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Jeremy John Irons

Hebrew: ג'רמי ג'ון איירונס
Current Location:: Skibbereen, Cork, Cork, Ireland
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Cowes, Isle of Wight, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Son of Paul Dugan Irons and Barbara Anne Sharpe Irons
Husband of Sinéad Cusack
Ex-husband of Private
Father of Private and Max Irons
Brother of Private and Private

Occupation: Actor
Managed by: Jason Scott Wills
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Jeremy Irons

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremy_Irons

Jeremy John Irons is an acclaimed English actor. More here: http://bit.ly/wTki7e.


Jeremy Irons From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jeremy Irons SDCC 2015 - Jeremy Irons (19524260758) (cropped).jpg Irons at the 2015 San Diego Comic-Con International promoting Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Born Jeremy John Irons 19 September 1948 (age 68) Cowes, Isle of Wight, England Alma mater Bristol Old Vic Theatre School Occupation Actor Years active 1969–present Spouse(s) Julie Hallam (m. 1969; div. 1969) Sinéad Cusack (m. 1978) Children 2, including Max Irons Jeremy John Irons (born 19 September 1948)[1] is an English actor. After receiving classical training at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, Irons began his acting career on stage in 1969 and has since appeared in many West End theatre productions, including The Winter's Tale, Macbeth, Much Ado About Nothing, The Taming of the Shrew, Godspell, Richard II, and Embers. In 1984, he made his Broadway debut in Tom Stoppard's The Real Thing and received a Tony Award for Best Actor.

Irons' first major film role came in the 1981 romantic drama The French Lieutenant's Woman, for which he received a BAFTA nomination for Best Actor. After starring in dramas such as Moonlighting (1982), Betrayal (1983), and The Mission (1986), he gained critical acclaim for portraying twin gynaecologists in David Cronenberg's psychological thriller Dead Ringers (1988). In 1990, Irons played accused murderer Claus von Bülow in Reversal of Fortune, and took home multiple awards, including an Academy Award for Best Actor.

Other notable films have included Steven Soderbergh's mystery thriller Kafka (1991), the period drama The House of the Spirits (1993), the romantic drama M. Butterfly (1993), the voice of Scar in Disney's The Lion King (1994), Simon Gruber in the action film Die Hard with a Vengeance (1995), the drama Lolita (1997), Musketeer Aramis in The Man in the Iron Mask (1998), the action adventure Dungeons & Dragons (2000), the drama The Merchant of Venice (2004), the drama Being Julia (2004), the epic historical drama Kingdom of Heaven (2005), the fantasy-adventure Eragon (2006), the Western Appaloosa (2008), and the indie drama Margin Call (2011). In 2016, he appeared in Assassin's Creed and, starting that year, he plays Alfred Pennyworth in the DC Extended Universe, beginning with Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, and later reprising the role in Justice League (2017) and The Batman (TBA).

Irons has also made several notable appearances on TV. He earned his first Golden Globe Award nomination for his break-out role in the ITV series Brideshead Revisited (1981). In 2005, Irons starred opposite Helen Mirren in the historical miniseries Elizabeth I, for which he received a Golden Globe Award and an Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actor. From 2011 to 2013 he starred as Pope Alexander VI in the Showtime historical series The Borgias. He is one of the few actors who won the "Triple Crown of Acting", winning an Academy Award (for film), an Emmy Award (television) and a Tony Award (for theatre). In October 2011, he was nominated Goodwill Ambassador of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Contents [hide] 1 Early life 2 Acting career 2.1 Early work 2.2 Television 2.3 Film 2.4 Theatre 3 Other ventures 3.1 Audio 3.2 Music 4 Activism 4.1 Charity work 4.2 Political views 4.3 Alternative medicine 4.4 Other 5 Personal life 6 Controversy 7 Filmography and awards 8 References 9 External links Early life[edit] Irons was born in Cowes on the Isle of Wight, the son of Paul Dugan Irons (1913–1983), an accountant, and Barbara Anne Brereton Brymer (née Sharpe; 1914–1999).[1] His paternal great-great-grandfather was a Metropolitan Policeman who was sacked for drunkenness, and later a Chartist. He has a small amount of Irish ancestry, tracing back to County Cork. Irons has a brother, Christopher (born 1943), and a sister, Felicity Anne (born 1944). He was educated at the independent Sherborne School in Dorset from 1962 to 1966. He was the drummer and harmonica player in a four-man school band called the Four Pillars of Wisdom.[2]

Acting career Early work Irons trained as an actor at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School and later became president of its fundraising appeal. He performed a number of plays, and busked on the streets of Bristol, before appearing on the London stage as John the Baptist and Judas opposite David Essex in Godspell, which opened at the Roundhouse on 17 November 1971 before transferring to Wyndham's Theatre playing a total of 1,128 performances.[3]

Television[edit]

Irons in July 2006 He made several appearances on British television, including the children's television series Play Away and as Franz Liszt in the BBC 1974 series Notorious Woman. More significantly he starred in the 13-part adaptation of H.E. Bates' novel Love for Lydia for London Weekend Television (1977), and attracted attention for his key role as the pipe-smoking German student, a romantic pairing with Judi Dench in Harold Pinter's screenplay adaptation of Aidan Higgins' novel Langrishe, Go Down for BBC television (1978).

The role which brought him fame was that of Charles Ryder in the television adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited (1981). First broadcast on ITV, the show ranks among the greatest British television dramas, with Irons receiving a Golden Globe nomination for his performance.[4] Brideshead reunited him with Anthony Andrews, with whom he had appeared in The Pallisers seven years earlier. In the same year he starred in the film The French Lieutenant's Woman opposite Meryl Streep.

After these major successes, in 1982 he played the leading role of an exiled Polish building contractor, working in the Twickenham area of South West London, in Jerzy Skolimowski's independent film Moonlighting, widely seen on television, a performance which extended his acting range. On 23 March 1991, Irons hosted Saturday Night Live on NBC in the US, and appeared as Sherlock Holmes in the Sherlock Holmes' Surprise Party sketch.[5]

In 2005, Irons won both an Emmy award and a Golden Globe award for his supporting role in the TV mini-series, Elizabeth I. A year later Irons was one of the participants in the third series of the BBC documentary series Who Do You Think You Are?.[6][7] In 2008, he played Lord Vetinari in Terry Pratchett's The Colour of Magic, an adaptation for Sky One.

On 6 November 2008, TV Guide reported he would star as photographer Alfred Stieglitz with Joan Allen as painter Georgia O'Keeffe, in a Lifetime Television biopic, Georgia O'Keeffe (2009).[8] Irons also appeared in the documentary for Irish television channel TG4, Faoi Lan Cheoil in which he learned to play the fiddle.

On 12 January 2011, Irons was a guest-star in an episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit called "Mask". He played Dr. Cap Jackson, a sex therapist.[9] He reprised the role on an episode titled "Totem" that ran on 30 March 2011.

Irons stars in the 2011 US premium cable network Showtime's series The Borgias, a highly fictionalised account of the Renaissance dynasty of that name.[10]

Film[edit]

Irons at the 2011 Berlin Film Festival Irons made his film debut in Nijinsky in 1980. He appeared sporadically in films during the 1980s, including the Cannes Palme d'Or winner The Mission in 1986, and in the dual role of twin gynaecologists in David Cronenberg's Dead Ringers in 1988. Other films include Danny the Champion of the World (1989), Reversal of Fortune (1990), for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor, Kafka (1991), Damage (1993), M. Butterfly (1993), The House of the Spirits (1993) appearing again with Glenn Close and Meryl Streep, the voice of Scar in The Lion King (1994), portraying Simon Gruber in Die Hard with a Vengeance (1995), co-starring Bruce Willis and Samuel L. Jackson, Bernardo Bertolucci's Stealing Beauty (1996), the 1997 remake of Lolita, and as the musketeer Aramis opposite Leonardo DiCaprio in the 1998 film version of The Man in the Iron Mask.

Irons in Paris, 2014 Other roles include the evil wizard Profion in the film Dungeons and Dragons (2000) and Rupert Gould in Longitude (2000). He played the Über-Morlock in the film The Time Machine (2002). In 2004, Irons played Severus Snape in Comic Relief's Harry Potter parody, "Harry Potter and the Secret Chamberpot of Azerbaijan". In 2005, he appeared in the films Casanova opposite Heath Ledger, and Ridley Scott's Kingdom of Heaven. He has co-starred with John Malkovich in two films; The Man in the Iron Mask (1998) and Eragon (2006), though they did not have any scenes together in the latter.

In 2008, Irons co-starred with Ed Harris and Viggo Mortensen in Appaloosa, directed by Harris. In 2011, Irons appeared alongside Kevin Spacey in the thriller Margin Call.[11] In 2012, he starred and worked as executive producer of the environmental documentary film Trashed.[12] Irons played Alfred Pennyworth in Warner Bros.' Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016)[13] and will reprise the role in the upcoming 2017 film Justice League and Ben Affleck's The Batman.[14]

He is cast in Francis Lawrence's 2018 film adaptation of Jason Matthews' book Red Sparrow as General Vladimir Korchnoi.

Theatre[edit] Irons has worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company three times in 1976, 1986–87 and 2010.[15][16] After years of success in the West End in London, Irons made his New York debut in 1984 and won a Tony Award for his Broadway performance opposite Glenn Close in The Real Thing.

After an absence from the London stage for 18 years, in 2006 he co-starred with Patrick Malahide in Christopher Hampton's stage adaptation of Sándor Márai's novel Embers at the Duke of York's Theatre.[17]

He made his National Theatre debut playing former British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan (1957–1963) in Never So Good, a new play by Howard Brenton which opened at the Lyttelton on 19 March 2008.[18][19] In 2009, Irons appeared on Broadway opposite Joan Allen in the play Impressionism.[20] The play ran through 10 May 2009 at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theater.[20]

Other ventures[edit] Audio[edit] Irons has had extensive voice work in a range of different fields throughout his career. He read the audiobook recording of Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist, Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita (he had also appeared in the 1997 film version of the novel), and James and the Giant Peach by the children's author Roald Dahl.[21]

In particular, he has received acclaim for his recordings of the poetry of T.S. Eliot for BBC Radio 4. Beginning in 2012 with The Waste Land, he went on to record Four Quartets in 2014, The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock on the centenary of its publication in 2015, and Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats in 2016. He finally completed recording the entire canon of T.S. Eliot which was broadcast over New Year's Day 2017.[22]

One of his best known film roles has turned out to be lending his distinctive voice to Scar in The Lion King (1994) serving as the main antagonist of the film. Irons has since provided voiceovers for three Disney World attractions. He narrated the Spaceship Earth ride, housed in the large geodesic globe at Epcot in Florida from October 1994 to July 2007.[23] He was also the English narrator for the Studio Tram Tour: Behind the Magic at the Walt Disney Studios Park at Disneyland Paris.[24] He voiced H. G. Wells in the English language version of the former Disney attraction The Timekeeper. He also reprised his role as Scar in Fantasmic. He is also one of the readers in the 4x CD boxed set of The Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde, produced by Marc Sinden and sold in aid of the Royal Theatrical Fund.[25][26]

He serves as the English language version of the audio guide for Westminster Abbey in London.[27] Irons has served as voice-over in two big cat documentary films by National Geographic: Eye of the Leopard, which was released in 2006,[28] and The Last Lions, which was released on 18 February 2011.[29] He also currently narrates the French-produced documentary series about volcanoes, Life on Fire. The series premiered on PBS in the United States on 2 January 2013.

In 2008, two researchers, a linguist and a sound engineer, found "the perfect [male] voice" to be a combination of Irons' and Alan Rickman's voices based on a sample of 50 voices.[30] Coincidentally, the two actors played brothers in the Die Hard series of films. Speaking at 200 words per minute and pausing for 1.2 seconds between sentences, Irons came very close to the ideal voice model, with the linguist Andrew Linn explaining why his "deep gravelly tones" inspired trust in listeners.[30] He recited the spoken sections, most notably 'Late Lament', for The Moody Blues 50th Anniversary Tour of 'Days Of Future Passed', and also appears on the video presentation.[31]

Music[edit] In 1985, Irons directed a music video for Carly Simon and her heavily promoted single, "Tired of Being Blonde", and in 1994, he had a cameo role in the video for Elastica's hit single "Connection".[32]

Irons has contributed to other musical performances, recording William Walton's Façade with Dame Peggy Ashcroft, Stravinsky's The Soldier's Tale conducted by the composer, and in 1987 the songs from Lerner and Loewe's My Fair Lady with Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, released on the Decca label. Irons sang segments of "Be Prepared" in the film The Lion King.

To mark the 100th anniversary of Noël Coward's birth, Irons sang a selection of his songs at the 1999 Last Night of the Proms held at the Royal Albert Hall in London, ending with "London Pride", a patriotic song written in the spring of 1941 during the Blitz.[33] In 2003, Irons played Fredrik Egerman in a New York revival of Stephen Sondheim's A Little Night Music, and two years later appeared as King Arthur in Lerner and Loewe's Camelot at the Hollywood Bowl. He performed the Bob Dylan song "Make You Feel My Love" on the 2006 charity album Unexpected Dreams – Songs From the Stars.[34]

In 2009, Irons appeared on the Touchstone album Wintercoast, recording a narrative introduction to the album.[35] Recording took place in New York City, New York in February 2009 during rehearsals for his Broadway play Impressionism.

Activism[edit] Charity work[edit] At the 1991 Tony Awards, Irons was one of the few celebrities to wear the recently created red ribbon to support the fight against AIDS, and he was the first celebrity to wear it onscreen.[36][37] He supports a number of other charities, including the Prison Phoenix Trust in England, and the London-based Evidence for Development which seeks to improve the lives of the world’s most needy people by preventing famines and delivering food aid, for both of which he is an active patron.[38][39][40]

In 2010, Irons starred in a promotional video[41] for "The 1billionhungry project" – a worldwide drive to attract at least one million signatures to a petition calling on international leaders to move hunger to the top of the political agenda.[42] He was named Goodwill Ambassador of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in 2011.[43]

Irons provided the narration of the 2013 documentary "Sahaya Going Beyond" about the work of the charity Sahaya International.[44] Irons is patron of London-based drama school, The Associated Studios.[45]

In November 2015, Irons supported the No Cold Homes campaign by the UK charity Turn2us.[46] Irons was one of nearly thirty celebrities, which include Helen Mirren, Hugh Laurie and Ed Sheeran, to donate items of winter clothing to the campaign, with the proceeds used to help people in the UK struggling to keep their home warm in winter.[46]

Political views[edit] In 1998, Irons and his wife were named in the list of the biggest private financial donors to the Labour Party, a year after its return to government with Tony Blair's victory in the 1997 United Kingdom general election, after 18 years in opposition.[47] In 2004, he publicly declared his support for the Countryside Alliance, referring to the 2004 Hunting Act as an "outrageous assault on civil liberties" and "one of the two most devastating parliamentary votes in the last century".[48]

Irons is an outspoken critic of the death penalty and has supported the campaign by the human rights organisation Amnesty International UK to abolish capital punishment worldwide.[49] Among his arguments in 2007, Irons states the death penalty infringes on two fundamental human rights, the right to life, and no-one shall be subject to torture, adding that while the person accused of a crime may have abused those rights, to advocate the same be done to them is to join them.[49]

In April 2013, Irons was asked by Huffpost Live host Josh Zepps his opinion on the fight for same-sex marriage in the United States. Irons responded, "Could a father not marry his son?" Zepps responded with an argument that laws against incest prevent such a union. Irons argued that "it's not incest between men. Incest is there to protect us from inbreeding, but men don't breed," and wondered whether same-sex marriage might allow fathers to bequeath their estates to their sons to avoid taxation. On the issue of advocates calling for same-sex marriage as opposed to civil unions, he said, "It seems to me that now they're fighting for the name," and, "I worry that it means somehow we debase, or we change, what marriage is. I just worry about that."[50][51] He later clarified his comments, saying he was providing an example of a situation that could cause a "legal quagmire" under the laws that allow same-sex marriage, and that he had been misinterpreted. He added that some gay relationships are "healthier" than their straight counterparts.[52]

He was also one of several celebrities who endorsed the parliamentary candidacy of the Green Party's Caroline Lucas at the 2015 UK general election.[53]

Irons, who supports the legal availability of abortion, having said that he believes that "women should be allowed to make the decision", nonetheless agreed with a pro-life advocate, being quoted as saying that "the church is right to say it's a sin".[54]

Alternative medicine[edit] He has been criticised in the British Medical Journal for his fundraising activities in support of The College of Medicine, an alternative medicine lobby group in the UK linked to Prince Charles.[55]

Other[edit] Irons is a patron of the Chiltern Shakespeare Company which produces Shakespearean plays annually in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire.[56] Irons was bestowed an Honorary-Life Membership by the University College Dublin Law Society in September 2008, in honour of his contribution to television, film, audio, music, and theatre.[57][58] Also in 2008, Irons was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by Southampton Solent University.[59] On 20 July 2016, Irons was announced as the first Chancellor of Bath Spa University.[60]

Jeremy Irons has written a three-page article on screen acting as the foreword to A Screen Acting Workshop by Mel Churcher published by Nick Hern Books (2011)

Personal life[edit]

Kilcoe Castle, built c. 1450 by the Clan Dermod MacCarthy Irons is fluent in French.[61]

Irons married Julie Hallam in 1969, but they divorced later that year.[1] He married Irish actress Sinéad Cusack on 28 March 1978.[1] They have two sons, Samuel "Sam" Irons (born 1978), who works as a photographer, and Maximilian "Max" Irons (born 1985), also an actor. Both of Irons' sons have appeared in films with their father. Irons' wife and children are Catholic; Irons has also been described as a practising Catholic,[62] but he has stated:

“ I don't go to church much because I don't like belonging to a club, and I don't go to confession or anything like that, I don't believe in it. But I try to be aware of where I fail and I occasionally go to services. I would hate to be a person who didn't have a spiritual side because there's nothing to nourish you in life apart from retail therapy.[63] ” Irons owns Kilcoe Castle near Ballydehob, County Cork, and had the castle painted pink.[64] He also has another Irish residence in The Liberties of Dublin, as well as a home in his birth town of Cowes[65] and a house and barn in Watlington, Oxfordshire.[66]

Controversy[edit] Irons is known for his outspoken opinions.

In 2004, he claimed that the fox hunting ban passed by British Parliament was an outrageous assault on civil liberties.[67]

In 2013, he claimed that he loves ‘touching people", and he expected that if any "self-respecting woman" minded she would simply tell him to "f*** off." He courted further controversy by suggesting underage girls who have sex with older men should not be ‘encouraged’ to think they are victims of sexual abuse.[68]

In the same year, he also opposed same-sex marriage on the grounds that it could "debase" marital law, suggesting it could be manipulated to allow fathers to pass on their estates to their sons without being taxed, because he supposed incest laws would not apply to men. [69] He later explained that "I will forever be playing Devil’s Advocate, just because I like a good discussion ... I was just wondering how things would change. You change one thing and there’s a knock-on effect", but "I don’t have prejudices ... anything that makes people happy should be encouraged."[14]

Filmography and awards[edit] Main article: Jeremy Irons on stage and screen References[edit] ^ Jump up to: a b c d "Jeremy Irons Biography (1948–)". Filmreference.com. Retrieved 14 June 2012. Jump up ^ Mark Nicholls (2012). "Lost Objects Of Desire: The Performances of Jeremy Irons". p. 8. Berghahn Books, Jump up ^ Stanley Green's Encyclopaedia of the Musical, Cassell (1976) Jump up ^ Dempster, Sarah; Dent, Grace; Mangan, Lucy; Lawson, Mark; Wollaston, Sam; Vine, Richard (19 July 2015). "The top 50 TV dramas of all time: 2-10". The Guardian. London. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons SNL Season 16, Episode 16". NBC. 19 July 2015. Jump up ^ Hoggard, Liz (30 September 2006). "Jeremy Irons: The fire in irons". The Independent. London. Retrieved 6 May 2010. Jump up ^ "BBC One Fall 2006" (Press release). BBC. Retrieved 18 July 2006. Jump up ^ "Lifetime to Paint Bio of Georgia O'Keeffe" TV Guide. 6 November 2008. Retrieved 7 November 2008. Jump up ^ "SVU Scoop: Oscar Winner Jeremy Irons to Guest-Star". TV Guide. Retrieved 3 December 2010. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons | British actor". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2017-08-12. Jump up ^ Kay, Jeremy (25 January 2011). "Margin Call is a fine crash movie, but no banker". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 24 February 2011. Jump up ^ Leo Hickman (11 December 2012). "Jeremy Irons talks trash for his new environmental documentary". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 November 2016. Jump up ^ "Jesse Eisenberg and Jeremy Irons Join the Cast of Warner Bros. Pictures' Untitled Superman/Batman Film from Director Zack Snyder". Business Wire. 31 January 2014. ^ Jump up to: a b Moreton, Cole (28 May 2016). "Jeremy Irons says he'd never accept a knighthood because he already has more money and fame than he deserves". Daily Mail. Retrieved 21 July 2017. Jump up ^ Trowbridge, Simon. The Company: A Biographical Dictionary of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Oxford: Editions Albert Creed (2010) ISBN 978-0-9559830-2-3 Jump up ^ "The Company: A Biographical Dictionary of the RSC: Supplementary Material". Stratfordians.org.uk. Retrieved 14 June 2012.[permanent dead link] Jump up ^ Thaxter, John (6 March 2006). "The Stage review of Embers". The Stage. Retrieved 14 June 2012. Jump up ^ Lalayn Baluch (16 January 2008). "The Stage / News / Irons to play Harold Macmillan in National debut". The Stage. Retrieved 14 June 2012. Jump up ^ "Productions : Never So Good". Royal National Theatre. Archived from the original on 12 May 2008. Retrieved 14 June 2012. ^ Jump up to: a b "Impressionism." The New York Times. Retrieved 8 April 2009. Jump up ^ "James and the Giant Peach Audiobook". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 26 June 2015 Jump up ^ Jeremy Irons Reads TS Eliot. BBC. Retrieved 4 July 2017 Jump up ^ Eve Zibart, David Hoekstra (2009). "Unofficial Guide to Walt Disney World For Grown-Ups". p. 130. John Wiley & Sons, Jump up ^ "Studio Tram Tour: Behind the Magic". Disneyland Paris. Retrieved 26 June 2015 Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons contributes to new Oscar Wilde audio CD". Archived from the original on 27 November 2010. Jump up ^ "The Royal Theatrical Fund – Helping and Supporting Theatrical Artists, Stage Actors, Television Actors, Film Actors and associated professions". Trtf.com. Archived from the original on 17 December 2010. Retrieved 22 February 2011. Jump up ^ "Westminster Abbey Audio Guide". westminster-abbey.org. Retrieved 26 June 2915 Jump up ^ Eye of the Leopard on IMDb Jump up ^ "The Last Lions – Official Movie Site – National Geographic Movies". National Geographic. Retrieved 22 February 2011. ^ Jump up to: a b "Formula 'secret of perfect voice'". BBC News. 30 May 2008. Retrieved 6 December 2010. Jump up ^ Wood, Mikael (18 June 2017). "The Moody Blues open the season — and flirt with self-parody — at the Hollywood Bowl". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 21 July 2017. Jump up ^ "Billboard 22 June 1985". p. 1. Billboard. Retrieved 26 June 2015 Jump up ^ "Last Night of the Proms 1999". BBC. Retrieved 26 June 2015 Jump up ^ "Unexpected Dreams – Songs From the Stars". AllMusic. Retrieved 26 June 2015 Jump up ^ "Touchstone – Wintercoast 2009" (Press release). touchstonemusic.co.uk. Retrieved 28 March 2009. Jump up ^ "World Aids Day". worldaidsday.org. Archived from the original on 28 May 2007. Retrieved 1 December 2007. Jump up ^ Wrench, Nigel (7 November 2003). "Why a Red Ribbon means Aids". BBC. Retrieved 21 April 2007. Jump up ^ "Prison Phoenix Trust". prisonphoenixtrust.org.uk. Retrieved 10 November 2006. Jump up ^ "Evidence for Development - Jeremy Irons". evidencefordevelopment.org. Retrieved 4 March 2012. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons supports Evidence for Development". YouTube. Retrieved 4 March 2012. Jump up ^ "Sign the petition to end hunger now". YouTube. Retrieved 22 February 2011. Jump up ^ "1billionhungry.org". Retrieved 22 February 2011. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons takes on UN world food ambassador role". BBC. 12 July 2015. Jump up ^ "Sahaya Going Beyond". sahayagoingbeyond.org. Retrieved 5 July 2013. Jump up ^ "The Associated Studios website". ^ Jump up to: a b "About us: Our campaign. Jeremy Irons". Turn2us.org. Retrieved 1 December 2015 Jump up ^ "'Luvvies' for Labour". BBC News. 30 August 1998. Retrieved 6 May 2010. Jump up ^ Adams, Guy (1 December 2004). "Irons to lead the field in battle against hunting ban". The Independent. London. Retrieved 14 February 2010. ^ Jump up to: a b "Jeremy Irons talks about the death penalty". Amnesty International UK. Retrieved 5 July 2015 Jump up ^ Shea, Danny (3 April 2013). "Jeremy Irons On Gay Marriage: 'Could A Father Not Marry His Son?' (VIDEO)". HuffPost. Retrieved 4 April 2013. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Iron's bizarre objection to gay marriage". The Guardian. London. 5 April 2013. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons clarifies gay marriage comments". 3 News NZ. 8 April 2013. Jump up ^ Elgot, Jessica (24 April 2015). "Celebrities sign statement of support for Caroline Lucas – but not the Greens". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 23 July 2015. Jump up ^ Catherine Shoard (24 March 2016). "Jeremy Irons: ‘I have the natural tendency of a benign dictator’". The Guardian. Jump up ^ Jane Cassidy (15 June 2011). "Lobby Watch: The College of Medicine". British Medical Journal. 343. PMID 21677014. doi:10.1136/bmj.d3712. Jump up ^ "de beste bron van informatie over chiltern shakespeare. Deze website is te koop!". chiltern-shakespeare.org. Archived from the original on 25 July 2011. Retrieved 22 February 2011. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons honoured by UCD Law Society". University College Dublin. Dublin. 11 September 2008. Retrieved 13 May 2012. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons at UCD". Dublin: YouTube. Retrieved 13 May 2012. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons receives honorary degree". Southampton Solent University. 2008. Archived from the original on 24 February 2013. Retrieved 23 February 2013. Jump up ^ "Oscar winning actor Jeremy Irons named Chancellor of Bath Spa University". Bathspa.ac.uk. 8 August 2016. Jump up ^ "L'Homme au Masque de Fer making of - French tv". YouTube. Jump up ^ Cheney, Alexandra (14 April 2013). "Jeremy Irons Calls Church ‘No Longer Relevant Politically’ - Speakeasy - WSJ". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 3 March 2017. Jump up ^ Lipworth, Elaine (14 May 2005). "King of all his castles". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 9 September 2010. ...their sons Sam, 27, and Max, 19. Jump up ^ Doyle, Andrew. "The best of Jeremy Irons in Limerick". Limerick.Today.ie. Archived from the original on 14 May 2014. Jump up ^ "WDYTYA? Series Three: Celebrity Gallery". BBC. Retrieved 14 June 2012. Jump up ^ "Oscar-winning actor Jeremy Irons in fight to ban lorries from his Oxfordshire town". Daily Mail. Retrieved 12 July 2015 Jump up ^ Adams, Guy (1 December 2004). "Irons to lead the field in battle against hunting ban". The Independent. Retrieved 11 May 2017. Jump up ^ Glennie, Alasdair (13 February 2013). "Jeremy Irons opens up about bottom controversy as he admits 'I love touching people' | Daily Mail Online". Daily Mail. Retrieved 11 May 2017. Jump up ^ Victoria Ward (4 April 2013). "Jeremy Irons claims gay marriage laws could lead to a father marrying his son". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 11 May 2017. External links[edit] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Jeremy Irons. Wikiquote has quotations related to: Jeremy Irons Jeremy Irons at the Internet Broadway Database Edit this at Wikidata Jeremy Irons on IMDb Jeremy Irons - The Authoritative Website Jeremy Irons at the British Film Institute's Screenonline Jeremy Irons Profile by The Daily Telegraph (13 March 2008) Awards and achievements Preceded by Daniel Day-Lewis Academy Award for Best Actor 1990 Succeeded by Anthony Hopkins [hide] Awards for Jeremy Irons [hide] v t e Academy Award for Best Actor 1928–1950 Emil Jannings (1928) Warner Baxter (1929) George Arliss (1930) Lionel Barrymore (1931) Fredric March / Wallace Beery (1932) Charles Laughton (1933) Clark Gable (1934) Victor McLaglen (1935) Paul Muni (1936) Spencer Tracy (1937) Spencer Tracy (1938) Robert Donat (1939) James Stewart (1940) Gary Cooper (1941) James Cagney (1942) Paul Lukas (1943) Bing Crosby (1944) Ray Milland (1945) Fredric March (1946) Ronald Colman (1947) Laurence Olivier (1948) Broderick Crawford (1949) José Ferrer (1950) 1951–1975 Humphrey Bogart (1951) Gary Cooper (1952) William Holden (1953) Marlon Brando (1954) Ernest Borgnine (1955) Yul Brynner (1956) Alec Guinness (1957) David Niven (1958) Charlton Heston (1959) Burt Lancaster (1960) Maximilian Schell (1961) Gregory Peck (1962) Sidney Poitier (1963) Rex Harrison (1964) Lee Marvin (1965) Paul Scofield (1966) Rod Steiger (1967) Cliff Robertson (1968) John Wayne (1969) George C. Scott1 (1970) Gene Hackman (1971) Marlon Brando1 (1972) Jack Lemmon (1973) Art Carney (1974) Jack Nicholson (1975) 1976–2000 Peter Finch (1976) Richard Dreyfuss (1977) Jon Voight (1978) Dustin Hoffman (1979) Robert De Niro (1980) Henry Fonda (1981) Ben Kingsley (1982) Robert Duvall (1983) F. Murray Abraham (1984) William Hurt (1985) Paul Newman (1986) Michael Douglas (1987) Dustin Hoffman (1988) Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) Jeremy Irons (1990) Anthony Hopkins (1991) Al Pacino (1992) Tom Hanks (1993) Tom Hanks (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Geoffrey Rush (1996) Jack Nicholson (1997) Roberto Benigni (1998) Kevin Spacey (1999) Russell Crowe (2000) 2001–present Denzel Washington (2001) Adrien Brody (2002) Sean Penn (2003) Jamie Foxx (2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) Forest Whitaker (2006) Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) Sean Penn (2008) Jeff Bridges (2009) Colin Firth (2010) Jean Dujardin (2011) Daniel Day-Lewis (2012) Matthew McConaughey (2013) Eddie Redmayne (2014) Leonardo DiCaprio (2015) Casey Affleck (2016) 1 refused award that year [hide] v t e Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor Robert De Niro (1980) Burt Lancaster (1981) Dustin Hoffman (1982) Eric Roberts (1983) Haing S. Ngor (1984) Jack Nicholson (1985) Bob Hoskins (1986) Albert Brooks (1987) Daniel Day-Lewis (1988) Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) Jeremy Irons (1990) Nick Nolte (1991) Denzel Washington (1992) Daniel Day-Lewis (1993) Albert Finney (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Geoffrey Rush (1996) Al Pacino (1997) Brendan Gleeson (1998) Jim Carrey (1999) Colin Farrell (2000) Brian Cox / Denzel Washington (2001) Adrien Brody (2002) Bill Murray (2003) Jamie Foxx (2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) Forest Whitaker (2006) Frank Langella (2007) Sean Penn / Mickey Rourke (2008) Jeremy Renner (2009) Jesse Eisenberg (2010) Brad Pitt (2011) Daniel Day-Lewis (2012) Chiwetel Ejiofor (2013) Michael Keaton (2014) Paul Dano / Leonardo DiCaprio (2015) Casey Affleck (2016) [hide] v t e Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television award winners for Best Actor Canadian Film Award 1968–1978 Gerard Parkes (1968) Chris Wiggins (1969) Doug McGrath and Paul Bradley (1970) Jean Duceppe (1971) Gordon Pinsent (1972) Jacques Godin (1973) no award (1974) Stuart Gillard (1975) André Melançon (1976) Len Cariou (1977) Richard Gabourie (1978) Genie Award 1980–2011 Christopher Plummer (1980) Thomas Peacocke (1981) Nick Mancuso (1982) Donald Sutherland (1983) Eric Fryer (1984) Gabriel Arcand (1985) John Wildman (1986) Gordon Pinsent (1987) Roger Lebel (1988) Jeremy Irons (1989) Lothaire Bluteau (1990) Rémy Girard (1991) Tony Nardi (1992) Tom McCamus (1993) Maury Chaykin (1994) David La Haye (1995) William Hutt (1996) Ian Holm (1997) Roshan Seth (1998) Bob Hoskins (1999) Tony Nardi (2000) Brendan Fletcher (2001) Luc Picard (2002) Rémy Girard (2003) Roy Dupuis (2004) Michel Côté (2005) Roy Dupuis (2006) Gordon Pinsent (2007) Natar Ungalaaq (2008) Joshua Jackson (2009) Paul Giamatti (2010) Mohamed Fellag (2011) Canadian Screen Award 2012–present James Cromwell (2012) Gabriel Arcand (2013) Antoine Olivier Pilon (2014) Jacob Tremblay (2015) Stephan James (2016) [hide] v t e David di Donatello Award for Best Foreign Actor 1957–1975 Laurence Olivier (1957) Marlon Brando / Charles Laughton (1958) Jean Gabin (1959) Cary Grant (1960) Charlton Heston (1961) Anthony Perkins / Spencer Tracy (1962) Gregory Peck (1963) Fredric March / Peter O'Toole (1964) Rex Harrison (1965) Richard Burton (1966) Richard Burton / Peter O'Toole (1967) Warren Beatty / Spencer Tracy (1968) Rod Steiger (1969) Dustin Hoffman / Peter O'Toole (1970) Ryan O'Neal (1971) Chaim Topol (1972) Yves Montand / Laurence Olivier (1973) Al Pacino / Robert Redford (1974) Burt Lancaster / Jack Lemmon / Walter Matthau (1975) 1976–1996 Jack Nicholson / Philippe Noiret (1976) Dustin Hoffman / Sylvester Stallone (1977) Richard Dreyfuss (1978) Richard Gere / Michel Serrault (1979) Dustin Hoffman / Jack Lemmon (1980) Burt Lancaster (1981) Klaus Maria Brandauer (1982) Paul Newman (1983) Woody Allen (1984) Tom Hulce (1985) William Hurt (1986) Dexter Gordon (1987) Michael Douglas (1988) Dustin Hoffman (1989) Philippe Noiret (1990) Jeremy Irons (1991) John Turturro (1992) Daniel Auteuil (1993) Anthony Hopkins (1994) John Travolta (1995) Harvey Keitel (1996) [hide] v t e Drama League's Distinguished Performance Award Katharine Cornell (1935) Helen Hayes (1936) Maurice Evans (1937) Cedric Hardwicke (1938) Raymond Massey (1939) Paul Muni (1940) Paul Lukas (1941) Judith Evelyn (1942) Alfred Lunt (1943) Lynn Fontanne (1944) Mady Christians (1945) Louis Calhern (1946) Ingrid Bergman (1947) Judith Anderson (1948) Robert Morley (1949) Grace George (1950) Claude Rains (1951) Julie Harris (1952) Shirley Booth (1953) Josephine Hull (1954) Viveca Lindfors (1955) David Wayne (1956) Eli Wallach (1957) Ralph Bellamy (1958) Cyril Ritchard (1959) Jessica Tandy (1960) Hume Cronyn (1961) Paul Scofield (1962) Charles Boyer (1963) Alec Guinness (1964) John Gielgud (1965) Richard Kiley (1966) Rosemary Harris (1967) Zoe Caldwell (1968) Alec McCowen (1969) James Stewart (1970) Anthony Quayle (1971) Eileen Atkins / Claire Bloom (1972) Alan Bates (1973) Christopher Plummer (1974) John Wood (1975) Eva Le Gallienne (1976) Tom Courtenay (1977) Frank Langella (1978) Frances Sternhagen (1979) Roy Scheider (1980) Ian McKellen (1981) Milo O'Shea (1982) Edward Herrmann / Kate Nelligan (1983) Jeremy Irons (1984) Derek Jacobi (1985) Bernadette Peters (1986) James Earl Jones (1987) John Lithgow (1988) Pauline Collins (1989) Robert Morse (1990) Stockard Channing (1991) Glenn Close (1992) Stephen Rea (1993) Sam Waterston (1994) Cherry Jones (1995) Uta Hagen (1996) Charles Durning / Bebe Neuwirth (1997) Brian Stokes Mitchell (1998) Kathleen Chalfant (1999) Eileen Heckart (2000) Mary-Louise Parker / Gary Sinise (2001) Liam Neeson (2002) Harvey Fierstein (2003) Hugh Jackman (2004) Norbert Leo Butz (2005) Christine Ebersole (2006) Liev Schreiber (2007) Patti LuPone (2008) Geoffrey Rush (2009) Alfred Molina (2010) Mark Rylance (2011) Audra McDonald (2012) Nathan Lane (2013) Neil Patrick Harris (2014) Chita Rivera (2015) Lin-Manuel Miranda (2016) Ben Platt (2017) [hide] v t e Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Anthony Quayle (1975) Ed Flanders (1976) Burgess Meredith (1977) Howard Da Silva (1978) Marlon Brando (1979) George Grizzard (1980) David Warner (1981) Laurence Olivier (1982) Richard Kiley (1983) Art Carney (1984) Karl Malden (1985) John Malkovich (1986) Dabney Coleman (1987) John Shea (1988) Derek Jacobi (1989) Vincent Gardenia (1990) James Earl Jones (1991) Hume Cronyn (1992) Beau Bridges (1993) Michael A. Goorjian (1994) Donald Sutherland (1995) Tom Hulce (1996) Beau Bridges (1997) George C. Scott (1998) Peter O'Toole (1999) Hank Azaria (2000) Brian Cox (2001) Michael Moriarty (2002) Ben Gazzara (2003) Jeffrey Wright (2004) Paul Newman (2005) Jeremy Irons (2006) Thomas Haden Church (2007) Tom Wilkinson (2008) Ken Howard (2009) David Strathairn (2010) Guy Pearce (2011) Tom Berenger (2012) James Cromwell (2013) Martin Freeman (2014) Bill Murray (2015) Sterling K. Brown (2016) [hide] v t e Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance Nancy Cartwright / Dan Castellaneta / Julie Kavner / Jackie Mason / Yeardley Smith / Marcia Wallace (1992) Dan Castellaneta (1993) Christopher Plummer (1994) Jonathan Katz (1995) none (1996) Jeremy Irons / Rik Mayall (1997) Hank Azaria (1998) Ja'net Dubois (1999) Seth MacFarlane / Julie Harris (2000) Hank Azaria / Ja'net Dubois (2001) Peter Macon / Pamela Adlon (2002) Hank Azaria (2003) Dan Castellaneta (2004) Keith David (2005) Kelsey Grammer (2006) none (2007) Keith David (2008) Dan Castellaneta (2009) Anne Hathaway (2010) Maurice LaMarche (2011) Maurice LaMarche (2012) Lily Tomlin (2013) [hide] v t e Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama 1943–1960 Paul Lukas (1943) Alexander Knox (1944) Ray Milland (1945) Gregory Peck (1946) Ronald Colman (1947) Laurence Olivier (1948) Broderick Crawford (1949) José Ferrer (1950) Fredric March (1951) Gary Cooper (1952) Spencer Tracy (1953) Marlon Brando (1954) Ernest Borgnine (1955) Kirk Douglas (1956) Alec Guinness (1957) David Niven (1958) Anthony Franciosa (1959) Burt Lancaster (1960) 1961–1980 Maximilian Schell (1961) Gregory Peck (1962) Sidney Poitier (1963) Peter O'Toole (1964) Omar Sharif (1965) Paul Scofield (1966) Rod Steiger (1967) Peter O'Toole (1968) John Wayne (1969) George C. Scott (1970) Gene Hackman (1971) Marlon Brando (1972) Al Pacino (1973) Jack Nicholson (1974) Jack Nicholson (1975) Peter Finch (1976) Richard Burton (1977) Jon Voight (1978) Dustin Hoffman (1979) Robert De Niro (1980) 1981–2000 Henry Fonda (1981) Ben Kingsley (1982) Robert Duvall / Tom Courtenay (1983) F. Murray Abraham (1984) Jon Voight (1985) Bob Hoskins (1986) Michael Douglas (1987) Dustin Hoffman (1988) Tom Cruise (1989) Jeremy Irons (1990) Nick Nolte (1991) Al Pacino (1992) Tom Hanks (1993) Tom Hanks (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Geoffrey Rush (1996) Peter Fonda (1997) Jim Carrey (1998) Denzel Washington (1999) Tom Hanks (2000) 2001–present Russell Crowe (2001) Jack Nicholson (2002) Sean Penn (2003) Leonardo DiCaprio (2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) Forest Whitaker (2006) Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) Mickey Rourke (2008) Jeff Bridges (2009) Colin Firth (2010) George Clooney (2011) Daniel Day-Lewis (2012) Matthew McConaughey (2013) Eddie Redmayne (2014) Leonardo DiCaprio (2015) Casey Affleck (2016) [hide] v t e Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film James Brolin (1970) Edward Asner (1971) James Brolin (1972) McLean Stevenson (1973) Harvey Korman (1974) Edward Asner/Tim Conway (1975) Edward Asner (1976) Norman Fell (1978) Danny DeVito/Vic Tayback (1979) Pat Harrington Jr./Vic Tayback (1980) John Hillerman (1981) Lionel Stander (1982) Richard Kiley (1983) Paul Le Mat (1984) Edward James Olmos (1985) Jan Niklas (1986) Rutger Hauer (1987) Barry Bostwick/John Gielgud (1988) Dean Stockwell (1989) Charles Durning (1990) Louis Gossett, Jr. (1991) Maximilian Schell (1992) Beau Bridges (1993) Edward James Olmos (1994) Donald Sutherland (1995) Ian McKellen (1996) George C. Scott (1997) Don Cheadle/Gregory Peck (1998) Peter Fonda (1999) Robert Downey Jr. (2000) Stanley Tucci (2001) Donald Sutherland (2002) Jeffrey Wright (2003) William Shatner (2004) Paul Newman (2005) Jeremy Irons (2006) Jeremy Piven (2007) Tom Wilkinson (2008) John Lithgow (2009) Chris Colfer (2010) Peter Dinklage (2011) Ed Harris (2012) Jon Voight (2013) Matt Bomer (2014) Christian Slater (2015) Hugh Laurie (2016) [hide] v t e Honorary César 1976–2000 Ingrid Bergman (1976) Diana Ross (1976) Henri Langlois (1977) Jacques Tati (1977) Robert Dorfmann (1978) René Goscinny (1978) Marcel Carné (1979) Charles Vanel (1979) Walt Disney (1979) Pierre Braunberger (1980) Louis de Funès (1980) Kirk Douglas (1980) Marcel Pagnol (1981) Alain Resnais (1981) Georges Dancigers (1982) Alexandre Mnouchkine (1982) Jean Nény (1982) Andrzej Wajda (1982) Raimu (1983) René Clément (1984) Georges de Beauregard (1984) Edwige Feuillère (1984) Christian-Jaque (1985) Danielle Darrieux (1985) Christine Gouze-Rénal (1985) Alain Poiré (1985) Maurice Jarre (1986) Bette Davis (1986) Jean Delannoy (1986) René Ferracci (1986) Claude Lanzmann (1986) Jean-Luc Godard (1987) Serge Silberman (1988) Bernard Blier (1989) Paul Grimault (1989) Gérard Philipe (1990) Jean-Pierre Aumont (1991) Sophia Loren (1991) Michèle Morgan (1992) Sylvester Stallone (1992) Jean Marais (1993) Marcello Mastroianni (1993) Gérard Oury (1993) Jean Carmet (1994) Jeanne Moreau (1995) Gregory Peck (1995) Steven Spielberg (1995) Lauren Bacall (1996) Henri Verneuil (1996) Charles Aznavour (1997) Andie MacDowell (1997) Michael Douglas (1998) Clint Eastwood (1998) Jean-Luc Godard (1998) Pedro Almodóvar (1999) Johnny Depp (1999) Jean Rochefort (1999) Josiane Balasko (2000) Georges Cravenne (2000) Jean-Pierre Léaud (2000) Martin Scorsese (2000) 2001–present Darry Cowl (2001) Charlotte Rampling (2001) Agnès Varda (2001) Anouk Aimée (2002) Jeremy Irons (2002) Claude Rich (2002) Bernadette Lafont (2003) Spike Lee (2003) Meryl Streep (2003) Micheline Presle (2004) Jacques Dutronc (2005) Will Smith (2005) Hugh Grant (2006) Pierre Richard (2006) Marlène Jobert (2007) Jude Law (2007) Jeanne Moreau (2008) Roberto Benigni (2008) Dustin Hoffman (2009) Harrison Ford (2010) Quentin Tarantino (2011) Kate Winslet (2012) Kevin Costner (2013) Scarlett Johansson (2014) Sean Penn (2015) Michael Douglas (2016) George Clooney (2017) [hide] v t e Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor Al Pacino (1975) Robert De Niro (1976) Richard Dreyfuss (1977) Jon Voight (1978) Dustin Hoffman (1979) Robert De Niro (1980) Burt Lancaster (1981) Ben Kingsley (1982) Robert Duvall (1983) F. Murray Abraham / Albert Finney (1984) William Hurt (1985) Bob Hoskins (1986) Jack Nicholson / Steve Martin (1987) Tom Hanks (1988) Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) Jeremy Irons (1990) Nick Nolte (1991) Clint Eastwood (1992) Anthony Hopkins (1993) John Travolta (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Geoffrey Rush (1996) Robert Duvall (1997) Ian McKellen (1998) Russell Crowe (1999) Michael Douglas (2000) Denzel Washington (2001) Daniel Day-Lewis / Jack Nicholson (2002) Bill Murray (2003) Liam Neeson (2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) Sacha Baron Cohen / Forest Whitaker (2006) Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) Sean Penn (2008) Jeff Bridges (2009) Colin Firth (2010) Michael Fassbender (2011) Joaquin Phoenix (2012) Bruce Dern (2013) Tom Hardy (2014) Michael Fassbender (2015) Adam Driver (2016) [hide] v t e National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor Michael Caine (1966) Rod Steiger (1967) Per Oscarsson (1968) Jon Voight (1969) George C. Scott (1970) Peter Finch (1971) Al Pacino (1972) Marlon Brando (1973) Jack Nicholson (1974) Jack Nicholson (1975) Robert De Niro (1976) Art Carney (1977) Gary Busey (1978) Dustin Hoffman (1979) Peter O'Toole (1980) Burt Lancaster (1981) Dustin Hoffman (1982) Gérard Depardieu (1983) Steve Martin (1984) Jack Nicholson (1985) Bob Hoskins (1986) Steve Martin (1987) Michael Keaton (1988) Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) Jeremy Irons (1990) River Phoenix (1991) Stephen Rea (1992) David Thewlis (1993) Paul Newman (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Eddie Murphy (1996) Robert Duvall (1997) Nick Nolte (1998) Russell Crowe (1999) Javier Bardem (2000) Gene Hackman (2001) Adrien Brody (2002) Bill Murray (2003) Jamie Foxx (2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) Forest Whitaker (2006) Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) Sean Penn (2008) Jeremy Renner (2009) Jesse Eisenberg (2010) Brad Pitt (2011) Daniel Day-Lewis (2012) Oscar Isaac (2013) Timothy Spall (2014) Michael B. Jordan (2015) Casey Affleck (2016) [hide] v t e New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor 1935–1950 Charles Laughton (1935) Walter Huston (1936) Paul Muni (1937) James Cagney (1938) James Stewart (1939) Charlie Chaplin (1940) Gary Cooper (1941) James Cagney (1942) Paul Lukas (1943) Barry Fitzgerald (1944) Ray Milland (1945) Laurence Olivier (1946) William Powell (1947) Laurence Olivier (1948) Broderick Crawford (1949) Gregory Peck (1950) 1951–1975 Arthur Kennedy (1951) Ralph Richardson (1952) Burt Lancaster (1953) Marlon Brando (1954) Ernest Borgnine (1955) Kirk Douglas (1956) Alec Guinness (1957) David Niven (1958) James Stewart (1959) Burt Lancaster (1960) Maximilian Schell (1961) No award (1962) Albert Finney (1963) Rex Harrison (1964) Oskar Werner (1965) Paul Scofield (1966) Rod Steiger (1967) Alan Arkin (1968) Jon Voight (1969) George C. Scott (1970) Gene Hackman (1971) Laurence Olivier (1972) Marlon Brando (1973) Jack Nicholson (1974) Jack Nicholson (1975) 1976–2000 Robert De Niro (1976) John Gielgud (1977) Jon Voight (1978) Dustin Hoffman (1979) Robert De Niro (1980) Burt Lancaster (1981) Ben Kingsley (1982) Robert Duvall (1983) Steve Martin (1984) Jack Nicholson (1985) Bob Hoskins (1986) Jack Nicholson (1987) Jeremy Irons (1988) Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) Robert De Niro (1990) Anthony Hopkins (1991) Denzel Washington (1992) David Thewlis (1993) Paul Newman (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Geoffrey Rush (1996) Peter Fonda (1997) Nick Nolte (1998) Richard Farnsworth (1999) Tom Hanks (2000) 2001–present Tom Wilkinson (2001) Daniel Day-Lewis (2002) Bill Murray (2003) Paul Giamatti (2004) Heath Ledger (2005) Forest Whitaker (2006) Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) Sean Penn (2008) George Clooney (2009) Colin Firth (2010) Brad Pitt (2011) Daniel Day-Lewis (2012) Robert Redford (2013) Timothy Spall (2014) Michael Keaton (2015) Casey Affleck (2016) [hide] v t e Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Raúl Juliá (1994) Gary Sinise (1995) Alan Rickman (1996) Gary Sinise (1997) Christopher Reeve (1998) Jack Lemmon (1999) Brian Dennehy (2000) Ben Kingsley (2001) William H. Macy (2002) Al Pacino (2003) Geoffrey Rush (2004) Paul Newman (2005) Jeremy Irons (2006) Kevin Kline (2007) Paul Giamatti (2008) Kevin Bacon (2009) Al Pacino (2010) Paul Giamatti (2011) Kevin Costner (2012) Michael Douglas (2013) Mark Ruffalo (2014) Idris Elba (2015) Bryan Cranston (2016) [hide] v t e Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play José Ferrer / Fredric March (1947) Henry Fonda / Paul Kelly / Basil Rathbone (1948) Rex Harrison (1949) Sidney Blackmer (1950) Claude Rains (1951) José Ferrer (1952) Tom Ewell (1953) David Wayne (1954) Alfred Lunt (1955) Paul Muni (1956) Fredric March (1957) Ralph Bellamy (1958) Jason Robards, Jr. (1959) Melvyn Douglas (1960) Zero Mostel (1961) Paul Scofield (1962) Arthur Hill (1963) Alec Guinness (1964) Walter Matthau (1965) Hal Holbrook (1966) Paul Rogers (1967) Martin Balsam (1968) James Earl Jones (1969) Fritz Weaver (1970) Brian Bedford (1971) Cliff Gorman (1972) Alan Bates (1973) Michael Moriarty (1974) John Kani and Winston Ntshona (1975) John Wood (1976) Al Pacino (1977) Barnard Hughes (1978) Tom Conti (1979) John Rubinstein (1980) Ian McKellen (1981) Roger Rees (1982) Harvey Fierstein (1983) Jeremy Irons (1984) Derek Jacobi (1985) Judd Hirsch (1986) James Earl Jones (1987) Ron Silver (1988) Philip Bosco (1989) Robert Morse (1990) Nigel Hawthorne (1991) Judd Hirsch (1992) Ron Leibman (1993) Stephen Spinella (1994) Ralph Fiennes (1995) George Grizzard (1996) Christopher Plummer (1997) Anthony LaPaglia (1998) Brian Dennehy (1999) Stephen Dillane (2000) Richard Easton (2001) Alan Bates (2002) Brian Dennehy (2003) Jefferson Mays (2004) Bill Irwin (2005) Richard Griffiths (2006) Frank Langella (2007) Mark Rylance (2008) Geoffrey Rush (2009) Denzel Washington (2010) Mark Rylance (2011) James Corden (2012) Tracy Letts (2013) Bryan Cranston (2014) Alex Sharp (2015) Frank Langella (2016) Kevin Kline (2017) [hide] v t e Hosts of the Tony Awards ceremonies 1947–1960 Brock Pemberton (1947) Bert Lytell / Hiram Sherman / Harry Hirshfield (1948) Brock Pemberton / James Sauter (1949) None (1950) James Sauter (1951) Helen Hayes (1952) Faye Emerson (1953) James Sauter (1954) Helen Hayes (1955) Jack Carter (1956) Bud Collyer (1957) Bud Collyer (1958) Bud Collyer (1959) Eddie Albert (1960) 1961–1980 Phil Silvers (1961) Ray Bolger / Robert Preston (1962) Abe Burrows / Robert Morse (1963) Sidney Blackmer (1964) Tom Bosley / José Ferrer / Van Johnson (1965) George Abbott / Ginger Rogers (1966) Mary Martin / Robert Preston (1967) Angela Lansbury / Peter Ustinov (1968) Diahann Carroll / Alan King (1969) Julie Andrews / Shirley MacLaine / Walter Matthau (1970) Lauren Bacall / Angela Lansbury / Anthony Quayle / Anthony Quinn (1971) Deborah Kerr / Henry Fonda / Peter Ustinov (1972) Rex Harrison / Celeste Holm (1973) Peter Falk / Florence Henderson / Robert Preston / Cicely Tyson (1974) Larry Blyden / George S. Irving / Larry Kert / Carol Lawrence / Michele Lee / Bernadette Peters / Bobby Van (1975) Eddie Albert / Richard Burton / Jane Fonda / Diana Rigg / George C. Scott / Trish Van Devere (1976) Jack Albertson / Bea Arthur / Buddy Ebsen / Damon Evans / Jean Stapleton / Leslie Uggams (1977) None (1978) Jane Alexander / Henry Fonda / Liv Ullmann (1979) Mary Tyler Moore / Jason Robards (1980) 1981–2000 Ellen Burstyn / Richard Chamberlain (1981) Tony Randall (1982) Richard Burton / Lena Horne / Jack Lemmon (1983) Julie Andrews / Robert Preston (1984) None (1985) None (1986) Angela Lansbury (1987) Angela Lansbury (1988) Angela Lansbury (1989) Kathleen Turner (1990) Julie Andrews / Jeremy Irons (1991) Glenn Close (1992) Liza Minnelli (1993) Anthony Hopkins / Amy Irving (1994) Nathan Lane / Glenn Close / Gregory Hines (1995) Nathan Lane (1996) Rosie O'Donnell (1997) Rosie O'Donnell (1998) None (1999) Rosie O'Donnell (2000) 2001–2020 Nathan Lane / Matthew Broderick (2001) Bernadette Peters / Gregory Hines (2002) Hugh Jackman (2003) Hugh Jackman (2004) Hugh Jackman (2005) None (2006) None (2007) Whoopi Goldberg (2008) Neil Patrick Harris (2009) Sean Hayes (2010) Neil Patrick Harris (2011) Neil Patrick Harris (2012) Neil Patrick Harris (2013) Hugh Jackman (2014) Kristin Chenoweth / Alan Cumming (2015) James Corden (2016) Kevin Spacey (2017) [hide] v t e Triple Crown of Acting winners Jack Albertson Anne Bancroft Ingrid Bergman Shirley Booth Ellen Burstyn Viola Davis Melvyn Douglas Helen Hayes Jeremy Irons Jessica Lange Frances McDormand Helen Mirren Thomas Mitchell Rita Moreno Al Pacino Christopher Plummer Vanessa Redgrave Jason Robards Geoffrey Rush Paul Scofield Maggie Smith Maureen Stapleton Jessica Tandy Authority control WorldCat Identities VIAF: 114783177 LCCN: n88227072 ISNI: 0000 0001 0937 8948 GND: 119238950 SUDOC: 059923741 BNF: cb13922838x (data) MusicBrainz: 349ab9cc-3062-430e-9561-d73d0e10e08a BNE: XX1281883 IATH: w6668ktk Categories: 1948 birthsLiving people20th-century English male actors21st-century English male actorsAlumni of Bristol Old Vic Theatre SchoolAnnie Award winnersAudio book narratorsBest Actor Academy Award winnersBest Actor Genie and Canadian Screen Award winnersBest Drama Actor Golden Globe (film) winnersBest Supporting Actor Golden Globe (television) winnersCésar Award winnersCusack family (Ireland)David di Donatello winnersEnglish male film actorsEnglish male Shakespearean actorsEnglish male stage actorsEnglish male television actorsEnglish male voice actorsBritish people of English descentBritish people of Irish descentEnglish people of Irish descentIrons familyLabour Party (UK) peopleOutstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Screen Actors Guild Award winnersOutstanding Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Primetime Emmy Award winnersPeople educated at Sherborne SchoolPeople from CowesRoyal Shakespeare Company membersTony Award winners

