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Jesse Brock

Also Known As: "Hungry Fox Jesse James Brock", "Son of Chief Red Bird Aaron Brock and wife Susannah"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Cumberland County, Province of Virginia
Death: October 13, 1843 (91)
Wallins Creek, Harlan County, Kentucky, United States
Place of Burial: Wallins Creek, Harlan County, Kentucky, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of George? Brock and Susannah Brock
Husband of Susannah Brock and Rebecca Brock
Father of James Calvin Brock, Sr.; Barthena Sloan; Amon Brock; John Brock; Jesse Allen Brock and 14 others
Brother of Mahala Susannah Callahan; Mary Osborne and James Brock

Occupation: Revolutionary War Soldier, Farmer, 3/4 Cherokee Chief, fought on the Whig side in the Revolution, Fought for the Whigs, 3/4 Cherokee Cheif
Occupation: Fought on the Whig side in the Revolution
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Jesse Brock

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/5052123/jesse-brock

===Jesse Brock

  • Birth: Dec. 8, 1751 Cumberland County Virginia, USA
  • Death: Oct. 13, 1843 Harlan Harlan County Kentucky, USA

Descendants Y DNA Haplogroup is J, indicating European origin father

no evidence supporting as son of Aaron "Totsuwha-Chief Red Bird" Brock

See http://www.indianreservations.net/2017/06/aaron-brock-red-bird-fath...

Notes

From https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/5052123/jesse-brock

Jesse Brock, Sr., was the son of Aaron Brock [????] and Susan Caroline (Cherokee) Brock [????], the husband of Rebecca (Howard) Brock, and the father of Barthena (Brock) Sloan, James Calvin Brock, Jesse Brock, John Brock, George Brock, Susannah (Brock) Blanton, Aaron Brock, Amon Brock, Mary (Brock) Helton, Sarah (Brock) Coldiron, Charlotte (Brock) Melton, and Hetty (Brock) Helton.

His Revolutionary War pension lists him as 3/4 Cherokee. [NO, it doesn’t - see https://revwarapps.org/s30887.pdf]

He was my 6g-grandfather. (bio by: Diane Midkiff)


Family links:

Parents:

  • Aaron (Totsu'hwa) Brock (1721 - 1797) [evidence needed to support this relationship]
  • Susannah Caroline Brock (1725 - 1764) [evidence needed]

Spouse:

  • Rebecca Howard Brock (1756 - 1841)*

Children:

  1. James Calvin Brock (1772 - 1830)*
  2. Barthena Brock Sloan (1776 - 1870)*
  3. Jesse Allen Brock (1783 - ____)*
  4. John Brock (1784 - 1857)*
  5. George Brock (1785 - ____)*
  6. Susannah Brock Blanton (1786 - 1861)*
  7. Amon Brock (1788 - 1863)*
  8. Mary Brock Helton (1793 - 1866)*

Siblings:

  • Mahala Susannah Brock Callahan (1749 - 1820)*
  • Mary Brock Osborne (1757 - 1855)**
  • James Calvin Brock (1759 - 1831)**
  • George Brock (1762 - 1839)**

  • Calculated relationship
    • Half-sibling

Burial: Old Masonic Cemetery Wallins Creek Harlan County Kentucky, USA GPS (lat/lon): 36.82479, -83.4119


Created by: joan blanton Record added: Sep 05, 2000 Find A Grave Memorial# 5052123

_______________________________________________

Jesse fought in the Revolutionary War and is listed on the same plaque as Carr Bailey Jr. in Harlan County in front of the court house. DAR Ancestor A014726

This web site has a lot of other information about his service in the war:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~brockfamily/Brock...

Jesse and Rebecca had 13 other children:

http://www.geocities.com/luvacuzn4/BrockJesseRebeccaHoward.html


"Jesse Brock was born in Cumberland Co., VA 1751. He referred to his birth date in his pension statement (S 30887 in Archives Washington, DC as follows: 'I was born on the 8th day of December 1751 so my father told me. He always told me I was four years old the year of Braddock's Defeat.'

