James (Timmins) Timms, Convict "Friendship" 1800

Is your surname Timms?

Research the Timms family

James (Timmins) Timms, Convict "Friendship" 1800's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

James Timms (Timmins)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Glen Avon, Cavan, Ireland
Death: February 21, 1837 (79)
Windsor, NSW, Australia
Place of Burial: Old Catholic cemetary Windsor
Immediate Family:

Husband of Ann (Baldwin) Timmins, Convict "Sydney Cove" 1807
Father of Michael Timmins; Mary Ann Keefe / Cafe; William Timmins; Ann Cross; Margaret Timmins and 8 others

Managed by: Susan Mary Rayner (Green) ( Ryan)
Last Updated:

About James (Timmins) Timms, Convict "Friendship" 1800

Iv had a look at the Timmins line and iv removed the parents of James Timmins.... I can't find any proof of either of the said parents in any documentation online. So im interested in some document. I also have come across a lot of James Timmins convict records and a presumed photo of him and his wife Ann Baldwin. I have a bit of an issue with this as the time of the photograph would have been pre 1837 and James would have been a fair age if he was born in 1757 as some trees state. Also Ann would appear much younger than she does in the photo and James older but to me they appear to be roughly the same age. For this reason im not sure of the authentication of it. sueg

===========

New South Wales, Australia, Settler and Convict Lists, 1787-1834 about James Timmins Name: James Timmins Arrival Date: Feb 1800 Vessel: Friendship Fleet: First Province: New South Wales Title: Male Year(s): 1788-1819 Place of Conviction: Kilencinham see image

===============

New South Wales, Australia, Settler and Convict Lists, 1787-1834 about James Timmins Name: James Timmins Arrival Date: Feb 1800 Vessel: Friendship Fleet: First Province: New South Wales Title: Male Year(s): 1816 Place of Conviction: Killmainham see image

=========

New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters, 1806-1849 about James Timmins Name: James Timmins Vessel: Firendship Province: New South Wales Title: General muster Year(s): 1822 see image

==========

New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary's Papers, 1788-1825 about James Timmins Name: James Timmins Event Date: 16 Nov 1816 Vessel: Friendship Event Description: Of Richmond; landholder. On list of persons who came as convicts and who claimed they were free at the last General Muster, without supporting documentation Comments: Per "Friendship" Series: (NRS 898) Special bundles, 1794-1825 Item: SZ759 Page: 284 see image

============

New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary's Papers, 1788-1825 about James Timmins Name: James Timmins Event Date: 14 Jun 1823 Vessel: Friendship Event Description: On list of applicants for clearing gangs; for 32 acres to be cleared on his estate at Richmond Comments: Per "Friendship" Series: (NRS 937) Copies of letters sent within the Colony, 1814-1825 Item: 4/3508 Page: 515 see image

========

New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary's Papers, 1788-1825 about James Timmins Name: James Timmins Event Date: 31 Jan 1822 Vessel: Friendship Event Description: Of Mathew Farm, Richmond. Application for clearing party Comments: Per "Friendship" Series: (NRS 898) Special bundles, 1794-1825 Item: 4/7014 Page: 91-2 see image

