James Stanton, Convict "Active" 1791

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James Stanton, Convict "Active" 1791's Geni Profile

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James Stanton

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Deptford Kent England
Death: February 01, 1822 (49-50)
At Sea. Ship "Purpose', Sydney Cove
Place of Burial: St Philips Anglican Church, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Immediate Family:

Husband of Frances (Haggard) Stanton, Convict "Earl Cornwallis" 1801
Father of Elizabeth Sarah Eagles; John Stanton and Jane Plows

Occupation: Seaman
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About James Stanton, Convict "Active" 1791

1. Occupation: seaman.

2. Occupation: silver plater.

3. Court: Sentenced to transportation for seven years at the Old Bailey, Dec 1789, Middlesex London,. JAMES STANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December, a silk purse, value 1 s. one silk handkerchief, value 2 s. one linen ditto, value 6 d. and five shillings and six pence in monies numbered , the monies of William Chance. WILLIAM CHANCE sworn. I am a clothier ; last Thursday evening, between five and seven, I was going along the Strand to the play; I past, I thought, two suspicious men; presently, I missed something from my right hand coat pocket; I saw two men following me, which I belive to be the same two men I suspected before; one of them ran across the street, and the other ran down the footway, behind me; I pursued him that ran down the path, a considerable way; that was the prisoner; he turned up a little dark court, called Swan-yard; there I stopped him; I found nothing on him; I took him to a magistrate in a coach, and a gentleman with us; at Bow-street, he was searched; and I was desired to search the coach; I went immediately, and searched it; and under one of the cushions of the seats, in the same corner where the prisoner set, I found one of my linen handkerchiefs; this is the handkerchief; the gentleman that assisted me, went away. Had you missed that linen handkerchief, before you got into the coach? - I missed every thing that was in that pocket; for it was turned inside out; there was this linen handkerchief, a silk handkerchief, and a purse containing five shillings and sixpence, all in that pocket; this handkerchief is the only thing that was found; there is no mark, but it is torn at the corner, which I very well recollect was done some time before by playing with a dog. PRISONER's DEFENCE. I had been to my uncle's in Pall-mall; he is clerk to Mess. Christie and Ansell; I heard the cry of stop thief; and I saw a little chap run past me; the prosecutor seized me, and could find no property about me; he broke his stick about my head; then he took me two Bow-street; I am innocent. Court to Chance. Did you ever lose sight of him? - Never. Jury. Did you search him before you went to Bow-street? - I just looked in his bosom. GUILTY. Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER. To be transported for seven years.

4. Immigration, 26 Jul 1791, Sydney, , New South Wales, Australia. He arrived as a convict on the 3rd Fleet vessel 'Active".

5. Court: convicted at the Canterbury Sessions, 14 Mar 1803, Kent England. He was charged on three counts. On the first, that he and another man stole "cordage and goods value 30/- of Our Lord the King" he was acquitted. On the second, that he stole "cordage and goods the value of £20 of Our Lord the King", the jury found him guilty and he was sentenced "to be hanged by the Neck until he be Dead". The third count which by now was irrelevant, was of "feloniously embezzling cordage value £5"

Each of these counts involved different accomplices, all of whom were acquitted of their various roles.

6. Immigration: Transported for a second time aboard the convict ship "Coromandel", 7 May 1804, Sydney Cove, Aust, New South Wales, Australia.

7. Pardon, 4 Jun 1806, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

8. Life Story. James Stanton was born in Depford, Kent, England in 1772. He worked as a seaman before appearing in the Old Bailey in December 1789.He was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December, a silk purse, value 1 s. one silk handkerchief, value 2 s. one linen ditto, value 6 d. and five shillings and six pence in monies numbered , the monies of William Chance. WILLIAM CHANCE sworn testimony:. I am a clothier ; last Thursday evening, between five and seven, I was going along the Strand to the play; I past, I thought, two suspicious men; presently, I missed something from my right hand coat pocket; I saw two men following me, which I believe to be the same two men I suspected before; one of them ran across the street, and the other ran down the footway, behind me; I pursued him that ran down the path, a considerable way; that was the prisoner; he turned up a little dark court, called Swan-yard; there I stopped him; I found nothing on him; I took him to a magistrate in a coach, and a gentleman with us; at Bow-street, he was searched; and I was desired to search the coach; I went immediately, and searched it; and under one of the cushions of the seats, in the same corner where the prisoner set, I found one of my linen handkerchiefs; this is the handkerchief; the gentleman that assisted me, went away. Had you missed that linen handkerchief, before you got into the coach? - I missed every thing that was in that pocket; for it was turned inside out; there was this linen handkerchief, a silk handkerchief, and a purse containing five shillings and sixpence, all in that pocket; this handkerchief is the only thing that was found; there is no mark, but it is torn at the corner, which I very well recollect was done some time before by playing with a dog. PRISONER's DEFENCE. I had been to my uncle's in Pall-mall; he is clerk to Mess. Christie and Ansell; I heard the cry of stop thief; and I saw a little chap run past me; the prosecutor seized me, and could find no property about me; he broke his stick about my head; then he took me two Bow-street; I am innocent. Court to Chance. Did you ever lose sight of him? - Never. Jury. Did you search him before you went to Bow-street? - I just looked in his bosom. GUILTY. Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER. To be transported for seven years. On 26 July 1791 he arrived in Sydney aboard the 3rd Fleet vessel "Active". Presumably he served his sentence and resumed his career as a seaman because he next appears in Kent, England charged on 14 Mar 1803 on three counts. On the first, that he and another man stole "cordage and goods value 30/- of Our Lord the King" he was acquitted. On the second, that he stole "cordage and goods the value of £20 of Our Lord the King", the jury found him guilty and he was sentenced "to be hanged by the Neck until he be Dead". The third count which by now was irrelevant, was of "feloniously embezzling cordage value £5"

Each of these counts involved different accomplices, all of whom were acquitted of their various roles. On 7 May 1804 he was transported for a second time aboard the convict ship "Coromandel". He was pardoned on 4 June 1806 and married Frances Haggart (aka Hoggard, Vivian or Vivern) on 19 September 1808. They had three children, Elizabeth, John and Jane. James died on 19 February 1822 in Sydney.


Tried on 9/12/1789 in Middle Essex and sentenced for 7 years. Remarks made next to his name was "beyond seas".

James had second wife, Bridget O'Connor

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James Stanton, Convict "Active" 1791's Timeline

1772
1772
Deptford Kent England
1806
1806
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
1808
1808
Sydney Cover Port Jackson
1810
1810
Camden, Camden Council, New South Wales, Australia
1822
February 1, 1822
Age 50
Sydney Cove
February 20, 1822
Age 50
St Philips Anglican Church, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia