James "the Weaver" Alexander

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James Benjamin Alexander

Also Known As: "middle name Benjamin; known as "the Weaver""
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Raphoe, County Donegal, Donegal, Ireland
Death: Died in Cecil County, Maryland, United States
Place of Burial: Newark, New Castle County, Delaware, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Reverend James A. Alexander of Laggan Presbytery; William Alexander, hypothetical father to the 9 Alexander siblings of Somerset MD; Marion Alexander; wife of William (Catherine?) Alexander and Mary Maxwell
Husband of Mary Wallace Alexander
Father of James Alexander, Jr; David Alexander; Arthur Alexander; John Alexander; Francis Alexander and 4 others
Brother of Elizabeth Alexander Wallace; Jane McKnitt (Alexander); William Alexander, Sr.; Francis Alexander; Andrew Joseph Alexander and 2 others
Half brother of Samuel Alexander

Managed by: Anne Brannen
Last Updated:

About James "the Weaver" Alexander

Pn Genol Mag p.1. 85,87 " James Alexander b. 1652 Scotland; d. abt1725New

Munster,Cecil Co .,Maryland"

Alex Kin p.8.,9 " Land Deed 1714. Milford Hundred: sold part ofland

toWm.Semple of Cheste r Co.,Pennsylvania Deed book 5 P.97 Cecil Co.

(borderdisputebetween MD.DE,PA settled by Mason -Dixon line)"

Pionerres "Was transported to Somerset Co. Maryland in

1678/9.(Earlysettlers,Vol 1, Land Of fice ,Annapolis).

Deeds Cecil His wife Mary name on deed for land in New

MunsterTractRecorded 22 Oct 1718/9.

Brevard " James Alexander (weaver) (b abt 1652)

ImmigratedfromIreland, m Mary (some sa y Mary Wallace dau of Jane

Wallace) JamesandMary lived in the Milford "Hundred' of the New Mu nster

tractinNorthern Cecil Co., Maryland"

Alexander Pioneers James Alexnnder,weaver of Somerst

andCecilCo.MD.died in New Munster are a of Cecil Co. after 1740.

Itisreasonable to assume that he was the same James who "transport

ed"toSomerset county in 1678.(Index of Early Settlers Vol 1

LandOffice,Annapolis) and that h e was close kin to the other

AlexanderPioneers.However,no land or court record has been foun d of him

inSomersetcounty. In fact the first record concering James is found in

thedeedof Tho mas Stevenson to the Alexanders in 1714 and again in 1718.

In these deeds James,weaver,and son Moses were joint grantees

totheirland which laid just s outh ot the Mason-Dixon line,on the

eastbank of theElk River adoining the land of David Alexa nder. In

1725,hewas an executorof the will of John Garner and the same year he

andhis son Mos es joinedin addressing a petition to the Assembly (anumber

of New MunsterAlexanders also sign ed this document). In 1735,James and

Moses sold landand in 1736 he sold more land to his sonM oses. He

probably died soonthereafter for no further recordsconcering him are

found.

"Inhabitants of Cecil County 1649-1774" by Henry Peden

p. 14 Alexander, James - 1724- "James' Inheritance" - 170 acres#

, Joseph - 1724 "Joseph and James' Settlement" - 710 acres

Brevard D" James Alexander (weaver) (b abt 1652) ImmigratedfromIreland,

m Mary Steel (som e say Mary Wallace dau of Jane Wallace)

Pn Genol Mag p.1. 85,87 " James Alexander b. 1652 Scotland; d.

1725NewMunster,Cecil Co.,M d from Ireland to Somerset Co.,MD 1678 to

CecilCo.LandDeed 1714."

Another deed of 1718 New Munster does mention James

Alexander,weaver(born 1652) and so n Moses. Another mentions David

Alexander,weaver whoseland was contiguous with James and Mose s. So this

Jamesis still living in1718. This must be the brother to Samuel,

Williametc (of th e 7 originalbrothers)

Helen Smith JAMES ALEXANDER born 1652, one of

originalsevenbrothers and two sisters, s on of either a William

Alexander(NorrisPreyer) and wife unknown or son of Rev. James Alexande r

andMaryMaxwell. Some material has Mary as buried in Cecil County.His

wifewassaid to be Mar y Steel-confirmed in will of John Garner. He

hadlandadjacent to David with son Moses. He die d about 1740.

Welch " James Alexander,who called himself Weaver

andCarpentermarried Mary Daughter o f John Steel. Thay had six sons

listed inthewill probated 1719 "

Pn Genol Mag p.1. 85,87 " James Alexander b. 1652 Scotland;

d.abt1725 New Munster,Ceci l Co.,Maryland"

Alexander Pioneers James Alexnnder,weaver of Somerst

andCecilCo.MD.died in New Munste r area of Cecil Co. after 1740.

Itisreasonable to assume that he was the same James who "tran

sported"toSomerset county in 1678.(Index of Early Settlers Vol 1

LandOffice,Annapolis) and th at he was close kin to the other

AlexanderPioneers.However,no land or court record has been f ound of him

inSomersetcounty. In fact the first record concering James is found in

thedeedo f Thomas Stevenson to the Alexanders in 1714 and again in 1718.

In these deeds James,weaver,and son Moses were joint grantees

totheirland which laid just s outh ot the Mason-Dixon line


"James the Weaver"

DNA results here:

http://alexanderdna.org/summary.html

James Alexander was probably from Ulster, North of Ireland. The date of his birth is not known. It is reasonable to assume that he was the same James who "transported" to Somerset County on the eastern shore of Maryland in 1678 (Index of Early Settlers, Vol. I, Land Office, Hall of Records, Annapolis, Maryland). This James Alexander, of Cecil County, was probably a brother or near relative of William Alexander, Sr., Andrew and Samuel, of Somerset County, as well as a brother of Joseph Alexander of Cecil County, who was a tanner.

Assuming that James Alexander was the one who "transported" in 1678 to Somerset County, he was doubtless one of the Alexander group who removed to the "Head of ye Bay" and for whom George Talbot, Surveyor General, surveyed the New Munster lands in 1683. The fact that he had a son, Moses, old enough in 1714 to received title to land, proves that he was of middle age and could have been in Cecil County for many years.

James Alexander and his son, Moses, both were weavers and farmers. The name of his wife does not appear in the records, nor any reference to her birth or death.

In 1718, Thomas Stevenson confirmed each of the purchasers of his land in a separate deed. James Alexander and his son, Moses, had land located in the New Munster division known as Milford Hundred.

There are no further records of James Alexander until 1735 when we find him selling this land:

"Deeds, Cecil County, Maryland, Book 5, p. 97, April 8, 1735

This indenture the 8th day of April 1735, between James Alexander with Moses his son, and Mary, wife to ye said Moses, of the one part?and William Sample, of Chester County, Pennsylvania of the other part?.

The said James Alexander, Moses Alexander, and wife Mary, do sell unto the said William Sample, a parcel of land being a part of the 92 acres purchased from Thomas Stevenson, of Bucks County, Pennsylvania?1718.