===========

GEDCOM Note

<p>James Timmins (1757 - 1837) </p><p><p></p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Immigration 16 February 1800 (Age 43)</p></p><p><p>Sydney Cove, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Source: Mayberry, Peter, comp. Irish convicts to NSW 1788-1849 [database online]</p><p><p>Text: James was an Irish rebel. He was tried in 1798 at Kilmainham, Dublin County and sentenced to lifeimprisonment. He was transported aboard the ship 'Friendship' which arrived in the colony on 16 Feb 1800, age given as 43.</p><p><p>James was a Irish landholder and an Irish rebel. HIs name is shownin various spellings:</p><p><p>Timming, Timmonds, Tummins or Tumming.</p></p><p><p>James was tried in 1798 at Kilmainham, Dublin and sentenced to "exiled" for life for his part in the 1798 Irish uprising against British rule in Ireland.</p><p><p>The Irish Rebellion was an unsuccessful attempt by a group of Irish nationalist to secure Ireland's independence from England. Following the demise of the 1798 Irish Rebellions, a number of the leaders and high-risk rebels were kept either in Kilmainham gaol or in prison ships. Reprisals after the Rebellions caused great ill feeling throughout the troubled lands of Insurrection Ireland. The government could not contemplate releasing those martyrs of Irish freedom back to their native land. Many rebels were transported to New South Wales with the hope that none would ever return.. It is estimated that only around 400 of the several thousand United Irishmen sentenced to transportation actually reached New South Wales and were transported in anumber of vessels along with other convicts.</p><p><p>James sailed from Cork, Ireland on 24 August 1788 aboard Friendship II to disembarked at Port Jackson on 16 February 1800. He is recorded as 43 years of age and a landowner, which may suggested he left behind a wife and family in Ireland.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>in 1805 James purchased 42 and a half acres of land at Yarramundi Lagoon, a part of James Matthews' farm. In the 1806 muster James is mentioned as a land holder, Mathews Farm, Yarramundi.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>In October 1810 James received his 'ticket of leave' and in 1814 received his Conditional Pardon on which it gives this description of him: Height: 5feet 5inches Complexion: dark, sallow Hair: black to grey Eyes: Hazel.</p><p><p>James Timmins married Ann Baldwin on 6 September 1807, St Phillip's Church of England, Sydney, NSW #V1807795-3A by the Rev. Henry Fulton. James would have been aged 50 and Ann was 19 -both made their mark with "X" and the witnesses were Simon and Eleanor McGuigan. Catholic priests did not arrive in the colony until after 1828 so James, a Irish Catholic, had no option but a Church of England service.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>1828 census shows James owning 42.1/2 acres at Richmond, grazing 10 horses and four head of cattle. They were also selling corn to the government.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Nicknames: "James /TIMMINS/ Convict"</p></p><p><p>Birthplace: Glen Avon, Cavan, Ireland </p></p><p><p>Death: Died February 21, 1837 in Windsor, NSW, Australia</p></p><p><p>Managed by: Susan Mary Rayner (Green)</p></p><p><p>Last Updated: May 13, 2013</p></p><p><p>View Complete ProfileAug 18 1757 - Of Cavan, Crosserlough, Drumakinneo, Ireland</p><p><p>Death: Feb 21 1837 - Yarramundi, Winsor, NSW.</p></p><p><p>Parents: Thomas Timmins, Sarah Timmins (born Gates)</p></p><p><p>Wife: Ann Timmins (born Baldwin)</p></p><p><p>Children: Mary Cafe (born Timmins), Ann Cross (born Timmins), Margaret Stinson (born Timmins), Catherine Tailby (born Timmins)James TIMMINS was born about 1757 in County Cavan, Ireland. Most of the prisoners on board the ships Minerva and Friendship 2 were involved in the 1798 rebellion, and James was transported on the Friendship 2. His involvement in the rebellion is supported by the fact he bought land in 1805, only those who had been regarded as exiles not convicts would have earned sufficient money to purchase land.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>He was a good farmer, and was 'off stores' by the muster of 1814 in which it is stated he is a landholder.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>He married Ann Baldwin, 30 years his junior, in 1807. They had 13 children, 12 of whom survived.