Jeremy Irons Biography Showing all 79 items Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (2) | Trade Mark (4) | Trivia (46) | Personal Quotes (23) Overview (3) Born September 19, 1948 in Cowes, Isle of Wight, England, UK Birth Name Jeremy John Irons Height 6' 2" (1.88 m) Mini Bio (1) British actor Jeremy Irons was born in Cowes, Isle of Wight, a small island off the south coast of England. He is the son of Barbara Anne Brereton (Sharpe) and Paul Dugan Irons, an accountant. Young Jeremy didn't prove very fond of figures. He visited mainland England only once a year. He wound up being grounded when his family settled down in Hertfordshire. At the age of 13 he enrolled in Sherborne School, Dorset, where he could practice his favorite sport, horse-riding. Before becoming an actor, he had considered a veterinarian surgeon's career.

He trained at the Bristol Old Vic School for two years, then joined Bristol Old Vic repertory company where he gained experience working in everything from Shakespeare to contemporary dramas. He moved to London in 1971 and had a number of jobs before landing the role of "John the Baptist" in the hit musical "Godspell". He went on to have a successful early career in the West End theatre and on TV, and debuted on-screen in Nijinsky (1980). In the early 80s, he gained international attention with his starring role in the Granada Television serial adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's classic novel Brideshead Revisited (1981), after which he was much in demand as a romantic leading man. He went on to a steady film career. In 1984, he debuted on Broadway opposite: Glenn Close in Tom Stoppard's "The Real Thing" and, in the mid-80s, he appeared in three lead roles with the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Once described as 'the thinking woman's pin up', he has made his name in thought provoking films such as David Cronenberg's Dead Ringers (1988), for which he won the New York Critics Best Actor Award. He gained a Golden Globe Award in addition to an Oscar for Best Actor in 1990 for his role as Claus von Bulow in Reversal of Fortune (1990) alongside Glenn Close. Among his many achievements, his role as Professor Higgins in Loewe-Lerner's famous musical "My Fair Lady" mustn't be forgotten. It was in London, back in 1987.

