Jean Mesnard, SV/PROG

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Jean Mesnard, SV/PROG

Also Known As: "Minnaar Minaar Meinard Mesnard", "Jean Mesnard", "Minnaar"
Birthplace: St Martin de la Brasque, Provence, France
Death: Died in South Africa
Immediate Family:

Son of Georges Mesnard and Madeleine Gauthier
Husband of Louise Courbonne, SM/PROG
Father of Jeanne Minnaar, b1; George Minnaar, b2; Jacques Minnaar, b3; Jean Minnaar, b4; Philippe Mesnard, b5 and 1 other
Half brother of Andre Meinard and Phillipe Meinard

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Jean Mesnard, SV/PROG


Jean MINNAAR (MESNARD), gebore omstreeks 1659, van Saint-Martin de la Brasque, Provence. Hy het eers in Den Haag gaan woon. Hy was 'n Franse Hugenoot wat in 1688 met die Berg China aangekom het met sy vrou Louise CORBONNE en 6 kinders, en hom te Paarl gevestig. Jean sterwe voor 19 Mei 1692. Vyf kinders sterf egter jonk. Die moeder sterwe binne twee jare nadat hulle by die Kaap aangekom het. Slegs Phillipe het getrou en kinders nagelaat:

Translation to English

Jean MINNAAR (Mesnard), born about 1659, Saint Martin de la Brasque, Provence. He first went to live in The Hague. He was a French Huguenot who arrived in 1688 with the Mountain China with his wife Louise CORBONNE and six children, and established him Paarl. Jean, however, died before 19 May 1692. Five children died young. The mother die within two years after they arrived at the Cape. Only Phillipe married & left children to follow him. children

1. Jeanne * 1678

2. George * 1679

3. Jacques * 1680

4. Jean * 1681

5. Phillipe * 1682 Provence x 7 Mei 1712 met Jeanne Mouy d/v Pierre Mouy en weduwee van Jean le Roux. Vestig te Wagenmakersvallei. Translation ...............................1712 married Jeannne Mouy daughter of Pierre Mouy and widow of Jean le Roux, established at Wagonmakersvalley, now Tulbugh..

6. Andre * 1687

Nadat beide ouers oorlede is het net die 10 jarige Philippe nog voortgeleef.


De Villiers/Pama


Verwysingsmateriaal, Boksburg biblioteek

Verwysingsmateriaal, Springs LDS FHC biblioteek

Saamgestel deur:

Martina Louw (nee van Breda)

Ek twyfel of die inligting van Dood in Kongo reg is.

Peter Louwrens

Verlaat Frankryk in 1686 en gaan woon in Den Haag. Arriveer in1688 op die Berg China met sy vrou en ses kinders Left France in 1686 and lived in The Hague. Arrived in1688 on the 'Mountain of China' 'with his wife and six children

SV/PROG­ MINNAAR Jean v. Provence, Franse vlugteling; * omstr. 1659.Kom 1688 met "Berg China" met vrou Louise Corbonne en ses kinders; In 1690 was by 'n wewenaar met 4 kinders. Philippe was die enigste wat getroud is en kinders nagelaat het. [Judi Meyer]

Mesnards in Booyens' 'China'

In 1685: The head of the family is Jean Meinard who is married to Louise Courbon. Louise will state her maiden name to be Courbonne – the feminine form. Louise is 28 at this time and Jean 26. They already have five children:

  • i. Jeanne *1678
  • ii. George *1679
  • iii. Jacques *1680
  • iv. Jean *1681
  • v. Phillipe *1682

Louise's mother? , Marie Anthouarde lives with them or nearby. (The CNRS database consistently has Marie Anthouarde together with Louise Courbonne and Jean Meinard, but the Frankfurt church entry shows Marie as being “the mother of Jeanne Courbonne”. We take this to be a data entry error and that it refers to Louise Courbonne as there is no associated Jeanne Courbonne in the database. C. Graham Botha, in The French Refugees at the Cape translates “haer schoonmoeder” in the 23 December 1687 VOIC document as “her mother-in-law”, assuming it to refer to Louise Courbonne, but that Dutch phrase is ambiguous. Boucher, in his two publications on the matter, first presents her as the mother of Louise and then as the mother of Jean. The author prefers to follow the Frankfurt church and take her to be Louise's mother)...

We have no evidence that Louise Courbonne is a sister of Louis Courbon (on the ship list) as speculated by Boucher (M. Boucher, French Speakers at the Cape (1981); pp. 191)

Jean Meinard, wife Louise Courbonne, 6 children from St. Martin de la Brasque in Church records:

Jean Mesnart (28) with Louise Corbonne, his wife (30), and six children, namely Jeanne (10), George (9), Jacques (8), Jean (7), Philippe (6) and the 5m. old baby André in VOC proposed passenger list for China at Rotterdam Dec 1687. In Batavia Fund records 1690: only Jean & 4 children

Marie Anthouarde, step-mother of Louise C. in Church records: Genève 12.09.1687 Schaffhausen 30.09.1687 Frankfurt 31.10.1687 In VOC proposed passenger list for China at Rotterdam Dec 1687: Marie Anthonarde, Jean Mesnart's mother-in-law Not in Batavia Fund records 1690.

