James (Rev.) Alexander, Laird of Boghall & Blackhouse, Minister at Kilmacolm

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James (Rev.) Alexander, Laird of Boghall & Blackhouse, Minister at Kilmacolm

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Boghall, Ayrshire, Scotland
Death: Died
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert Alexander, Laird of Blackhouse and Boghall, Baillie of Paisley and Marion "Mary" Hamilton
Husband of Mary Alexander
Father of Elizabeth Alexander Wallace; Joseph Alexander; John Alexander, Lord of Boghall and Blackhouse; Elizabeth Alexander; Mary Alexander and 2 others
Brother of Claude Alexander, Lord of Newtoun; Janet Alexander and Marion Alexander
Half brother of John Alexander; Robert Alexander, Principal Clerk of the Court of Session and Reverend James A. Alexander of Laggan Presbytery

Occupation: Minister, Minister at Laggan Presbyterian Church, County Donegal, Ireland
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About James (Rev.) Alexander, Laird of Boghall & Blackhouse, Minister at Kilmacolm

His death date is disputed.

son, John, and four daughters, Elizabeth, Mary, Jean (m. William Greenless), and Anna

EDUCATION: Master of Arts, Glasgow, 1673.

CHURCH: Licensed by Presbytery of Irvine, 1655. CHURCH: Minister of Kilmacolm, 1655; ordained same year. CHURCH: Deprived by Act of Parliament, June 1662; Decreet of the Privy Council, October 1662. CHURCH: Accused before the Privy Council at Ayr for preaching and baptizing irregularly, 1669.

Source: #735 Fasti Ecclesiæ Scoticanæ: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation (1915-), Scott, Hew, (9 volumes. Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1915-), FHL book 941 D3s; FHL microfiche 6026402., vol. 3 p. 211. via http://histfam.familysearch.org/getperson.php?personID=I36945&tree=Fasti. Available online at https://archive.org/stream/fastiecclesiaesc03scot#page/210/mode/2up:

James Alexander of Blackhouse and Boghall, born 1634, eldest son of Robert A. of Blackhouse, town clerk of Paisley, and Marion Hamilton. MA Glasgow 1653. Licensed by Presbytery of Irvine 27th January 1655. Ordained 29th March that year. Deprived by Act of Parliament 11th June, and decreet of the Privy Council 1 October 1662. In March of 1669 he was accused before the Privy Council at Ayr for preaching and baptizing irregularly. He died of fever that year. He was imminent for his piety and scholarship. He married (cont. 9 June 1657) Mary (died in 1701) Maxwell, daughter of John Maxwell of Southbar, and had issue:

  • Robert of Blackhouse, W.S., died 23rd May 1723;
  • John, merchant, Glasgow;
  • Jean, married (1) (cont. 24rd August 1689) William Greenlees of Auchlamont, writer in Ayr, (2) 26th Nov 1704, Alan Walkinshaw of Orchard;
  • Mary
  • Elizabeth
  • Anne

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Memorials of the earl of Stirling and of the house of Alexander [PW added: VOL. 2, available online at http://www.archive.org/stream/memorialsofearlo02rogeuoft/memorialsofearlo02rogeuoft_djvu.txt]

By Charles Rogers Published by W. Paterson, 1877 Pages 24-25

James Alexander, designed "of Boghall," eldest son of Robert Alexander of Blackhouse, was born in 1634. He entered the University of Glasgow, where he graduated in 1653. Obtaining license as a probationer in 1655, he was the same year ordained minister of Kilmalcolm, Renfrewshire. for his adherence to the Presbyterian polity, he was deprived by Act of Parliament, 11th June, and of the Privy Council, 1st October 1662. Accused of preaching and baptizing irregularly, he was summoned to Ayr in March 1669; he died of fever in the same year about the age of thirty-four (Fasti Eccl. Scot., vol. ii., p. 250; NOTE: THIS REFERENCE IS NOT CORRECT). He married Mary, daughter of John Maxwell of Southbar, descended from Adam Maxwell, fifth son of the first Lord Maxwell of Caerlaverock, by Elizabeth, daughter of William Cuninghame of craigends; she died in 1670. By her he had a son, John, and four daughters, Elizabeth, Mary, Jean, and Anna. His daughter Jean was, in September 1689, married to William Greenless, one of the magistrates of Paisley (Reg. Abbey Parish of Paisley).