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>There are various stories recorded in "Corn and Pumpkins and Yarramundi" by Val Close, documenting a case in which he was charged with attempted rape, and found not guilty on the grounds that the claimant (the owner of a private grog shop) had attempted to extort others with similar claims.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>He lived until he was 80, dying in 1837 and is buried at Windsor Catholic Cemetery and his headstone still remains.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>1. James Timmins</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Convict - 1798 Irish rebellion. Arrived on the Friendship .</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>About The Timmins, Smith & Stewart Families</p></p><p><p>THE TIMMINS FAMILY</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>The following has been sourced from numerous family articles, family trees and </p><p><p>books. I will attempt to acknowledge all sources and/or authors if known.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>JAMES TIMMINS and ANN BALDWIN:</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>James was born about 1757, possibly in Glen Aven (or Glengavlen) County Cavan, </p><p><p>Ireland (as was declared by James himself in the NSWmuster of 1811). There is </p><p><p>no proof, only speculation, but it is likely that James was sentenced to life </p><p><p>because of his involvement in the 1798 Irish Rebellion. He is said to have </p><p><p>been tried in Kulmainham, today a suburb of Dublin, in July 1798. </p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>James was transported to Port Jackson on the ship "Friendship 2" , which </p></p><p><p>tends to confirm that he may have been a political prisoner. In Charles </p></p><p><p>Bateson's book "The Convict Ships 1787-1868" (AH &AW Reed 1974) Bateson writes;</p><p><p>"Most of the prisoners on boardthe ships "Minerva" and "Friendship 2" were </p><p><p>involved in the 1798 rebellion in Ireland. The ships sailed from Cork on </p></p><p><p>24/8/1799. The "Friendship" was not a good ship and sailedpoorly. It could </p><p><p>not keep up with the "Minerva", which arrived in Sydney five weeks ahead of </p><p><p>the "Friendship 2". During the voyage 19 prisoners had been buried, a </p></p><p><p>mortality rate of one death to every seven men embarked. As there were no </p></p><p><p>complaints of harsh treatment and the survivors were in good health, the high </p><p><p>death rate was probably due to the state in which the convicts had been at the </p><p><p>time of their departure and the fact that several were aged."</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>The "Friendship 2" arrived in Sydney on 16/2/1800.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Peter Taylor's book "Australia - The First Twelve Years" also mentions both </p><p><p>the "Minerva" and the "Friendship", the author says that they brought a number </p><p><p>of Irish rebels of good standing who had been sentenced to death by court-</p></p><p><p>martial for political offences;</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>"They had agreed to leave Ireland as a condition of their reprieve and had </p><p><p>been taken on board as convicts without any legal warrant. Among those brought </p><p><p>by the "Friendship 2" was a doctor who had been a sheriff of his county, a </p><p><p>couple of priests and several professional gentlemen".</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Fred Embrey, a descendant of James and Ann - from the Ann Timmins/William </p></p><p><p>Cross line -wrote:</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>"I understand that the political prisoners were technically free men and were </p><p><p>regarded as exiles rather than convicts. It is significant that James </p></p><p><p>purchased his land as early as 1805, although he did not receive a ticket of </p><p><p>leave until 1810. He must have been free long before this date because he was </p><p><p>working his property. He also had enough money to buy that property. Although </p><p><p>convicts were allowed to earn money in their free time, it is unlikely that </p><p><p>James could have earned sufficient money, by part-time work, between 1800 and </p><p><p>1805"</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>There have been other unproven assumptions regarding James life pre-1798. Was </p><p><p>he a Catholic Priest? This assumption rests on his age (42 when he left Cork), </p><p><p>that he was unmarried and that priests were involved in the rebellion - and </p><p><p>that there were exiled priests onboard the "Friendship 2". The other </p></p><p><p>possibility, but less romantic and caddish, is that James may have left a wife </p><p><p>and children behind in Ireland.