John "Monoculus" de Burgh, of Saxlingham, Lord of Knaresborough

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John "Monoculus" de Burgh (FitzRichard), of Saxlingham, Lord of Knaresborough

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Knaresborough, Yorkshire, England
Death: Died in Saxlingham, Walsingham, Norfolk, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Richard de Vesci, de Vains
Husband of Magdalen Cecily de Blois
Father of Payn FitzJohn de Burgh, Sheriff of Hereford and Shropshire; William FitzJohn; Eustace FitzJohn, Lord of Alnwick, Constable of Knaresborough and Cheshire; Agnes FitzJohn, Abbess of Barking and Adelais FitzJohn, Abbess of Barking

Managed by: Justin Swanström
Last Updated:

About John "Monoculus" de Burgh, of Saxlingham, Lord of Knaresborough

John FitzRichard

NOTE: often confused with John FitzNigell also known as "Monoculus"

  • Father: Richard fitzRanulf (this family is connected to the de Vesci family)
  • Mother: Unknown
  • Spouse: Unknown
  • Issue: Payn, Eustace, William, Adelais (Alice), Abbess of Barking, Agnes FitzJohn married Roger de Valoines

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3T-Z.htm

1. RANULF (-before 1061). A charter of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy dated 1061 records that the abbot of Mont Saint-Michel had wrongfully sold property to “Ralf the moneyer”[764]. Another document dealing with the same matter also records that the abbot of Mont Saint-Michel had wrongfully sold property to “Ranulf the moneyer” but that it was inherited by “Gualeran son of Ranulf” who sold it back to the abbey[765]. m ---. The name of Ranulf’s wife is not known. Ranulf & his wife had four children:

a) OSBERN . “…Rannulfus Monetarius et Osbernus filius eius…” witnessed an undated charter of “Roger son of Hugh bishop of Coutances” for the abbey of Saint-Amand, Rouen[766].

b) WALERAN . A document records that the abbot of Mont Saint-Michel had wrongfully sold property to “Ranulf the moneyer” but that it was inherited by “Gualeran son of Ranulf” who sold it back to the abbey[767]. The charter dated 1080 which records the foundation of Caen Sainte-Trinité, before 1066, lists property including that sold by "Waleranno filio Rannulfi monetarii" in Caen and "in Amblida unum molendinum et illam terram quam frater suus Conanus in eaden villa tenuit in alodio"[768].

c) [RICHARD . No direct proof has been found that Richard was the son of Ranulf. However, this parentage is inferred from a document which records that the abbot of Mont Saint-Michel had wrongfully sold property to “Ranulf the moneyer”, that it was inherited by “Gualeran son of Ranulf” who sold it back to the abbey, that it was claimed by “John of Richard” who “some fifteen years…later” seized the property, and that judgment in the ensuing dispute was awarded to the abbey[769]. In addition, Richard’s son is named “Johannes nepos Walerami” (presumably Waleran, son of Ranulf, see above) in his capacity as holder of the manor of Elsenham, Essex in Domesday Book[770], although this phrase does not exclude the possibility that the relationship was through a sister of Waleran and that Richard was her husband.] m ---. The name of Richard’s wife is not known. Richard & his wife had one child:

i) JOHN . A document records that the abbot of Mont Saint-Michel had wrongfully sold property to “Ranulf the moneyer” but that it was inherited by “Gualeran son of Ranulf” who sold it back to the abbey, that it was claimed by “John of Richard” who “some fifteen years…later” seized the property, judgment in the ensuing dispute being awarded to the abbey[771].

- see below.

d) CONAN . The charter dated 1080 which records the foundation of Caen Sainte-Trinité, before 1066, lists property including that sold by "Waleranno filio Rannulfi monetarii" in Caen and "in Amblida unum molendinum et illam terram quam frater suus Conanus in eaden villa tenuit in alodio"[772].


JOHN, son of [RICHARD & his wife ---] . A document records that the abbot of Mont Saint-Michel had wrongfully sold property to “Ranulf the moneyer” but that it was inherited by “Gualeran son of Ranulf” who sold it back to the abbey, that it was claimed by “John of Richard” who “some fifteen years…later” seized the property, judgment in the ensuing dispute being awarded to the abbey[773]. A manuscript concerning the founders of Watton priory records that “Johannis pater primi Eustachii et Serlo de Burgo, sive de Pembrok” were brothers[774]. The Complete Peerage sets out the arguments which refute this hypothesis[775]. m ---. The name of John’s wife is not known.

