Jacques Cornelissen Van Slyck

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Jacques Cornelissen Van Slyck

Also Known As: "Mohawk name - Itsychosaquacha", "Akes Gautsch", "van Sleyck", "Jacques"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Canajoharie, New Netherland Colony
Death: May 11, 1690 (45-54)
Schenectady, Albany County, Province of New York
Place of Burial: Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Cornelius Antonissen van Slyck; Cornelis Antonissen “Broer Cornelis” Van Slyck; Ots-Toch Hartell and Ots-Toch Hartell
Husband of Margaret (Grietje) Ryckman
Father of Susanna Jacques Bradt; Captain Harmen Jacquesz van Slyke; Geertruy Jacquese Van Slyck; Margareta Jacquese Van Slyck; Helena Jacquese Van Slyck and 5 others
Brother of Leah Van Slyck; Martin Mouris Van Slyck; Beartie Nieffens van Slyck; Elisabeth Leah van Slyck; HIlletje Cornelise Van Olinda and 7 others

Occupation: Tapster (Tavern Keeper), Trader, 1st liscensed "tapster"
Managed by: Gregory Frank Yochim
Last Updated:

About Jacques Cornelissen Van Slyck

Sources:

Mohawk Frontier, The Dutch Community of Schenectady, New York, 1661-1710 by Thomas E Burke, Jr.

pg. 23 " Van Slyck, who was described in contemporary records as "formerly an Indian", was clearly trusted by the Mohawks. " also "Of all the seventeenth-century interpreters, van Slyck may have been the best, and his services were in demand as far away as"

pg 24 " New York City, where in August 1687 he helped to examine "a Christian Maquase brought a Prisonner from Cannada"


Jacques, son of Cornelis Van Slyck, was born in 1640 in Canajoharie; his Indian name was Itsychosaquacha; he was also sometimes called Agues [Aques?] Comllyssen Gautsch. The Mohawks gave him half of the island lying immediately west of the city, also land five miles above the city, on the south side of the Mohawk. This would seem to give color to the tradition that his father married a woman of the Mohawk tribe. In 1671 Jacques Van Slyck was one of the two licensed tapsters of the village. He married Grietje, daughter of Harmen Janse Ryckman, of Albany; after his death in 1690 she married Adam Vrooman. His will was made May 8, 1690.

The following children were living in 1697:

  1. Harmen.
  2. Susanna, married Samuel Arentse Bratt.
  3. Grietje, married (first) Andries Arentse Bratt; (second) Harmen Vedder.
  4. Cornelis.
  5. Geertruy, married Johannes Myndertse.
  6. Marten.
  7. Helena.
  8. Lytje.
  9. Lida, married Isaac Van Valkenburg.

Of these children, Marten and Cornelis lived upon the first flat on land left them by their father, which is still owned by the family.

From: "A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times," 7: Adult Freeholders — Jacques Cornelise Van Slyck by Prof. Jonathan Pearson

"Jacques was born in 1640, at Canajoharie; his Indian name was Itsychosaquachka; he was also sometimes called Jacques Cornelise Gautsh. He married Grietje, daughter of Harmen Janse Ryckman of Albany and had nine children living in 1697. He died probably about 1690, as his widow made an antenuptial contract 21 Feb., 1691/2, being then about to marry Adam Vrooman. His will was made 8th May, 1690. In 1671, he was one of the two licensed tapsters in the village.

He seems to have had the regard both of the natives and the Dutch and to have had considerable influence with both peoples between whom he acted as interpreter.

At one time he had a house lot in the village probably on the west corner of Washington street and Cucumber Alley, having a front on the former street of about 166 feet and extending back to the Binnè kil. The alley on the north side — 16 feet wide wood measure, — was the passage to the Binnè kil which was crossed by a scow to his farm on the Great island.

This lot passed to his son Capt. Harmen Van Slyck; in 1778, it was owned by Harmanus and Samuel sons of the latter, and still later by James Van Slyck Ryley their nephew, his mother being a daughter of Col. Jacobus Van Slyck.