He is married to actress Sinéad Cusack, with whom he appeared in Waterland (1992) and in the Royal Shakespeare Company plays. He appeared with his son Samuel Irons and his father-in-law Cyril Cusack in the film Roald Dahl's Danny the Champion of the World (1989). His son Max Irons is also an actor. - IMDb Mini Biography By: Gustaf Molin <gumo@hem2.passagen.se> and Guy Bellinger

Spouse (2) Sinéad Cusack (28 March 1978 - present) (2 children) Julie Hallam (1969 - 1969) (annulled) Trade Mark (4) Renowned for aggressive and industrious work ethic Often plays sinister villains Rich haunting voice Calm, reserved performances Trivia (46) An exceptionaly good horseman and enjoys skiing. Hates cooking, but loves gardening and the beauty of nature. Born at 2:00am-BST. After being ticketed in England for driving 97 mph. on his BMW motorcycle and being charged with speeding and fined $225.00, he had his motorcycle license suspended for three months (1 June 1995). Son-in-law of Cyril Cusack and Maureen Cusack. Brother-in-law of Sorcha Cusack, Niamh Cusack, Paul Cusack, Pádraig Cusack and Catherine Cusack. Owns Kilcoe Castle (which he had painted a rusty pink) in County Cork, Ireland, and has become involved in local politics. He has twice played characters with the same first and last name. The first in Lolita (1997) (Humbert Humbert) and second in And Now... Ladies and Gentlemen... (2002) (Valentin Valentin). In 1996, he became the fourteenth performer to win the Triple Crown of acting. Oscar: Best Actor in a Leading Role, Reversal of Fortune (1990), Tony: Best Actor in a Play, "The Real Thing" (1984) and Emmy: Outstanding Voice-Over Performance, The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century: War Without End (1996) Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie, Elizabeth I (2005) & Outstanding Narrator, Big Cat Week: Game of Lions (2013). Narrated the "Spaceship Earth" attraction in Epcot. Won Broadway's 1984 Tony Award as Best Actor (Play) for Tom Stoppard's "The Real Thing." Member of jury at the Cannes Film Festival in 2000. At the 1990 Oscars, Irons concluded his acceptance speech for best actor in Reversal of Fortune (1990) by thanking "David". The "David" was David Cronenberg, who directed Irons the previous year in Dead Ringers (1988). The "Series of Unfortunate Events" novels by Daniel Handler make reference to three of his characters. In Reversal of Fortune (1990), he plays Klaus von Bülow, husband to Sunny von Bülow. Two of the lead characters in Handler's novels are named Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire. In The Carnivorous Carnival, Klaus and his other sister Violet disguise themselves as circus freaks named Beverly and Elliot, which are the names of the identical twin gynecologists that Irons plays in Dead Ringers (1988). In 2003, he appeared in a Comic Relief sketch entitled "Harry Potter and the Secret Chamberpot of Azerbaijan". Irons played Severus Snape, a character played in the films by Alan Rickman. Irons and Rickman play brothers in the "Die Hard" films. Has a signet ring with the insignia PDI engraved on it. It belonged to his father Paul Dugan Irons. He currently owns Audi A6 Quatro estate, BMW cruising bike, and Ducati motorbike. He has owned Morris Minor, Honda 50, and a Volkswagen rag-top Beetle. Born to Paul Dugan Irons, an accountant, and Barbara Anne Sharpe a homemaker, he has a brother, Christopher and a sister Felicity. His previous jobs include assistant stage manager, house-cleaner, "busker" (singing and playing guitar outside movie theaters), and gardener. Was one of the cast members of cult children's programme Play Away (1971), from which clips featuring him are regularly repeated on "Before They Were Famous..." type programmes. President of the jury at 2007 Sarajevo Film Festival. One of the first celebrities to wear the recently created Red Ribbon, supporting the fight against AIDS (1991). Supporter of English football team Portsmouth F.C. Attended Sherborne School for boys from 1962-1966. Helped to financially Sponser British Character Actor Stephen Manwaring whilst Stephen was at The Italia Conti Academy of Theatre Arts in 1999-2002. Won the 1984 Tony Award (New York City) for Actor in a Drama for "The Real Thing". In 2004, he declared his support for the Countryside Alliance. In 1998, he was named as a major donor to the Labour Party. Confessed to Pat Kenny on Irish TV, The Late Late Show (1970), that one of his guilty pleasures was sifting through dumpsters in search of discarded "treasures". Son-in-law of Maureen Cusack. Brother-in-law of Paul Cusack and 'Padraig Cusack'. Is one of 9 actors to have won the Triple Crown of Acting (an Oscar, Emmy and Tony); the others in chronological order are Thomas Mitchell, Melvyn Douglas, Paul Scofield, Jack Albertson, Jason Robards, Al Pacino, Geoffrey Rush and Christopher Plummer. He and his documentary film Trashed (2012) was be featured at the "New York Times Energy for Tomorrow" Conference on "Building Sustainable Cities" in New York City on April 25, 2013. Became a father for the 1st time at age 30 when his 2nd wife Sinéad Cusack gave birth to their son Samuel Irons on 16 September 1978. Became a father for the 2nd time at age 37 when his 2nd wife Sinéad Cusack gave birth to their son Max Irons on 17 October 1985. On Broadway in the play "Impressionism". Opened March 24. Scheduled to run through July 5th, 2009. [March 2009] Starring in the theatrical adaptation of Sándor Márai's novel, "Embers" at Duke of York's Theatre in London. [February 2006] At the New York City Opera in Stephen Sondheim's "A Little Night Music". [March 2003] He is the second Academy-Award winning actor to play the role of Alfred Pennyworth after Michael Caine. Although he is a heavy smoker, he claims that he is unable to drink alcohol without getting sick. Starred opposite his wife Sinead Cusack in Laga'at B'Yofee (1996). He won an Oscar for playing Claus Von Bullow in Reversal of Fortune (1990), making him one of 18 actors to win the Award for playing a real person who was still alive at the evening of the Award ceremony (as of 2015). The other seventeen actors and their respective performances are: Spencer Tracy for playing Father Edward Flanagan in Boys Town (1938), Gary Cooper for playing Alvin C. York in Samal York (1941), Patty Duke for playing Helen Keller in The Miracle Worker (1962), Jason Robards for playing Ben Bradlee in All the President's Men (1976), Robert De Niro for playing Jake La Motta in Raging Bull (1980), Sissy Spacek for playing Loretta Lynn in Coal Miner's Daughter (1980)_, Susan Sarandon for playing Sister Helen Prejean in Gever Met Mahaleh (1995), Geoffrey Rush for playing David Helfgott in Shine (1996), Julia Roberts for playing Erin Brockovich in Erin Brockovich (2000), Jim Broadbent for playing John Bayley in Iris V'John (2001), Jennifer Connelly for playing Alice Nash in Niflaot Ha-Tvuna (2001), Helen Mirren for playing Queen Elizabeth II in Ha'malka (2006), Sandra Bullock for playing Leigh Anne Tuohy in Hizdamnut shnia (2009), Christian Bale for playing Dickie Eklund in The Fighter (2010), Melissa Leo for playing Alice Eklund-Ward in The Fighter (2010), Meryl Streep for playing Margaret Thatcher in Eshet ha'barzel (2011) and Eddie Redmayne for playing Stephen Hawking in Ha'teoria shel ha'kol (2014). Was wearing sneakers when called to the stage to accept his Oscar in 1991. He and fellow Melech Ha-Arayot (1994) cast member Whoopi Goldberg were both nominees for the first ever Emmy Award for Outstanding Narrator in 2014; Irons won. Turned down the role of Dr Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs (1991) because he just finished playing Claus Von Bulow in Reversal of Fortune (1990) and didn't want to play another dark character. He was originally considered for the part of Neville Chamberlain in Masaryk (2016), eventually played by Paul Nicholas. He is fluent in French. Owns a home in The Liberties neighborhood in Dublin, Ireland, as well as a home in his birthplace of Cowes, on the Isle Of Wight, and a farm in Watlington, Oxfordshire. Personal Quotes (23) I've never been passionate about acting, and I find more and more that I work to live the life I want to live. An actor like Al Pacino lives to act. I'm not sure though, there's something about the detachment I have, the feeling of the lack of importance about what I do, that is healthy. Anyway, I'm never satisfied. I think were I ever satisfied with my work, I'd be in trouble. Basically, I want to keep working, so I don't worry about the size of the character - if it's interesting, I'll do it. It's quite nice doing smaller roles, in some ways. It means I get home more, and I can get on with my life. The movie industry is run by accountants in Hollywood and it's as simple as this; everyone has a number on their computer. They can look up Jeremy Irons and see what my last five movies have made. Say you want to make a $20m picture, which is relatively cheap. If Jeremy makes $9m, the director makes $5m, then you need a leading lady, and they just go through those figures - that's how casting happens. And none of my movies has made a lot of money. As you get older, you look back and try to make sense of the sort of person you have become. And I think the most important thing that happened in my childhood was the first night I went to boarding school at the age of seven. I remember that night, and the loneliness. Also, my parents' marriage broke up when I was 15. But I think it was that first night at seven years old when I felt something had broken, and I've spent my life trying to get back to that feeling of home. It's the same sense of family that you find in the theater and movies. In fact, I'm hoping to make a film about that very subject - the need for home. You don't really have a home until you have children. And that home is created by the children. What a camera likes are eyes which have life and tell a story. On his Ducati motorbike: "Ferrari on two wheels." I sing like an actor and dance like a duck. In an interview, he once explained the origin and pronunciation of his name thus: "My name is certainly not pronounced 'Eye-rons,' but just like the metal. In England we say, 'Eye-ons' -- we're lazy about our Rs. Here [USA] I guess you would say 'Ire-ons.'" The name is fairly common in England, it's probably short for Ironsmith." If we have to pay taxes [for Emmy gift bags], so be it. But don't spend it on bombs, for Christ's sake. (When asked by an interviewer about why he accepted his role in Dungeons & Dragons (2000)) "Are you kidding? I'd just bought a castle, I had to pay for it somehow!" Actors often behave like children and so we're taken for children. I want to be grown up. [1986 comment on Robert De Niro] He is a method actor. I think it would be fair to say he's much slower than I am. As a man, Bob dislikes making a decision. And acting is a whole line of decisions. You make a decision every time you play a line -- do I say it like this or like that? But what I saw was a man trying many areas and now and again something would really work. [on Lolita (1997)] It's very difficult because children under sixteen are immensely attractive, any father will tell you. We have to accept that, understand it for what it is and not become hysterical about it. Strangely enough, Humbert Humbert is not a paedophile ... because he knew he was doing wrong. That's his tragedy in a way. I remember when my son was twelve he was like a god. He just went through that sort of golden time for about 18 months. Parental love is sexual. Boys will flirt outrageously with their mothers. [on Waterland (1992)] I find working for money and nothing else just totally soul-destroying. I've always wanted to work with the best directors on material that interests me, so that how this has come about really. [accepting his Best Actor Oscar, 1991] This is great! [on portraying Rodrigo Borgia] I don't want to make him a sympathetic man. I want him to be an inconsistent man, a man where one moment you think 'Christ, that's terrible!' and some moments you think 'Oh, he's wonderful!' Like all of us, I want to try and create someone that is neither black nor white. [At 2005 Oscars, responding to a loud bang on-stage while speaking about the 'Live Action Short' category] Oh God, I hope they missed. [on Downton Abbey (2010)] If you think that's good, then watch the Shakespeare productions [Shakespeare Uncovered (2012)]. You'll see what real writing, what real stories, what real characters are about. [on returning to the stage in a 1981 interview] I'd like to very much, but the stage - particularly the Royal Shakespeare, which is where I'd like to return for the exceptional quality of its work - really requires at least a year's commitment. A year now in the theatre is probably not a very clever idea; I think I should be consolidating my film career. [in a 1981 interview about movie stardom] I suppose I'd like to be a movie star because I'd like to make people come to the pictures I'm in. Then, of course, there's a responsibility to choose good material. And when they saw me, I'd like to dazzle them, as a star dazzle - as for the paraphernalia surrounding a star, that doesn't interest me much. I quite like my privacy. I enjoy playing villains. It's very difficult in many situations to know who the villains and good guys are. People tend to think in black and white, and, of course, we are all gray. (in a 2016 AARP interview) I feel as confidant on my motorcycle as I do on my two feet. I call it my urban horse. The joy of motorcycling is real freedom and being in touch with the environment - the road circuits, the temperatures, the winds, the smells. It's a wonderful sensory experience.

About Jeremy Irons (suomi)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremy_Irons

Jeremy John Irons is an acclaimed English actor. More here: http://bit.ly/wTki7e.


Jeremy Irons From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jeremy Irons SDCC 2015 - Jeremy Irons (19524260758) (cropped).jpg Irons at the 2015 San Diego Comic-Con International promoting Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Born Jeremy John Irons 19 September 1948 (age 68) Cowes, Isle of Wight, England Alma mater Bristol Old Vic Theatre School Occupation Actor Years active 1969–present Spouse(s) Julie Hallam (m. 1969; div. 1969) Sinéad Cusack (m. 1978) Children 2, including Max Irons Jeremy John Irons (born 19 September 1948)[1] is an English actor. After receiving classical training at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, Irons began his acting career on stage in 1969 and has since appeared in many West End theatre productions, including The Winter's Tale, Macbeth, Much Ado About Nothing, The Taming of the Shrew, Godspell, Richard II, and Embers. In 1984, he made his Broadway debut in Tom Stoppard's The Real Thing and received a Tony Award for Best Actor.

Irons' first major film role came in the 1981 romantic drama The French Lieutenant's Woman, for which he received a BAFTA nomination for Best Actor. After starring in dramas such as Moonlighting (1982), Betrayal (1983), and The Mission (1986), he gained critical acclaim for portraying twin gynaecologists in David Cronenberg's psychological thriller Dead Ringers (1988). In 1990, Irons played accused murderer Claus von Bülow in Reversal of Fortune, and took home multiple awards, including an Academy Award for Best Actor.

Other notable films have included Steven Soderbergh's mystery thriller Kafka (1991), the period drama The House of the Spirits (1993), the romantic drama M. Butterfly (1993), the voice of Scar in Disney's The Lion King (1994), Simon Gruber in the action film Die Hard with a Vengeance (1995), the drama Lolita (1997), Musketeer Aramis in The Man in the Iron Mask (1998), the action adventure Dungeons & Dragons (2000), the drama The Merchant of Venice (2004), the drama Being Julia (2004), the epic historical drama Kingdom of Heaven (2005), the fantasy-adventure Eragon (2006), the Western Appaloosa (2008), and the indie drama Margin Call (2011). In 2016, he appeared in Assassin's Creed and, starting that year, he plays Alfred Pennyworth in the DC Extended Universe, beginning with Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, and later reprising the role in Justice League (2017) and The Batman (TBA).

Irons has also made several notable appearances on TV. He earned his first Golden Globe Award nomination for his break-out role in the ITV series Brideshead Revisited (1981). In 2005, Irons starred opposite Helen Mirren in the historical miniseries Elizabeth I, for which he received a Golden Globe Award and an Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actor. From 2011 to 2013 he starred as Pope Alexander VI in the Showtime historical series The Borgias. He is one of the few actors who won the "Triple Crown of Acting", winning an Academy Award (for film), an Emmy Award (television) and a Tony Award (for theatre). In October 2011, he was nominated Goodwill Ambassador of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Contents [hide] 1 Early life 2 Acting career 2.1 Early work 2.2 Television 2.3 Film 2.4 Theatre 3 Other ventures 3.1 Audio 3.2 Music 4 Activism 4.1 Charity work 4.2 Political views 4.3 Alternative medicine 4.4 Other 5 Personal life 6 Controversy 7 Filmography and awards 8 References 9 External links Early life[edit] Irons was born in Cowes on the Isle of Wight, the son of Paul Dugan Irons (1913–1983), an accountant, and Barbara Anne Brereton Brymer (née Sharpe; 1914–1999).[1] His paternal great-great-grandfather was a Metropolitan Policeman who was sacked for drunkenness, and later a Chartist. He has a small amount of Irish ancestry, tracing back to County Cork. Irons has a brother, Christopher (born 1943), and a sister, Felicity Anne (born 1944). He was educated at the independent Sherborne School in Dorset from 1962 to 1966. He was the drummer and harmonica player in a four-man school band called the Four Pillars of Wisdom.[2]

Acting career Early work Irons trained as an actor at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School and later became president of its fundraising appeal. He performed a number of plays, and busked on the streets of Bristol, before appearing on the London stage as John the Baptist and Judas opposite David Essex in Godspell, which opened at the Roundhouse on 17 November 1971 before transferring to Wyndham's Theatre playing a total of 1,128 performances.[3]

Television[edit]

Irons in July 2006 He made several appearances on British television, including the children's television series Play Away and as Franz Liszt in the BBC 1974 series Notorious Woman. More significantly he starred in the 13-part adaptation of H.E. Bates' novel Love for Lydia for London Weekend Television (1977), and attracted attention for his key role as the pipe-smoking German student, a romantic pairing with Judi Dench in Harold Pinter's screenplay adaptation of Aidan Higgins' novel Langrishe, Go Down for BBC television (1978).

The role which brought him fame was that of Charles Ryder in the television adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited (1981). First broadcast on ITV, the show ranks among the greatest British television dramas, with Irons receiving a Golden Globe nomination for his performance.[4] Brideshead reunited him with Anthony Andrews, with whom he had appeared in The Pallisers seven years earlier. In the same year he starred in the film The French Lieutenant's Woman opposite Meryl Streep.

After these major successes, in 1982 he played the leading role of an exiled Polish building contractor, working in the Twickenham area of South West London, in Jerzy Skolimowski's independent film Moonlighting, widely seen on television, a performance which extended his acting range. On 23 March 1991, Irons hosted Saturday Night Live on NBC in the US, and appeared as Sherlock Holmes in the Sherlock Holmes' Surprise Party sketch.[5]

In 2005, Irons won both an Emmy award and a Golden Globe award for his supporting role in the TV mini-series, Elizabeth I. A year later Irons was one of the participants in the third series of the BBC documentary series Who Do You Think You Are?.[6][7] In 2008, he played Lord Vetinari in Terry Pratchett's The Colour of Magic, an adaptation for Sky One.

On 6 November 2008, TV Guide reported he would star as photographer Alfred Stieglitz with Joan Allen as painter Georgia O'Keeffe, in a Lifetime Television biopic, Georgia O'Keeffe (2009).[8] Irons also appeared in the documentary for Irish television channel TG4, Faoi Lan Cheoil in which he learned to play the fiddle.

On 12 January 2011, Irons was a guest-star in an episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit called "Mask". He played Dr. Cap Jackson, a sex therapist.[9] He reprised the role on an episode titled "Totem" that ran on 30 March 2011.

Irons stars in the 2011 US premium cable network Showtime's series The Borgias, a highly fictionalised account of the Renaissance dynasty of that name.[10]

Film[edit]

Irons at the 2011 Berlin Film Festival Irons made his film debut in Nijinsky in 1980. He appeared sporadically in films during the 1980s, including the Cannes Palme d'Or winner The Mission in 1986, and in the dual role of twin gynaecologists in David Cronenberg's Dead Ringers in 1988. Other films include Danny the Champion of the World (1989), Reversal of Fortune (1990), for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor, Kafka (1991), Damage (1993), M. Butterfly (1993), The House of the Spirits (1993) appearing again with Glenn Close and Meryl Streep, the voice of Scar in The Lion King (1994), portraying Simon Gruber in Die Hard with a Vengeance (1995), co-starring Bruce Willis and Samuel L. Jackson, Bernardo Bertolucci's Stealing Beauty (1996), the 1997 remake of Lolita, and as the musketeer Aramis opposite Leonardo DiCaprio in the 1998 film version of The Man in the Iron Mask.

Irons in Paris, 2014 Other roles include the evil wizard Profion in the film Dungeons and Dragons (2000) and Rupert Gould in Longitude (2000). He played the Über-Morlock in the film The Time Machine (2002). In 2004, Irons played Severus Snape in Comic Relief's Harry Potter parody, "Harry Potter and the Secret Chamberpot of Azerbaijan". In 2005, he appeared in the films Casanova opposite Heath Ledger, and Ridley Scott's Kingdom of Heaven. He has co-starred with John Malkovich in two films; The Man in the Iron Mask (1998) and Eragon (2006), though they did not have any scenes together in the latter.

In 2008, Irons co-starred with Ed Harris and Viggo Mortensen in Appaloosa, directed by Harris. In 2011, Irons appeared alongside Kevin Spacey in the thriller Margin Call.[11] In 2012, he starred and worked as executive producer of the environmental documentary film Trashed.[12] Irons played Alfred Pennyworth in Warner Bros.' Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016)[13] and will reprise the role in the upcoming 2017 film Justice League and Ben Affleck's The Batman.[14]

He is cast in Francis Lawrence's 2018 film adaptation of Jason Matthews' book Red Sparrow as General Vladimir Korchnoi.

Theatre[edit] Irons has worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company three times in 1976, 1986–87 and 2010.[15][16] After years of success in the West End in London, Irons made his New York debut in 1984 and won a Tony Award for his Broadway performance opposite Glenn Close in The Real Thing.

After an absence from the London stage for 18 years, in 2006 he co-starred with Patrick Malahide in Christopher Hampton's stage adaptation of Sándor Márai's novel Embers at the Duke of York's Theatre.[17]

He made his National Theatre debut playing former British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan (1957–1963) in Never So Good, a new play by Howard Brenton which opened at the Lyttelton on 19 March 2008.[18][19] In 2009, Irons appeared on Broadway opposite Joan Allen in the play Impressionism.[20] The play ran through 10 May 2009 at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theater.[20]

Other ventures[edit] Audio[edit] Irons has had extensive voice work in a range of different fields throughout his career. He read the audiobook recording of Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist, Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita (he had also appeared in the 1997 film version of the novel), and James and the Giant Peach by the children's author Roald Dahl.[21]

In particular, he has received acclaim for his recordings of the poetry of T.S. Eliot for BBC Radio 4. Beginning in 2012 with The Waste Land, he went on to record Four Quartets in 2014, The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock on the centenary of its publication in 2015, and Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats in 2016. He finally completed recording the entire canon of T.S. Eliot which was broadcast over New Year's Day 2017.[22]

One of his best known film roles has turned out to be lending his distinctive voice to Scar in The Lion King (1994) serving as the main antagonist of the film. Irons has since provided voiceovers for three Disney World attractions. He narrated the Spaceship Earth ride, housed in the large geodesic globe at Epcot in Florida from October 1994 to July 2007.[23] He was also the English narrator for the Studio Tram Tour: Behind the Magic at the Walt Disney Studios Park at Disneyland Paris.[24] He voiced H. G. Wells in the English language version of the former Disney attraction The Timekeeper. He also reprised his role as Scar in Fantasmic. He is also one of the readers in the 4x CD boxed set of The Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde, produced by Marc Sinden and sold in aid of the Royal Theatrical Fund.[25][26]

He serves as the English language version of the audio guide for Westminster Abbey in London.[27] Irons has served as voice-over in two big cat documentary films by National Geographic: Eye of the Leopard, which was released in 2006,[28] and The Last Lions, which was released on 18 February 2011.[29] He also currently narrates the French-produced documentary series about volcanoes, Life on Fire. The series premiered on PBS in the United States on 2 January 2013.