John & his wife had five children:

1. PAYN FitzJohn of Ewyas, Herefordshire (before 1100-killed 10 Jul 1137, bur Gloucester Abbey). "…Pag fil Johis…" subscribed the charter dated to [10 Apr/29 May] 1121 which records the arrangements for the marriage of "Miloni de Gloec" and "Sibilia filia Beorndi de Novo Mercato"[776]. "…Pag fil Johis…" subscribed the charter date [3/10] Jun 1123 under which Henry I King of England granted the lands of "Edrici fil Chetelli" to "Walto de Gloec"[777]. A charter of King Henry I dated 1133 is witnessed by Payn FitzJohn, Eustache and William his brothers[778]. Sheriff of Hereford and Shropshire. The Gesta Stephani Regis records that "Paganus filius Joannis…et Milo" were killed, dated to [1137/40][779].

m (before [1125]) as her first husband, SIBYLLA de Lacy, daughter of --- (-after [1140]). The date of her marriage is estimated from the dating of her older daughter’s first marriage to “before [Dec 1137/May 1138]”. “Sibilla de Lacy” notified her bailiffs and foresters that she had donated “land of Leghe near the church of St Michael” to “my uncle Walter abbot of Gloucester”, for the souls of “myself and my husband Payne Fitz-john”, by charter dated to [1130/39][780]. "Rogo filio Milonis Gloec et Cecilie uxori sue filie Pag fil Johis" the lands of her father, including land which "Pag dedit Sibille uxoris sue in dote", by charter dated to [Dec 1137/May 1138][781]. Roger Bishop of Salisbury instructed "Sibille q fuit uxor Pag fil Johis" to restore property which her husband had granted to "Rogo fil Milon Gloec cum Cecilia filia tua p-mogenita" by charter dated 1138[782]. She married secondly (after 1138) Joscelin de Dinan. Her second marriage is confirmed by two charters of St. Guthlac’s priory, Hereford: in the first, “Sybil de Laceo” donated land at “Parva Frome” in Herefordshire, while in the second Sibylla “domina de Lodel” donated further land in the same place “ex proprio jure hereditare mee” with the consent of “domini mei Gozonis de Dinan”[783]. It is assumed that Sibylla survived for at least two years after her second marriage as her second husband is recorded as having had two children. No source has been identified which confirms that Sibylla was their mother, although the naming of the younger child after her is indicative.

Payn & his wife had two children:

a) CECILY ([before 1126]-1207[784]). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire records that “Rogerus comes Hereford” married “vicecomes Paganus…filiam”[785]. Her birth date is estimated from the dating of her first marriage. King Stephen confirmed to "Rogo filio Milonis Gloec et Cecilie uxori sue filie Pag fil Johis" the lands of her father by charter dated to [Dec 1137/May 1138][786]. Heiress of Swanscombe, Kent. The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified. "Walter de Maine" confirmed the donation of land in Perriton to Bruton by undated charter witnessed by "Cecilia comitissa uxore mea…"[787]. "Walterus de Meduana" confirmed to King Henry II that he held "in capite...xx milites" in Kent which “Galfridus Tallebot” had held on the death of King Henry I, dated 1166[788]. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "comitissa Hereford quæ fuit uxor Walteri de Meduana" paying "xiv l x s de scutagio militum de veteri feffamento xxix milites" in Kent[789]. Bracton records a claim in 1232 made by “Warinus de Monte Canisio” against “Adam de Kailly et Mabiliam uxorem eius...Isabellam de Friuilla...Matillidem Giffard” for land “in Luddeduna” inherited from “Cecilia [...comitissa] antecess sua...quia obiit sine herede de se descendit...Agneti...sorori et heredi et quia ipse Willelmus obiit sine herede...de se descendit...isti Warino...fratri et heredi suo”, and that the defendants replied that “Cecilia comitissa” had given the land, which “Willelmus de Pictavia...virum suum” held for one knight’s fee, to “Ricardo Giffard patri predictarum Mabilie et Isabelle...Osbertus filius Ricardi” and that “mortuo predicto Willelmo” Cecilia had married “Walterum de Meinne”[790].

m firstly (before [Dec 1137/May 1138]) ROGER FitzMiles, son of MILES Earl of Hereford & his wife Sibylle de Neufmarché (-1155, bur Llanthony Priory, Gloucester). He succeeded his father in 1143 as Earl of Hereford.

m secondly GUILLAUME de Poitou, son of ---. m thirdly (before 1166) GAUTHIER de Mayenne, son of JUHEL Seigneur de Mayenne & his wife Clémence de Ponthieu (-before 1191).