Birth: 1628 in Boghall, Stirling, Scotland

Death: AFT 5 MAR 1686 in Ayr, Scotland

----------------

Notes from janice mcalpine mcalpage@cox.net 5/8/2011 http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bevangenealogy&id=I56079

[RE James Alexander and Mary Maxwell]

"History of the county of Ayr : with a genealogical account of the families of Ayrshire," James Paterson, Ayr, J. Dick, 1847- 1852. (Online)

Page 510 is about Robert Alexander, of Blackhouse and Boghall, who married Marion Hamilton. Their son James Alexander married Mary Maxwell, daughter of John Maxwell of Southbar, with a marriage contract dated 9 June 1657.

According to the history, James Alexander was heir to Robert Alexander's property at Blackhouse and Boghall. James Alexander was among the "outed" ministers in 1662, but he did not move to Ireland. He died after 5 March 1686 {CURATOR NOTE: I've not yet found the source of this date], still in Ayr, Scotland.

James and Mary had 4 children:

1. Robert, born about 1658, d. 1723 in Ayr, Scotland. He married Sophia Blair.

2. John, born about 1660, was a merchant in Glasgow, and died in 1712 in Glasgow, Scotland. He married, about 1690, Janet Cuninghame, a daughter of the Laird of Craigends

3. Anna, married to Peter Murdoch, merchant, and Provost of Edinburgh (his second wife.)

4. Jean, married to William Greenlies of Auchlamont (Paisley parish) writer in Ayr. Contract dated 24th August 1689.

---------------------------------

From curator Pam Wilson: I retrieved the source mentioned above, History of the County of Ayr, which has two volumes. In Volume 2 beginning on page 509 is the following account of the heirs of Robert Alexander of Blackhouse: (Note: The text was copied from https://archive.org/stream/historycountyay00pategoog/historycountyay00pategoog_djvu.txt, which has a very poor scanned electronic transcription; it was corrected from viewing the scanned PDF of the text available at https://archive.org/stream/historycountyay00pategoog#page/n5/mode/2up.)

p. 509 ALEXANDERS OF BLACKHOUSE.

Robert Alexander of Blackhouse in the parish of Mearns, a small estate of about fifty acres. He was born in 1604, and apprenticed to John Quhyt, writer in Paisley. He had a long and prosperous career: writer and Town-clerk about 1636, and Bailie of Paisley in 1648, and again at various times in subsequent years. He acquired the lands of Blackhouse, near Ayr, in 1648. The feucharter, by James second Earl of Abercom, is dated 17th June of that year, in favour of Robert Alexander, Esq., of all, &c., the two merk land of Blackhouse, with houses, &c., glebes, fishings, used and wont, in the water of Ayr, parts and pertinents; and all and whole the lands of Chappellands, comprehending therein the lands of Dykes and Smiddyhill, and the mill of Dalmilling, lying in the barony of Monkton and Dalmilling, regality of Paisley, bailliary of Kyle-Stewart, and shire of Ayr. Mr. Alexander acquired various other properties in the vicinity, all of which were incorporated under the designation of Blackhouse. On the 25th May 1668, he had a disposition in favour of himself in liferent, and of his son, James Alexander, in fee, of the 42s. land of Woodquarter, called Thomyflat, from Allan Hunter, who had a feucharter of the same from John, second Lord Barganie, 31st May 1665. He had also a disposition and assignation, in the same terms, of the lands of Boghall, from John Cuninghame, Esq. of Baidland, and Robert Gordon of Boghall, and John Gordon, his eldest son, dated 22d June 1665. These lands were formerly held by the Lockharts of Boghall, a branch of the Lockharts of Bar, who appear to have obtained them from the Earl of Abercorn, successor to the Abbots of Paisley. John Lockhart of Bar was served heir to his grandfather, Alexander Lockhart of Boghall, in all and whole the 16s. 8d. land of Taitsquarter, with the pertinents, &c. ; the 3 merk land of Dalmilling of old extent, also called Taitsquarter ; the 16s. 8d. land of Dalmilling, of the same extent, called Jaspersteumstead, with the pendicles, &c ;

p. 510 as also the merkland now called Chappelland, &c., 24th June 1630. These lands were alienated by John Lockhart of Bar to Robert Gordon, Provost of the burgh of Ayr, and John Gordon, merchant burgess there, his eldest son, dated 25th June 1647. They had thereafter become the property of John Montgomerie, whose son, Patrick Montgomerie of Blackhouse, disposed of them to John Cuninghame of Baidland, 11th June 1663. On the 28th of April 1664, a decreet of apprising of the lands of Boghall was obtained by Mr. Cuninghame of Baidland, for payment of the money he had some time before advanced upon them; hence the sale of the lands by the parties concerned to the Alexanders in 1665.