Wit: Signed: James Alexander

David Alexander Moses Alexander

John McCallmont Mary Alexander

Then came Captain James Alexander, Moses Alexander, and Mary, wife of the said Moses?.

Deeds, Cecil Co., MD, Book 5, p. 235 1736

James Alexander, Gentleman, of Milford Hundred, releases to his son, Moses Alexander, the remainder of the tract of land jointly purchased by them from Thomas Stevenson.

James Alexander disappears from the record about 1740, and it is supposed he died about that time, but no will or administration has ever been found for him.

He probably married in Ireland, and his wife may have been dead when he came to America.

Children of James Alexander

As for children: We know he definitely had one son, Moses, and he seems to have had a son, James, Jr.

David Alexander, weaver, bought land adjoining his, but whether this David was his older son, or whether he was a brother, is not known.

The EARLY SETTLERS OF MARYLAND" by GUS SKORDAS

Alexander, James Liber 15 folio 553 Transported 1678

"James Alexander was a passenger on The St. George, a merchant ship that sailed from Waterford, Ireland to Maryland in 1677"

The passenger list for The St. George, a merchant ship that sailed from Waterford, Ireland to Maryland in 1677

St. George - London - Waterford - Maryland - Oct 7, 1677

Following is The passenger list for The St. George, a merchant ship that sailed from Waterford, Ireland to Maryland in 1677, carrying 180 passengers.

"Oct. 7 [1677] Portsmouth. Ralegh Hull to Robert Yard. This morning sailed from Spithead The St. George of London for Waterford and thence for Maryland, wind N. E." On November 1, 1678, John Quigley, a merchant captain, not The captain of The ship, appeared before The Secretary of Maryland and applied for land warrants for transporting 180 settlers into The province on The ship St. George of London. Following is The list of settlers. The original spelling is duplicated, along with The original order of names.

William Simple

James Alexander

Captain John Quigley hath appeared before me and made oath upon The Holy Evangelist of Almighty God that The severall persons within named amounting to The number of one hundred and eighty were by him imported into this province in The Ship St. George of London, and that neither himself nor any person for him by his consent privity or knowledge hath made use of their or any of their rights for taking up of land according to The condition of plantations. Given under my hand The first day of November anno 1678. Source: Maryland State Archives. Land Office, Patent Records, Liber 15, Folio 553. Annapolis, Maryland: 1678.

George C.Greer; Early Varginia Immigrants 1623 - 1666. " Names of Immigrants Compiled from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680. Besides James Alexander listed for 1678 there was a John Alexander listed for 1679

Index " James Alexander, weaver, married Mary Steele who probably died in Somerset. The Index of Early Settlers, Vol 1, Land Commissioner's Office, Annapolis, Md., has a James Alexander, weaver transported to Somerset in 1678.

According to The book, "Alexander Kin I", page 15 under The caption of

Chapter IV Third Generation, James, Weaver, one of "The Seven

Brothers", The immigrant.

The EARLY SETTLERS OF MARYLAND" by GUS SKORDAS

Alexander, James Liber 15 folio 553 Transported 1678

" James Alexander was a passenger on The St. George, a merchant ship that sailed from Waterford, Ireland to Maryland in 1677"

The passenger list for The St. George, a merchant ship that sailed from Waterford, Ireland to Maryland in 1677

St. George - London - Waterford - Maryland - Oct 7, 1677 Following is The passenger list for The St. George, a merchant ship that sailed from Waterford, Ireland to Maryland in 1677, carrying 180 passengers. "Oct. 7 [1677] Portsmouth. Ralegh Hull to Robert Yard. This morning sailed from Spithead The St. George of London for Waterford and thence for Maryland, wind N. E." On November 1, 1678, John Quigley, a merchant captain, not The captain of The ship, appeared before The Secretary of Maryland and applied for land warrants for transporting 180 settlers into The province on The ship St. George of London. Following is The list of settlers. The original spelling is duplicated, along with The original order of names.

William Simple

James Alexander

Captain John Quigley hath appeared before me and made oath upon The Holy Evangelist of Almighty God that The severall persons within named amounting to The number of one hundred and eighty were by him imported into this province in The Ship St. George of London, and that neither himself nor any person for him by his consent privity or knowledge hath made use of their or any of their rights for taking up of land according to The condition of plantations. Given under my hand The first day of November anno 1678. Source: Maryland State Archives. Land Office, Patent Records, Liber 15, Folio 553. Annapolis, Maryland: 1678.

George C.Greer; Early Varginia Immigrants 1623 - 1666. " Names of Immigrants Compiled from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680. Besides James Alexander listed for 1678 there was a John Alexander listed for 1679

Index " James Alexander, weaver, married Mary Steele who probably died in Somerset. The Index of Early Settlers, Vol 1, Land Commissioner's Office, Annapolis, Md., has a James Alexander, weaver transported to Somerset in 1678.(Alex Kin) A brother Andrew Alexander had children Elias and Abigail born in Somerset, but he is thought to have died by 1700 as he is not found later in Cecil County or Somerset. Elias was early found in Cecil County as witness of New Munster purchase.

COPY OF DEED 1714

Thomas Stevenson to MATTHEW WALLACE, James Alexander, Arthur Alexander, David Alexander, James Alexander and Joseph Alexander.

Recorded in Book 2. (J. D. 2) pages 280-281-282-283, one of The Land Record Books in and for Cecil Co. State of Maryland. Dated May 18, 1714.

This INDENTURE made The eighteenth day of May in The thirteenth year of The Reign of our Soverigh Lay Anne by The Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland, Queen defender of The faith & in ye years of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fourteen by and between Thomas Stevenson of ye County of Bucks in ye Province of Pennsylvania, Gent of ye one part and MATTHEW WALLACE, yeoman,James Alexander, farmer, and carpenter Arthur Alexander farmer, David Alexander weaver, James Alexander weaver, and

Joseph Alexander Tanner

Pn Genol Mag p.1. 85,87 " James Alexander b. 1652 Scotland; . d. abt 1725 New Munster,Cecil Co.,Md"

Alex Kin p.8.,9 " James Alexander, weaver transported to Somerset in 1678.

Land Deed 1714. Milford Hundred: sold part of land to Wm.Semple of Chester Co.,Pa Deed book 5 P.97 Cecil Co. (border dispute between MD.DE,PA settled by Mason-Dixon line)"

Alex Kin P 201 "Deed Thomas Stevenson of Bucks Co., PA gent. For £20 to James Alexander of Cecil Co., weaver, and Moses Alexander his son 92 ¾ acres of land by Christiana Creek in The easternmost part of a line of The Newmunster tract and is a corner of Joseph Alexander's land, part of 903 acres purchased from Robert Roberts of Queen Anne's Co. by deed dated 14 Aug 1718. Made 15 Aug 1718. Wit Gavin Hutchinson, James Alexander, John Alexander. Ackn: by Gavin Hutchinson, attorney for Stevenson JP's Matth. Vanbebber, M. Vanderheyden. Rec 11 Feb 1718 S. Knight, Clerk.