In 2008, two researchers, a linguist and a sound engineer, found "the perfect [male] voice" to be a combination of Irons' and Alan Rickman's voices based on a sample of 50 voices.[30] Coincidentally, the two actors played brothers in the Die Hard series of films. Speaking at 200 words per minute and pausing for 1.2 seconds between sentences, Irons came very close to the ideal voice model, with the linguist Andrew Linn explaining why his "deep gravelly tones" inspired trust in listeners.[30] He recited the spoken sections, most notably 'Late Lament', for The Moody Blues 50th Anniversary Tour of 'Days Of Future Passed', and also appears on the video presentation.[31]

Music[edit] In 1985, Irons directed a music video for Carly Simon and her heavily promoted single, "Tired of Being Blonde", and in 1994, he had a cameo role in the video for Elastica's hit single "Connection".[32]

Irons has contributed to other musical performances, recording William Walton's Façade with Dame Peggy Ashcroft, Stravinsky's The Soldier's Tale conducted by the composer, and in 1987 the songs from Lerner and Loewe's My Fair Lady with Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, released on the Decca label. Irons sang segments of "Be Prepared" in the film The Lion King.

To mark the 100th anniversary of Noël Coward's birth, Irons sang a selection of his songs at the 1999 Last Night of the Proms held at the Royal Albert Hall in London, ending with "London Pride", a patriotic song written in the spring of 1941 during the Blitz.[33] In 2003, Irons played Fredrik Egerman in a New York revival of Stephen Sondheim's A Little Night Music, and two years later appeared as King Arthur in Lerner and Loewe's Camelot at the Hollywood Bowl. He performed the Bob Dylan song "Make You Feel My Love" on the 2006 charity album Unexpected Dreams – Songs From the Stars.[34]

In 2009, Irons appeared on the Touchstone album Wintercoast, recording a narrative introduction to the album.[35] Recording took place in New York City, New York in February 2009 during rehearsals for his Broadway play Impressionism.

Activism[edit] Charity work[edit] At the 1991 Tony Awards, Irons was one of the few celebrities to wear the recently created red ribbon to support the fight against AIDS, and he was the first celebrity to wear it onscreen.[36][37] He supports a number of other charities, including the Prison Phoenix Trust in England, and the London-based Evidence for Development which seeks to improve the lives of the world’s most needy people by preventing famines and delivering food aid, for both of which he is an active patron.[38][39][40]

In 2010, Irons starred in a promotional video[41] for "The 1billionhungry project" – a worldwide drive to attract at least one million signatures to a petition calling on international leaders to move hunger to the top of the political agenda.[42] He was named Goodwill Ambassador of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in 2011.[43]

Irons provided the narration of the 2013 documentary "Sahaya Going Beyond" about the work of the charity Sahaya International.[44] Irons is patron of London-based drama school, The Associated Studios.[45]

In November 2015, Irons supported the No Cold Homes campaign by the UK charity Turn2us.[46] Irons was one of nearly thirty celebrities, which include Helen Mirren, Hugh Laurie and Ed Sheeran, to donate items of winter clothing to the campaign, with the proceeds used to help people in the UK struggling to keep their home warm in winter.[46]

Political views[edit] In 1998, Irons and his wife were named in the list of the biggest private financial donors to the Labour Party, a year after its return to government with Tony Blair's victory in the 1997 United Kingdom general election, after 18 years in opposition.[47] In 2004, he publicly declared his support for the Countryside Alliance, referring to the 2004 Hunting Act as an "outrageous assault on civil liberties" and "one of the two most devastating parliamentary votes in the last century".[48]

Irons is an outspoken critic of the death penalty and has supported the campaign by the human rights organisation Amnesty International UK to abolish capital punishment worldwide.[49] Among his arguments in 2007, Irons states the death penalty infringes on two fundamental human rights, the right to life, and no-one shall be subject to torture, adding that while the person accused of a crime may have abused those rights, to advocate the same be done to them is to join them.[49]

In April 2013, Irons was asked by Huffpost Live host Josh Zepps his opinion on the fight for same-sex marriage in the United States. Irons responded, "Could a father not marry his son?" Zepps responded with an argument that laws against incest prevent such a union. Irons argued that "it's not incest between men. Incest is there to protect us from inbreeding, but men don't breed," and wondered whether same-sex marriage might allow fathers to bequeath their estates to their sons to avoid taxation. On the issue of advocates calling for same-sex marriage as opposed to civil unions, he said, "It seems to me that now they're fighting for the name," and, "I worry that it means somehow we debase, or we change, what marriage is. I just worry about that."[50][51] He later clarified his comments, saying he was providing an example of a situation that could cause a "legal quagmire" under the laws that allow same-sex marriage, and that he had been misinterpreted. He added that some gay relationships are "healthier" than their straight counterparts.[52]

He was also one of several celebrities who endorsed the parliamentary candidacy of the Green Party's Caroline Lucas at the 2015 UK general election.[53]

Irons, who supports the legal availability of abortion, having said that he believes that "women should be allowed to make the decision", nonetheless agreed with a pro-life advocate, being quoted as saying that "the church is right to say it's a sin".[54]

Alternative medicine[edit] He has been criticised in the British Medical Journal for his fundraising activities in support of The College of Medicine, an alternative medicine lobby group in the UK linked to Prince Charles.[55]

Other[edit] Irons is a patron of the Chiltern Shakespeare Company which produces Shakespearean plays annually in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire.[56] Irons was bestowed an Honorary-Life Membership by the University College Dublin Law Society in September 2008, in honour of his contribution to television, film, audio, music, and theatre.[57][58] Also in 2008, Irons was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by Southampton Solent University.[59] On 20 July 2016, Irons was announced as the first Chancellor of Bath Spa University.[60]

Jeremy Irons has written a three-page article on screen acting as the foreword to A Screen Acting Workshop by Mel Churcher published by Nick Hern Books (2011)

Personal life[edit]

Kilcoe Castle, built c. 1450 by the Clan Dermod MacCarthy Irons is fluent in French.[61]

Irons married Julie Hallam in 1969, but they divorced later that year.[1] He married Irish actress Sinéad Cusack on 28 March 1978.[1] They have two sons, Samuel "Sam" Irons (born 1978), who works as a photographer, and Maximilian "Max" Irons (born 1985), also an actor. Both of Irons' sons have appeared in films with their father. Irons' wife and children are Catholic; Irons has also been described as a practising Catholic,[62] but he has stated:

“ I don't go to church much because I don't like belonging to a club, and I don't go to confession or anything like that, I don't believe in it. But I try to be aware of where I fail and I occasionally go to services. I would hate to be a person who didn't have a spiritual side because there's nothing to nourish you in life apart from retail therapy.[63] ” Irons owns Kilcoe Castle near Ballydehob, County Cork, and had the castle painted pink.[64] He also has another Irish residence in The Liberties of Dublin, as well as a home in his birth town of Cowes[65] and a house and barn in Watlington, Oxfordshire.[66]

Controversy[edit] Irons is known for his outspoken opinions.

In 2004, he claimed that the fox hunting ban passed by British Parliament was an outrageous assault on civil liberties.[67]

In 2013, he claimed that he loves ‘touching people", and he expected that if any "self-respecting woman" minded she would simply tell him to "f*** off." He courted further controversy by suggesting underage girls who have sex with older men should not be ‘encouraged’ to think they are victims of sexual abuse.[68]

In the same year, he also opposed same-sex marriage on the grounds that it could "debase" marital law, suggesting it could be manipulated to allow fathers to pass on their estates to their sons without being taxed, because he supposed incest laws would not apply to men. [69] He later explained that "I will forever be playing Devil’s Advocate, just because I like a good discussion ... I was just wondering how things would change. You change one thing and there’s a knock-on effect", but "I don’t have prejudices ... anything that makes people happy should be encouraged."[14]