Robert Alexander, of Blackhouse and Boghall, married Marion Hamiltoun, and had issue : —

1. Master James, his successor.

2. Claud, of Newton (ancestor of Alexander of Ballochmyle.)

3. Mr. Robert, writer in Paisley, from 1677 to 1699.

4. John. He and Robert are mentioned as the *' breither-german" to Claud, in a document in 1678.

1. Jonet, married to Robert Love, maltman in Paisley. Her "breither" Claud, Mr. Robert and John, were bound to give the soume of 3000 merks In 1676, if Marion, as under, should die before her marriage. Robert Love died before 1678.

2. Marion, married John Maxwell of Braidieland, parish of Paisley, in 1678. Braidieland consisted of 20s. old extent, and and another mailing of 40s. She brought a tocher of 3600 merks, and her jointure was 400 merks.

  • **

Mr. [James] Alexander of Blackhouse and Boghall, Minister of Kilmalcolm, to which charge he was ordained in 1656. He married Mary, daughter of the Laird of Southbar, and aunt of Mr. James Stirling, minister of the Barony of Glasgow. This marriage took place in 1657. A contract was entered into upon the occasion, "between the said Robert Alexander and James Alexander, commissar at Kilmalcolm, his eldest son, on the marriage of the latter with Mary Maxwell, daughter of John Maxwell of Southbar, whereby the former became bound to convey to the latter his lands of Blackhouse, Chappelland, mill of Daimilling, £3, 11s. land of Dalmilling, called Gairdner Hunter and Lauchland's mailings, and the one-half merkland of Dalmilling, called Greystack, under the reservation of his own liferent of one half thereof," dated 9th June 1657. Mr. Alexander was among the "outed" ministers in 1662. He is said to have died of fever in 1669; but this could not have been the case, for, on the 30th October 1685, he grants a disposition in favour of Robert Alexander, his eldest lawfull son, of the lands and estate of Blackhouse. He had issue : —

1. Robert, of Blackhouse.

2. John, bom about 1660, was a merchant in Glasgow, and at his death, in 1712, he mortified £100 for the use of the poor members of the merchant rank in Glasgow, and also to the poor of the Kirk Session, £66, 14s. 4d. Scots. He married, about 1690, Janet Cuninghame, a daughter of the Laird of Craigends, and had issue : —

1. Robert, his heir.

2. William, Provost of Edinburgh.

3. Anna, married to Peter Murdoch, merchant, and Provost of Edinburgh (his second wife.) They had a

daughter, Mary.

3. Jean, married to William Greenlies of Auchlamont (Paisley parish) writer in Ayr. Contract dated 24th August 1689. He died before 1698.

  • **

Robert Alexander of Blackhouse had a charter of that property, under the Great Seal, 5th March 1686. With consent of his father James, he disposed of part of the lands of Chapelland to Sir Thomas Wallace of Craigie, Bart. He was one of the principal clerks of the court of session. He married Sophia, daughter of John Blair of Innerwick. He was an able, virtuous, benevolent, and friendly man. On his death, in 1723, Allan Ramsay wrote a laudatory poem in honour of his memory. He left an only daughter, Jean, married to Lockhart of Lee. Amongst the title-deeds are — *' Retour of the special service of Mrs. Jean Alexander of Blackhouse, as only child and heir to the said Robert Alexander, and spouse to John Lockhart, Esq. of Lee, in the said lands of Boghall and Dalmilling," dated 26th June 1733. Also, "Precept of Clare Constat, by Hugh Baillie Esq. of Monktoun, in favour of the said Mrs. Jean Alexander, or Lockhart, for infefting her as heir foresaid," &c,, 26th March 1734. Mrs. Alexander excambied, for certain parts of the lands of Dalmilling, with Sir Thomas Wallace of Craigie, the upper holm of Blackhouse, with four rigs of land with the bog and brae above the holm, all parts of the lands of Blackhouse.

  • **

Robert Alexander, fifth of Blackhouse, was served heir to the said Mrs. Jean Alexander, or Lockhart, his cousin, in the lands of Blackhouse, 1769.

William Alexander, sixth of Blackhouse, next succeeded as heir apparent.

