Island Genealogies, pp. 126-8.


Henry WILLIS

[NI5267]

Sep 1628 - Jul 1714

BIRTH: Sep 1628

DEATH: Jul 1714

Father: Henry WILLIS

Mother: UNKNOWN

Family 1 : Mary PEACE

MARRIAGE: 1654

+Mary WILLIS

+Elisabeth WILLIS

+William WILLIS

Henry WILLIS

+Rachel WILLIS

+Sarah WILLIS

Hester (Esther) WILLIS


The following information was taken Information taken from Friends Intelligencer. March 2, 1872. Please remember that Quakers refer to themselves as Friends.

In my research I learned that the earliest mention of Quaker meetings in Westbury, New York (sometimes called Woodedge and Plainedge) was March 23, 1671. Friends (Quakers) met at the houses of Henry Willis and Edmund Titus, two prominent Friends who “soon felt the strong arm of the law”. On August 15, 1678, George Masters, a tailor from New York became engaged to marry Mary Willis. Their plans were brought to the Friends meeting. The Friends appointed Samuel Spicer, John Tilton, Mary Willis and Martha Titus to “inquire of their clearness of all other persons”.

On September 9, 1678 Mary Willis and George Masters were married in the home of Henry Willis during the Quaker meeting. This action was in violation of the law. The Court of Sessions fined Henry Willis 10 pounds. Henry Willis refused to pay. The Court demanded an “execution issued forth” and Joseph Lee, under sheriff, seized Henry’s barn of corn.

Henry Willis appealed to the Governor on May 4, 1680 for redress.

In 1687 a new Presbyterian minister, Jeremiah Hobart, was appointed for the village of Hempstead. According to the law, the villagers were required to ‘provide’ for the new minister. It appears Henry Willis, along with other Quakers, refused. There are records that the constables demanded Henry pay 34 shillings toward the building of the priest’s home. Upon his refusal one cow worth 4 pounds 10 shillings was taken.

On December 30th of the same year the constables demanded Henry pay 2 pounds 17 shillings for the priest’s wages. Henry refused, upon which eight sheep worth 4 pounds 14 shillings were taken.

On November 29, 1687 Henry Willis and Edmund Titus petitioned the Governor for relief saying,

   “They have already suffered in the spoil of their goods for the setting up and upholding a worship in the town of Hempstead, which in their conscience they believe to be not the true worship of God; and are again threatened to have a part of their effects taken from them toward the maintenance of Jeremiah Hobart whom in conscience they cannot maintain, knowing him to be no minister of Christ; and so are no way concerned with any agreement made with him. The taking of our goods is contrary to the laws which give liberty of conscience to all persuasions.” 

It appears the minister was at last forced to leave by reason of numbers of his congregation turning Quakers and many others being so irreligious that they wouldn’t contribute to the support of the church.

Quaker records report that on November 7, 1714 Henry Willis, aged 86 died.

   “He received the Truth [ joined the Quakers ] soon after its breaking forth in these latter days, and in very early life suffered much mocking, stoning, beating, bruising and imprisoning in old England.”

As you can see, life in pre Constitutional America was quite different. In these posts we are beginning to sense the growing frustrations in the colonists for basic rights, such as the freedom of religion.

As they say in Australia

"Good On Ya Gramps!"

Source: http://atropesend.blogspot.com/2010/07/our-8th-great-grandparents-r...


The following information was taken from Hicks, Benjamin D., Willis Family of Long Island, (New York: New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, Oct. 1884 Vol. XV reprinted in Hoff, Henry B. Genealogies of Long Island Families Baltimore :Genealogical Pub. Co., 1987]), p. 743.

   Henry and Mary resided in the town of Devizes until 1667, where their three elder children were born. The year after the great fire they moved to London, where they lived for seven or eight years and had several children. It being soon after the rise of the religious sect called Quakers, of which they were members, they suffered, in common with their friends, imprisonment and persecution at the hands of the officials, and much abuse and annoyance from the rabble because of their peculiar views.
   About the year 1675 Henry and his family (except the eldest daughter Mary) emigrated to America and found a temporary home in the town of Oysterbay, on Long Island. A year or two thereafter he purchased of Captain John Seaman a piece of land in the adjoining township of
   Hempstead (now North Hempstead), where he permanently settled, giving the place the name of Westbury, after a town in his native county in England, which it continues to bear to the present day. Henry Willis died in Westbury July 11, 1714, and his wife Mary on April 23, 1714.

Source: http://atropesend.blogspot.com/2010/04/henry-willis-and-mary-pease-...

It was Henry Willis who named the town of Westbury, NY

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westbury,_New_York



The Willis family were English Quakers, descendants of Henry Willis of Wiltshire County, England, who arrived in Westbury, Long Island, about 1675. He probably named Westbury for his hometown of Westbury in England. His descendant Richard Willis moved to New Rochelle before the Revolution. By then they were not very good Quakers because his son James Willis was a lieutenant in the militia during the Revolution and owned three slaves. The genealogy of the Long Island Willis family for at least ten generations has been published by the NYG&B

other reading

  • Titlle Adam and Anne Mott by Thomas Clapp Cornell
    • in which accounts of persecution in England are described on page 285

persecuted for his faith in both England and the New York Colony

http://longislandgenealogy.com/ligwillis.html

He lived in the town of Devizes, Wiltshire, until 1667, the year after the great fire of London, when he removed thither. About 1675 he and his family, except his daughter Mary who came later, emigrated to America, apparently by way of Philadelphia, Pa.. In 1683 he bought 50 acres of land at Foster’s Meadow, Queens County, NY

Reference for him and his immediate family:

Bunker: Long Island Genealogies, pp. 126-8.