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>The first 5 years of Jame's life inAustralia is not known, but in 1805 he </p><p><p>purchased 42 ½ acres at Yarramundi Lagoon, a part of James Matthews farm. In </p><p><p>the 1806 muster James is mentioned as a landholder, Matthews Farm, Yarramundi.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann Baldwin was born C1788 in England, possibly in the Holborn area of London. </p><p><p>Her father was John Baldwin and her mother was Hannah Wire (or Hire). She had </p><p><p>at least two siblings, her younger sister Mary and a third unnamed infant </p></p><p><p>child (see transcript of Ann's Court hearing).</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann (17) and Mary Baldwin were charged at the 8th. Session (September) 1805, </p><p><p>at the Old Bailey London. The full text of Ann's trial is reproduced elsewhere </p><p><p>in this tree, but the following extract is indicative of the "seriousness" of </p><p><p>Ann's offence(s):</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>"Ann Baldwin and Mary Baldwin were indicted, the first for feloniously </p></p><p><p>stealing, on the 8 September, a shift value 3 shillings, a petticoat value 3s, </p><p><p>a habit skirt 4s, a pair of shoes value 2s.6d, a pair of stocking value 3s, a </p><p><p>comb value 3s, a handkerchief 6d and a piece of cloth value 1 shilling; the </p><p><p>property of John Turner, and the latter (presumably Mary, not J. Turner) for </p><p><p>feloniously receiving the same knowing them to be stolen".</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>The trial also raised the possibility of indicting their mother Mary as "the </p><p><p>child appears to be only an instrument in the hands of the mother? the reason </p><p><p>the not being indicted was, she had got a dying infant in her lap; she has run </p><p><p>away since".</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>"On the above offences Ann Baldwin was found GUILTY and transported for seven </p><p><p>years. Mary Baldwin was found NOT GUILTY.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann was again indicted (at the same hearing) for stealing, on the 23rd August, </p><p><p>a pair of silk gloves, value 1s. 6d, a handkerchief value 1s, the property of </p><p><p>Charles Walls. No evidence being adduced against the prisoner on this </p></p><p><p>indictment, she was from this ACQUITTED."</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann when interviewed when well into her 90's said that she "saw Lord Nelsons </p><p><p>funeral". However, it is more likely she "remembered his funeral" as she was </p><p><p>sentenced in September 1805 and Nelson died October 1805 (in Spain). Ann was </p><p><p>transported on the "Sydney Cove" which left Falmouth, England, on 11/1/1807 </p><p><p>and arrived in Sydney on 18/6/1807. I can find no explanation for the 2 years, </p><p><p>between 1805 and 1807, but I assume Ann was simply held in custody pending </p><p><p>transportation.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>It must have been a whirlwind courtship - James and Ann were married on the </p><p><p>6/9/1807. It is reported that they were married at St. Phillips Church, </p></p><p><p>Sydney. </p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Over the next 23 years James and Ann had 13 children.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Their 6th child, John Timmins, born 1817, was destined to become a legend </p></p><p><p>because of his epic droving trips and other exploits withcattle, taking them </p><p><p>from the north-west slopes and plains of NSW to Sydney. He was the first man </p><p><p>to have done so. He also begat my great, great, grandmother. There are </p></p><p><p>numerous articles regarding John's (also called Jack) exploits with the </p></p><p><p>breeding and training of working cattle dogs. He had a bred cross breed dog </p><p><p>called the "Timmins Biters" - but that another story! Google "Timmins dog's </p><p><p>biters" for any number of articles.