On the 29th November 1786, a decreet of sale was obtained before the Lords of Council and Session, at the instance of George Home of Branxton, Esq., one of the Principal Clerks of Sessions, against the Messrs. Alexander, merchants in Edinburgh, of the lands and estate of Blackhouse. ln 1787 the property came into the hands of the Ayr Coal Company, represented by David Balfour, Esq., W.S., from whom it was acquired by John Taylor, Esq., W.S., for himself, and as trustee for the other partners, 14th August 1789. In 1829, it became the property of the Messrs. Hunter and Co., bankers, Ayr, who disposed of it a few years ago to John Taylor Gordon, Esq. of Newton Lodge. Mr. Campbell of Craigie bought Dalmilling, or Milton Mill, from Mr. Home in 1790.

-----------------------------

http://archive.org/stream/kilmacolmparishh00murr/kilmacolmparishh00murr_djvu.txt Kilmacolm: a Parish History by James Murray (Paisley, Scotland, 1898)

pp. 58-59: On Mr. Hall's return to his own charge in Ireland, the pulpit of Kilmacolm was again vacant. Without, however, any considerable delay the parish made up its mind on a successor. It so happened that the parishes of Erskine and Neilston were also vacant, and all three set their affections on the same man. This very popular preacher was James Alexander, the eldest son of Robert Alexander of Blackhouse. He was a young man of great promise, a distinguished student of Glasgow University, where he graduated in Arts in 1653. He was under twenty years of age when he was inducted to the charge of Kilmacolm. The proceedings in the case were very simple and unanimous : — " 27th Jan., 1655. Mr. James Alexander having passed all his examinations, is licentiat to preach as an expectant. The same day the parochiners of Kilmacolm, Erskine, and Neilston, desyre the Presbytery to send Mr. James to preach in their respective congregations betwixt and the nixt Presbytery day ; but the Presbytery, having heard the said Mr. James declare that he inclineth to preach only in Kilmacolm, do therefore appoint him to preach there." On 7th February the "parochiners of Kilmacolm submit a Call to Mr. Alexander, and ask the Presbytery to take him on trials." They appoint his trials for next meeting, when he delivers a controversial thesis in Latin, and is examined in " Chronologie, Cases of Conscience, problematic questions reconciling places of Scripture, and in Greek and Hebrev?." His trials are sustained, and his induction fixed for 29th March : — " 29th March, 1655. This day, being a day of solemne humiliation, Mr. Alex. Dunlop did preach, and thereafter Mr. James Alexander was ordained minister at Kilmacolm, with fasting, prayer, and imposition of the hands of the Presbytery, in the public congregation ; and Mr. Hugh Smith did preach in the afternoon." The induction was attended by no social or festive celebrations ; the act of ordination had a special virtue when the ordaining Presbyters were fasting, and a day of humiliation was a day given over to much preaching.

The temporalities of the benefice were not yet quite clearly defined. Thus it would seem that during the vacancy certain of the landlords had appropriated the minister's glebe : — " 25th July, 1655. The Presbytery, finding Mr. Alexander minister of Kilmacolm to be presentlie without the possession of a Gleib, and have seen the designation of a Gleib to Mr. Ninian Campbell, the previous minister, in the whilk Gleib, designed as aforesaid, the Earl of Glencairn and the Laird of Newark pretend interest, and therefore the said Mr. James is withheld from the possession thereof: and further, they seriouslie recommend to the parochiners of Kilmacolm the reparation of the Manss, nowe verie insufiicient." On enquiry it was found that the glebe was inconvenient, both by situation and by being scattered over the parish, and a commission was appointed by the Presby- tery to arrange for an excambion and a final designation of the glebe of Kilmacolm.

p. 63: James Alexander who, as we have seen, was inducted to Kilmacolm in 1655, was a young man of great ability and of unquestioned zeal and earnestness. He is described as " eminent for piety, and a considerable scholar, singular for gravity, and of a most obliging temper." He seems at once to have obtained the respect and esteem of his parishioners. No longer had they to complain that they were not sufficiently roused. None "was suffered to fall asleep under his ministry; nor were ill-doers allowed to escape the penalty of their transgressions. The Earl of Glencairn himself was dealt with by the Kirk-Session for grievous misconduct. In the year 1657 no fewer than three young women of Kilmacolm, Janet Taylor, Christian Wilson, and Margaret Hay, admitted to the Session that he was the father of their illegitimate children. This great scandal Mr. Alexander deemed it necessary to bring before the Presbytery. They could not summon the Earl to their bar, as he was at the time a prisoner in the Castle of Edinburgh in connection with the abortive Highland rising. They, however, appointed one of their number to visit him in prison, who, on 20th Jan., 1658, reported that he had brought the Earl humbly to acknowledge his guilt, and to profess sincere sorrow for his sin. As he could not in present circumstances, make public repentance in the kirk of Kilmacolm, Mr. Alexander was instructed, on the next Sunday, to announce to the congregatlon that the Earl of Glencairn confessed that he was guilty and earnestly craved forgiveness. The time was near at hand when the proud and crafty Earl was to deal, after a very different fashion, with church censures, and the doings of ecclesiastical courts.