"General Braddock and his 'Redcoats' were defeated by the French and Indians in July of 1755, early in the French and Indian War. Gen. Braddock had been sent from England to take command of the colonial troops, combined with the Redcoats he had brought with him, and try to drive the French out of the Ohio River country. He was making a drive on Fort Duquesne which the French had built on the ground now covered by Pittsburg, when the Indians attacked in a woodland, killing many of Braddock's troops and routing the remainder. The General had four horses shot from under him. After he himself was shot he was carried back with the retreating army. On July 13 he died and was buried in the road so the tread of retreating horses' hoofs would obliterate the grave and thus hide it from the pursuing French and Indian troops.

"A large contingent of the colonial army was from Jesse Brock's part of Virginia, hence it is easy to understand how the defeat of the famous English general at the head of Virginia troops became a date of reference.

"Eventually, of course, the English, or British as they are also known, defeated the French and declared the Ohio River country open for settlement. However, the American colonies soon began to resent British rule, and this resentment culminated in a Colonial revolution against the British which came to be known as The Revolutionary War.

"At the outbreak of this [Revolutionary] war Jesse Brock was living at Guilford, NC. He was a young man of 25 and, as someone has put it, was excellent 'war fodder.' So, when the call to arms came he soon found himself among the ranks.

"After the close of the war Jesse Brock lived for a while in Guilford Co., NC, then moved to Franklin Co., VA. Being dissatisfied with Franklin Co. he moved back to Guilford. But Guilford didn't yet suit him so he moved to Russell Co. in Southwest Virginia, about 1794.

"This was the year the notorious halfbreed Cherokee Chief Benge and his band burned the Peter and Henry Livingston homes on Holston River, captured two Livingston women and set out Northward across Russell Co. with them. White men pursued, overtook the party in the Big Stone Gap near present Appalachia, VA, slew Benge and rescued the women.

"This was the last known Indian raid in Southwest Virginia. Being a newcomer to the area the event made a deep impression on Jesse Brock, for, according to a descendant, James Brock of Leslie Co., KY, the old man told and retold the story.

"But Jesse Brock found disfavor with Russell Co., VA, and cast about for another area. He'd heard stories about Knox Co., KY, just north of Big Black Mountain. So about 1798 he took his small family to the banks of Wallen's creek, a branch of Cumberland River.

"Here, descendants say, he died Oct. 13, 1843. His wife is said to have been Rebecca Howard, a sister of Samuel Howard, the first settler of the area. Jesse was buried in the old Mason's Cemetery on Wallen's Creek, which became a part of Harlan Co. when it was formed in 1819."


In January 1856, a Harlan Co. court document stated, "Ordered by the Court that Satisfactory proof has been made that JESSE BROCK Decet on the 13th day of Oct 1843 and left no living widow but he has 6 heirs living AARON BROCK, AMON BROCK, SALLY COLDIRON, POLLY HELTON, SUSANNAH BLANTON, THENY STONE."

Not listed, but mentioned in Elijah Brock testimony to Annie Walker Burns were JAMES and JESSE BROCK, JR., who apparently predeceased their father (Harlan Co. Court Orders, 1840-60, p. 358).

Not mentioned in either was GEORGE BROCK, who is believed by descendants to be Jesse's son, and had land dealings with him in Harlan Co. DNA of his descendants does not match the other descendants of Jesse, so his relationship is uncertain. George outlived Jesse about twenty years, dying ca 1865 in Scioto Co., OH, where he moved in 1819. Nevertheless, he and his descendants are included below in a 3-generation register.