Filmography and awards[edit] Main article: Jeremy Irons on stage and screen References[edit] ^ Jump up to: a b c d "Jeremy Irons Biography (1948–)". Filmreference.com. Retrieved 14 June 2012. Jump up ^ Mark Nicholls (2012). "Lost Objects Of Desire: The Performances of Jeremy Irons". p. 8. Berghahn Books, Jump up ^ Stanley Green's Encyclopaedia of the Musical, Cassell (1976) Jump up ^ Dempster, Sarah; Dent, Grace; Mangan, Lucy; Lawson, Mark; Wollaston, Sam; Vine, Richard (19 July 2015). "The top 50 TV dramas of all time: 2-10". The Guardian. London. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons SNL Season 16, Episode 16". NBC. 19 July 2015. Jump up ^ Hoggard, Liz (30 September 2006). "Jeremy Irons: The fire in irons". The Independent. London. Retrieved 6 May 2010. Jump up ^ "BBC One Fall 2006" (Press release). BBC. Retrieved 18 July 2006. Jump up ^ "Lifetime to Paint Bio of Georgia O'Keeffe" TV Guide. 6 November 2008. Retrieved 7 November 2008. Jump up ^ "SVU Scoop: Oscar Winner Jeremy Irons to Guest-Star". TV Guide. Retrieved 3 December 2010. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons | British actor". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2017-08-12. Jump up ^ Kay, Jeremy (25 January 2011). "Margin Call is a fine crash movie, but no banker". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 24 February 2011. Jump up ^ Leo Hickman (11 December 2012). "Jeremy Irons talks trash for his new environmental documentary". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 November 2016. Jump up ^ "Jesse Eisenberg and Jeremy Irons Join the Cast of Warner Bros. Pictures' Untitled Superman/Batman Film from Director Zack Snyder". Business Wire. 31 January 2014. ^ Jump up to: a b Moreton, Cole (28 May 2016). "Jeremy Irons says he'd never accept a knighthood because he already has more money and fame than he deserves". Daily Mail. Retrieved 21 July 2017. Jump up ^ Trowbridge, Simon. The Company: A Biographical Dictionary of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Oxford: Editions Albert Creed (2010) ISBN 978-0-9559830-2-3 Jump up ^ "The Company: A Biographical Dictionary of the RSC: Supplementary Material". Stratfordians.org.uk. Retrieved 14 June 2012.[permanent dead link] Jump up ^ Thaxter, John (6 March 2006). "The Stage review of Embers". The Stage. Retrieved 14 June 2012. Jump up ^ Lalayn Baluch (16 January 2008). "The Stage / News / Irons to play Harold Macmillan in National debut". The Stage. Retrieved 14 June 2012. Jump up ^ "Productions : Never So Good". Royal National Theatre. Archived from the original on 12 May 2008. Retrieved 14 June 2012. ^ Jump up to: a b "Impressionism." The New York Times. Retrieved 8 April 2009. Jump up ^ "James and the Giant Peach Audiobook". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 26 June 2015 Jump up ^ Jeremy Irons Reads TS Eliot. BBC. Retrieved 4 July 2017 Jump up ^ Eve Zibart, David Hoekstra (2009). "Unofficial Guide to Walt Disney World For Grown-Ups". p. 130. John Wiley & Sons, Jump up ^ "Studio Tram Tour: Behind the Magic". Disneyland Paris. Retrieved 26 June 2015 Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons contributes to new Oscar Wilde audio CD". Archived from the original on 27 November 2010. Jump up ^ "The Royal Theatrical Fund – Helping and Supporting Theatrical Artists, Stage Actors, Television Actors, Film Actors and associated professions". Trtf.com. Archived from the original on 17 December 2010. Retrieved 22 February 2011. Jump up ^ "Westminster Abbey Audio Guide". westminster-abbey.org. Retrieved 26 June 2915 Jump up ^ Eye of the Leopard on IMDb Jump up ^ "The Last Lions – Official Movie Site – National Geographic Movies". National Geographic. Retrieved 22 February 2011. ^ Jump up to: a b "Formula 'secret of perfect voice'". BBC News. 30 May 2008. Retrieved 6 December 2010. Jump up ^ Wood, Mikael (18 June 2017). "The Moody Blues open the season — and flirt with self-parody — at the Hollywood Bowl". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 21 July 2017. Jump up ^ "Billboard 22 June 1985". p. 1. Billboard. Retrieved 26 June 2015 Jump up ^ "Last Night of the Proms 1999". BBC. Retrieved 26 June 2015 Jump up ^ "Unexpected Dreams – Songs From the Stars". AllMusic. Retrieved 26 June 2015 Jump up ^ "Touchstone – Wintercoast 2009" (Press release). touchstonemusic.co.uk. Retrieved 28 March 2009. Jump up ^ "World Aids Day". worldaidsday.org. Archived from the original on 28 May 2007. Retrieved 1 December 2007. Jump up ^ Wrench, Nigel (7 November 2003). "Why a Red Ribbon means Aids". BBC. Retrieved 21 April 2007. Jump up ^ "Prison Phoenix Trust". prisonphoenixtrust.org.uk. Retrieved 10 November 2006. Jump up ^ "Evidence for Development - Jeremy Irons". evidencefordevelopment.org. Retrieved 4 March 2012. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons supports Evidence for Development". YouTube. Retrieved 4 March 2012. Jump up ^ "Sign the petition to end hunger now". YouTube. Retrieved 22 February 2011. Jump up ^ "1billionhungry.org". Retrieved 22 February 2011. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons takes on UN world food ambassador role". BBC. 12 July 2015. Jump up ^ "Sahaya Going Beyond". sahayagoingbeyond.org. Retrieved 5 July 2013. Jump up ^ "The Associated Studios website". ^ Jump up to: a b "About us: Our campaign. Jeremy Irons". Turn2us.org. Retrieved 1 December 2015 Jump up ^ "'Luvvies' for Labour". BBC News. 30 August 1998. Retrieved 6 May 2010. Jump up ^ Adams, Guy (1 December 2004). "Irons to lead the field in battle against hunting ban". The Independent. London. Retrieved 14 February 2010. ^ Jump up to: a b "Jeremy Irons talks about the death penalty". Amnesty International UK. Retrieved 5 July 2015 Jump up ^ Shea, Danny (3 April 2013). "Jeremy Irons On Gay Marriage: 'Could A Father Not Marry His Son?' (VIDEO)". HuffPost. Retrieved 4 April 2013. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Iron's bizarre objection to gay marriage". The Guardian. London. 5 April 2013. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons clarifies gay marriage comments". 3 News NZ. 8 April 2013. Jump up ^ Elgot, Jessica (24 April 2015). "Celebrities sign statement of support for Caroline Lucas – but not the Greens". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 23 July 2015. Jump up ^ Catherine Shoard (24 March 2016). "Jeremy Irons: ‘I have the natural tendency of a benign dictator’". The Guardian. Jump up ^ Jane Cassidy (15 June 2011). "Lobby Watch: The College of Medicine". British Medical Journal. 343. PMID 21677014. doi:10.1136/bmj.d3712. Jump up ^ "de beste bron van informatie over chiltern shakespeare. Deze website is te koop!". chiltern-shakespeare.org. Archived from the original on 25 July 2011. Retrieved 22 February 2011. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons honoured by UCD Law Society". University College Dublin. Dublin. 11 September 2008. Retrieved 13 May 2012. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons at UCD". Dublin: YouTube. Retrieved 13 May 2012. Jump up ^ "Jeremy Irons receives honorary degree". Southampton Solent University. 2008. Archived from the original on 24 February 2013. Retrieved 23 February 2013. Jump up ^ "Oscar winning actor Jeremy Irons named Chancellor of Bath Spa University". Bathspa.ac.uk. 8 August 2016. Jump up ^ "L'Homme au Masque de Fer making of - French tv". YouTube. Jump up ^ Cheney, Alexandra (14 April 2013). "Jeremy Irons Calls Church ‘No Longer Relevant Politically’ - Speakeasy - WSJ". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 3 March 2017. Jump up ^ Lipworth, Elaine (14 May 2005). "King of all his castles". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 9 September 2010. ...their sons Sam, 27, and Max, 19. Jump up ^ Doyle, Andrew. "The best of Jeremy Irons in Limerick". Limerick.Today.ie. Archived from the original on 14 May 2014. Jump up ^ "WDYTYA? Series Three: Celebrity Gallery". BBC. Retrieved 14 June 2012. Jump up ^ "Oscar-winning actor Jeremy Irons in fight to ban lorries from his Oxfordshire town". Daily Mail. Retrieved 12 July 2015 Jump up ^ Adams, Guy (1 December 2004). "Irons to lead the field in battle against hunting ban". The Independent. Retrieved 11 May 2017. Jump up ^ Glennie, Alasdair (13 February 2013). "Jeremy Irons opens up about bottom controversy as he admits 'I love touching people' | Daily Mail Online". Daily Mail. Retrieved 11 May 2017. Jump up ^ Victoria Ward (4 April 2013). "Jeremy Irons claims gay marriage laws could lead to a father marrying his son". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 11 May 2017. External links[edit] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Jeremy Irons. Wikiquote has quotations related to: Jeremy Irons Jeremy Irons at the Internet Broadway Database Edit this at Wikidata Jeremy Irons on IMDb Jeremy Irons - The Authoritative Website Jeremy Irons at the British Film Institute's Screenonline Jeremy Irons Profile by The Daily Telegraph (13 March 2008) Awards and achievements Preceded by Daniel Day-Lewis Academy Award for Best Actor 1990 Succeeded by Anthony Hopkins [hide] Awards for Jeremy Irons [hide] v t e Academy Award for Best Actor 1928–1950 Emil Jannings (1928) Warner Baxter (1929) George Arliss (1930) Lionel Barrymore (1931) Fredric March / Wallace Beery (1932) Charles Laughton (1933) Clark Gable (1934) Victor McLaglen (1935) Paul Muni (1936) Spencer Tracy (1937) Spencer Tracy (1938) Robert Donat (1939) James Stewart (1940) Gary Cooper (1941) James Cagney (1942) Paul Lukas (1943) Bing Crosby (1944) Ray Milland (1945) Fredric March (1946) Ronald Colman (1947) Laurence Olivier (1948) Broderick Crawford (1949) José Ferrer (1950) 1951–1975 Humphrey Bogart (1951) Gary Cooper (1952) William Holden (1953) Marlon Brando (1954) Ernest Borgnine (1955) Yul Brynner (1956) Alec Guinness (1957) David Niven (1958) Charlton Heston (1959) Burt Lancaster (1960) Maximilian Schell (1961) Gregory Peck (1962) Sidney Poitier (1963) Rex Harrison (1964) Lee Marvin (1965) Paul Scofield (1966) Rod Steiger (1967) Cliff Robertson (1968) John Wayne (1969) George C. Scott1 (1970) Gene Hackman (1971) Marlon Brando1 (1972) Jack Lemmon (1973) Art Carney (1974) Jack Nicholson (1975) 1976–2000 Peter Finch (1976) Richard Dreyfuss (1977) Jon Voight (1978) Dustin Hoffman (1979) Robert De Niro (1980) Henry Fonda (1981) Ben Kingsley (1982) Robert Duvall (1983) F. Murray Abraham (1984) William Hurt (1985) Paul Newman (1986) Michael Douglas (1987) Dustin Hoffman (1988) Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) Jeremy Irons (1990) Anthony Hopkins (1991) Al Pacino (1992) Tom Hanks (1993) Tom Hanks (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Geoffrey Rush (1996) Jack Nicholson (1997) Roberto Benigni (1998) Kevin Spacey (1999) Russell Crowe (2000) 2001–present Denzel Washington (2001) Adrien Brody (2002) Sean Penn (2003) Jamie Foxx (2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) Forest Whitaker (2006) Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) Sean Penn (2008) Jeff Bridges (2009) Colin Firth (2010) Jean Dujardin (2011) Daniel Day-Lewis (2012) Matthew McConaughey (2013) Eddie Redmayne (2014) Leonardo DiCaprio (2015) Casey Affleck (2016) 1 refused award that year [hide] v t e Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor Robert De Niro (1980) Burt Lancaster (1981) Dustin Hoffman (1982) Eric Roberts (1983) Haing S. Ngor (1984) Jack Nicholson (1985) Bob Hoskins (1986) Albert Brooks (1987) Daniel Day-Lewis (1988) Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) Jeremy Irons (1990) Nick Nolte (1991) Denzel Washington (1992) Daniel Day-Lewis (1993) Albert Finney (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Geoffrey Rush (1996) Al Pacino (1997) Brendan Gleeson (1998) Jim Carrey (1999) Colin Farrell (2000) Brian Cox / Denzel Washington (2001) Adrien Brody (2002) Bill Murray (2003) Jamie Foxx (2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) Forest Whitaker (2006) Frank Langella (2007) Sean Penn / Mickey Rourke (2008) Jeremy Renner (2009) Jesse Eisenberg (2010) Brad Pitt (2011) Daniel Day-Lewis (2012) Chiwetel Ejiofor (2013) Michael Keaton (2014) Paul Dano / Leonardo DiCaprio (2015) Casey Affleck (2016) [hide] v t e Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television award winners for Best Actor Canadian Film Award 1968–1978 Gerard Parkes (1968) Chris Wiggins (1969) Doug McGrath and Paul Bradley (1970) Jean Duceppe (1971) Gordon Pinsent (1972) Jacques Godin (1973) no award (1974) Stuart Gillard (1975) André Melançon (1976) Len Cariou (1977) Richard Gabourie (1978) Genie Award 1980–2011 Christopher Plummer (1980) Thomas Peacocke (1981) Nick Mancuso (1982) Donald Sutherland (1983) Eric Fryer (1984) Gabriel Arcand (1985) John Wildman (1986) Gordon Pinsent (1987) Roger Lebel (1988) Jeremy Irons (1989) Lothaire Bluteau (1990) Rémy Girard (1991) Tony Nardi (1992) Tom McCamus (1993) Maury Chaykin (1994) David La Haye (1995) William Hutt (1996) Ian Holm (1997) Roshan Seth (1998) Bob Hoskins (1999) Tony Nardi (2000) Brendan Fletcher (2001) Luc Picard (2002) Rémy Girard (2003) Roy Dupuis (2004) Michel Côté (2005) Roy Dupuis (2006) Gordon Pinsent (2007) Natar Ungalaaq (2008) Joshua Jackson (2009) Paul Giamatti (2010) Mohamed Fellag (2011) Canadian Screen Award 2012–present James Cromwell (2012) Gabriel Arcand (2013) Antoine Olivier Pilon (2014) Jacob Tremblay (2015) Stephan James (2016) [hide] v t e David di Donatello Award for Best Foreign Actor 1957–1975 Laurence Olivier (1957) Marlon Brando / Charles Laughton (1958) Jean Gabin (1959) Cary Grant (1960) Charlton Heston (1961) Anthony Perkins / Spencer Tracy (1962) Gregory Peck (1963) Fredric March / Peter O'Toole (1964) Rex Harrison (1965) Richard Burton (1966) Richard Burton / Peter O'Toole (1967) Warren Beatty / Spencer Tracy (1968) Rod Steiger (1969) Dustin Hoffman / Peter O'Toole (1970) Ryan O'Neal (1971) Chaim Topol (1972) Yves Montand / Laurence Olivier (1973) Al Pacino / Robert Redford (1974) Burt Lancaster / Jack Lemmon / Walter Matthau (1975) 1976–1996 Jack Nicholson / Philippe Noiret (1976) Dustin Hoffman / Sylvester Stallone (1977) Richard Dreyfuss (1978) Richard Gere / Michel Serrault (1979) Dustin Hoffman / Jack Lemmon (1980) Burt Lancaster (1981) Klaus Maria Brandauer (1982) Paul Newman (1983) Woody Allen (1984) Tom Hulce (1985) William Hurt (1986) Dexter Gordon (1987) Michael Douglas (1988) Dustin Hoffman (1989) Philippe Noiret (1990) Jeremy Irons (1991) John Turturro (1992) Daniel Auteuil (1993) Anthony Hopkins (1994) John Travolta (1995) Harvey Keitel (1996) [hide] v t e Drama League's Distinguished Performance Award Katharine Cornell (1935) Helen Hayes (1936) Maurice Evans (1937) Cedric Hardwicke (1938) Raymond Massey (1939) Paul Muni (1940) Paul Lukas (1941) Judith Evelyn (1942) Alfred Lunt (1943) Lynn Fontanne (1944) Mady Christians (1945) Louis Calhern (1946) Ingrid Bergman (1947) Judith Anderson (1948) Robert Morley (1949) Grace George (1950) Claude Rains (1951) Julie Harris (1952) Shirley Booth (1953) Josephine Hull (1954) Viveca Lindfors (1955) David Wayne (1956) Eli Wallach (1957) Ralph Bellamy (1958) Cyril Ritchard (1959) Jessica Tandy (1960) Hume Cronyn (1961) Paul Scofield (1962) Charles Boyer (1963) Alec Guinness (1964) John Gielgud (1965) Richard Kiley (1966) Rosemary Harris (1967) Zoe Caldwell (1968) Alec McCowen (1969) James Stewart (1970) Anthony Quayle (1971) Eileen Atkins / Claire Bloom (1972) Alan Bates (1973) Christopher Plummer (1974) John Wood (1975) Eva Le Gallienne (1976) Tom Courtenay (1977) Frank Langella (1978) Frances Sternhagen (1979) Roy Scheider (1980) Ian McKellen (1981) Milo O'Shea (1982) Edward Herrmann / Kate Nelligan (1983) Jeremy Irons (1984) Derek Jacobi (1985) Bernadette Peters (1986) James Earl Jones (1987) John Lithgow (1988) Pauline Collins (1989) Robert Morse (1990) Stockard Channing (1991) Glenn Close (1992) Stephen Rea (1993) Sam Waterston (1994) Cherry Jones (1995) Uta Hagen (1996) Charles Durning / Bebe Neuwirth (1997) Brian Stokes Mitchell (1998) Kathleen Chalfant (1999) Eileen Heckart (2000) Mary-Louise Parker / Gary Sinise (2001) Liam Neeson (2002) Harvey Fierstein (2003) Hugh Jackman (2004) Norbert Leo Butz (2005) Christine Ebersole (2006) Liev Schreiber (2007) Patti LuPone (2008) Geoffrey Rush (2009) Alfred Molina (2010) Mark Rylance (2011) Audra McDonald (2012) Nathan Lane (2013) Neil Patrick Harris (2014) Chita Rivera (2015) Lin-Manuel Miranda (2016) Ben Platt (2017) [hide] v t e Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Anthony Quayle (1975) Ed Flanders (1976) Burgess Meredith (1977) Howard Da Silva (1978) Marlon Brando (1979) George Grizzard (1980) David Warner (1981) Laurence Olivier (1982) Richard Kiley (1983) Art Carney (1984) Karl Malden (1985) John Malkovich (1986) Dabney Coleman (1987) John Shea (1988) Derek Jacobi (1989) Vincent Gardenia (1990) James Earl Jones (1991) Hume Cronyn (1992) Beau Bridges (1993) Michael A. Goorjian (1994) Donald Sutherland (1995) Tom Hulce (1996) Beau Bridges (1997) George C. Scott (1998) Peter O'Toole (1999) Hank Azaria (2000) Brian Cox (2001) Michael Moriarty (2002) Ben Gazzara (2003) Jeffrey Wright (2004) Paul Newman (2005) Jeremy Irons (2006) Thomas Haden Church (2007) Tom Wilkinson (2008) Ken Howard (2009) David Strathairn (2010) Guy Pearce (2011) Tom Berenger (2012) James Cromwell (2013) Martin Freeman (2014) Bill Murray (2015) Sterling K. Brown (2016) [hide] v t e Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance Nancy Cartwright / Dan Castellaneta / Julie Kavner / Jackie Mason / Yeardley Smith / Marcia Wallace (1992) Dan Castellaneta (1993) Christopher Plummer (1994) Jonathan Katz (1995) none (1996) Jeremy Irons / Rik Mayall (1997) Hank Azaria (1998) Ja'net Dubois (1999) Seth MacFarlane / Julie Harris (2000) Hank Azaria / Ja'net Dubois (2001) Peter Macon / Pamela Adlon (2002) Hank Azaria (2003) Dan Castellaneta (2004) Keith David (2005) Kelsey Grammer (2006) none (2007) Keith David (2008) Dan Castellaneta (2009) Anne Hathaway (2010) Maurice LaMarche (2011) Maurice LaMarche (2012) Lily Tomlin (2013) [hide] v t e Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama 1943–1960 Paul Lukas (1943) Alexander Knox (1944) Ray Milland (1945) Gregory Peck (1946) Ronald Colman (1947) Laurence Olivier (1948) Broderick Crawford (1949) José Ferrer (1950) Fredric March (1951) Gary Cooper (1952) Spencer Tracy (1953) Marlon Brando (1954) Ernest Borgnine (1955) Kirk Douglas (1956) Alec Guinness (1957) David Niven (1958) Anthony Franciosa (1959) Burt Lancaster (1960) 1961–1980 Maximilian Schell (1961) Gregory Peck (1962) Sidney Poitier (1963) Peter O'Toole (1964) Omar Sharif (1965) Paul Scofield (1966) Rod Steiger (1967) Peter O'Toole (1968) John Wayne (1969) George C. Scott (1970) Gene Hackman (1971) Marlon Brando (1972) Al Pacino (1973) Jack Nicholson (1974) Jack Nicholson (1975) Peter Finch (1976) Richard Burton (1977) Jon Voight (1978) Dustin Hoffman (1979) Robert De Niro (1980) 1981–2000 Henry Fonda (1981) Ben Kingsley (1982) Robert Duvall / Tom Courtenay (1983) F. Murray Abraham (1984) Jon Voight (1985) Bob Hoskins (1986) Michael Douglas (1987) Dustin Hoffman (1988) Tom Cruise (1989) Jeremy Irons (1990) Nick Nolte (1991) Al Pacino (1992) Tom Hanks (1993) Tom Hanks (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Geoffrey Rush (1996) Peter Fonda (1997) Jim Carrey (1998) Denzel Washington (1999) Tom Hanks (2000) 2001–present Russell Crowe (2001) Jack Nicholson (2002) Sean Penn (2003) Leonardo DiCaprio (2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) Forest Whitaker (2006) Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) Mickey Rourke (2008) Jeff Bridges (2009) Colin Firth (2010) George Clooney (2011) Daniel Day-Lewis (2012) Matthew McConaughey (2013) Eddie Redmayne (2014) Leonardo DiCaprio (2015) Casey Affleck (2016) [hide] v t e Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film James Brolin (1970) Edward Asner (1971) James Brolin (1972) McLean Stevenson (1973) Harvey Korman (1974) Edward Asner/Tim Conway (1975) Edward Asner (1976) Norman Fell (1978) Danny DeVito/Vic Tayback (1979) Pat Harrington Jr./Vic Tayback (1980) John Hillerman (1981) Lionel Stander (1982) Richard Kiley (1983) Paul Le Mat (1984) Edward James Olmos (1985) Jan Niklas (1986) Rutger Hauer (1987) Barry Bostwick/John Gielgud (1988) Dean Stockwell (1989) Charles Durning (1990) Louis Gossett, Jr. (1991) Maximilian Schell (1992) Beau Bridges (1993) Edward James Olmos (1994) Donald Sutherland (1995) Ian McKellen (1996) George C. Scott (1997) Don Cheadle/Gregory Peck (1998) Peter Fonda (1999) Robert Downey Jr. (2000) Stanley Tucci (2001) Donald Sutherland (2002) Jeffrey Wright (2003) William Shatner (2004) Paul Newman (2005) Jeremy Irons (2006) Jeremy Piven (2007) Tom Wilkinson (2008) John Lithgow (2009) Chris Colfer (2010) Peter Dinklage (2011) Ed Harris (2012) Jon Voight (2013) Matt Bomer (2014) Christian Slater (2015) Hugh Laurie (2016) [hide] v t e Honorary César 1976–2000 Ingrid Bergman (1976) Diana Ross (1976) Henri Langlois (1977) Jacques Tati (1977) Robert Dorfmann (1978) René Goscinny (1978) Marcel Carné (1979) Charles Vanel (1979) Walt Disney (1979) Pierre Braunberger (1980) Louis de Funès (1980) Kirk Douglas (1980) Marcel Pagnol (1981) Alain Resnais (1981) Georges Dancigers (1982) Alexandre Mnouchkine (1982) Jean Nény (1982) Andrzej Wajda (1982) Raimu (1983) René Clément (1984) Georges de Beauregard (1984) Edwige Feuillère (1984) Christian-Jaque (1985) Danielle Darrieux (1985) Christine Gouze-Rénal (1985) Alain Poiré (1985) Maurice Jarre (1986) Bette Davis (1986) Jean Delannoy (1986) René Ferracci (1986) Claude Lanzmann (1986) Jean-Luc Godard (1987) Serge Silberman (1988) Bernard Blier (1989) Paul Grimault (1989) Gérard Philipe (1990) Jean-Pierre Aumont (1991) Sophia Loren (1991) Michèle Morgan (1992) Sylvester Stallone (1992) Jean Marais (1993) Marcello Mastroianni (1993) Gérard Oury (1993) Jean Carmet (1994) Jeanne Moreau (1995) Gregory Peck (1995) Steven Spielberg (1995) Lauren Bacall (1996) Henri Verneuil (1996) Charles Aznavour (1997) Andie MacDowell (1997) Michael Douglas (1998) Clint Eastwood (1998) Jean-Luc Godard (1998) Pedro Almodóvar (1999) Johnny Depp (1999) Jean Rochefort (1999) Josiane Balasko (2000) Georges Cravenne (2000) Jean-Pierre Léaud (2000) Martin Scorsese (2000) 2001–present Darry Cowl (2001) Charlotte Rampling (2001) Agnès Varda (2001) Anouk Aimée (2002) Jeremy Irons (2002) Claude Rich (2002) Bernadette Lafont (2003) Spike Lee (2003) Meryl Streep (2003) Micheline Presle (2004) Jacques Dutronc (2005) Will Smith (2005) Hugh Grant (2006) Pierre Richard (2006) Marlène Jobert (2007) Jude Law (2007) Jeanne Moreau (2008) Roberto Benigni (2008) Dustin Hoffman (2009) Harrison Ford (2010) Quentin Tarantino (2011) Kate Winslet (2012) Kevin Costner (2013) Scarlett Johansson (2014) Sean Penn (2015) Michael Douglas (2016) George Clooney (2017) [hide] v t e Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor Al Pacino (1975) Robert De Niro (1976) Richard Dreyfuss (1977) Jon Voight (1978) Dustin Hoffman (1979) Robert De Niro (1980) Burt Lancaster (1981) Ben Kingsley (1982) Robert Duvall (1983) F. Murray Abraham / Albert Finney (1984) William Hurt (1985) Bob Hoskins (1986) Jack Nicholson / Steve Martin (1987) Tom Hanks (1988) Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) Jeremy Irons (1990) Nick Nolte (1991) Clint Eastwood (1992) Anthony Hopkins (1993) John Travolta (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Geoffrey Rush (1996) Robert Duvall (1997) Ian McKellen (1998) Russell Crowe (1999) Michael Douglas (2000) Denzel Washington (2001) Daniel Day-Lewis / Jack Nicholson (2002) Bill Murray (2003) Liam Neeson (2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) Sacha Baron Cohen / Forest Whitaker (2006) Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) Sean Penn (2008) Jeff Bridges (2009) Colin Firth (2010) Michael Fassbender (2011) Joaquin Phoenix (2012) Bruce Dern (2013) Tom Hardy (2014) Michael Fassbender (2015) Adam Driver (2016) [hide] v t e National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor Michael Caine (1966) Rod Steiger (1967) Per Oscarsson (1968) Jon Voight (1969) George C. Scott (1970) Peter Finch (1971) Al Pacino (1972) Marlon Brando (1973) Jack Nicholson (1974) Jack Nicholson (1975) Robert De Niro (1976) Art Carney (1977) Gary Busey (1978) Dustin Hoffman (1979) Peter O'Toole (1980) Burt Lancaster (1981) Dustin Hoffman (1982) Gérard Depardieu (1983) Steve Martin (1984) Jack Nicholson (1985) Bob Hoskins (1986) Steve Martin (1987) Michael Keaton (1988) Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) Jeremy Irons (1990) River Phoenix (1991) Stephen Rea (1992) David Thewlis (1993) Paul Newman (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Eddie Murphy (1996) Robert Duvall (1997) Nick Nolte (1998) Russell Crowe (1999) Javier Bardem (2000) Gene Hackman (2001) Adrien Brody (2002) Bill Murray (2003) Jamie Foxx (2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) Forest Whitaker (2006) Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) Sean Penn (2008) Jeremy Renner (2009) Jesse Eisenberg (2010) Brad Pitt (2011) Daniel Day-Lewis (2012) Oscar Isaac (2013) Timothy Spall (2014) Michael B. Jordan (2015) Casey Affleck (2016) [hide] v t e New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor 1935–1950 Charles Laughton (1935) Walter Huston (1936) Paul Muni (1937) James Cagney (1938) James Stewart (1939) Charlie Chaplin (1940) Gary Cooper (1941) James Cagney (1942) Paul Lukas (1943) Barry Fitzgerald (1944) Ray Milland (1945) Laurence Olivier (1946) William Powell (1947) Laurence Olivier (1948) Broderick Crawford (1949) Gregory Peck (1950) 1951–1975 Arthur Kennedy (1951) Ralph Richardson (1952) Burt Lancaster (1953) Marlon Brando (1954) Ernest Borgnine (1955) Kirk Douglas (1956) Alec Guinness (1957) David Niven (1958) James Stewart (1959) Burt Lancaster (1960) Maximilian Schell (1961) No award (1962) Albert Finney (1963) Rex Harrison (1964) Oskar Werner (1965) Paul Scofield (1966) Rod Steiger (1967) Alan Arkin (1968) Jon Voight (1969) George C. Scott (1970) Gene Hackman (1971) Laurence Olivier (1972) Marlon Brando (1973) Jack Nicholson (1974) Jack Nicholson (1975) 1976–2000 Robert De Niro (1976) John Gielgud (1977) Jon Voight (1978) Dustin Hoffman (1979) Robert De Niro (1980) Burt Lancaster (1981) Ben Kingsley (1982) Robert Duvall (1983) Steve Martin (1984) Jack Nicholson (1985) Bob Hoskins (1986) Jack Nicholson (1987) Jeremy Irons (1988) Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) Robert De Niro (1990) Anthony Hopkins (1991) Denzel Washington (1992) David Thewlis (1993) Paul Newman (1994) Nicolas Cage (1995) Geoffrey Rush (1996) Peter Fonda (1997) Nick Nolte (1998) Richard Farnsworth (1999) Tom Hanks (2000) 2001–present Tom Wilkinson (2001) Daniel Day-Lewis (2002) Bill Murray (2003) Paul Giamatti (2004) Heath Ledger (2005) Forest Whitaker (2006) Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) Sean Penn (2008) George Clooney (2009) Colin Firth (2010) Brad Pitt (2011) Daniel Day-Lewis (2012) Robert Redford (2013) Timothy Spall (2014) Michael Keaton (2015) Casey Affleck (2016) [hide] v t e Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Raúl Juliá (1994) Gary Sinise (1995) Alan Rickman (1996) Gary Sinise (1997) Christopher Reeve (1998) Jack Lemmon (1999) Brian Dennehy (2000) Ben Kingsley (2001) William H. Macy (2002) Al Pacino (2003) Geoffrey Rush (2004) Paul Newman (2005) Jeremy Irons (2006) Kevin Kline (2007) Paul Giamatti (2008) Kevin Bacon (2009) Al Pacino (2010) Paul Giamatti (2011) Kevin Costner (2012) Michael Douglas (2013) Mark Ruffalo (2014) Idris Elba (2015) Bryan Cranston (2016) [hide] v t e Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play José Ferrer / Fredric March (1947) Henry Fonda / Paul Kelly / Basil Rathbone (1948) Rex Harrison (1949) Sidney Blackmer (1950) Claude Rains (1951) José Ferrer (1952) Tom Ewell (1953) David Wayne (1954) Alfred Lunt (1955) Paul Muni (1956) Fredric March (1957) Ralph Bellamy (1958) Jason Robards, Jr. (1959) Melvyn Douglas (1960) Zero Mostel (1961) Paul Scofield (1962) Arthur Hill (1963) Alec Guinness (1964) Walter Matthau (1965) Hal Holbrook (1966) Paul Rogers (1967) Martin Balsam (1968) James Earl Jones (1969) Fritz Weaver (1970) Brian Bedford (1971) Cliff Gorman (1972) Alan Bates (1973) Michael Moriarty (1974) John Kani and Winston Ntshona (1975) John Wood (1976) Al Pacino (1977) Barnard Hughes (1978) Tom Conti (1979) John Rubinstein (1980) Ian McKellen (1981) Roger Rees (1982) Harvey Fierstein (1983) Jeremy Irons (1984) Derek Jacobi (1985) Judd Hirsch (1986) James Earl Jones (1987) Ron Silver (1988) Philip Bosco (1989) Robert Morse (1990) Nigel Hawthorne (1991) Judd Hirsch (1992) Ron Leibman (1993) Stephen Spinella (1994) Ralph Fiennes (1995) George Grizzard (1996) Christopher Plummer (1997) Anthony LaPaglia (1998) Brian Dennehy (1999) Stephen Dillane (2000) Richard Easton (2001) Alan Bates (2002) Brian Dennehy (2003) Jefferson Mays (2004) Bill Irwin (2005) Richard Griffiths (2006) Frank Langella (2007) Mark Rylance (2008) Geoffrey Rush (2009) Denzel Washington (2010) Mark Rylance (2011) James Corden (2012) Tracy Letts (2013) Bryan Cranston (2014) Alex Sharp (2015) Frank Langella (2016) Kevin Kline (2017) [hide] v t e Hosts of the Tony Awards ceremonies 1947–1960 Brock Pemberton (1947) Bert Lytell / Hiram Sherman / Harry Hirshfield (1948) Brock Pemberton / James Sauter (1949) None (1950) James Sauter (1951) Helen Hayes (1952) Faye Emerson (1953) James Sauter (1954) Helen Hayes (1955) Jack Carter (1956) Bud Collyer (1957) Bud Collyer (1958) Bud Collyer (1959) Eddie Albert (1960) 1961–1980 Phil Silvers (1961) Ray Bolger / Robert Preston (1962) Abe Burrows / Robert Morse (1963) Sidney Blackmer (1964) Tom Bosley / José Ferrer / Van Johnson (1965) George Abbott / Ginger Rogers (1966) Mary Martin / Robert Preston (1967) Angela Lansbury / Peter Ustinov (1968) Diahann Carroll / Alan King (1969) Julie Andrews / Shirley MacLaine / Walter Matthau (1970) Lauren Bacall / Angela Lansbury / Anthony Quayle / Anthony Quinn (1971) Deborah Kerr / Henry Fonda / Peter Ustinov (1972) Rex Harrison / Celeste Holm (1973) Peter Falk / Florence Henderson / Robert Preston / Cicely Tyson (1974) Larry Blyden / George S. Irving / Larry Kert / Carol Lawrence / Michele Lee / Bernadette Peters / Bobby Van (1975) Eddie Albert / Richard Burton / Jane Fonda / Diana Rigg / George C. Scott / Trish Van Devere (1976) Jack Albertson / Bea Arthur / Buddy Ebsen / Damon Evans / Jean Stapleton / Leslie Uggams (1977) None (1978) Jane Alexander / Henry Fonda / Liv Ullmann (1979) Mary Tyler Moore / Jason Robards (1980) 1981–2000 Ellen Burstyn / Richard Chamberlain (1981) Tony Randall (1982) Richard Burton / Lena Horne / Jack Lemmon (1983) Julie Andrews / Robert Preston (1984) None (1985) None (1986) Angela Lansbury (1987) Angela Lansbury (1988) Angela Lansbury (1989) Kathleen Turner (1990) Julie Andrews / Jeremy Irons (1991) Glenn Close (1992) Liza Minnelli (1993) Anthony Hopkins / Amy Irving (1994) Nathan Lane / Glenn Close / Gregory Hines (1995) Nathan Lane (1996) Rosie O'Donnell (1997) Rosie O'Donnell (1998) None (1999) Rosie O'Donnell (2000) 2001–2020 Nathan Lane / Matthew Broderick (2001) Bernadette Peters / Gregory Hines (2002) Hugh Jackman (2003) Hugh Jackman (2004) Hugh Jackman (2005) None (2006) None (2007) Whoopi Goldberg (2008) Neil Patrick Harris (2009) Sean Hayes (2010) Neil Patrick Harris (2011) Neil Patrick Harris (2012) Neil Patrick Harris (2013) Hugh Jackman (2014) Kristin Chenoweth / Alan Cumming (2015) James Corden (2016) Kevin Spacey (2017) [hide] v t e Triple Crown of Acting winners Jack Albertson Anne Bancroft Ingrid Bergman Shirley Booth Ellen Burstyn Viola Davis Melvyn Douglas Helen Hayes Jeremy Irons Jessica Lange Frances McDormand Helen Mirren Thomas Mitchell Rita Moreno Al Pacino Christopher Plummer Vanessa Redgrave Jason Robards Geoffrey Rush Paul Scofield Maggie Smith Maureen Stapleton Jessica Tandy Authority control WorldCat Identities VIAF: 114783177 LCCN: n88227072 ISNI: 0000 0001 0937 8948 GND: 119238950 SUDOC: 059923741 BNF: cb13922838x (data) MusicBrainz: 349ab9cc-3062-430e-9561-d73d0e10e08a BNE: XX1281883 IATH: w6668ktk Categories: 1948 birthsLiving people20th-century English male actors21st-century English male actorsAlumni of Bristol Old Vic Theatre SchoolAnnie Award winnersAudio book narratorsBest Actor Academy Award winnersBest Actor Genie and Canadian Screen Award winnersBest Drama Actor Golden Globe (film) winnersBest Supporting Actor Golden Globe (television) winnersCésar Award winnersCusack family (Ireland)David di Donatello winnersEnglish male film actorsEnglish male Shakespearean actorsEnglish male stage actorsEnglish male television actorsEnglish male voice actorsBritish people of English descentBritish people of Irish descentEnglish people of Irish descentIrons familyLabour Party (UK) peopleOutstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Screen Actors Guild Award winnersOutstanding Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Primetime Emmy Award winnersPeople educated at Sherborne SchoolPeople from CowesRoyal Shakespeare Company membersTony Award winners