On page 5, Chapter II of Alex Kin it starts something to The affect that their ancestor is James The weaver, but willl include material they have on seven brothers. The first one listed is William Alexander (born 1646) his cattle mark registered 1687, his son Wm. Jr. and his wife Ann, probably Ann Liston, dau of Wm. Liston.

Pioneers "Was transported to Somerset Co. Md. in 1678/9. (Early settlers,Vol 1, Land Office ,Annapolis).

Deeds Cecil Deed Book 3. 212. August 15,1718 His wife Mary name on deed for land in New Munster Tract Recorded 22 Oct 1718/9.

Brevard " James Alexander (weaver) (b abt 1652) Immigrated from Ireland, m Mary (some say Mary Wallace dau of Jane Wallace) James and Mary lived in The Milford "Hundred' of The New Munster tract in Northern Cecil Co., Md."

Alexander Pioneers James Alexnnder,weaver of Somerst and Cecil Co.MD.died in New Munster area of Cecil Co. after 1740. It is reasonable to assume that he was The same James who "transported" to Somerset County in 1678.(Index of Early Settlers Vol 1 Land office, Annapolis) and that he was close kin to The other Alexander Pioneers. However,no land or court record has been found of him in Somerset County. In fact The first record concering James is found in The deed of Thomas Stevenson to The Alexanders in 1714 and again in 1718.

In these deeds James,weaver,and son Moses were joint grantees to their land which laid just south ot The Mason-Dixon line,on The east bank of The Elk River adoining The land of David Alexander. In 1725,he was an executor of The will of John Garner and The same year he and his son Moses joined in addressing a petition to The Assembly (a number of New Munster Alexanders also signed this document). In 1735, James and Moses sold land and in 1736 he sold more land to his son Moses. He probably died soon thereafter for no further records concering him are found.

"Inhabitants of Cecil County 1649-1774" by Henry Peden p. 14 Alexander, James - 1724- "James' Inheritance" - 170 acres#, Joseph - 1724 "Joseph and James' Settlement" - 710 acres

Ch Christinia "The Presbyterian Historical Society has John Garner as The first recorded elder of The Head of Christiana Church in 1707, followed by John Steel in 1711, James Alexander beginning in 1715, joined by David Alexander in 1726, The latter serving until 1732. On 8/9/1726, John Brevard of The Elder Broad Creek Church and David Alexander attended The New Castle Presbytery in DE. In 1717,

GUS SKORDAS "Alexander, James Liber 15 folio 553 Transported 1678

MD Heraldic Families pg 64 " James Alexander, weaver, married Mary Steele who probably died in Somerset. The Index of Early Settlers, Vol 1, Land Commissioner's Office, Annapolis, Md., has a James Alexander, weaver transported to Somerset in 1678. A brother Andrew Alexander had children Elias and Abigail born in Somerset, but he is thought to have died by 1700 as he is not found later in Cecil County or Somerset. Elias was early found in Cecil County as witness of New Munster purchase.

Pn Genol Mag p.1. 85,87 " James Alexander b. 1652 Scotland; d.abt 1725 New Munster,Cecil Co.,Md from Ireland to Somerset Co.,MD 1678 to Cecil Co.Land Deed 1714."

Another deed of 1718 New Munster does mention James Alexander, weaver (born 1652) and son Moses. Another mentions David Alexander, weaver whose land was contiguous with James and Moses. So this James is still living in 1718.

Brevard D" James Alexander (weaver) (b abt 1652) Immigrated from Ireland, m Mary Steel (some say Mary Wallace dau of Jane Wallace)

Peden " James Alexander mentioned in 1755 deposition of Sophia Gardner that he is her father and that James Alexander, jr.is her brother (CELC 2:57-58)

Alex Notebooks pg 6 " James Alexander,weaver died in New Munster area of Cecil Co.after 1740

MD Heraldic Families pg 64 " One William Alexander came from Scotland before 1675, Ch--of William Sr. unknown but for William Jr., who m- Catherine. (Will dated 3/7/1732, Somerset Co., Md., book E. B. 9, folio 174; made 2nd will after death of his son, James.) Issue--James, m-- (???) (Will dated 3/30/1725. Somerset Co., Md., book W. B. 9, folio 174.) Samuel; Moses, issue--Mary; Eliza; Samuel. Liston (???); Mary (???); Agnes, m--William Alexander, her cousin, parents of Col. Adam Alexander, with line proven.

Welch " James Alexander,who called himself Weaver and Carpenter married Mary Daughter of John Steel. Thay had six sons listed in The will probated 1719 "

Pn Genol Mag p.1. 85,87 " James Alexander b. 1652 Scotland; d. abt 1725 New Munster,Cecil Co.,Md"

Alexander Pioneers James Alexnnder,weaver of Somerst and Cecil Co.MD.died in New Munster area of Cecil Co. after 1740. It is reasonable to assume that he was The same James who "transported" to Somerset County in 1678.(Index of Early Settlers Vol 1 Land office, Annapolis) and that he was close kin to The other Alexander Pioneers. However,no land or court record has been found of him in Somerset County. In fact The first record concering James is found in The deed of Thomas Stevenson to The Alexanders in 1714 and again in 1718. Deed Book 3. 212. Aug 15 1718

In these deeds James,weaver,and son Moses were joint grantees to their land which laid just south ot The Mason-Dixon line,on The east bank of The Elk River adoining The land of David Alexander. In 1725,he was an executor of The will of John Garner and The same year he and his son Moses joined in addressing a petition to The Assembly (a number of New Munster Alexanders also signed this document). In 1735, James and Moses sold land and in 1736 he sold more land to his son Moses. He probably died soon thereafter for no further records concering him are found.

Another deed of 1718 New Munster does mention James Alexander, weaver (born 1652) and son Moses. Another mentions David Alexander, weaver whose land was contiguous with James and Moses. So this James is still living in 1718. This must be The brother to Samuel, William etc (of The 7 original brothers)

Church Christiana " A Rev. Gillespie was The first pastor of church, Head of Christiana, in Cecil Co. Elders. John Garner was The first one mentioned 1707, John Steel,1711, James Alexander, and David Alexander, 1726, Andrew Wallace in 1726"

James, "The weaver".

D.A. Tompkins, History of Mecklenburg Co NC, Vol I, (Charlotte 1903) states James 'The weaver' transported to Somerset in 1678. This James seems to disappear from The records about 1740. No will or estate settlement has been found. No mention is made of his wife after 1714.His son James Jr was on The Rent Roll in The New Munster section in 1738. Alexander Kin states only Moses and James Jr have been authenticated as children of James 'The weaver' although they say he must have had others.