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>In the Scots Church at Windsor, on 12 September 1848, the Presbyterian </p></p><p><p>minister Matthew Adam married John Timmins and Elizabeth Scott. Elizabeth was </p><p><p>the second of four children of William Scott and Elizabeth Pitt, nee' Laycock. </p><p><p>It is presumedthat the marriage, in the Presbyterian Church, wasn't well </p></p><p><p>received by devout the Irish catholic James and Ann Timmins.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>John and Elizabeth Timmins had 9 children. The fourth child Emily Ann Timmins </p><p><p>gave birth to a son, registered as Hubert Timmins on 8 September 1874, at </p></p><p><p>Gunyerwarsaldi, near Warialda NSW. This male child, born out of wedlock, later </p><p><p>called Herbert, then Peter, married Emily Waters in St. Matthew's Church of </p><p><p>England, at Narrabri NSW in 1894.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>A son of that marriage, (another) Herbert, married Margery (later always called Marjorie) </p><p><p>Stewart. Herbert and Marjorie Timmins are my grandparents.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Please feel free to contact me direct onselectedfinance@optusnet.com.au </p></p><p><p>should you wish to amend, contribute to, or comment on the above - or any </p></p><p><p>other person or family on this site. Peter Smith 25 Badgery Ave Homebush 2140 </p><p><p>02 9764 1082.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>About The Timmins, Smith & Stewart Families</p></p><p><p>THE TIMMINS FAMILY</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>The following has been sourced from numerous family articles, family trees and </p><p><p>books. I will attempt to acknowledge all sources and/or authors if known.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>JAMES TIMMINS and ANN BALDWIN:</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>James was born about 1757, possibly in Glen Aven (or Glengavlen) County Cavan, </p><p><p>Ireland (as was declared by James himself in the NSW muster of 1811). There is </p><p><p>no proof, only speculation, but it is likely that James was sentenced to life </p><p><p>because of his involvement in the 1798 Irish Rebellion. He is said to have </p><p><p>been tried in Kulmainham, today a suburb of Dublin, in July 1798. </p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>James was transported to Port Jackson on the ship "Friendship 2" , which </p></p><p><p>tends to confirm that he may havebeen a political prisoner. In Charles </p></p><p><p>Bateson's book "The Convict Ships 1787-1868" (AH &AW Reed 1974) Bateson writes;</p><p><p>"Most of the prisoners on board the ships "Minerva" and "Friendship 2" were </p><p><p>involved in the 1798 rebellion in Ireland. The ships sailed from Cork on </p></p><p><p>24/8/1799. The "Friendship" was not a good ship and sailed poorly. It could </p><p><p>not keep up with the "Minerva", which arrived in Sydney five weeks ahead of </p><p><p>the "Friendship 2". During the voyage 19 prisoners had been buried, a </p></p><p><p>mortality rate of one death to every seven men embarked. As there were no </p></p><p><p>complaints of harsh treatment and the survivors were in good health, the high </p><p><p>death rate was probably due to the state in which theconvicts had been at the </p><p><p>time of their departure and the fact that several were aged."</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>The "Friendship 2" arrived in Sydney on 16/2/1800.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Peter Taylor's book "Australia - The First Twelve Years" also mentions both </p><p><p>the "Minerva" and the "Friendship", the author says that they brought a number </p><p><p>of Irish rebels of good standing who had been sentenced to death by court-</p></p><p><p>martial for political offences;</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>"They had agreed to leave Ireland as a condition of their reprieve and had</p><p><p>been taken on board as convicts without any legal warrant. Among those brought </p><p><p>by the "Friendship 2" was a doctor who had been a sheriff of his county, a </p><p><p>couple of priests and several professional gentlemen".