Henry WILLIS

[NI5267]

Sep 1628 - Jul 1714

BIRTH: Sep 1628

DEATH: Jul 1714

Father: Henry WILLIS

Mother: UNKNOWN

Family 1 : Mary PEACE

MARRIAGE: 1654

+Mary WILLIS

+Elisabeth WILLIS

+William WILLIS

Henry WILLIS

+Rachel WILLIS

+Sarah WILLIS

Hester (Esther) WILLIS

The following information was taken Information taken from Friends Intelligencer. March 2, 1872. Please remember that Quakers refer to themselves as Friends.

In my research I learned that the earliest mention of Quaker meetings in Westbury, New York (sometimes called Woodedge and Plainedge) was March 23, 1671. Friends (Quakers) met at the houses of Henry Willis and Edmund Titus, two prominent Friends who “soon felt the strong arm of the law”. On August 15, 1678, George Masters, a tailor from New York became engaged to marry Mary Willis. Their plans were brought to the Friends meeting. The Friends appointed Samuel Spicer, John Tilton, Mary Willis and Martha Titus to “inquire of their clearness of all other persons”.

On September 9, 1678 Mary Willis and George Masters were married in the home of Henry Willis during the Quaker meeting. This action was in violation of the law. The Court of Sessions fined Henry Willis 10 pounds. Henry Willis refused to pay. The Court demanded an “execution issued forth” and Joseph Lee, under sheriff, seized Henry’s barn of corn.

Henry Willis appealed to the Governor on May 4, 1680 for redress.

In 1687 a new Presbyterian minister, Jeremiah Hobart, was appointed for the village of Hempstead. According to the law, the villagers were required to ‘provide’ for the new minister. It appears Henry Willis, along with other Quakers, refused. There are records that the constables demanded Henry pay 34 shillings toward the building of the priest’s home. Upon his refusal one cow worth 4 pounds 10 shillings was taken.

On December 30th of the same year the constables demanded Henry pay 2 pounds 17 shillings for the priest’s wages. Henry refused, upon which eight sheep worth 4 pounds 14 shillings were taken.

On November 29, 1687 Henry Willis and Edmund Titus petitioned the Governor for relief saying,

“They have already suffered in the spoil of their goods for the setting up and upholding a worship in the town of Hempstead, which in their conscience they believe to be not the true worship of God; and are again threatened to have a part of their effects taken from them toward the maintenance of Jeremiah Hobart whom in conscience they cannot maintain, knowing him to be no minister of Christ; and so are no way concerned with any agreement made with him. The taking of our goods is contrary to the laws which give liberty of conscience to all persuasions.”

It appears the minister was at last forced to leave by reason of numbers of his congregation turning Quakers and many others being so irreligious that they wouldn’t contribute to the support of the church.

Quaker records report that on November 7, 1714 Henry Willis, aged 86 died.

“He received the Truth [ joined the Quakers ] soon after its breaking forth in these latter days, and in very early life suffered much mocking, stoning, beating, bruising and imprisoning in old England.”

As you can see, life in pre Constitutional America was quite different. In these posts we are beginning to sense the growing frustrations in the colonists for basic rights, such as the freedom of religion.

As they say in Australia

"Good On Ya Gramps!"

Source: http://atropesend.blogspot.com/2010/07/our-8th-great-grandparents-r...

The following information was taken from Hicks, Benjamin D., Willis Family of Long Island, (New York: New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, Oct. 1884 Vol. XV reprinted in Hoff, Henry B. Genealogies of Long Island Families Baltimore :Genealogical Pub. Co., 1987]), p. 743.

Henry and Mary resided in the town of Devizes until 1667, where their three elder children were born. The year after the great fire they moved to London, where they lived for seven or eight years and had several children. It being soon after the rise of the religious sect called Quakers, of which they were members, they suffered, in common with their friends, imprisonment and persecution at the hands of the officials, and much abuse and annoyance from the rabble because of their peculiar views.

About the year 1675 Henry and his family (except the eldest daughter Mary) emigrated to America and found a temporary home in the town of Oysterbay, on Long Island. A year or two thereafter he purchased of Captain John Seaman a piece of land in the adjoining township of

Hempstead (now North Hempstead), where he permanently settled, giving the place the name of Westbury, after a town in his native county in England, which it continues to bear to the present day. Henry Willis died in Westbury July 11, 1714, and his wife Mary on April 23, 1714.

Source: http://atropesend.blogspot.com/2010/04/henry-willis-and-mary-pease-...

It was Henry Willis who named the town of Westbury, NY

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westbury,_New_York The Willis family were English Quakers, descendants of Henry Willis of Wiltshire County, England, who arrived in Westbury, Long Island, about 1675. He probably named Westbury for his hometown of Westbury in England. His descendant Richard Willis moved to New Rochelle before the Revolution. By then they were not very good Quakers because his son James Willis was a lieutenant in the militia during the Revolution and owned three slaves. The genealogy of the Long Island Willis family for at least ten generations has been published by the NYG&B

other reading

   Titlle Adam and Anne Mott by Thomas Clapp Cornell
       in which accounts of persecution in England are described on page 285
view all 16

Henry Robert Hughe Willis's Timeline

1628
September 14, 1628
Devizes, Wiltshire, England (United Kingdom)
1655
July 26, 1655
Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom
1660
1660
Devizes, Wiltshire, England (United Kingdom)
1663
October 16, 1663
Devizes, Wiltshire, England (United Kingdom)
1666
1666
Devizes, Wiltshire, United Kingdom
1668
January 6, 1668
Shoreditch, London, Middlesex, England (United Kingdom)
1671
March 6, 1671
London, England (United Kingdom)
1674
January 8, 1674
London, Middlesex, England