The CharlMeck story ". JAMES Alexander was The person of that name called "weaver", fifth listed of The Alexanders in The sale of land to "Matthew Wallace and Co." by

Thomas Stevenson of Bucks Co., Pa., through his attorney, John McKnitt, in 1714.11 He married Mary, daughter of John Steel. In his will 12 he calls himself "James Alexander, carpenter, of New Minster, Cecil County." He named as executors his wife, Mary, his father-in-law John Steel, yoeman [sic], of New Castle County, Delaware, and his "brother Francis Alexander of Cecil County, Maryland." A witness was his brother Samuel Alexander. The will of John Garner, of Cecil County, dated 7 March 1723/4, probated 22 October 1725,13 contained a bequest of £40 to "The children of James Alexander by Mary Steel." The eldest of these was Moses Alexander who was a witness to that will. Another was David, and Arthur was probably another. In their father's 1719 will mention by name is made of other sons named Joseph, John, and Francis The youngest.

10 This was surveyed for him 20 May 1689. It contained 200 acres "in The fork of The Southern most branches of The Rockiawakin."

11 2 Cecil County Deeds ,280, 283, at Elkton.

12 Abstracted Calendar of Delaware Wills: New Castle County, C-103. 13 Baldwin: Maryland Calendar 0f Wills, Vol. V p. 204.

14 Frances Alexander Butterworth: A Family of The House of Alexander, p.12.

15 Same reference as in footnote 14.

There is a well established tradition that seven Alexander brothers, Presbyterians from Scotland who had sojourned a while in The north of Ireland, probably at Raphoe.Co., Donegal, and Sligo,Co.,came to Somerset Co.Md. before going on to Cecil Co. If we may judge from The circumstantial evidence remaining, then along with The brothers came two sisters: one, The wife of Matthew Wallace; The other Jane, who married John McKnitt. '

"The passenger list for The St. George, a merchant ship that sailed from Waterford, Ireland to Maryland in 1677"

St. George - London - Waterford - Maryland - Oct 7, 1677 Following is The passenger list for The St. George, a merchant ship that sailed from Waterford, Ireland to Maryland (don't know what port) in 1677, carrying 180 passengers. "Oct. 7 [1677] Portsmouth. Ralegh Hull to Robert Yard. This morning sailed from Spithead The St. George of London for Waterford and thence for Maryland, wind N. E." On November 1, 1678, John Quigley, a merchant captain, not The captain of The ship, appeared before The Secretary of Maryland and applied for land warrants for transporting 180 settlers into The province on The ship St. George of London. Following is The list of settlers. The original spelling is duplicated, along with The original order of names.

William Simple

James Alexander

Captain John Quigley hath appeared before me and made oath upon The Holy Evangelist of Almighty God that The severall persons within named amounting to The number of one hundred and eighty were by him imported into this province in The Ship St. George of London, and that neither himself nor any person for him by his consent privity or knowledge hath made use of their or any of their rights for taking up of land according to The condition of plantations. Given under my hand The first day of November anno 1678. Source: Maryland State Archives. Land Office, Patent Records, Liber 15, Folio 553. Annapolis, Maryland: 1678.

George C.Greer; Early Varginia Immigrants 1623 - 1666. " Names of Immigrants Compiled from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680. Besides James Alexander listed for 1678 there was a John Alexander listed for 1679

Gust Skordas "Alexander, John Liber 20 Folio 185 Transported in 1679

DeedMD 2:280 This Indenture made 18 day of May 1715 between Thomas Stevenson of Bucks Co.,.Province of Penn and Nathan (Mathias or Matthew) Wallace,Yeoman, James Alexander Farmer, Arthur Alexander farmer, David Alexander weaver, James Alexander weaver, and Joseph Alexander,etc. This trract of land contained 1150 aces being on The east side of The main brach of The Elk river in Cecil County in The Provence of Maryland, part of said Tract to James Alexander weaver and his son Moses Alexander, joint purchasers etc.

PA Genol Mag " James Alexander was The person of that name called"weaver" fifth listed of The Alexanders in The sale of land to Matthew Wallace and Co."by Thomas Stevenson,of BucksCo,Pa,through his attorney,John Mcknitt,in 1714 (Cecil County Deeds 280,283,at Elkton)."

Pioneers " The first record concering James is found in The deed of Thomas Stevenson to The Alexanders in 1714 and again in 1718 In these deeds James, weaver and son Moses were joint grantees to their land which laid just south of The Mason-Dixon line, on The east bank of The Elk River. adjoining The land of David Alexander,"

Alexander Pioneers James Alexnnder,weaver of Somerst and Cecil Co.MD.died in New Munster area of Cecil Co. after 1740. It is reasonable to assume that he was The same James who "transported" to Somerset County in 1678.(Index of Early Settlers Vol 1 Land Office, Annapolis) and that he was close kin to The other Alexander Pioneers. However,no land or court record has been found of him in Somerset County. In fact The first record concering James is found in The deed of Thomas Stevenson to The Alexanders in 1714 and again in 1718.

In these deeds James,weaver,and son Moses were joint grantees to their land which laid just south ot The Mason-Dixon line,on The east bank of The Elk River adoining The land of David Alexander. In 1725,he was an executor of The will of John Garner and The same year he and his son Moses joined in addressing a petition to The Assembly (a number of New Munster Alexanders also signed this document). In 1735, James and Moses sold land and in 1736 he sold more land to his son Moses. He probably died soon thereafter for no further records concering him are found.

Only two children of James,weaver are of record, Namely Moses and James jr.The former became his father's heir and took over his unsold land. Nothing is known of James Jr. except that he was charged with ground rent on The tract "New Munster" in 1739.

Peden Colonial Familes "James Alexander deposing in 1755 that Sophia Gardner is his daughter and James Alexander jr. deposes that Sophia Gardner is his sister. (Since James The weaver was The only James to have a son named James Jr. of this period, it appears that this refers to our James The weaver and his son James Jr. John Gardner will of abt.1723 shows that The children of James and Mary Steele are left some money. Sophia must have died by 1755. However that means that James The weaver must have been younger than born in 1652 to still be alive in 1755. I venture that he may have been born about 1660 and been about 18 years old when he came to Maryland on The St. George 1678.)r (CELC 2:57-58)

Deeds Maryland 3-282 The land of New Munster owned by Joseph [James] Alexander, carpender, deceased, was conveyed in 1719 by His sons Joseph, John, Francis and Mary (relict of James B.) to Joseph Alexander and James his son. 316 Acres of land bought by James B. from Thomas Stevenson. in 1714.( Cecil Deed Book 3 page 282 dtd 18 Mar 1719)

Brevard D " James Alexander (weaver) (b abt 1652) Immigrated from Ireland, m Mary Steel (some say Mary Wallace dau of Jane Wallace) James and Mary lived in The Milford "Hundred' of The New Munster tract in Northern Cecil Co., Md."

Will John Garner "Garner, John, Cecil Co, 7th March 1723-4, 22nd Oct 1725

To : children of James Alexander, by Mary Steel, L40"

MD Heraldic Families Pg 60-61 under subtitile: " History of Presbyterians in America, New Brunswick Presbytery."In 1750 John Steel became part of this Synod as minister. He came from Ireland from The Londonderry Presbytery. He settled in New London, Penn, emigrated to Va. Augusta Co. (then Rockbridge) included Alexanders, Browns, Wallaces and Patons -all intermarried. (James The weaver mar. Mary Steele and Samuel's son James (d.1717) married a Mary Steele

Maryland Heralic Families p.58 "James Alexander m. Mary (....) who had come from Munster, Ireland and d. bef 1714"

MD Hearldic Families PAGE 58: " Mary WALLACE Alexander was, with several sons, among The first to purchase and colonize a large tract of land in Cecil Co., Md. With others she fled to this country from Munster, The Earl of Sterling having suffered attainder,together with several thousand, from earls to yeomen, during The Dublin Parliment of James The Second.

