Hester Needham (Bateman) most famous 18th c. English female silversmith

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Hester Bateman (Needham)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: London, Greater London, England, United Kingdom
Death: Died in London, England, United Kingdom
Place of Burial: London, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Thomas Needham and Ann Needham
Wife of John Bateman gold chain maker and wire drawer
Mother of Jonathan Bateman; Ann Bateman; Peter Bateman; William Bateman; John Bateman and 2 others
Sister of William Needham; Margaret Needham; John Needham and Elizabeth Needham

Managed by: Susan Mary Rayner (Green) (RYAN)
Last Updated:

About Hester Needham (Bateman) most famous 18th c. English female silversmith

HESTER BATEMAN (1709-1794) was the most famous 18th c. English female silversmith. Hester was the daughter of John and Elizabeth Nedem. She married in 1732 (at the Church of St. Botolph's, Aldergate, in the City of London) the goldsmith John Bateman, whereby together they worked a small silversmith business. It is believed John never held a formal apprenticeship, which is why many Bateman pieces had been contracted out to talented craftsmen.

John was a "Chainmaker" (a branch of the silversmiths' art) and died on November 13, 1760 leaving in his will "unto my loving wife, Easter Bateman all my household goods and implements".
When her husband died in 1760, Hester had at least five children - Jonathan, Peter, probably John (who may have been connected with the business, although he is only recorded as a watch and clock-maker), Letitia (who married Richard Clarke), and Ann. Only Peter, Letitia, and Ann were still living at the time of Hester's death.
Hester registered her mark at Goldsmith's Hall ‘April 16, 1761, as Hester Bateman in Bunnhill Row and this mark was used until 1790.
Hester died in 1794, when she was living in the Parish of St. Andrew when she lived with her daughter Letitia.
Her sons PETER BATEMAN and JOHN BATEMAN registered their mark in 1790. This partnership was of short duration as Jonathan, who married Ann Downlinff, died in 1791.
In 1791 the mark was changed to PETER and ANN BATEMAN. Ann was Jonathan's widow and not Peter's wife (he married Alice Beavoir) or Hester's daughter (Ann Bateman married Richard Cottrill).
In 1800 was registered the mark of PETER BATEMAN, ANN BATEMAN and WILLIAM (I) BATEMAN. William Bateman was the son of Jonathan and Ann Bateman who in 1800 entered in partnership with his uncle Peter and his mother Ann.
In 1805, after the death of Ann, was registered the new mark of PETER BATEMAN and WILLIAM (I) BATEMAN.
From 1815 to 1840 WILLIAM (I) BATEMAN was registered alone.
From 1839 to 1843 was registered the mark of WILLIAM (II) BATEMAN (son of William I) & DANIELL BALL

source http://www.silvercollection.it/BATEMAN.html

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Hester Bateman (bap. 1708–1794[1]) was an English silversmith who successfully ran her family business for thirty years following the death of her husband. She was succeeded in turn by her sons, grandson and great-grandson and the Bateman family silversmithing company lasted until the middle of the nineteenth century Biography[edit]

Hester Neden or Needham was baptised in London on 7 October 1708, the daughter of John Neden or Needham.[2] On 20 May 1732 she married a gold chain maker and wire drawer called John Bateman.[1] During their marriage, she gave birth to six children: John Joseph (Joss), Letitia, Ann, Peter, William and Jonathan. John Bateman died of consumption (tuberculosis) in 1760, leaving his tools to his wife in his will.[1] She took over the family business and registered her first sponsor's mark at the Goldsmith's Hall in 1761, simply "HB" in script.[3] From the time up to the late 1770s, not much Bateman work is known, possibly because she was supplying pieces for other silversmiths that were subsequently overstamped with their marks.[2]

After about 1774, Hester Bateman worked to build up the business at 107 Bunhill Row, London with her sons Jonathan and Peter.[2] They used the latest technology to produce their silverware as cheaply as possible and compete with other companies using Sheffield Plate.[1] They used thin gauge sheet silver and machines to punch and pierce it.[2] The family specialised in household silverware in a neo classical style, and she expanded their range to include many goods such as tea caddies, jugs, salvers, salt cellars, wine labels, trays and ink wells.[4] Their work is characterised by bright-cut engraving, beading around edges and piercing.[2][5]