The first patent for land at Schenectady was made Nov. 12, 1662, by Governor Stuyvesant and confirmed by Governor Nicolls April 13, 1667, — to Sweer Theunissen [Van Velsen] and Jacques Cornelyssen [Van Slyck] to each of them severally the moiety of "a certain Island, — Marten's island — near Schenectady over against the town, etc., containing [82] acres first taking out six acres or three morgens on said island the title to which was vested in said Theunissen, who married the widow of Jan Barentse Wemp to whom and to the said Jacques Cornelise said island was granted Nov. 12, 1662."

After Van Slyck's death, Grietje Vrooman his widow, received a confirmatory patent April 2, 1695 for his moiety of said island in trust for the use of their four sons, — Harmen, Cornelis, Marten and Acus. This island originally belonged to Marten Maurits, Van Slyck's brother, who dying in 1662, it fell to Jacques by inheritance; hence at first it was called Marten's island, afterwards Van Slyck's and sometimes Sweer Theunise's and Wemp's island, all of whom had an interest in the same.

Besides the half island above mentioned, Van Slyck also received a grant of land on the First flat on the south side of the Mohawk river to the west of the village, described in the confirmatory patent of Oct. 30, 1684, as "situate between two creeks, one called Stone creek to the eastward, the other the Platte creek to the westward; — the low land lying along the river side to the south of the Mohawk river and on the north of the land belonging to the inhabitants of Schenectady of which said Jacques is to have forty morgens or eighty acres of the best clearest land lying between said creeks, and also forty morgens or eighty acres of woodland on the west side of the Platte creek adjoining to his arable land along the river side.

The land confirmed by this grant to Jacques Cornelise, is stated to have come to him in right of his mother who was a Mohawk woman. His sons Marten and Cornelis inherited and lived upon this farm which is still in possession and occupancy of the family."


There were two early settlers of Beverwyck of this name: Willena [Willem?], whose descendants settled below Albany in Columbia county and elsewhere, and Cornelis Antonesses, alias "Broer Carnelis," so called by the natives. He married and had several children: Jacques, Marten Mouris, Hilletje and perhaps Lea. Marten Mouris was in Beverwyck in 1661 and gave name to the island (later Van Slyck) lying in the Mohawk west of Schenectady, and died early in 1662. Hilletje married Pieter Danielse Van Olinda, who was often employed as the provincial interpreter for the five nations. Lea married (first) Claas Willemse Van Cappernol; (second) Jonathan Stevens. "Broer Carnelis" died in 1676. By reason of his eminent services, rendered in bringing about peace with the natives, he received a patent for a large tract of land at Catskill and also owned land near Cohoes.

(II) Jacques, son of Cornelis Van Slyck, was born in 1640 in Canajoharie; his Indian name was Itsychosaquacha; he was also sometimes called Agues [Aques?] Comllyssen Gautsch. The Mohawks gave him half of the island lying immediately west of the city, also land five miles above the city, on the south side of the Mohawk. This would seem to give color to the tradition that his father married a woman of the Mohawk tribe. In 1671 Jacques Van Slyck was one of the two licensed tapsters of the village. He married Grietje, daughter of Harmen Janse Ryckman, of Albany; after his death in 1690 she married Adam Vrooman. His will was made May 8, 1690. The following children were living in 1697;

Harmen. Susanna, married Samuel Arentse Bratt. Grietje, married (first) Andries Arentse Bratt; (second) Harmen Vedder. Cornelis. Geertruy, married Johannes Myndertse. Marten. Helena. Lytje. Lida, married Isaac Van Valkenburg. Of these children, Marten and Cornelis, lived upon the first flat, on land left them by their father, which is still owned by the family.

https://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/nn/surnames/vslyke.shtml