JESSE BROCK was, by family tradition and a Strong family history by his descendants, the son of Aaron Brock and his Cherokee wife, who it is said lived in a tree when first coming to what is now Harlan Co., KY, when it was part of Lee Co., VA. Today's Blanton Forest State Nature Preserve along Pine Mountain in Harlan Co. is the largest old-growth forest in Kentucky, and one of the largest in the United States; the trees are enormous.

JESSE BROCK was said by his grandson Elijah Brock to be about 3/4 Indian. Aaron Brock is believed to be Chief Red Bird, the Cherokee, a treaty signer.

DNA test results of Brock great-gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-grandsons of Jesse shows their Y-chromosome patrilineal ancestor to be Melungeon, that is, Jewish, which can describe many part-Cherokee and many of the neighboring families related to the Brocks by blood or marriage.

I was informed via e-mail, from Dr. K.B. Tankersley, that through DNA studies of the descendants of Aaron Brock that James is definately his son . . .


http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~brockfamily/ChiefRedBird-b...


The following is from a book Luther F. Addington and Robert W. Helton published in 1972 by the Historical Society of Southwest Virginia, Wise, Virginia. It was on the website, "http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~brockfamily/Brock..."

pp. 1-3:

"Jesse Brock was born in Cumberland Co., VA 1751. He referred to his birth date in his pension statement (S 30887 in Archives Washington, DC as follows: 'I was born on the 8th day of December 1751 so my father told me. He always told me I was four years old the year of Braddock's Defeat.'

"General Braddock and his 'Redcoats' were defeated by the French and Indians in July of 1755, early in the French and Indian War. Gen. Braddock had been sent from England to take command of the colonial troops, combined with the Redcoats he had brought with him, and try to drive the French out of the Ohio River country. He was making a drive on Fort Duquesne which the French had built on the ground now covered by Pittsburg, when the Indians attacked in a woodland, killing many of Braddock's troops and routing the remainder. The General had four horses shot from under him. After he himself was shot he was carried back with the retreating army. On July 13 he died and was buried in the road so the tread of retreating horses' hoofs would obliterate the grave and thus hide it from the pursuing French and Indian troops.

"A large contingent of the colonial army was from Jesse Brock's part of Virginia, hence it is easy to understand how the defeat of the famous English general at the head of Virginia troops became a date of reference.

"Eventually, of course, the English, or British as they are also known, defeated the French and declared the Ohio River country open for settlement. However, the American colonies soon began to resent British rule, and this resentment culminated in a Colonial revolution against the British which came to be known as The Revolutionary War.

"At the outbreak of this [Revolutionary] war Jesse Brock was living at Guilford, NC. He was a young man of 25 and, as someone has put it, was excellent 'war fodder.' So, when the call to arms came he soon found himself among the ranks.

"After the close of the war Jesse Brock lived for a while in Guilford Co., NC, then moved to Franklin Co., VA. Being dissatisfied with Franklin Co. he moved back to Guilford. But Guilford didn't yet suit him so he moved to Russell Co. in Southwest Virginia, about 1794.

"This was the year the notorious halfbreed Cherokee Chief Benge and his band burned the Peter and Henry Livingston homes on Holston River, captured two Livingston women and set out Northward across Russell Co. with them. White men pursued, overtook the party in the Big Stone Gap near present Appalachia, VA, slew Benge and rescued the women.

"This was the last known Indian raid in Southwest Virginia. Being a newcomer to the area the event made a deep impression on Jesse Brock, for, according to a descendant, James Brock of Leslie Co., KY, the old man told and retold the story.

"But Jesse Brock found disfavor with Russell Co., VA, and cast about for another area. He'd heard stories about Knox Co., KY, just north of Big Black Mountain. So about 1798 he took his small family to the banks of Wallen's creek, a branch of Cumberland River.

"Here, descendants say, he died Oct. 13, 1843. His wife is said to have been Rebecca Howard, a sister of Samuel Howard, the first settler of the area. Jesse was buried in the old Mason's Cemetery on Wallen's Creek, which became a part of Harlan Co. when it was formed in 1819."


http://www.yeahpot.com/gedcom/aaronbrock/pafg02.htm#57406

James' mother was full blood cherokee and his father was 50% Cherokee and was known as Chief Redbird. James was therefore 3/4 Cherokee.