Hester Bateman retired in 1790 and was succeeded by her sons.[1] She died on 16 September 1794 and was buried at St Luke's, Old Street, London.[1]

Legacy[edit]

The business that Hester Bateman had built up and run for thirty years was taken over by her sons Peter and Jonathan. They registered a hallmark with their initials ("PB" over "IB") in December 1790, but Jonathan died in April 1791.[3] Jonathan's widow Ann entered a hallmark with her brother-in-law Peter ("PB" over "AB") and worked for the company until 1805.[2] Peter Bateman retired in 1815 and passed the company to his nephew William, son of Jonathan and Ann Bateman. His son, also called William Bateman, took over in 1839 until 1843 when the Bateman family company closed.[2] Bateman silverware continues to be popular, and Hester Bateman is considered one of the finest English silversmiths.[3][6]

References[edit]

1.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Eatwell, Ann (2004). "Hester Bateman". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/53864. Retrieved 12 February 2010. 2.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Campbell, Gordon (2006). The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts, Volume 1. Oxford University Press. p. 79. ISBN 0-19-518948-5. 3.^ Jump up to: a b c Bly, John (2000). Discovering Hallmarks on English Silver. Osprey Publishing. p. 23. ISBN 0-7478-0450-8. 4.Jump up ^ A Historical Dictionary of British Women. Routledge. 2003. p. 36. ISBN 1-85743-228-2. 5.Jump up ^ Bexfield, Daniel (2003). "Hester Bateman and Family". Daniel Bexfield Antiques. Retrieved 13 February 2010. 6.Jump up ^ Loomis, Frank Farmer (2005). Antiques 101: A Crash Course in Everything Antique. Krause Publications. p. 245. ISBN 0-89689-158-5. source Biography[edit]

Hester Neden or Needham was baptised in London on 7 October 1708, the daughter of John Neden or Needham.[2] On 20 May 1732 she married a gold chain maker and wire drawer called John Bateman.[1] During their marriage, she gave birth to six children: John Joseph (Joss), Letitia, Ann, Peter, William and Jonathan. John Bateman died of consumption (tuberculosis) in 1760, leaving his tools to his wife in his will.[1] She took over the family business and registered her first sponsor's mark at the Goldsmith's Hall in 1761, simply "HB" in script.[3] From the time up to the late 1770s, not much Bateman work is known, possibly because she was supplying pieces for other silversmiths that were subsequently overstamped with their marks.[2]

After about 1774, Hester Bateman worked to build up the business at 107 Bunhill Row, London with her sons Jonathan and Peter.[2] They used the latest technology to produce their silverware as cheaply as possible and compete with other companies using Sheffield Plate.[1] They used thin gauge sheet silver and machines to punch and pierce it.[2] The family specialised in household silverware in a neo classical style, and she expanded their range to include many goods such as tea caddies, jugs, salvers, salt cellars, wine labels, trays and ink wells.[4] Their work is characterised by bright-cut engraving, beading around edges and piercing.[2][5]

Hester Bateman retired in 1790 and was succeeded by her sons.[1] She died on 16 September 1794 and was buried at St Luke's, Old Street, London.[1]

Legacy[edit]

The business that Hester Bateman had built up and run for thirty years was taken over by her sons Peter and Jonathan. They registered a hallmark with their initials ("PB" over "IB") in December 1790, but Jonathan died in April 1791.[3] Jonathan's widow Ann entered a hallmark with her brother-in-law Peter ("PB" over "AB") and worked for the company until 1805.[2] Peter Bateman retired in 1815 and passed the company to his nephew William, son of Jonathan and Ann Bateman. His son, also called William Bateman, took over in 1839 until 1843 when the Bateman family company closed.[2] Bateman silverware continues to be popular, and Hester Bateman is considered one of the finest English silversmiths.[3][6]