Jeremy Irons Biography Showing all 79 items Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (2) | Trade Mark (4) | Trivia (46) | Personal Quotes (23) Overview (3) Born September 19, 1948 in Cowes, Isle of Wight, England, UK Birth Name Jeremy John Irons Height 6' 2" (1.88 m) Mini Bio (1) British actor Jeremy Irons was born in Cowes, Isle of Wight, a small island off the south coast of England. He is the son of Barbara Anne Brereton (Sharpe) and Paul Dugan Irons, an accountant. Young Jeremy didn't prove very fond of figures. He visited mainland England only once a year. He wound up being grounded when his family settled down in Hertfordshire. At the age of 13 he enrolled in Sherborne School, Dorset, where he could practice his favorite sport, horse-riding. Before becoming an actor, he had considered a veterinarian surgeon's career.

He trained at the Bristol Old Vic School for two years, then joined Bristol Old Vic repertory company where he gained experience working in everything from Shakespeare to contemporary dramas. He moved to London in 1971 and had a number of jobs before landing the role of "John the Baptist" in the hit musical "Godspell". He went on to have a successful early career in the West End theatre and on TV, and debuted on-screen in Nijinsky (1980). In the early 80s, he gained international attention with his starring role in the Granada Television serial adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's classic novel Brideshead Revisited (1981), after which he was much in demand as a romantic leading man. He went on to a steady film career. In 1984, he debuted on Broadway opposite: Glenn Close in Tom Stoppard's "The Real Thing" and, in the mid-80s, he appeared in three lead roles with the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Once described as 'the thinking woman's pin up', he has made his name in thought provoking films such as David Cronenberg's Dead Ringers (1988), for which he won the New York Critics Best Actor Award. He gained a Golden Globe Award in addition to an Oscar for Best Actor in 1990 for his role as Claus von Bulow in Reversal of Fortune (1990) alongside Glenn Close. Among his many achievements, his role as Professor Higgins in Loewe-Lerner's famous musical "My Fair Lady" mustn't be forgotten. It was in London, back in 1987.

He is married to actress Sinéad Cusack, with whom he appeared in Waterland (1992) and in the Royal Shakespeare Company plays. He appeared with his son Samuel Irons and his father-in-law Cyril Cusack in the film Roald Dahl's Danny the Champion of the World (1989). His son Max Irons is also an actor. - IMDb Mini Biography By: Gustaf Molin <gumo@hem2.passagen.se> and Guy Bellinger

Spouse (2) Sinéad Cusack (28 March 1978 - present) (2 children) Julie Hallam (1969 - 1969) (annulled) Trade Mark (4) Renowned for aggressive and industrious work ethic Often plays sinister villains Rich haunting voice Calm, reserved performances Trivia (46) An exceptionaly good horseman and enjoys skiing. Hates cooking, but loves gardening and the beauty of nature. Born at 2:00am-BST. After being ticketed in England for driving 97 mph. on his BMW motorcycle and being charged with speeding and fined $225.00, he had his motorcycle license suspended for three months (1 June 1995). Son-in-law of Cyril Cusack and Maureen Cusack. Brother-in-law of Sorcha Cusack, Niamh Cusack, Paul Cusack, Pádraig Cusack and Catherine Cusack. Owns Kilcoe Castle (which he had painted a rusty pink) in County Cork, Ireland, and has become involved in local politics. He has twice played characters with the same first and last name. The first in Lolita (1997) (Humbert Humbert) and second in And Now... Ladies and Gentlemen... (2002) (Valentin Valentin). In 1996, he became the fourteenth performer to win the Triple Crown of acting. Oscar: Best Actor in a Leading Role, Reversal of Fortune (1990), Tony: Best Actor in a Play, "The Real Thing" (1984) and Emmy: Outstanding Voice-Over Performance, The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century: War Without End (1996) Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie, Elizabeth I (2005) & Outstanding Narrator, Big Cat Week: Game of Lions (2013). Narrated the "Spaceship Earth" attraction in Epcot. Won Broadway's 1984 Tony Award as Best Actor (Play) for Tom Stoppard's "The Real Thing." Member of jury at the Cannes Film Festival in 2000. At the 1990 Oscars, Irons concluded his acceptance speech for best actor in Reversal of Fortune (1990) by thanking "David". The "David" was David Cronenberg, who directed Irons the previous year in Dead Ringers (1988). The "Series of Unfortunate Events" novels by Daniel Handler make reference to three of his characters. In Reversal of Fortune (1990), he plays Klaus von Bülow, husband to Sunny von Bülow. Two of the lead characters in Handler's novels are named Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire. In The Carnivorous Carnival, Klaus and his other sister Violet disguise themselves as circus freaks named Beverly and Elliot, which are the names of the identical twin gynecologists that Irons plays in Dead Ringers (1988). In 2003, he appeared in a Comic Relief sketch entitled "Harry Potter and the Secret Chamberpot of Azerbaijan". Irons played Severus Snape, a character played in the films by Alan Rickman. Irons and Rickman play brothers in the "Die Hard" films. Has a signet ring with the insignia PDI engraved on it. It belonged to his father Paul Dugan Irons. He currently owns Audi A6 Quatro estate, BMW cruising bike, and Ducati motorbike. He has owned Morris Minor, Honda 50, and a Volkswagen rag-top Beetle. Born to Paul Dugan Irons, an accountant, and Barbara Anne Sharpe a homemaker, he has a brother, Christopher and a sister Felicity. His previous jobs include assistant stage manager, house-cleaner, "busker" (singing and playing guitar outside movie theaters), and gardener. Was one of the cast members of cult children's programme Play Away (1971), from which clips featuring him are regularly repeated on "Before They Were Famous..." type programmes. President of the jury at 2007 Sarajevo Film Festival. One of the first celebrities to wear the recently created Red Ribbon, supporting the fight against AIDS (1991). Supporter of English football team Portsmouth F.C. Attended Sherborne School for boys from 1962-1966. Helped to financially Sponser British Character Actor Stephen Manwaring whilst Stephen was at The Italia Conti Academy of Theatre Arts in 1999-2002. Won the 1984 Tony Award (New York City) for Actor in a Drama for "The Real Thing". In 2004, he declared his support for the Countryside Alliance. In 1998, he was named as a major donor to the Labour Party. Confessed to Pat Kenny on Irish TV, The Late Late Show (1970), that one of his guilty pleasures was sifting through dumpsters in search of discarded "treasures". Son-in-law of Maureen Cusack. Brother-in-law of Paul Cusack and 'Padraig Cusack'. Is one of 9 actors to have won the Triple Crown of Acting (an Oscar, Emmy and Tony); the others in chronological order are Thomas Mitchell, Melvyn Douglas, Paul Scofield, Jack Albertson, Jason Robards, Al Pacino, Geoffrey Rush and Christopher Plummer. He and his documentary film Trashed (2012) was be featured at the "New York Times Energy for Tomorrow" Conference on "Building Sustainable Cities" in New York City on April 25, 2013. Became a father for the 1st time at age 30 when his 2nd wife Sinéad Cusack gave birth to their son Samuel Irons on 16 September 1978. Became a father for the 2nd time at age 37 when his 2nd wife Sinéad Cusack gave birth to their son Max Irons on 17 October 1985. On Broadway in the play "Impressionism". Opened March 24. Scheduled to run through July 5th, 2009. [March 2009] Starring in the theatrical adaptation of Sándor Márai's novel, "Embers" at Duke of York's Theatre in London. [February 2006] At the New York City Opera in Stephen Sondheim's "A Little Night Music". [March 2003] He is the second Academy-Award winning actor to play the role of Alfred Pennyworth after Michael Caine. Although he is a heavy smoker, he claims that he is unable to drink alcohol without getting sick. Starred opposite his wife Sinead Cusack in Laga'at B'Yofee (1996). He won an Oscar for playing Claus Von Bullow in Reversal of Fortune (1990), making him one of 18 actors to win the Award for playing a real person who was still alive at the evening of the Award ceremony (as of 2015). The other seventeen actors and their respective performances are: Spencer Tracy for playing Father Edward Flanagan in Boys Town (1938), Gary Cooper for playing Alvin C. York in Samal York (1941), Patty Duke for playing Helen Keller in The Miracle Worker (1962), Jason Robards for playing Ben Bradlee in All the President's Men (1976), Robert De Niro for playing Jake La Motta in Raging Bull (1980), Sissy Spacek for playing Loretta Lynn in Coal Miner's Daughter (1980)_, Susan Sarandon for playing Sister Helen Prejean in Gever Met Mahaleh (1995), Geoffrey Rush for playing David Helfgott in Shine (1996), Julia Roberts for playing Erin Brockovich in Erin Brockovich (2000), Jim Broadbent for playing John Bayley in Iris V'John (2001), Jennifer Connelly for playing Alice Nash in Niflaot Ha-Tvuna (2001), Helen Mirren for playing Queen Elizabeth II in Ha'malka (2006), Sandra Bullock for playing Leigh Anne Tuohy in Hizdamnut shnia (2009), Christian Bale for playing Dickie Eklund in The Fighter (2010), Melissa Leo for playing Alice Eklund-Ward in The Fighter (2010), Meryl Streep for playing Margaret Thatcher in Eshet ha'barzel (2011) and Eddie Redmayne for playing Stephen Hawking in Ha'teoria shel ha'kol (2014). Was wearing sneakers when called to the stage to accept his Oscar in 1991. He and fellow Melech Ha-Arayot (1994) cast member Whoopi Goldberg were both nominees for the first ever Emmy Award for Outstanding Narrator in 2014; Irons won. Turned down the role of Dr Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs (1991) because he just finished playing Claus Von Bulow in Reversal of Fortune (1990) and didn't want to play another dark character. He was originally considered for the part of Neville Chamberlain in Masaryk (2016), eventually played by Paul Nicholas. He is fluent in French. Owns a home in The Liberties neighborhood in Dublin, Ireland, as well as a home in his birthplace of Cowes, on the Isle Of Wight, and a farm in Watlington, Oxfordshire. Personal Quotes (23) I've never been passionate about acting, and I find more and more that I work to live the life I want to live. An actor like Al Pacino lives to act. I'm not sure though, there's something about the detachment I have, the feeling of the lack of importance about what I do, that is healthy. Anyway, I'm never satisfied. I think were I ever satisfied with my work, I'd be in trouble. Basically, I want to keep working, so I don't worry about the size of the character - if it's interesting, I'll do it. It's quite nice doing smaller roles, in some ways. It means I get home more, and I can get on with my life. The movie industry is run by accountants in Hollywood and it's as simple as this; everyone has a number on their computer. They can look up Jeremy Irons and see what my last five movies have made. Say you want to make a $20m picture, which is relatively cheap. If Jeremy makes $9m, the director makes $5m, then you need a leading lady, and they just go through those figures - that's how casting happens. And none of my movies has made a lot of money. As you get older, you look back and try to make sense of the sort of person you have become. And I think the most important thing that happened in my childhood was the first night I went to boarding school at the age of seven. I remember that night, and the loneliness. Also, my parents' marriage broke up when I was 15. But I think it was that first night at seven years old when I felt something had broken, and I've spent my life trying to get back to that feeling of home. It's the same sense of family that you find in the theater and movies. In fact, I'm hoping to make a film about that very subject - the need for home. You don't really have a home until you have children. And that home is created by the children. What a camera likes are eyes which have life and tell a story. On his Ducati motorbike: "Ferrari on two wheels." I sing like an actor and dance like a duck. In an interview, he once explained the origin and pronunciation of his name thus: "My name is certainly not pronounced 'Eye-rons,' but just like the metal. In England we say, 'Eye-ons' -- we're lazy about our Rs. Here [USA] I guess you would say 'Ire-ons.'" The name is fairly common in England, it's probably short for Ironsmith." If we have to pay taxes [for Emmy gift bags], so be it. But don't spend it on bombs, for Christ's sake. (When asked by an interviewer about why he accepted his role in Dungeons & Dragons (2000)) "Are you kidding? I'd just bought a castle, I had to pay for it somehow!" Actors often behave like children and so we're taken for children. I want to be grown up. [1986 comment on Robert De Niro] He is a method actor. I think it would be fair to say he's much slower than I am. As a man, Bob dislikes making a decision. And acting is a whole line of decisions. You make a decision every time you play a line -- do I say it like this or like that? But what I saw was a man trying many areas and now and again something would really work. [on Lolita (1997)] It's very difficult because children under sixteen are immensely attractive, any father will tell you. We have to accept that, understand it for what it is and not become hysterical about it. Strangely enough, Humbert Humbert is not a paedophile ... because he knew he was doing wrong. That's his tragedy in a way. I remember when my son was twelve he was like a god. He just went through that sort of golden time for about 18 months. Parental love is sexual. Boys will flirt outrageously with their mothers. [on Waterland (1992)] I find working for money and nothing else just totally soul-destroying. I've always wanted to work with the best directors on material that interests me, so that how this has come about really. [accepting his Best Actor Oscar, 1991] This is great! [on portraying Rodrigo Borgia] I don't want to make him a sympathetic man. I want him to be an inconsistent man, a man where one moment you think 'Christ, that's terrible!' and some moments you think 'Oh, he's wonderful!' Like all of us, I want to try and create someone that is neither black nor white. [At 2005 Oscars, responding to a loud bang on-stage while speaking about the 'Live Action Short' category] Oh God, I hope they missed. [on Downton Abbey (2010)] If you think that's good, then watch the Shakespeare productions [Shakespeare Uncovered (2012)]. You'll see what real writing, what real stories, what real characters are about. [on returning to the stage in a 1981 interview] I'd like to very much, but the stage - particularly the Royal Shakespeare, which is where I'd like to return for the exceptional quality of its work - really requires at least a year's commitment. A year now in the theatre is probably not a very clever idea; I think I should be consolidating my film career. [in a 1981 interview about movie stardom] I suppose I'd like to be a movie star because I'd like to make people come to the pictures I'm in. Then, of course, there's a responsibility to choose good material. And when they saw me, I'd like to dazzle them, as a star dazzle - as for the paraphernalia surrounding a star, that doesn't interest me much. I quite like my privacy. I enjoy playing villains. It's very difficult in many situations to know who the villains and good guys are. People tend to think in black and white, and, of course, we are all gray. (in a 2016 AARP interview) I feel as confidant on my motorcycle as I do on my two feet. I call it my urban horse. The joy of motorcycling is real freedom and being in touch with the environment - the road circuits, the temperatures, the winds, the smells. It's a wonderful sensory experience.