</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Fred Embrey, a descendant of James and Ann - from the Ann Timmins/William </p></p><p><p>Cross line -wrote:</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>"I understand that the political prisoners were technically free men and were </p><p><p>regarded as exiles rather than convicts. It is significant that James </p></p><p><p>purchased his land as earlyas 1805, although he did not receive a ticket of </p><p><p>leave until 1810. He must have been free long before this date because he was </p><p><p>working his property. He also had enough money to buy that property. Although </p><p><p>convicts were allowed to earn money in their free time, it is unlikely that </p><p><p>James could have earned sufficient money, by part-time work, between 1800 and </p><p><p>1805"</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>There have been other unproven assumptions regarding James life pre-1798. Was </p><p><p>he a Catholic Priest? This assumption rests on his age (42 when he left Cork), </p><p><p>that he was unmarried and that priests were involved in the rebellion - and </p><p><p>that there were exiled priests onboard the "Friendship 2". The other </p></p><p><p>possibility, but less romantic and caddish, is that James may have left a wife </p><p><p>and children behind in Ireland.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>The first 5 years of Jame's life in Australia is not known, but in 1805 he </p><p><p>purchased 42 ½ acres at Yarramundi Lagoon, a part of James Matthews farm. In </p><p><p>the 1806 muster James is mentioned as a landholder, Matthews Farm, Yarramundi.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann Baldwin was born C1788 in England, possibly in the Holborn area of London. </p><p><p>Her father was John Baldwin and her mother was Hannah Wire (or Hire). She had </p><p><p>at least two siblings, her younger sister Mary and a third unnamed infant </p></p><p><p>child (see transcript of Ann's Court hearing).</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann (17) and Mary Baldwin were charged at the 8th. Session (September) 1805, </p><p><p>at the Old Bailey London. The full text of Ann's trial is reproduced elsewhere </p><p><p>in this tree, but the following extract is indicative of the "seriousness" of </p><p><p>Ann's offence(s):</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>"Ann Baldwin and Mary Baldwin were indicted, the first for feloniously </p></p><p><p>stealing, on the 8 September, a shift value 3 shillings, a petticoat value 3s, </p><p><p>a habit skirt 4s, a pair of shoes value 2s.6d, a pair of stocking value 3s, a </p><p><p>comb value 3s, a handkerchief 6d and a piece of cloth value 1 shilling; the </p><p><p>property of John Turner, and the latter (presumably Mary, not J. Turner) for </p><p><p>feloniously receiving the same knowing them to be stolen".</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>The trial also raised the possibility of indicting their mother Mary as "the </p><p><p>child appears to be only an instrument in the hands of the mother? the reason </p><p><p>the not being indicted was, she had got a dying infant in her lap; she has run </p><p><p>away since".</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>"On the above offences Ann Baldwin was found GUILTY and transported for seven </p><p><p>years. Mary Baldwin was found NOT GUILTY.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann was again indicted (at the same hearing) for stealing, on the 23rd August, </p><p><p>a pair of silk gloves, value 1s. 6d, a handkerchief value 1s, the property of </p><p><p>Charles Walls. No evidence being adduced against the prisoner on this </p></p><p><p>indictment, she was from this ACQUITTED."</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann when interviewed when well into her 90's said that she "saw Lord Nelsons </p><p><p>funeral". However, it is more likely she "remembered his funeral" as she was </p><p><p>sentenced in September 1805 and Nelson died October 1805 (in Spain). Ann was </p><p><p>transported on the "Sydney Cove" which left Falmouth, England, on 11/1/1807 </p><p><p>and arrived in Sydney on 18/6/1807. I can find no explanation for the 2 years, </p><p><p>between 1805 and 1807, but I assume Ann was simply held in custody pending </p><p><p>transportation.