References[edit]

1.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Eatwell, Ann (2004). "Hester Bateman". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/53864. Retrieved 12 February 2010. 2.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Campbell, Gordon (2006). The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts, Volume 1. Oxford University Press. p. 79. ISBN 0-19-518948-5. 3.^ Jump up to: a b c Bly, John (2000). Discovering Hallmarks on English Silver. Osprey Publishing. p. 23. ISBN 0-7478-0450-8. 4.Jump up ^ A Historical Dictionary of British Women. Routledge. 2003. p. 36. ISBN 1-85743-228-2. 5.Jump up ^ Bexfield, Daniel (2003). "Hester Bateman and Family". Daniel Bexfield Antiques. Retrieved 13 February 2010. 6.Jump up ^ Loomis, Frank Farmer (2005). Antiques 101: A Crash Course in Everything Antique. Krause Publications. p. 245. ISBN 0-89689-158-5. source Biography[edit]

Hester Neden or Needham was baptised in London on 7 October 1708, the daughter of John Neden or Needham.[2] On 20 May 1732 she married a gold chain maker and wire drawer called John Bateman.[1] During their marriage, she gave birth to six children: John Joseph (Joss), Letitia, Ann, Peter, William and Jonathan. John Bateman died of consumption (tuberculosis) in 1760, leaving his tools to his wife in his will.[1] She took over the family business and registered her first sponsor's mark at the Goldsmith's Hall in 1761, simply "HB" in script.[3] From the time up to the late 1770s, not much Bateman work is known, possibly because she was supplying pieces for other silversmiths that were subsequently overstamped with their marks.[2]

After about 1774, Hester Bateman worked to build up the business at 107 Bunhill Row, London with her sons Jonathan and Peter.[2] They used the latest technology to produce their silverware as cheaply as possible and compete with other companies using Sheffield Plate.[1] They used thin gauge sheet silver and machines to punch and pierce it.[2] The family specialised in household silverware in a neo classical style, and she expanded their range to include many goods such as tea caddies, jugs, salvers, salt cellars, wine labels, trays and ink wells.[4] Their work is characterised by bright-cut engraving, beading around edges and piercing.[2][5]

Hester Bateman retired in 1790 and was succeeded by her sons.[1] She died on 16 September 1794 and was buried at St Luke's, Old Street, London.[1]

Legacy[edit]

The business that Hester Bateman had built up and run for thirty years was taken over by her sons Peter and Jonathan. They registered a hallmark with their initials ("PB" over "IB") in December 1790, but Jonathan died in April 1791.[3] Jonathan's widow Ann entered a hallmark with her brother-in-law Peter ("PB" over "AB") and worked for the company until 1805.[2] Peter Bateman retired in 1815 and passed the company to his nephew William, son of Jonathan and Ann Bateman. His son, also called William Bateman, took over in 1839 until 1843 when the Bateman family company closed.[2] Bateman silverware continues to be popular, and Hester Bateman is considered one of the finest English silversmiths.[3][6]


Hester Bateman was a silversmith, born 1709 in Clerkenwell, London, England. She married John Bateman a goldsmith, born 1725 ca.

Hester was illiterate, unable to read or write and signed her contracts with an "X" mark.

She learned smithing from her husband, while rearing six children: John, Letticia, Ann, Peter, William, Jonathan

They lived in a house in St Luke, North London for more than a century and purchased houses on both sides of their home, 2 of the children occupied those houses in later years.

John died in 1760, bequeathing all his tools to Hester, who carried on the business. She registered her mark of a scroll HB at the London Goldsmoths Hall in 1761.

Source

Www.bryandouglas.co.uk/control/hester_bateman.htm

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Hester Needham (Bateman) most famous 18th c. English female silversmith's Timeline

1708
October 7, 1708
1708
London, Greater London, England, United Kingdom
1730
1730
Age 22
1736
1736
Age 28
1740
1740
Age 32
1745
1745
Age 37
1747
1747
Age 39
London, England, United Kingdom
1794
1794
Age 86
London, England, United Kingdom
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