Evans " James Alexander,who called himself Weaver and Carpenter married Mary Daughter of John Steel. Thay had six sons listed in The will probated 1719 "

Index " James Alexander, weaver, married Mary Steele who probably died in Somerset. The Index of Early Settlers, Vol 1, Land Commissioner's Office, Annapolis, Md., has a James Alexander, weaver transported to Somerset in 1678.(Alex Kin) A brother Andrew Alexander had children Elias and Abigail born in Somerset, but he is thought to have died by 1700 as he is not found later in Cecil County or Somerset. Elias was early found in Cecil County as witness of New Munster purchase.

History Cecil " George Johnston, in History of Cecil Co. concludes that Mary Alexander was " The widow of James Alexander decesed"

"Inhabitants of Cecil County 1649-1774" by Henry Peden p. 133 Early Inhabitants of Cecil Co Alexander, Mary..widow of James Alexander 1718"

Deed book 5 p 97 Cecil Co Md. dated April 1 1735 records: "James Alexander and son Moses and Mary wife of ye said Moses" selling part of their New Munster tract to William Sample of Chester Co.Pa.

Documents seem to verify the existence of seven Alexander brothers (Andrew, William, Samuel, James, Francis, Joseph, and John) who settled in Somerset County, Maryland between the years 1677 and 1714, having come from Ulster. Some researchers believe the father of these brothers to be James Alexander, born about 1628 in Lanarkshire, Scotland or some nearby location in the Scottish Lowlands. However, I would advise caution in accepting this as absolute fact since it is based on family tradition alone. It is entirely probable that the Alexanders came from the Lowlands but the exact location remains unproven by recorded evidence.

The above mentioned authors in addition to Helen Smith of Texas, an unpublished researcher who has an unbelievable data base on the Alexanders, believe that our Alexanders trace to the first immigrant James Alexander, frequently referred to as James Alexander, weaver to distinguish him from others of a similar given name. Other James Alexander's were often noted as carpenter or blacksmith, etc. Lacking any proof to the contrary and accepting the methodical research that brought previous genealogists to such a conclusion, I believe James Alexander, weaver to be our original immigrant. When the generations are delineated, we will see that James Alexander, weaver is the ggg-grandfather of Margaret Alexander Berryhill.

~~~~~~~~~~~

James and Mary Steele Alexander

The approximate date of birth for James Alexander, weaver is 1652. Most believe this James was among those included on the passenger's list for the ship The St. George, sailing out of Waterford, Ireland to Maryland on October 7, 1677, transported 1678. On this list was included the name of William Simple [sic] or Sample: this family would be found with the Alexander family for years to come, often intermarrying. James was not listed among the indentured passengers; therefore it is believed that he came through independent means.

While records are not conclusive, most researchers believe James married Mary Steele, daughter of John Steele found of record when he signed a loyalty oath to William and Mary of England in Somerset County, Maryland, 28 November 1689. Many of the signers' descendants would be found in North Carolina years later. It is believed that Mary Steele died in Somerset County prior to the family's move to Cecil County.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Some believe that upon his arrival in the New World, James stayed for a short while in Accomack County, Virginia prior to his moving to Somerset County in Maryland, a short distance since the colonies intersected in that particular geographic area. Definitive records are not available to document his exact movements; however, it was not unusual for families to arrive in one colony only to be transported to another.

This was often a financial arrangement whereby the colonists could obtain land warrants after paying their own transport (as in the case of Robert Holt) or they were transported as "head rights" for others seeking large tracts of land. Others were transported as indentured servants for a specific period of time. With the colonies being independent entities, many of the settlers shopped about from one colony to another in hopes of obtaining more or better land.


Others moved for freedom of religious practices and political beliefs. While we have been taught that the United States was founded to a large extent as a haven for religious freedom, the early colonial period did not necessarily exhibit that tolerance. As an example, those in control of Virginia prior to independence were staunch Anglicans. Those of other faiths, in our case Presbyterians, were often not welcomed and their preachers were forbidden to practice their faith.

Some did not share an enthusiasm for the form of government in operation in Virginia, pre-revolutionary times. Others, particularly Scot-Irish did not share an enthusiasm for England, the mother country. Still others moved about to gain new lands or simply because their neighbors were moving. Whatever the reasons, there was a constant, restless movement within and among the colonies. During this time period, it would have been highly likely that James would have been one of those on the move.

~~~~~~~~~~~

James the weaver's stay in Somerset County produced no records for us to determine the length of stay. However, in May of 1714, we find a land transaction involving James in the New Munster area of Maryland, present day Cecil County. The county is located in the extreme northeast region of Maryland near the borders of Pennsylvania and Delaware. Just across the Delaware River is New Castle, an historic city that served as the point of entry for many immigrants in the colonial period.

The New Munster story is worthy of additional examination but beyond the scope of this study. History buffs might find it interesting to take a longer look at the Munster settlement, closely associated with the third Lord Baltimore.

May 8, 1714. Thomas Stevenson to Matthew Wallace,

James Alexander, Arthur Alexander, David Alexander,

James Alexander, and Joseph Alexander, 1,150 acres,

on the east side of the Big Elk, for sum of one hundred

and seventy two pounds - ten shillings.

Within the deed, the grantees are named as Matthew Wallace, yeoman; James Alexander, farmer; Arthur Alexander, farmer; David Alexander, weaver; James Alexander, weaver; and Joseph Alexander, tanner.

This sale of land was to all of the grantees in common. It would be for them to assign particular portions to each other. James the weaver and his son Moses lived in the northern area of the tract in an area to become known as Milford Hundred. We do not know the exact acreage he drew.

In 1718, Thomas Stevenson gave them individual titles to the land they had settled on and improved.

Thomas Stevenson of Bucks Co., PA gent. For 20 pds.

to James Alexander of Cecil Co., weaver, and Moses

Alexander his son 92 3/4 acres of land by Christiana Creek

in the easternmost part of a line of the New Munster tract...

In 1735, James, Moses and his wife Mary, sold 92 acres to William Sample, weaver of Chester County, Pennsylvania. This was land formerly held by Thomas Stevenson. In the same instrument, James deeded the balance to Moses, so there must have been more than 92 acres at that point in time.

James sold additional land to son Moses for 30 pds., October

20, 1736, land formerly bought from Stevenson by James and Moses.