About ג'רמי איירונס (עברית)

ג'רמי איירונס ג'רמי איירונס Jeremy Irons Jeremy Irons (Berlin Film Festival 2011).jpg ג'רמי איירונס, (פסטיבל ברלין, 2011) תאריך לידה 19 בספטמבר 1948 (בן 68) מקום לידה קווס, האי וייט, אנגליה פרסים פרס אוסקר פרס גלובוס הזהב פרס גילדת שחקני המסך פרס טוני שפה מועדפת אנגלית עריכת הנתון בוויקינתונים http://www.jeremy-irons.com/ פרופיל ב-IMDb לעריכה בוויקינתונים שמשמש מקור לחלק מהמידע בתבנית ג'רמי ג'ון איירונס (באנגלית: Jeremy John Irons; נולד ב-19 בספטמבר 1948) הוא שחקן קולנוע, טלוויזיה ותיאטרון אנגלי זוכה פרס אוסקר לשחקן הטוב ביותר לשנת 1990 על תפקידו בסרט "תהפוכות הגורל".

תוכן עניינים [%D7%94%D7%A1%D7%AA%D7%A8%D7%94] 1 השנים הראשונות 2 קריירה 2.1 תיאטרון 2.2 טלוויזיה 2.3 קולנוע 3 חייו האישיים 4 פילמוגרפיה 5 קישורים חיצוניים השנים הראשונות[%D7%A2%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%AA קוד מקור | עריכה] איירונס נולד בקווס, האי וייט. הוא בנם של ברברה אן ופול דאגן איירונס. איירונס הוא ממוצא אירי. יש לו אח בשם כריסטופר ואחות בשם פליסטי. איירונס למד ב"בית ספר שרבון" (אנ') במחוז דורסט שבדרום מערב אנגליה במשך 4 שנים.

קריירה[%D7%A2%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%AA קוד מקור | עריכה] תיאטרון[%D7%A2%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%AA קוד מקור | עריכה] איירונס החל את קריירת המשחק שלו ב"בית ספר לתיאטרון בריסטול אולד ויק" שם הופיע בכמה הצגות וערך מופעי רחוב ברחובות בריסטול. כשעבר לבמות הגדולות יותר בלונדון הופיע איירונס בתור יוחנן המטביל ויהודה איש קריות לפני שהופיע בתיאטרון ויינדהאם. לאות כבוד על קריירת הקולנוע, טלוויזיה והתיאטרון קיבל איירונס את תואר מלגת הכבוד מאוניברסיטת דבלין ב-2008. את החותמת על קריירת התיאטרון המוצלחת קיבל איירונס ב-1984 כשזכה בפרס טוני על ההופעה הטובה ביותר, את הפרס קיבל על הופעת הבכורה שלו בניו יורק במחזה "הדבר האמיתי".

טלוויזיה[%D7%A2%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%AA קוד מקור | עריכה] בתחילת דרכו בטלוויזיה הבריטית הופיע איירונס במספר סדרות טלוויזיה מקומיות הכוללות את "פרנץ ליסט", "Notorious Woman" ו"Love for Lydia". התפקיד אשר הביא לאיירונס את מלוא הפרסום וההכרה הראשוניים היה בסדרה "חמדת הימים" על פי ספרו של אוולין וו, על תפקיד זה קיבל איירונס מועמדות ראשונה לפרס אמי, פרס גלובוס הזהב ול"פרס האקדמיה הבריטית". בשנת 2005 זכה איירונס בפרס אמי ובפרס גלובוס הזהב על תפקידו בסדרה המבוססת על דמותה של אליזבת הראשונה, מלכת אנגליה. איירונס מככב בסדרת הטלוויזיה של רשת Showtime "הבורג'ס" ששודרה בשנת 2011. בשנת 2014, זכה בפרס אמי נוסף על קריינותו בסרט הטבע 'Game of Lions' (אנ').

קולנוע[%D7%A2%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%AA קוד מקור | עריכה] את ההכרה הקולנועית הראשונה שלו קיבל איירונס בסרט "אהובת הקצין הצרפתי" בשנת 1981 לצד מריל סטריפ, על הופעתו בסרט זה היה מועמד לפרס באפט"א. את מועמדות פרס גלובוס הזהב השנייה שלו קיבל איירונס ב-1986 כששיחק לצד רוברט דה נירו בדרמה ההיסטורית "המיסיון". איירונס שיתף פעולה עם הבמאי הקנדי דייוויד קרוננברג בסרט האימה הפסיכולוגי "תאומי המריבה", על תפקידו קיבל מועמדות לפרס סאטורן.

בשנת 1990 זכה איירונס בפרס אוסקר לשחקן הטוב ביותר ובפרס גלובוס הזהב על תפקידו בעיבוד הקולנועי לספר תהפוכות הגורל. איירונס שיחק בסרט את קלאוס פון ביולוב, המיליונר שהואשם ברצח אשתו ושכר את העורך דין הטוב ביותר שניתן למצוא – אלן דרשוביץ. איירונס דיבב את דמותו של האריה הרשע סקאר בסרט האנימציה שובר הקופות "מלך האריות". שנה לאחר מכן שיחק איירונס את הנבל התורן שמתעלל בג'ון מקליין (ברוס ויליס) בסרט "מת לחיות 3". בשנת 2005 שיחק איירונס בסרטו של רידלי סקוט "ממלכת גן עדן" וגילם את דמותו של רמון השלישי מטריפולי שליט העיר טבריה בתקופת מסעות הצלב. שנה לאחר מכן שיחק בעיבוד לספר הפנטזיה "אראגון" ובו גילם את דמותו של ברום, מספר סיפורים זקן ומסתורי. בשנת 2009 שיחק ב"הפנתר הוורוד 2".

בדצמבר 2016 שיחק בסרט הפעולה "אמונת המתנקש", אשר מבוסס על סדרת משחקי הווידאו Assassin's Creed. איירונס מגלם את אלן ריקין, לצידם של מייקל פסבנדר, מריון קוטיאר, ברנדן גליסון ומייקל קנת' ויליאמס.

חייו האישיים[%D7%A2%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%AA קוד מקור | עריכה] איירונס נישא לשחקנית האירית שינייד קיוזאק ב-1978, לזוג נולדו שני בנים סאמואל ג'יימס ברפני איירונס (1978) ומקסימיליאן פול דיארמויד איירונס (1985). איירונס דובר צרפתית שוטפת.

פילמוגרפיה[%D7%A2%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%AA קוד מקור | עריכה] אהובת הקצין הצרפתי (1981) - בתפקיד: צ'ארלס הנרי סמיתסון / מייק. בגידה (1982) - בתפקיד : ג'ארי. המיסיון (1986) - בתפקיד : האב גבריאל . תאומי המריבה (1988) - בתפקיד : בברלי מאנטלה/ אליוט מאנטלה. תהפוכות הגורל (1990) - בתפקיד: קלאוס פון בילוב. קאפקא (1991) - בתפקיד: פראנץ קאפקא. החלטה גורלית (1992) - בתפקיד : גאי ג'ונס. מ. באטרפליי (1993) - בתפקיד : רנה ג'אליארד. בית הרוחות (1993) - בתפקיד: אשטבאן טרואבה. מלך האריות (1994) - בתפקיד: דיבוב קולו של סקאר. מת לחיות 3 (1995) - בתפקיד: סיימון גרובר. לגעת ביופי (1996) - בתפקיד: אלכס. תיבה סינית (1997) - בתפקיד: ג'והן. לוליטה (1997) - בתפקיד: הומברט הומברט. האיש בעל מסיכת הברזל (1998) - בתפקיד: אראמיס. מבוכים ודרקונים (2000) - בתפקיד: פרופיון. המלאך הרביעי (2001) - בתפקיד: ג'אק אלווין. קאלאס לנצח (2002) - בתפקיד: לארי קאלי. שיחה אחרונה (2002) - סרט טלוויזיה - בתפקיד: פ. סקוט פיצג'ראלד. מכונת הזמן (2002) - בתפקיד: מנהיג המורלוקים, אובר מורלוק. גבירותי ורבותי (2003) - בתפקיד: ואלנטין ואלנטין. הסוחר מוונציה (2004) - בתפקיד: אנטוניו. להיות ג'וליה (2004) - בתפקיד: מייקל גוסלין. ממלכת גן עדן (2005) - בתפקיד: טיבריאס. קזאנובה (2005) - בתפקיד: פוצ'י. אינלנד אמפייר (2006) - בתפקיד: קינגסלי סטיוארט. אראגון (2006) - בתפקיד: ברום. אפאלוסה (2008) - בתפקיד: ראנדל קראג. הפנתר הוורוד 2 (2009) - בתפקיד: אלונסו אוונלאנדה. המילים (2012) - בתפקיד: האיש הזקן. רכבת לילה לליסבון (2013) - בתפקיד: ריימונד גרגוריוס. יצורים יפהפיים (2013) - בתפקיד: מאקון רוונווד. הקומה האחרונה (2015) - בתפקיד: רויאל. באטמן נגד סופרמן (2016) - בתפקיד: אלפרד פאניוורת', משרתו של ברוס ויין. אמונת המתנקש (2016) - בתפקיד: אלן ריקיין, יו"ר תעשיות אבסטרגן. התכתבות (2016) - בתפקיד: אד פוארום. האיש שידע אינסוף (2016) - בתפקיד : ג'. ה . הארדי. המרוץ (2016) - בתפקיד : אוורי בראנדג', נציג הוועד האולימפי. שעתם היפה (2017) - בתפקיד: שר ההגנה. קישורים חיצוניים[%D7%A2%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%AA קוד מקור | עריכה] ויקישיתוף מדיה וקבצים בנושא ג'רמי איירונס בוויקישיתוף IMDB Logo 2016.svg ג'רמי איירונס, במסד הנתונים הקולנועיים IMDb (באנגלית) אמיר קמינר, ירמיהו הקדוש, במדור פנאי פלוס באתר ynet‏, 19 באפריל 2011 ‏ איילה אור-אל, לוס אנג'לס, סגנון הפופ: ג'רמי איירונס נהנה לגלם את האפיפיור, באתר nrg‏, 24 ביוני 2012 דודי כספי, לוס אנג'לס, ג'רמי איירונס: "כבר אין לי ריגוש", באתר ישראל היום, 10 בספטמבר 2012

[%D7%94%D7%A1%D7%AA%D7%A8%D7%94]פרס אוסקר לשחקן הטוב ביותר 1928‏-1940 אמיל יאנינגס (1928) • ורנר בקסטר (1929) • ג'ורג' ארליס (1930) • ליונל ברימור (1931) • פרדריק מארץ'/ואלאס בירי (1932) • צ'ארלס לוטון (1933) • קלארק גייבל (1934) • ויקטור מקלגלן (1935) • פול מוני (1936) • ספנסר טרייסי (1937) • ספנסר טרייסי (1938) • רוברט דונט (1940) • ג'יימס סטיוארט 1941‏-1960 גרי קופר (1941) • ג'יימס קאגני (1942) • פול לוקאס (1943) • בינג קרוסבי (1944) • ריי מילאנד (1945) • פרדריק מארץ' (1946) • רונלד קולמן (1947) • לורנס אוליבייה (1948) • ברודריק קרופורד (1949) • חוזה פרר (1950) • המפרי בוגרט (1951) • גרי קופר (1952) • ויליאם הולדן (1953) • מרלון ברנדו (1954) • ארנסט בורגניין (1955) • יול ברינר (1956) • אלק גינס (1957) • דייוויד ניבן (1958) • צ'רלטון הסטון (1959) • ברט לנקסטר (1960) 1961‏-1980 מקסימיליאן של (1961) • גרגורי פק (1962) • סידני פואטייה (1963) • רקס הריסון (1964) • לי מרווין (1965) • פול סקופילד (1966) • רוד סטייגר (1967) • קליף רוברטסון (1968) • ג'ון ויין (1969) • ג'ורג' סי. סקוט (1970) • ג'ין הקמן (1971) • מרלון ברנדו (1972) • ג'ק למון (1973) • ארט קרני (1974) • ג'ק ניקולסון (1975) • פיטר פינץ' (1976) • ריצ'רד דרייפוס (1977) • ג'ון ווייט (1978) • דסטין הופמן (1979) • רוברט דה נירו (1980) 1981‏-2000 הנרי פונדה (1981) • בן קינגסלי (1982) • רוברט דובאל (1983) • פ. מארי אברהם (1984) • ויליאם הרט (1985) • פול ניומן (1986) • מייקל דאגלס (1987) • דסטין הופמן (1988) • דניאל דיי לואיס (1989) • ג'רמי איירונס (1990) • אנתוני הופקינס (1991) • אל פצ'ינו (1992) • טום הנקס (1993) • טום הנקס (1994) • ניקולס קייג' (1995) • ג'פרי ראש (1996) • ג'ק ניקולסון (1997) • רוברטו בניני (1998) • קווין ספייסי (1999) • ראסל קרואו (2000) 2001-היום דנזל וושינגטון (2001) • אדריאן ברודי (2002) • שון פן (2003) • ג'יימי פוקס (2004) • פיליפ סימור הופמן (2005) • פורסט ויטאקר (2006) • דניאל דיי לואיס (2007) • שון פן (2008) • ג'ף ברידג'ס (2009) • קולין פירת' (2010) • ז'אן דוז'רדן (2011) • דניאל דיי לואיס (2012) • מתיו מקונוהיי (2013) • אדי רדמיין (2014) • לאונרדו דיקפריו (2015) • קייסי אפלק (2016) [%D7%94%D7%A1%D7%AA%D7%A8%D7%94]פרס גלובוס הזהב לשחקן הטוב ביותר - סרט דרמה 1943‏-1960 פול לוקאס (1943) • אלכסנדר נוקס (1944) • ריי מילאנד (1945) • גרגורי פק (1946) • רונלד קולמן (1947) • לורנס אוליבייה (1948) • ברודריק קרופורד (1949) • חוזה פרר (1950) • פרדריק מארץ' (1951) • גרי קופר (1952) • ספנסר טרייסי (1953) • מרלון ברנדו (1954) • ארנסט בורגניין (1955) • קירק דאגלס (1956) • אלק גינס (1957) • דייוויד ניבן (1958) • אנתוני פרנציוזה (1959) • ברט לנקסטר (1960) 1961‏-1980 מקסימיליאן של (1961) • גרגורי פק (1962) • סידני פואטייה (1963) • פיטר או'טול (1964) • עומר שריף (1965) • פול סקופילד (1966) • רוד סטייגר (1967) • פיטר או'טול (1968) • ג'ון ויין (1969) • ג'ורג' סי. סקוט (1970) • ג'ין הקמן (1971) • מרלון ברנדו (1972) • אל פצ'ינו (1973) • ג'ק ניקולסון (1974) • ג'ק ניקולסון (1975) • פיטר פינץ' (1976) • ריצ'רד ברטון (1977) • ג'ון ווייט (1978) • דסטין הופמן (1979) • רוברט דה נירו (1980) 1981‏-2000 הנרי פונדה (1981) • בן קינגסלי (1982) • רוברט דובאל (1983) • פ. מארי אברהם (1984) • ג'ון ווייט (1985) • בוב הוסקינס (1986) • מייקל דאגלס (1987) • דסטין הופמן (1988) • טום קרוז (1989) • ג'רמי איירונס (1990) • ניק נולטי (1991) • אל פצ'ינו (1992) • טום הנקס (1993) • טום הנקס (1994) • ניקולס קייג' (1995) • ג'פרי ראש (1996) • פיטר פונדה (1997) • ג'ים קארי (1998) • דנזל וושינגטון (1999) • טום הנקס (2000) 2001-היום ראסל קרואו (2001) • ג'ק ניקולסון (2002) • שון פן (2003) • לאונרדו דיקפריו (2004) • פיליפ סימור הופמן (2005) פורסט ויטאקר (2006) • דניאל דיי לואיס (2007) • מיקי רורק (2008) • ג'ף ברידג'ס (2009) • קולין פירת' (2010) • ג'ורג' קלוני (2011) • דניאל דיי לואיס (2012) • מתיו מקונוהיי (2013) • אדי רדמיין (2014) • לאונרדו דיקפריו (2015) • קייסי אפלק (2016) [%D7%94%D7%A1%D7%AA%D7%A8%D7%94]פרס גלובוס הזהב לשחקן המשנה הטוב ביותר בסדרת טלוויזיה, מיני-סדרה או סרט טלוויזיה 1970‏-1980 ג'יימס ברולין (1970) • אדוארד אסנר (1971) • ג'יימס ברולין (1972) • מקלין סטיבנסון (1973) • הארווי קורמן (1974) • אדוארד אסנר/טים קונווי (1975) • אדוארד אסנר (1976) • אדוארד אסנר (1977) • נורמן פל (1978) • דני דה ויטו/ויק טייבאק (1979) • פאט הרינגטון ג'וניור/ויק טייבאק (1980) 1981‏-2000 ג'ון הילרמן (1981) • ליונל סטנדר (1982) • ריצ'רד קיילי (1983) • פול לה מאט (1984) • אדוארד ג'יימס אולמוס (1985) • יאן ניקלאס (1986) • רוטגר האוור (1987) • בארי בוסטוויק/ג'ון גילגוד (1988) • דין סטוקוול (1989) • צ'ארלס דרנינג (1990) • לואיס גוסט ג'וניור (1991) • מקסימיליאן של (1992) • בו ברידג'ס (1993) • אדוארד ג'יימס אולמוס (1994) • דונלד סאת'רלנד (1995) • איאן מק'קלן (1996) • ג'ורג' סי. סקוט (1997) • דון צ'ידל/גרגורי פק (1998) • פיטר פונדה (1999) • רוברט דאוני ג'וניור (2000) 2001-היום סטנלי טוצ'י (2001) • דונלד סאת'רלנד (2002) • ג'פרי רייט (2003) • ויליאם שאטנר (2004) • פול ניומן (2005) ג'רמי איירונס (2006) • ג'רמי פיבן (2007) • טום וילקינסון (2008) • ג'ון לית'גו (2009) • כריס קולפר (2010) • פיטר דינקלג' (2011) • אד האריס (2012) • ג'ון ווייט (2013) • מאט בומר (2014) • כריסטיאן סלייטר (2015) • יו לורי (2016) [%D7%94%D7%A1%D7%AA%D7%A8%D7%94]פרס גילדת שחקני המסך לשחקן הטוב ביותר בסרט טלוויזיה או במיני-סדרה 1994‏-2000 ראול ג'וליה (1994) • גארי סיניז (1995) • אלן ריקמן (1996) • גארי סיניז (1997) • כריסטופר ריב (1998) • ג'ק למון (1999) • בריאן דנהי (2000) 2001-היום בן קינגסלי (2001) • ויליאם ה' מייסי (2002) • אל פצ'ינו (2003) • ג'פרי ראש (2004) • פול ניומן (2005) ג'רמי איירונס (2006) • קווין קליין (2007) • פול ג'יאמטי (2008) • קווין בייקון (2009) • אל פצ'ינו (2010) • פול ג'יאמטי (2011) • קווין קוסטנר (2012) • מייקל דאגלס (2013) • מארק רופאלו (2014) • אידריס אלבה (2015) • בראיין קראנסטון (2016) בקרת זהויות WorldCat VIAF: 114783177 LCCN: n88227072 ISNI: 0000 0001 0937 8948 GND: 119238950 SUDOC: 059923741 BNF: cb13922838x (data) MusicBrainz: 349ab9cc-3062-430e-9561-d73d0e10e08a BNE: XX1281883 קטגוריות: זוכי אוסקר: השחקן הטובשחקני קולנוע וטלוויזיה אנגליםשחקני תיאטרון אנגליםזוכי פרס טוניזוכי פרס גילדת שחקני המסך - שחקניםחברי הלהקה השייקספירית המלכותיתזוכי אמי בפריים טיים: שחקן משנה במיני-סדרה או בסרטזוכי אמי בפריים טיים: קריינותזוכי פרס גלובוס הזהב: קולנוע: שחקן ראשי בדרמהזוכי פרס גלובוס הזהב: טלוויזיה: שחקן משנהבוגרי בית הספר למשחק בריסטול אולד ויקזוכי פרס דונוסטיה

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Jeremy Irons's Timeline

1948
September 19, 1948
Cowes, Isle of Wight, England, United Kingdom
1985
October 17, 1985
London, Greater London, England, United Kingdom