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>It must have been a whirlwind courtship - James and Ann were married on the </p><p><p>6/9/1807. It is reported that they were married at St. Phillips Church, </p></p><p><p>Sydney. </p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Over the next 23 years James and Ann had 13 children.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Their 6th child, John Timmins, born 1817, was destined to become a legend </p></p><p><p>because of his epic droving trips and other exploits with cattle, taking them </p><p><p>from the north-west slopes and plains of NSW to Sydney. He was the first man </p><p><p>to have done so. He also begat my great, great, grandmother. There are </p></p><p><p>numerous articles regarding John's (also called Jack) exploits with the </p></p><p><p>breeding and training of working cattle dogs. He had a bred cross breed dog </p><p><p>called the "Timmins Biters" - but that another story! Google "Timmins dog's </p><p><p>biters" for any number of articles.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>In the Scots Church at Windsor, on 12 September 1848, the Presbyterian </p></p><p><p>minister Matthew Adam married John Timmins and Elizabeth Scott. Elizabeth was </p><p><p>the second of four children of William Scott and Elizabeth Pitt, nee' Laycock. </p><p><p>It is presumed that the marriage, in the Presbyterian Church, wasn't well </p></p><p><p>received by devout the Irish catholic James and Ann Timmins.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>John and Elizabeth Timmins had 9 children. The fourth child EmilyAnn Timmins </p><p><p>gave birth to a son, registered as Hubert Timmins on 8 September 1874, at </p></p><p><p>Gunyerwarsaldi, near Warialda NSW. This male child, born out of wedlock, later </p><p><p>called Herbert, then Peter, married Emily Waters in St. Matthew's Church of </p><p><p>England, at Narrabri NSW in 1894.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>A son of that marriage, (another) Herbert, married Margery (later always called Marjorie) </p><p><p>Stewart. Herbert and Marjorie Timmins are my grandparents.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Please feel free to contact me direct on selectedfinance@optusnet.com.au </p></p><p><p>should you wish to amend, contribute to, or comment on the above - or any </p></p><p><p>other person or family on this site. Peter Smith 25 Badgery Ave Homebush 2140 </p><p><p>02 9764 1082.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>List of Last Names</p></p><p><p>- A -</p></p><p><p>Adams</p></p><p><p>Alexander</p></p><p><p>Allen</p></p><p><p>Anderson (11)</p></p><p><p>Archbold</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- B -</p></p><p><p>Baker</p></p><p><p>Baldwin</p></p><p><p>Bates</p></p><p><p>Bell</p></p><p><p>Benjamin</p></p><p><p>Bernfield</p></p><p><p>Berwick</p></p><p><p>Bissett</p></p><p><p>Brayshaw (11)</p></p><p><p>Breneger</p></p><p><p>Brown</p></p><p><p>Brummell</p></p><p><p>Burnard</p></p><p><p>Burrell</p></p><p><p>Burrow</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- C -</p></p><p><p>Cafe</p></p><p><p>Callahan</p></p><p><p>Cameron</p></p><p><p>Campbell</p></p><p><p>Carr</p></p><p><p>Carter</p></p><p><p>Chamberlain</p></p><p><p>Charlesworth (11)</p></p><p><p>Chase</p></p><p><p>Chilton</p></p><p><p>Clark</p></p><p><p>Clarke (14)</p></p><p><p>Cluff</p></p><p><p>Cochran</p></p><p><p>Cook</p></p><p><p>Cooper</p></p><p><p>Core</p></p><p><p>Cross (13)</p></p><p><p>Cunningham</p></p><p><p>Cutler</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- D -</p></p><p><p>Dean</p></p><p><p>Dilley</p></p><p><p>Downes</p></p><p><p>Duff</p></p><p><p>Duncan</p></p><p><p>Dunne</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- E -</p></p><p><p>Earl</p></p><p><p>Edmonds</p></p><p><p>Elliott</p></p><p><p>English</p></p><p><p>Everingham</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- F -</p></p><p><p>Faber</p></p><p><p>Fielding</p></p><p><p>Flannery</p></p><p><p>Franklin</p></p><p><p>Frederiksen</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- G -</p></p><p><p>Gill</p></p><p><p>Greenaway</p></p><p><p>Greer</p></p><p><p>Griffith</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- H -</p></p><p><p>Hefferan</p></p><p><p>Hire</p></p><p><p>Hooker</p></p><p><p>Howell, nee Crowley</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- I -</p></p><p><p>Ingham</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- J -</p></p><p><p>Johnston</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- K -</p></p><p><p>Kane</p></p><p><p>Kealey</p></p><p><p>Killen</p></p><p><p>Kliendienst</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- L -</p></p><p><p>Langley</p></p><p><p>Lawler (14)</p></p><p><p>Laycock</p></p><p><p>Linton</p></p><p><p>Lloyd</p></p><p><p>Louis</p></p><p><p>Lovell</p></p><p><p>Lovell (?)