It is assumed that James the weaver acquired more land as the years progressed; perhaps the deeds were never recorded or we have been unable to find them.

~~~~~~~~~~~

James the weaver disappeared from record about 1740, no will found; therefore, we assume he died in Cecil County, Maryland about that time. It appears that James and Mary had at least four children, perhaps more: James Jr., David, Mary, and Moses. James Jr was found on the ground rent roll for New Munster in 1739. Nothing of certainty has been found on the other children, except Moses.

One take on his parentage:

FIRST GENERATION

1. John ALEXANDER of Tarbert,Kintyre was born between 1601 and 1604 in

Tarbert, Kentyre, Scotland. He died about 1641 in Eridy, Donegal County,

Ireland.

He was married to Elizabeth/Agnes/Cleo Vershoyle GRAHAME/GREENE (daughter

of I.K. VERSOYLE-CAMPBELL) in 1623 in Tassagart, Saggart, Co Dublin,

Ireland.. Elizabeth/Agnes/Cleo Vershoyle GRAHAME/GREENE was born about

1600 in Tassagart, Saggart, Co Dublin, Ireland.. John ALEXANDER of

Tarbert,Kintyre and Elizabeth/Agnes/Cleo Vershoyle GRAHAME/GREENE had the

following children:

+2i.William ALEXANDER.

+3ii.Andrew ALEXANDER Rev D.D..

4iii.Janet ALEXANDER was born.

+5iv.Robert ALEXANDER.

+6v.Archibald ALEXANDER.

+7vi.John ALEXANDER.

8vii.Elizabeth ALEXANDER was born in 1632 in Tarbert, Kentyre,

Scotland.

SECOND GENERATION

2. William ALEXANDER was born about 1625 of Eridy, Donegal Co., Ireland.

He died in 1715 in Somerset Co..

William ALEXANDER had the following children:

+9i.William ALEXANDER Sr. (Org 7).

+10ii.Andrew ALEXANDER (Org 7) farmer.

+11iii.Elizabeth ALEXANDER org 7.

+12iv.James B. ALEXANDER (Org 7) weaver.

+13v.Frances ALEXANDER (Org 7).

+14vi.Samuel ALEXANDER Sr. (Org 7).

+15vii.Joseph ALEXANDER (Org 7) tanner.

+16viii.Jane ALEXANDER org 7.

+17ix.John ALEXANDER (Org 7).

"With the new DNA tester coming in on David Alexander's line, (I am presuming it is David Alexander the Weaver, born 1680) to James the Weaver. It proves James the Weaver is still a brother to both Samuel and Joseph Alexander."

"We have not been able to find any male Alexander heirs of Francis, John nor William. Using Jack Wells' site as reference: William's most recent Alexander male listed is a gggrandson b. abt 1780; Francis shows a grandson b. 1720; John shows the most recent heirs but we have not been able to connect with any yet."

James Alexander, born about 1660, and died about 1755, in Cecil County, Maryland. James was twice married, the names of his first and second wives are not known. By his first wife, he had issue at least one son as follow: A. David Alexander, known as "Weaver" was born about 1680 in Somerset County, Maryland. He died after 23 Oct 1769 in Cecil County, Maryland. By his second wife, Joseph had the following known children, all born in Somerset County, Maryland. B. James Alexander Jr., born about 1690, and died after 1755. C. Moses Alexander, born about 1693, and died before 1 Dec 1762, in New Munster, Maryland. He was buried in the Head of Christiana Church Cemetery, Newark, New Castle County, Delaware. D. Sophia Alexander, born about 1697, and died after 1755, in Cecil County, Maryland. She married John Gardner. E. Mark Alexander, born 1700. Mark married his paternal first cousin once remove, Mary Wallace, daughter of Matthew Wallace and Sarah Alexander, and granddaughter of Samuel Alexander and Mary Taylor.


DRAFT WRITTEN JUNE 26, 2015

He was part of a branch of the Alexander family which was nicknamed the "Infamous Nine", or the "Seven Brothers and Two Sisters".

He went by the nickname of James "the Weaver" Alexander.

The is no single book or historical narrative of his life, which has consistent facts and evidence. There are only a few casual traditional stories about him and his family, along with some legal records of his real estate farmland transactions.

  • **

ARRIVAL IN 1670

One account of his family history said that James "the Weaver's" grandfather, named John Alexander, was already living at a settlement in VA as early as 1659. John Alexander had already scouted for good sites and negotiated for land, for the expedition of Presbyterian colonists which included the "Seven Brothers and Two Sisters" family.

A traditional story went as follows: "The "Infamous Nine" came over with their father, William. William's father, John... , migrated to Virginia with some of his children in 1659. They apparently decided that Maryland was a better place and migrated there from Virginia about the same time that William and the nine arrived in 1670. Thus, a father was reunited with a son, siblings were reunited, and some of the younger nieces and nephews met their aunts and uncles for the first time."

The paragraph above is credited to the Historical Society of Cecil County. The quoted text above was submitted by Richard L. Brown to the Electric Scotland website: http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/minibios/a /alexander_hezekiah.htm

Note: No printed version of this story has been found yet, in any hard copy of a book or other publication.

  • **

MANOKIN SITE

In the story above, James Benjamin Alexander arrived in Maryland around the year 1670, as a young man, when he was about 18 years old. He might have traveled to America on a ship of about 180 passengers, who were all from the Laggan Presbytery. The Laggan Presbytery was made up of members of Presbyterian Church of Scotland, who lived within the nine counties of the Ulster Plantation of Northern Ireland. The River Lagan was located on a floodplain in County Antrim and County Down of the Ulster Province.

The ship full of colonists from the Laggan Presbytery might have made landfall on Manhattan Island, NY. By September of 1670, the ship was reported to have dropped anchor in the Delaware River. The Delaware River was used to access a town called New Castle, DE at the head of the Christiana River, and also a few other towns which were further inland in PA. From DE, James "the Weaver" Alexander and his family might have continued on the ship's voyage down the Atlantic Seaboard. Apparently they finally debarked and settled at a deserted Indian village called Manokin Village, in Maryland. The traditional story told above, related that his grandfather and a few other family members met them there. Apparently he and his entire family was re-united at Manokin Village in Maryland by the late autumn of 1670. A William Alexander purchased a cattle brand in November of 1670, and assumedly the cattle which had already been branded with its mark. Even though the new group of immigrants appeared to arrive rather late in the year, it would not have mattered much, if the site had already been set up and prepped for the winter.

What is consistent about the stories for his father, William Alexander, Sr./I, is that wherever the perspective of the story occurs, his father is always somewhere else. For example, in the stories from Northern Ireland, his father is either deceased or he is already in America. In the stories from America, his father is coming over on the ship from Northern Ireland with his wife and children, but his father has never been to America before. Wherever the perspective of the story takes place -- wherever you are -- James "the Weaver's" father is not there -- he is always somewhere else.

One traditional story related that his family considered settling farther to the south in Norfolk County, VA where there was already a sizable colony of Protestants. However they decided instead to settle at a deserted Indian village called Manokin, where all of the native American Indian residents had died in a smallpox epidemic. "Manokin" is an Indian name pronounced as "Muh-NO-kin". Manokin Village was a good site, with river access leading out to the Chesapeake Bay, and from there to the Atlantic Ocean. The site was renamed as Manokin Hundred. The Manokin Hundred was located down on the waters of the Chesapeake Bay.

Another benefit to the Manokin site was that MD offered more religious tolerance for non-Episcopalians than VA, and that angle could have been the deciding factor, as to why the "Seven Brothers and Two Sisters" family chose to settle at the Manokin Hundred, near the heads of the Manokin and Wiccomico Rivers.