The following Biographical information is from the family records of Patti FAG #47100504

James died September 1831 in Cumberland Co., KY. He married about 1781 an unknown 1st wife. He md. 2nd about 1788 to Mildred Crane, born about 1758 in Granville Co., NC, and died about 1834 in Cumberland Co., KY.

James served as a Private with the North Carolina Line of the Army of the United States, 10th Regt. in Bradley's Co. He enlisted on 30 June 1779 in Halifax Co., NC, for a period of 18 months, but served 84 mos. (seven years) as Pvt., 10th Regt., Capt. Bradley's Co., Col. Abraham Shepherd's Regt., North Carolina Line, Revolutionary War, and received 640 ac of land for his service. The war ended in 1783, but apparently he served until August 1786.


After the Revolution, the new United States was filled with thousands of former Revolutionary Soldiers, all of whom had been paid a suit of clothes and a promise of land "out west somewhere" in the form of a certificate called a Bounty-land Warrant. These certificates had a set value of $1.25 per acre of land, but a soldier would have to travel to the great western wilderness and claim his parcel of land. The certificates could be legally "assigned," and the buyer of the certificate would then gain the claim to the wilderness land "out west somewhere." Certificate No. 147: Ordered that Jesse Brock have a certificate for 206 acres of land by virtue of an Act ... of Assembly approved December the __ 1800, Lying on Cumberland River to include the mouth of Wallens Creek Beginning at a beech and buckeye on the bank of Said river thence south 40 W. 140 poles crossing Said river to a beech and chestnut thence crossing said river at mouth of said creek . . . No. 12494, signed Richard Ballinger. Receipt for payment of a land grant "surveyed for Jesse Brock 205 acres on a Knox County Court certificate No. 147 and dated June the __th 1802 situate lying in the County of Knox on Cumberland River including the mouth of Wallins Creek beginning at a beech and buckeye on the bank of Said River on the South side thence . . . beginning. Surveyed Nov 22 1807. Witnessed by James Brock and Aron Brock. 6th Dec 1816, Received of Jesse Brock the Treasurer's Receipt for Fourteen dollars and 92 cents, being the balance in full without Interest on 206 acres of Land, granted to him by the Knox County Court on a Certificate, Nol. 147. In 1822 and 1823, Jesse was granted 50 acres on Wallins Creek and 50 acres on Cumberland River, in Harlan Co.

In January 1856, a Harlan Co. court document stated, "Ordered by the Court that Satisfactory proof has been made that JESSE BROCK Decet on the 13th day of Oct 1843 and left no living widow but he has 6 heirs living AARON BROCK, AMON BROCK, SALLY COLDIRON, POLLY HELTON, SUSANNAH BLANTON, THENY STONE."

Aaron Brock m Amy Waldrup whose first child Rebecca b. 1810 . Aaron married again and had children (4?) and married a 3rd time and no children. First wife Amy had (9?) children including Dicey who was mentioned later in the will of Solomon C Saylor.

Rebecca Brock first child  m Solomon C Saylor.   Rebecca was one of 14 children ( 13 girls and one boy). 
Jesse's wife . Rebecca Howard's great-great-grandfather was Sir John Howard, Earl of Arundel (England).
view all 30

Jesse Brock's Timeline

1751
December 8, 1751
Cumberland County, Province of Virginia
1760
1760
Age 8
Virginia Census
1760
Age 8
VA
1772
1772
Cumberland County, Virginia
1772
1775
January 1775
Cumberland County, Province of Virginia
November 5, 1775
Province of North Carolina
1776
January 1, 1776
Cumberland, Virginia, United States
1783
September 6, 1783
Cumberland, Cumberland County, VA, United States