</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- M -</p></p><p><p>Mann</p></p><p><p>Matthews</p></p><p><p>Maurer</p></p><p><p>McDonald</p></p><p><p>McEwen</p></p><p><p>McGuire</p></p><p><p>McHenry</p></p><p><p>McLean</p></p><p><p>McMahon</p></p><p><p>McManus</p></p><p><p>McVittie</p></p><p><p>Melville</p></p><p><p>Mitchell</p></p><p><p>Moore (21)</p></p><p><p>Moore (?)</p></p><p><p>Morrall</p></p><p><p>Morris</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- N -</p></p><p><p>N</p></p><p><p>Nicholl</p></p><p><p>Not known</p></p><p><p>Novak</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- O -</p></p><p><p>O'Neil</p></p><p><p>O'Shannessy</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- P -</p></p><p><p>Page</p></p><p><p>Paull</p></p><p><p>Payne</p></p><p><p>Pitt</p></p><p><p>Purtle</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- R -</p></p><p><p>Rabbitt</p></p><p><p>Readford</p></p><p><p>Really</p></p><p><p>Resker</p></p><p><p>Roberts</p></p><p><p>Robertson</p></p><p><p>Roche</p></p><p><p>Rolls</p></p><p><p>Ryan</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- S -</p></p><p><p>Scott</p></p><p><p>Sexton</p></p><p><p>Shand</p></p><p><p>Shattock</p></p><p><p>Shearer</p></p><p><p>Simpson</p></p><p><p>Sinclair</p></p><p><p>Smith (47)</p></p><p><p>Smith (?)</p></p><p><p>Sorenson</p></p><p><p>Steelcable</p></p><p><p>Steele</p></p><p><p>Stewart (27)</p></p><p><p>Stroud</p></p><p><p>Sutton</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- T -</p></p><p><p>Tailby</p></p><p><p>Tattam</p></p><p><p>Taylor</p></p><p><p>TBA</p></p><p><p>Thompson (13)</p></p><p><p>Thomsett</p></p><p><p>Thornberry</p></p><p><p>Timmins (91)</p></p><p><p>Trevor</p></p><p><p>Turville</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- U -</p></p><p><p>Unknown Surname</p></p><p><p> </p></p><p><p>- W -</p></p><p><p>Walker</p></p><p><p>Waters (13)</p></p><p><p>Watson</p></p><p><p>Webech</p></p><p><p>West</p></p><p><p>Williams</p></p><p><p>Witts</p></p><p><p>Wood</p></p><p><p>Woodward</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Getting Around</p></p><p><p>There are several ways to browse the family tree. The Tree View graphically shows the relationship of selected person to their kin. The Family View shows the person you have selected in the center, with his/her photo on the left and notes on the right. Above are the father and mother and below are the children. The Ancestor Chart shows the person you have selected in the left, with the photograph above and children below. On the right are the parents, grandparents and great-grandparents. The Descendant Chart shows the person you have selected in the left, with the photograph and parents below. On the right are the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.</p><p><p>Do you know who your second cousins are? Try the Kinship Relationships Tool. Your site can generate various Reports for each name in your family tree. You can select a name from the list on the top-right menu bar.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>In addition to the charts and reports you have Photo Albums, the Events list and the Relationships tool. Family photographs are organized in the Photo Index. Each Album's photographs are accompanied by a caption. To enlarge a photograph just click on it. Keep up with the family birthdays and anniversaries inthe Events list. Birthdays and Anniversaries of living persons are listed by month. Want to know how you are related to anybody ? Check out the Relationships tool.</p><p></p>

view all 20

James (Timmins) Timms, Convict "Friendship" 1800's Timeline

1757
August 18, 1757
Glen Avon, Cavan, Ireland
1800
February 16, 1800
Age 42
On "Friendship 2"
1808
1808
Yarrmundi, NSW, Australia
1810
1810
Yarrumundu, New South Wales, Australia
1810
Age 52
1811
1811
Sydney, NSW, Australia
1813
1813
Yarramundi, NSW, Australia
1814
1814
"Yarramundi", Windsor, New South Wales, Australia
1816
1816
"Yarramundi", Windsor, New South Wales, Australia