  • **

NEW MUNSTER SITE

James "the Weaver" Alexander's parents, two sisters, and brothers named William Jr. and Andrew appear to have remained at the Manokin Hundred. However the rest of the family -- James "the Weaver" Alexander, his wife, his in-laws, and his remaining brothers appear to have moved northward to New Munster sometime between the years 1700 and 1706. As of 2015, the nearest large city that is close to the site of the old New Munster Manor site is the city of Baltimore, MD.

New Munster Manor was located at the northernmost tip of the Chesapeake Bay River, in the far northeast corner of Cecil County, MD. The Alexander brothers rented this land at New Munster first, in the traditional manner of Great Britain, where all farm land was leased from the aristocratic class, and owned by the King. Then around 1714 the Alexander brothers obtained outright ownership of the land they had farmed in Cecil County, MD. This had to have been a unique milestone in the family history.

The New Munster Manor tract was supposed to be part of MD, but due to a mistake in the land survey, some of it was later found to extend across the border into PA by over a mile. See the first map attached to this memorial page, which comes from a book entitled "History of Cecil County, Maryland". New Munster Manor had a river going through the middle of it called the Big Elk River, which extended from MD on up into PA. From the map, it looks like the New Munster Manor site could either be approached from the west via the Chesapeake Bay which led into the Big Elk River in MD, or it could be approached from the east via the Atlantic Ocean which led into the Head of Christiana River in DE.

James "the Weaver" Alexander's farm was in Cecil County, MD. Although he lived in Maryland, he attended the Head of Christiana Presbyterian church to the east, in nearby New Castle County, DE. Both he and his father-in-law were Elders at this church, so it is likely that their graves were placed in the churchyard cemetery there.

Cecil County, MD became a major mercantile center for the East Coast. There was a cottage industry for woven cloth, in the area. Ships could pick up cargoes of woven cloth or cotton bales by sailing into the Delaware River, and stopping at New Castle, New Castle County, DE, and also by continuing up the river into Bucks County, PA. The colonial settlers in America saved quite a bit of money by purchasing their woven cloth locally, instead of importing it from Great Britain.

New Castle County in DE might have been named after Newcastle, England: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newcastle_upon_Tyne

Originally the Cecil County, MD area that James "the Weaver" lived in was called the New Munster tract in the "County of Ireland", MD. The county name was later changed to Cecil County. His farm site was close to the area that was first called New Munster, then New Minster, then the Milford Hundred, and later still the North Milford Hundred.

Munster was the name of the southernmost province in Ireland, and the three other provinces were named Ulster, Connacht, and Leinster: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_of_Ireland

There was also a town in Germany called Munster, which was the home of a religious movement called the Anabaptists. They believed that adults should make their own decisions as to when they should ask to be baptized into the church, and that babies should not automatically be baptized within a few days of birth. In America the Anabaptist movement gave rise to the conservative Amish and Mennonite communities of PA: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anabaptists

MASON-DIXON LINE

The original boundary survey for Cecil County, MD was not measured correctly. Later on some northern portions of Cecil County were found to extend as much as a few miles northward into the neighboring state of PA. The boundary dispute between MD and PA and DE was finally resolved by a survey called the Mason-Dixon line, conducted from 1763 to 1769. To the north of the Mason-Dixon line, the economy ran mostly on the labor of skilled workers who worked in factories, and mines, and the shipping industry -- to the south, the climate was warm enough for the economy to be based on agriculture, which could be handled by less skilled farm workers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mason%E2%80%93Dixon_line

The Mason-Dixon line was within a few miles of James "the Weaver" Alexander's farm. It cut through the middle of the New Munster Manor property, as seen on the attached map which was drawn in 1800. A river ran through New Munster Manor, called the Big Elk River, which continued from MD northward up into PA.

  • ********************************************************

HIS NEPHEW NAMED JAMES "THE CARPENTER" BENJAMIN ALEXANDER

On a sidenote, James "the Weaver" Alexander listed on this memorial page had a nephew named after him, who was called James "the Carpenter" Benjamin Alexander (1685-1719), of memorial page #52984806. James "the Carpenter" was the son of Samuel Alexander and his wife named Mary (Taylor) Alexander.

His nephew also married a lady named Mary Steele. His nephew married Mary (Steele) Alexander (1689-1718), who was said to be the daughter of James Steele. In contrast, the James "the Weaver" of this memorial page married Mary Alexander (Steele) Alexander (1650-1714), who was the daughter of John Steele.

The two paragraphs above pretty much sum up the reason why it is so difficult to trace the Alexander family. Generally speaking, the major difficulty with finding anyone named Alexander, like James "the Weaver" on this memorial page, is that there is often more than one person with the same name. Another common problem begins with the phrase, "There was a border dispute...", and indeed there was a border dispute between MD and DE and PA, when James "the Weaver" Benjamin Alexander lived there in the late 1600's and early 1700's. The geographical names of places, and their location in counties, cities, and states, have changed quite a bit over time. The Alexander families tended to move to new wilderness areas, and to lose track of where their old family cemeteries were located. Many of the first immigrants to America were buried on family farms, not in cemeteries. Unfortunately, more than one Alexander cemetery was moved, in order to make way for a new construction project like a canal or a hotel complex. Aside from all of the issues listed above, it's fairly simple to find anyone in the Alexander family through their church records, wills, and real estate transactions. Of course, nothing could be done about it if there was a fire -- and indeed, as it turns out... there was a fire which destroyed all of the church records for the Manokin and Wicomico Presbyterian Churches in Somerset County, MD prior to about 1757.

See page 226 for more info on James "the Carpenter" Alexander (1685-1719) here: http://interactive.ancestry.com/48376/PAFamiliesII-001402-212?backurl=http%3a%2f%2ftrees.ancestry.com%2ftree%2f44720743 %2fperson%2f6950482415&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnToTree#? imageId=PAFamiliesII-001406-216

This is the end of the information about James "the Weaver" Alexander's (1652-1740) nephew named James "the Carpenter" Alexander (1685-1719).

  • ********************************************************

CHILDREN

James "the Weaver" Alexander (1652-1740) lived in the Manokin Hundred, Somerset County, MD until about 1700, when he moved northward to nearby New Munster, Cecil County, MD. Therefore it is likely that all of his children were born in the Manokin Hundred. James "the Weaver" Alexander was one of seven sons. His children are listed below, as seven sons and one daughter:

James (1675-1780);

David (1680-1749), father of Ezekial Alexander of Mecklenburg County, NC;

Arthur (1682-unknown);

John (1686-1733);

Francis (1688-1775);

Mary (1693-1773), married Isaac Robert Miller (1690-before 1793), and they lived at Tyger Creek, Anson County, NC (later part of Berkeley County, SC, later still part of Spartanburg County, SC, and may now be located in Greenville County, NC);

