James C. Coles

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James C. Coles

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ohio, United States
Death: May 27, 1885 (79)
Immediate Family:

Son of Solomon Coles, Jr. and Elizabeth Coles
Husband of Mary Coles
Father of John Coles; William Coles; Amos Coles; John Coles; Jessie Coles and 5 others
Brother of Isaac Coles; Ester Galloway Coles; Jesse Coles; John Coles; Thomas Coles and 5 others

Occupation: Noridan, Miller / Abolitist / Settler
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About James C. Coles

"COLES, JAMES, farmer, Sec. 30; P.O. Madora; born November 28, 1805 in Berks county, Pa.; moved with his parents to Belmont county, Ohio, in 1807; came to this county in the fall of 1852, and settled on his present home, where he owns 120 acres of land; is one of the oldest settlers in the township; he helped to organize the first township and voted at the first election held in it; sent four sons to the army, two of them dying in the service of their country; named the township in which he lives, Liberty; married January 6, 1831, Mary Pierson, a native of Pennsylvania; had eleven children: W.B., Amos, Jesse, Levi, Lydia J., Benj. P., Barton, Elizabeth E., and Phebe A.; Benj. and Barton are dead; the last two died in the army."

Directory of Warren County, Liberty Township, pp. 619-620.

From a History of Warren Co., Iowa (1908) Source: (compiled by Mrs. Buela Imhoff)

"In Liberty Twsp., Mark Williams was the 3rd settler. The first recorded entry of land was of John Williams, June 29, 1849. Samuel James, Robert Kester, and James Coles made settlements further south on Otter Creek. The township was organized and named Liberty because may of the early settlers were abolitionists and some had left their eastern homes because of the contention over the rights of the slave. James Coles, who named the township, was known to be very much opposed to the fugitive slave law and assisted more than one slave to escape into Canada. Joseph N. Coles taught the first school."

From History of Liberty Center Methodist Church, by Mrs. Orville Thompson. Source: (compiled by Mrs. Buela Imhoff)

"The M.E. church at Liberty Center was organized in 1856. The first minister was J. W. Todd. The charter members were: Enoch and Polly Matson, John and Rachel Matson, Jerry and Juliann Matson, William and Mahalis Berry, Sarah Coles, Jerry and Mary Berry, and Polly and Ellen Coles.

"The minister held a revival meeting that winter in a log cabin located where the Christian church used to stand southwest of Liberty Center. There were a goodly number of converts at this meeting. When the period for probation for new members had expired, the membership had increased to eighty. It was decided to secure a building for worship. In 1860, the original part of the building of S. J. Shupe's store was leased and afterwards purchased of Nathan Mosher for a church. They worshipped in this building on the corner until 1870 when the original part of the present church was erected. In 1906, the church was enlarged. The lot the church stands on was donated by Jerry Boston. The trustees were J. P. McFarland, Joseph Michael, W. E. Vanderventer, Benjamine Coles and W. H. McKenney."

From page copied from published book, source: Buela Imhoff

"In the fall of 1856, Rev. J. W. Todd, John and George Conrad, conducted revival services which continued at intervals far into the summer of 1857. A Methodist church was organized with the following members: Enoch and Polly Matson, John and Rachel Matson, Benj. and Julianna Matson, William and Mahala Berry, Sara Coles, and Mary and Sarah Berry. Polly and Ellen Coles were the first probationers; Joseph Michael, the first class leader; and Jacob Garbison, the first local preacher."

More About JAMES C. COLES:

Burial: Christian Neck cemetery, Liberty Center, Iowa

Census 1860: Liberty Twsp., Warren Co. Iowa

Occupation: Miller and Farmer


The township was organized and named Liberty because many of the early settlers were abolitionists, and some had left their eastern homes because of the contention over the rights of the slave. James Coles, who named the township, was known to be very much opposed to the fugitive slave law and assisted more than one slave to escape into Canada. The sincerity of these people was demonstrated a few years later when they gave up their sons to die for the Union.

Source: [History of Warren County, Iowa: From Its Earliest Settlement to 1908] ; By W. C. Martin; The J. Clarke Publishng Co.; Chicago: 1908

Note to Earl Noland: Found this info. If not agreeable, please remove. D. Glenn

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James C. Coles's Timeline

1805
November 28, 1805
Ohio, United States
1830
1830
Age 24
1832
1832
Age 26
1833
1833
Age 27
1834
May 8, 1834
Age 28
Oxford, Guernsey County, Ohio, United States
1835
1835
Age 29
1837
1837
Age 31
1840
March 30, 1840
Age 34
Ohio, United States
1841
1841
Age 35
1843
January 28, 1843
Age 37
Morgan Co vs Phillips Co OH