p. 68 When the Act of Glasgow was passed on 1st October, 1662, the Presbytery of Paisley consisted of 15 ministers. These were Mr. James Taylor at Greenock ; Mr. John Hamilton at Tnverkip ; Mr. James Wallace at Inchinnan ; Mr. Hugh Peebles at Lochwinnoch : Messrs. Alex. Dunlop, John Drysdale, and James Stirling, at Paisley; Mr. John Stirling at Kilbarchan ; Mr. Patrick Simpson at Renfrew ; Mr. Hugh Smith at East- wood ; Mr. William Thomson at Mearns; Mr. William Thomson at Houston ; Mr. James Hutchison at Killallan ; Mr. Hugh Wallace at Neilston ; and Mr. James Alexander at Kilmacolm. Of these, eleven were summarily ejected, leaving only the first four in the above list. About a year afterwards, three of these refusing to conform, were suspended from the ministry, and ejected from their charges; so that out of the whole Presbytery of Paisley, only one minister, Mr. Taylor, of Greenock, continued to hold office.

-------------------------------

The following account has confused the identities of at least two people, so its credibility is weak: http://www.appalachianaristocracy.com/getperson.php?personID=I10600&tree=01

Source: Memorials of the earl of Stirling and of the house of Alexander By Charles Rogers Published by W. Paterson, 1877 Pages 24-25

James Alexander, designed "of Boghall," eldest son of Robert Alexander of Blackhouse, was born in 1634. He entered the University of Glasgow, where he graduated in 1653. Obtaining license as a probationer in 1655, he was the same year ordained minister of Kilmalcolm, Renfrewshire. for his adherence to the Presbyterian polity, he was deprived by Act of Parliament, 11th June, and of the Privy Council, 1st October 1662. Accused of preaching and baptizing irregularly, he was summoned to Ayr in March 1669; he died of fever in the same year about the age of thirty-four (Fasti Eccl. Scot., vol. ii., p. 250).

He married Mary, daughter of John Maxwell of Southbar, descended from Adam Maxwell, fifth son of the first Lord Maxwell of Caerlaverock, by Elizabeth, daughter of William Cuninghame of Craigends; she died in 1670. By her he had a son, John, and four daughters, Elizabeth, Mary, Jean, and Anna. His daughter Jean was, in September 1689, married to William Greenless, one of the magistrates of Paisley (Reg. Abbey Parish of Paisley).

[NOTE from PW: This is where quote from Rogers ends; the source of the following is unclear, but it is apparently in reference to a later "Reverend Alexander" since James died in 1669. This information is about a different James Alexander:]

Reverand Alexander was a minister of the Convoy congregation, approximately 4 miles from Raphoe, Donegal County, Ireland, until his death in 1704. Convoy is in the Laggan Presbtery. He was educated at King's College in Aberdeen, Scotland from 1666-1670. He was ordained 12 Dec 1677 and became a minister in Convoy in 1678.

Reverend Alexander, a member of the Laggan Presbytery in Raphoe was imprisoned, which may have induced his brothers to flee to America. He upheld his religious beliefs which were contrary to Royal Authority and was fined 20. The story is he was imprisoned for calling a fast to protest the policies of the Church of England. He was unable to pay and was jailed in Dublin, Ireland on 8 October 1681 until 20 April 1682 when he was released to the Sheriff and the fine was reduced to 20 shillings, paid by his friends.

His seven sons and two daughters left Ireland for America in the ship Welcome, landed in 21 September 1670 in Maryland.

Most probably Reverend Alexander and his wife are presumed to have remained in Ireland. Their children settled in Somerset and later in Cecil County Maryland.

===========

James was a Reverend.

view all 13

James (Rev.) Alexander, Laird of Boghall & Blackhouse, Minister at Kilmacolm's Timeline

1634
April 1634
Boghall, Ayrshire, Scotland
1650
1650
Age 15
Raphoe, Ulster, Donegal, Ireland
1660
1660
Age 25
Raphoe, Ulster, Donegal, Ireland
1669
March 1669
Age 34
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