James Lee Barrett

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James Lee Barrett

Birthdate:
Death: October 15, 1989 (59)
Immediate Family:

Son of James Hamlin Barrett and Anne Langdon Barrett

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Immediate Family

About James Lee Barrett

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Lee_Barrett

James Lee Barrett (November 19, 1929 – October 15, 1989) was an American author, producer and screenwriter.

Biography

Barrett was born in 1929 in Charlotte, North Carolina and graduated in 1950 from Anderson University (South Carolina). Prior to his career as a screenwriter, he served in the United States Marines.

His first screenplay (based on his teleplay The Murder of a Sand Flea) was for the 1957 film, The D.I., which starred Jack Webb as a Marine Corps drill instructor at MCRD Parris Island. Barrett had been on Parris Island as a recruit in 1950 and served in the Korean War.

Barrett, along with Peter Udell and Phillip Rose won the 1975 Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical for Shenandoah, which was based on his 1965 film by the same name, which starred James Stewart.

Other notable works written by Barrett include the 1965 epic film The Greatest Story Ever Told, Smokey and the Bandit, The Green Berets, Bandolero! and co-writing On the Beach. Barrett also scripted a made-for-TV remake of The Defiant Ones (which starred Carl Weathers and Robert Urich in the Sidney Poitier and Tony Curtis roles), and adapted the 1967 movie In the Heat of the Night for a weekly series. (The show starred Carroll O'Connor and Howard Rollins, in the Rod Steiger and Sidney Poitier roles.) Barrett wrote and produced ...tick...tick...tick..., a similarly-themed Southern crime drama starring Jim Brown and George Kennedy.

Death

Barrett died in Templeton, California in 1989 of cancer, aged 59.

Select Credits

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Lee_Barrett#Select_Credits

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https://www.scencyclopedia.org/sce/entries/barrett-james-lee/

Barrett wrote the scripts for some of Hollywood’s most successful film and television productions. Among his most popular films were The Greatest Story Ever Told, The Green Berets, and Smoky and the Bandit. His screenplay for the comedy The Cheyenne Social Club won a Writers Guild of America award in 1970. One of his most enduring works has been the film Shenandoah, whose star, James Stewart, became a good friend.

Barrett wrote the scripts for some of Hollywood’s most successful film and television productions. Among his most popular films were The Greatest Story Ever Told, The Green Berets, and Smoky and the Bandit. His screenplay for the comedy The Cheyenne Social Club won a Writers Guild of America award in 1970. One of his most enduring works has been the film Shenandoah, whose star, James Stewart, became a good friend.

Barrett pursued his education at Anderson College, Furman University, Pennsylvania State University, Columbia University, and the Art Students League in New York. After a stint in the U.S. Marine Corps he moved to New York City, where, failing to place any of the numerous short stories he had written, he began to try his hand at writing material for television. His first breakthrough was the production of his teleplay Cold Harbor, and soon after Barrett was writing for the big New York television market: Kraft Theatre, Playhouse 90, and Armstrong Circle Theatre. One of his Kraft teleplays, Murder of a Sand Flea, based on a Marine experience, caught the eye of the actor Jack Webb, who brought Barrett to Hollywood to adapt it into a movie. It was released in 1957 as The D.I., and Barrett remained in the film capital for the rest of his life.

During the next thirty years Barrett wrote the scripts for some of Hollywood’s most successful film and television productions. Among his most popular films were The Greatest Story Ever Told, The Green Berets, and Smoky and the Bandit. His screenplay for the comedy The Cheyenne Social Club won a Writers Guild of America award in 1970. One of his most enduring works has been the film Shenandoah, whose star, James Stewart, became a good friend. Barrett’s musical book for the stage version of Shenandoah won him a Tony Award.

Barrett’s made-for-television films include Belle Star, Angel City, The Day Christ Died, Mayflower: The Pilgrim Experience, The Law & Charlie Dodge, April Morning, Stagecoach, Poker Alice, Vengeance, and The Quick and the Dead. He created pilots for such productions as The Doctors Brandon, Big Bad John, The Judge, When the Whistle Blows, Running Hot, The Cowboys, You the Jury, and Big Man, Little Lady. He wrote the seven-hour, three-part miniseries The Awakening Land and the holiday special Stubby Pringle’s Christmas. He developed In the Heat of the Night for television and was the originator of the popular series Our House. “I’ve told mostly about people,” Barrett remarked near the end of his career. “And that, really, is what makes a good motion picture—the people and how real they are. Always the people.”

Barrett was a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the writers’ Guild of America, West; the Dramatists’ Guild; and the Authors’ League of America. In 1998 he was inducted into the South Carolina Academy of Authors. He and his wife, Danish-born Merete Engelstoft Barrett, were the parents of five children. Barrett died of cancer on October 15, 1989, at his home in Templeton, California.

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James Lee Barrett's Timeline

1929
November 19, 1929
1989
October 15, 1989
Age 59