b) AGNES (-after 1185). The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Holkham” held by “Agnes de Muntchenesy…lx annorum…filia Pagani filii Johannis”, adding that she had “iii filios primogenitus…Radulphus et secundus Willelmus…ambo milites, tertius…Hubertus…clericus…[et] ii filias…una nupta Stephano de Glanville et altera Willemo Painel”[791]. The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified. Bracton records a claim in 1232 made by “Warinus de Monte Canisio” against “Adam de Kailly et Mabiliam uxorem eius...Isabellam de Friuilla...Matillidem Giffard” for land “in Luddeduna” inherited from “Cecilia [...comitissa] antecess sua...quia obiit sine herede de se descendit...Agneti...sorori et heredi et quia ipse Willelmus obiit sine herede...de se descendit...isti Warino...fratri et heredi suo”, and that the defendants replied that “Cecilia comitissa” had given the land, which “Willelmus de Pictavia...virum suum” held for one knight’s fee, to “Ricardo Giffard patri predictarum Mabilie et Isabelle...Osbertus filius Ricardi” and that “mortuo predicto Willelmo” Cecilia had married “Walterum de Meinne”[792].

m firstly WARIN [I] de Munchensy, son of HUBERT [I] de Munchensy & his second wife Muriel de Valoignes (-before 1162).

m secondly (1162) HALENALD de Bidun, son of HALENALD de Bidun & his wife --- (-before 1185).

2. EUSTACE FitzJohn (before 1100-1157). A charter of King Henry I dated 1133 is witnessed by Payn FitzJohn, Eustache and William his brothers[793]. "…Eustachius filius Johannis…" witnessed the charter of Ramsey abbey dated to [1133/37] which records that "Walterus de Bolebeche…Heylenius uxor sua et Hugo filius suus" donated "terram de Waltone"[794]. "Walter de Gaunt" founded Bridlington priory, with the assent of Henry I King of England, by undated charter, witnessed by "…Eustace FitzJohn…"[795]. An undated charter records the foundation of Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland by ”Eustachius filius Johannis”, for the soul of “Ivonis de Vescy” and the health of “Willielmi de Vescy filii mei”[796]. “Eustachius filius Johannis…et uxor mea Agneta” founded Watton priory by charter dated to [1150][797].

m firstly BEATRICE de Vescy, daughter of YVES de Vescy Lord of Alnwick and Malton, Yorkshire & his wife [Alda Tyson]. A manuscript concerning the founders of Watton priory records the marriage of “Eustachius filius Johannis” and “filia et hærede Ivonis de Vescey”, adding that she died giving birth to their son William[798]. An undated charter recording the foundation of Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland recites a donation by ”Willielmi de Vescy, filii Eustachii, filii Johannis”, for the souls of “patris mei Eustachii et matris meæ Beatricis”[799].

m secondly as her first husband, AGNES, daughter of WILLIAM FitzNeel Constable of Chester, Baron of Halton & his wife ---. “Eustachius filius Johannis…et uxor mea Agneta” founded Watton priory by charter dated to [1150][800]. “Agnes filia Willelmi constabularii Cestrie” confirmed an exchange of property made by “dominus Eustachius vir meus” with the nuns of Watton, for the souls of “Ricardi filii mei et Galfridi”, by charter dated to [1150/57], witnessed by “…Rogerus filius Willelmi constabularii…”[801]. Agnes married secondly (after 1157) Robert FitzCount.

Eustace & his first wife had two children:

a) WILLIAM de Vescy (-before Nov 1183, bur Alnwick Abbey). A manuscript concerning the founders of Watton priory names “Willielmum” as son of “Eustachius filius Johannis” and his wife “filia et hærede Ivonis de Vescey”, adding that he adopted the name Vescy from his mother’s family[802].

- see below.