The Van Slyke Family in America The Van Slyke Family in America: A Genealogy of Cornelise Antonissen Van Slyke, 1604-1676 and his Mohawk Wife Ots-Toch, including the story of Jacques Hertel, 1603-1651, Father of Ots-Toch and Interpreter to Samuel de Champlain REVISED EDITION published May 2010. Read the description of this book

However my latest book is available as of May 2010! The Van Slyke Family in America: A Genealogy of Cornelise Antonissen Van Slyke, 1604-1676 and his Mohawk Wife Ots-Toch , including the story of Jacques Hertel, 1603-1651, Father of Ots-Toch and Interpreter to Samuel de Champlain REVISED EDITION published 2010. 287 pages 8.5x11, coil bound.

Cornelis Van Slyke's story is of a Dutchman who came to the New World as a carpenter at the age of 30, who became an interpreter for the Mohawk nation, was adopted into the tribe, and who met and married a French-Mohawk woman (Ots-Toch)who never left her native village. Their children, all raised at Canajoharie, one of the Mohawk castles or villages, became well-known and respected in the Dutch community. All except one left the village and married Dutch settlers. One of their children was my 8th great grandfather, Jacques Cornelissen Van Slyke who was known as Akes Gautsch, and whose Mohawk name was It-sy-cho-sa-quash-ka. Jacques was also an interpreter and one of the first settlers of Schenectady.

Ever since the publication of the first Van Slyke Family in America book in 1996, I have been continuing my research on this family. A few years ago I found a court record in New Netherland where Cornelis Van Slyke wrote about the death of a man in Breuckelen Netherlands. Cornelis referred to the deceased man as his brother and asked if he was in the will. This exciting discovery spurred me to hire a Dutch researcher to search the Breuckelen and Nijenrode archives for more details. His findings are presented in this Revised Edition.

The Van Slyke Family in America, Revised Edition, discusses Cornelise Antonissen Van Slyke born in Brueckelen, Netherlands in 1604 and his Mohawk-French wife Ots-Toch born ca 1620 at Canajoharie, New York. Cornelis came to the New World in May of 1634, settling at Beverwyck and then Schenectady, New York. Cornelis was known by several names, making research on him somewhat complicated, but not impossible.

He can be found in the various records of the time as Cornelis Teunissen, Cornelis Antonissen, Cornelis Van Slicht (as he himself signed his contract with Kilean Van Rensellaer in 1634), Cornelis van Breuckelen (from Breuckelen) as he was called by van Rensellaer, Broer (brother) Cornelis as called by the Mohawks and Brodeur (brother) by the Dutch.

My first book on the family was published in 1996. I found the story of Cornelis and Ots-Toch so compelling that in 1993 I decided to write a book on them. I wanted to trace Ots-Toch's lineage as far as possible, and try to prove which, if either, of the two stories of her parentage was correct. I wanted to know my ancestors as real people - the times they lived in, the neighbours they had, their friends and other relatives, events in their lives, what they wore, and any details I could find to put flesh on the bones. My first book is now out of print but my revised edition is now available!

In the Revised Edition, new findings on the Van Slyke family in Breuckelen are revealed. New facts are added to the descendant genealogies and a few errors from the first book are corrected. More sources have been added and there is more detail about individuals included. There are 1,342 footnoted sources for the facts contained in this 287 page book. See the Cornelis Van Slyke book List of Contents


GEDCOM Source

Ancestry Family Tree http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=103920662&pid=14603

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Jacques Cornelissen Van Slyck's Timeline

1640
1640
Canajoharie, New Netherland Colony
1662
1662
Canajoharie, Montgomery, New York, United States
1664
1664
Schenectady, New Netherland Colony
1666
1666
Albany, Albany County, NY, United States
1668
1668
Schenectady, NY, United States
1670
1670
1670
Schenectady, Schenectady, New York, United States
1675
October 2, 1675
Schenectady, Schenectady, NY, United States
1685
1685
Schenectady, NY, United States