It seems hugely unlikely that Jean Meinard would board the China with all his (living) children if his wife were not with him. We therefore conclude that Jean Meinard, his wife Louise Courbonne and at least 4 of their children board, being the 4 referred to in the Batavian fund disbursement in Table 4. We thus conclude that Louise Courbonne perishes on the ship...

As to the refugees themselves, the hardest hit family is that of Jean Meinard. By the end of 1692 Jean himself will be no more. Not long afterwards Philippe will be the only survivor of the original family of 9 Meinards who set out from Saint Martin de la Brasque in August 1687. From him will descend the entire Minnaar family of South Africa

Meinard Family in Boucher

The largest party to register for a passage on the Berg China was that of the Meinard (Mesnard) family: Jean Meinard, his wife Louise Courbonne, her mother-in-law Marie Anthouarde, a widow of sixty-four, and six small children, Jeanne, ten, Georges, nine, Jacques, eight, Jean, seven, Philippe, six, and a baby Andre, aged five months. The sailing list of 1687 gives Jean’s age as twenty-eight and that of his wife as thirty. If the husband’s age is correctly stated he married at an unusually young age. Of this considerable family group all but Jean Meinard the father and two of his children, one of them Philippe, had died by 1690.

Although neither the marriage of Jean Meinard to Louise Courbonne, nor the baptism of any of their children has been discovered, there is a strong lead in the records of Provence for the years 1677 and 1683 to the place of origin of the father. He probably came from Saint-Martin-de- la-Brasque, where Georges Meinard and his wife Jeanne Asscotte had sons Jean, Andre and Philippe. Jean did not share in a division of property made between the father and the other two sons, both married, in April 1677.180 Was he perhaps the Cape settler? The family Christian names mentioned here strongly support this view. There were Meinards at Merindol who were clearly related to those at Saint-Martin. An Andre Meinard of Merindol, with wife and children, received assistance at Leyden in January 1688 and a Pierre Meinard from the same place settled in Magdeburg after the revocation, working there as a wool-comber. There is every indication that the Cape Meinards went to Merindol at or before the revocation. A Jean Meinard of that place, with five children, four of them boys, was described as a fugitive by the viguier, or magistrate, Joachim Jury, in 1687. Also mentioned by Jury were Pierre Rouman(ne) and his wife Marie Roux (Rousse), together with other members of the Roux family. It is known that Andre Meinard, Jean’s brother at Saint-Martin, was married to Honorade Roumanne of Peypin-d’Aigues.

The Meinards had abjured the Calvinist faith after the revocation, but like so many others who were forced to do so, made their escape from France. The route they took cannot be determined with certainty, but they may have followed the example of Pierre Rouman and his wife, who left from Marseilles. Did Louise Courbonne travel independently? Her name is not mentioned with her husband’s among the refugees of 1687 and the fact that she had a small child suggests that she may have delayed her departure until after his birth, or had perhaps left for the United Provinces at an earlier date. Where the family lived in the decade before the revocation remains an unsolved problem. It may have been in one of the more remote villages of Provence. Between 1675 and 1677 members of the Meinard, Roux and Malian families of Merindol were living in the hamlet of Vins, far to the south-east in the administrative region of Brignoles. Orange too, before the expulsion of strangers in 1685, is a not unlikely place of residence.

It is possible that Louis Courbon and Louise Courbonne were brother and sister. Jean Meinard’s wife would therefore be from the neighbourhood of Cabrieres-d’Aigues. A Louise Courbonne from nearby La Motte-d’Aigues was godmother at Manosque in June 1684 to Marie, daughter of Daniel Roux and Madeleine Jourdanne. Further family connections are indicated in the marriage at Manosque in 1671 of Frangois Ro(u)man of Saint-Martin-de-la-Brasque and Marie Courbonne of the same village.187 East of Manosque at Roumoules lived a mason Pierre Courbon.188 The name Marie Anthouarde is also to be found at Cabrieres. The widow of Jacques Pillat in 1674, her daughter Madeleine was married to a Pierre Jourdan and another daughter Susanne was the wife of a Jean Jourdan.189 It is also clear that the Anthouarde and Grange families of Cabrieres-d'Aigues were united.

• M. Boucher.M (1981). French speakers at the Cape: The European Background. Pretoria, UNISA: Ch 7: Cape Settlers III: from South-Eastern France and Adjoining Territories p191

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Jean Mesnard, SV/PROG's Timeline

St Martin de la Brasque, Provence, France
Age 19
France, Provence
Age 20
Provence, France
Age 21
Provence, France
Age 22
France, Provence
Age 23
Rhône, Rhône-Alpes, France
Age 28
Provence, France
May 19, 1692
Age 33
South Africa