Moses James Alexander (1693-1762), father of three children who moved from Cecil County, MD down to Mecklenburg County, NC who were named Col. Moses Alexander (1725-1779), Zebulon Alexander (1720- 1784) and Mary (Alexander) Miller (1719-1773);

Joseph (1700-1769).

  • **

James "the Weaver" Alexander's will did not mention the names of his three oldest sons on the list above, who appear to have been named James, David, and Arthur. Nor did his will mention any daughters, such as Mary (Alexander) Miller (1693-1773).

  • **

There is an article on RootsWeb.com with ID: I3417, with a great deal of information on James "the Weaver". Three items are quoted below.

1) James "the Weaver" Benjamin Alexander left a will, which was described as follows: "Wills NC 1717 Book C V.1 p. 103 July 12 1717 New Castle De.

James Alexander left a Will filed in New Castle Co., DE names wife Mary, Father in law John Steele, yeoman of New Castle Co DE., brother Francis Alexander, weaver of Cecil Co. MD and sons Moses, Joseph, John and Francis.""

2) James "the Weaver" served as an Elder beginning in 1715, at the Head of Christiana Church. His father-in-law John Steele served as an elder at the same church in 1711.

"The Presbyterian Historical Society has John Garner as the first recorded elder of the Head of Christiana Church in 1707, followed by John Steele in 1711, James Alexander beginning in 1715...."

3) "Alex Notebooks pg 6 "James Alexander, weaver died in New Munster area of Cecil Co. after 1740 MD Heraldic Families pg 64" (end of three quotes from RootsWeb article)

Source of all three items quoted above: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=david%5Fhughey&id=I3417

  • *******************************

THE HEAD OF CHRISTIANA PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Because James "the Weaver" and his father-in-law named John Steele were founding members and Elders in the Head of Christiana Presbyterian Church, some general information about the church and New Castle Presbytery is included below.

"The first Presbyterian services in this area were conducted by Rev. John Wilson in 1706. Then pastor of New Castle Presbyterian Church, Rev. Wilson came every other Sunday to minister to the many residents of this area who had immigrated from Scotland and Ireland. In 1708, a modest log structure was erected on land owned by John Steele. The first installed pastor was Rev. George Gillespie, a native of Scotland, who arrived in 1713 and served until his death in 1760. During his tenure the log building was replaced by a brick structure which served the congregation until it was destroyed by fire in 1858. Within one year, the present church was built, and while alterations have been made, the basic structure remains intact." Source of quotation: http://hocpc.org/about/history/

Historic Marker Text: http://archives.delaware.gov/markers/ncc/NC-115.shtml

SIX CHURCH ELDERS FROM THREE STATES - ME, DE, AND PA A total of six Elders were split among 3 areas: two from Cecil County, Maryland; two from New Castle County, Delaware; and two from Chester County, PA. http://www.cecilhistory.org/virtuallibrary/churches.pdf

NEW CASTLE PRESBYTERY This web page link from the New Castle Presbytery has a great deal of historical background information, which is relevant to the Head of Christiana Presbyterian Church and the Alexander family too: http://ncpresbytery.wpengine.com/?page_id=62

PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY http://www.history.pcusa.org//collections

  • *******************************

HIS ARRIVAL IN AMERICA AND HIS BROTHER JOHN

Where there is anyone in America named James Alexander, there is often a brother for him named John. This might be a traditional naming pattern taken from the Bible -- where two brothers named James and John worked for a former carpenter from Galilee. They were nicknamed the "Boanerges" in Greek, which translates to the "Sons of Thunder" in English. They were the sons of Zebedee of Bethsaida. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostle_%28Christian%29#The_twelve_apostles

Although James "the Weaver" was said to have arrived in 1670 with his siblings who were known as the "Infamous Nine", there is no record of anyone named James "the Weaver" Alexander in MD in land records or otherwise until 1678, when a James "the Weaver" Alexander appeared in 1678 on ship records for the a ship called the "St. George". This is hard to explain. In 1670 he would have been about 18 years old, which would have been too young to marry. By 1678 he would have been about 27 years old, and that would be a good age for a young man in colonial America to marry and settle down.

One plausible explanation is that James "the Weaver" was working on a ship, going back and forth between America and Ulster, in order to help transport Presbyterian colonists -- but then in 1678, he finally decided to settle down in MD. On the other hand, perhaps this was an entirely different James "the Weaver" Alexander, who was transported into Somerset County, MD in 1678. A person who paid for his own ship voyage to America, back around 1678, was eligible to file for a free land grant under his own name -- in contrast, someone who "was transported" to America, would have his free land grant go to whomever paid for the price of the trip.

Also, a John Alexander was transported into Somerset County, MD in the following year of 1679. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=david%5Fhughey&id=I3417

There was some sort of a minor court case in MD, concerning a John Alexander in MD, and whether or not he was eligible to file for a land grant under his own name -- so his brother James Alexander testified in court on his behalf. The "Infamous Nine" siblings appear to have been the only Alexander family in MD to include two brothers named James and John, so this court case probably involved them.

  • **

DEATH

There is no verified date of death for James "the Weaver" Alexander. He disappeared from all legal records after the year 1740. No headstone has been found for him yet, either. However, since he was an Elder at the nearby Head of Christiana Presbyterian Church in New Castle, DE beginning in 1715, then it is likely he was interred at the churchyard cemetery.

  • **

DESCENDANTS

Beginning around 1740, James "the Weaver" had quite a few descendants who moved from the general area of Cecil County, MD much farther southwest down to Anson County, in the Carolina Colony. In 2014, this general area which used to be designated as Anson County, in the colony of Carolina, has one big city called Spartanburg, Spartanburg County SC, and another big city called Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, NC. Many of his brothers and sisters sent their children down to the same general area.

The colonists in NC/SC used many of the same names from old locations in MD/DE/PA for their new counties and cities down in NC/SC. Thus there was a Chester County, PA and a Chester County, NC -- a York County, PA and a York County, SC. James "the Weaver" Alexander's descendants used a similar traditional naming pattern when they named their children -- and the same first names repeated in the family for his descendants, for hundreds of years.

They didn't know it yet, back around 1740 when James "the Weaver" Alexander passed away, but all of his descendants from MD and NC were going to do an excellent job of cooperating with one other, during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). About a hundred years later, his descendants were going to do an equally excellent job of fighting against each other, in the Civil War.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=106787827

view all 13

James "the Weaver" Alexander's Timeline

1652
1652
Raphoe, County Donegal, Donegal, Ireland
1675
1675
Age 23
New Munster Manor, Cecil County, Maryland
1680
1680
Age 28
Cecil County, Maryland, United States
1682
1682
Age 30
Cecil County, Maryland
1686
1686
Age 34
Cecil County, Maryland, United States
1688
1688
Age 36
Cecil County, Maryland
1693
1693
Age 41
Somerset County, Maryland, United States
1693
Age 41
Somerset County, Maryland, United States
1713
1713
Age 61
New Castle County, Delaware