b) [AUBREYE] (-after [1165/75]). Her family origin is indicated by the charter dated to [1180/93] under which [her son] “Robertus de Lasci” granted property “in Magna Merclesdene” [Great Marsden] in fee to “Willelmo filio Eustachii avunculo meo”[803]. Wightman says that her name “Aubreye” is based only on a 16th century source[804]. The grantee is identified as William de Vescy (died before Nov 1183) by an undated charter (dated to [1215], which appears incongruous considering the chronology of the Vescy family) under which his descendant “Willelmus de Vesci” donated land “in Merkisdene quam Robertus Mey...de me tenuit” [apparently the same property] to Pontefract St. John[805]. The question of the family origin of the wife of Henry de Lacy has been somewhat confused by a later manuscript history of the Lacy family, which records that “Henricus Lacy” married “sororem Willielmi Vesci rectoris de Berwic”[806]. The editor of the Early Yorkshire Charters compilation identifies this person as “William de Vescy, sometime parson of Barwick-in-Elmet”[807], presumably based on a misinterpretation of “rector”. In conclusion, assuming that “avunculus” in the [1180/93] charter can be interpreted in its strict sense of maternal uncle and also that [Aubreye] and William de Vescy shared both parents, Henry’s wife was the daughter of Eustace FitzJohn by his first marriage. The possibility of an earlier marriage of [Aubreye] is raised by the same manuscript history of the Lacy family which records that “Albreda vel Aubreia, filia Roberti Lisours, soror ex parte matris” succeeded on the death of “Robertus Lacy”[808]. If that is correct, Aubreye’s father was an earlier husband of Robert de Lacy’s mother. However, this appears disproved by the Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 which records “Alicia que fuit uxor Fulconis de Lisoriis et soror Willielmi de Auberville"[809], apparently the mother of Robert de Lisours. “Henricus de Laceio et uxor mea” confirmed a donation to York St. Peter by charter dated to [1165/75][810]. m HENRY de Lacy, son of ROBERT de Lacy & his wife Matilda --- (-Holy Land 25 Sep 1177).

Eustace & his second wife had two children:

c) RICHARD FitzEustace (-1163). “Agnes filia Willelmi constabularii Cestrie” confirmed an exchange of property made by “dominus Eustachius vir meus” with the nuns of Watton, for the souls of “Ricardi filii mei et Galfridi”, by charter dated to [1150/57], witnessed by “…Rogerus filius Willelmi constabularii…”[811].

- see below.

d) GEOFFREY FitzEustace . “Willelmus de Vescy” confirmed donations made by “pater meus Eustachius filius Johannis” to the nuns of Watton, for the souls of “patris mei et uxoris sue Agnetis et…matris mee et fratrum meorum Ricardi et Gaufridi”, by charter dated to [1150/57], witnessed by “domino patre meo Eustachio…”[812]. “Agnes filia Willelmi constabularii Cestrie” confirmed an exchange of property made by “dominus Eustachius vir meus” with the nuns of Watton, for the souls of “Ricardi filii mei et Galfridi”, by charter dated to [1150/57], witnessed by “…Rogerus filius Willelmi constabularii…”[813].

3. WILLIAM FitzJohn (-after 1133). A charter of King Henry I dated 1133 is witnessed by Payn FitzJohn, Eustache and William his brothers[814]. Steward and justiciar of King Henry I in Normandy. same person as…? WILLIAM FitzJohn (-after 1166). Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, records the seven knights fees held by "Willelmus filius Johannis" from the king in Dorset "de honore Moretoniæ"[815].

4. ADELAIS . King Stephen granted Barking abbey to "Adel[ide] sorori Pag[ani] filii Joh[annis]" by charter dated to [1136/Aug 1138], witnessed by "…E[ustachio] filio Joh[annis]"[816]. Abbess of Barking.

5. AGNES ([1125]-after 1185). “Rogerus de Valoniis” confirmed the foundation of Binham monastery by “patris mei Petri de Valoniis”, by undated charter, probably dated to after 1135, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis uxor mea, Petrus et Robertus et Gaufridus et Johannes filii mei…"[817]. “Petrus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus…de Valoniis avus meus et…pater meus Rogerus”, by undated charter dated to after 1154, witnessed by "Agnes de Valoniis, Robertus et Gaufredus et Rogerus et Johannes et Philippus de Valoniis…"[818]. “Agnes de Valoniis” notified “filio suo Petro...ceterisque filiis suis” of her donation of “terre mee de Westleye” made to Binham priory, for the souls of “domini mei R. et...mea et...fratris mei Pagani...filiorum filiarumque...meorum” by undated charter, witnessed by “...Rogerus de Valoniis et Johannes frater eius, Fulquius de Munpincun et Radulfus filius eius...”[819]. “Robertus de Valoniis” confirmed donations to Binham monastery by “Petrus de Valoniis avus meus et Rogerus pater meus et Petrus de Valoniis frater meus et domina Agnes mater mea”, with the advice of "dominæ Agnetis matris meæ et Hadæwisæ uxoris meæ", by undated charter[820]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “Hortfurdburia et Hochwelle” held by “Agnes de Valeines…l annorum”, property “Hecham et Leic” held by “Agnes de Valuines…plusquam lx annorum”, and “Redefelde” held by “Agnes de Valuines…soror Pagani filii Johannis” adding that her heir is “filia eius et heres data est Durando de Ostili”[821]. The Complete Peerage says that her age suggests that she may have been the daughter of a second marriage[822]. m ROGER de Valoignes, son of PIERRE de Valoignes & his wife Agnes --- (-[1141/42]).

--------------------------------

Tim Powys-Lybbe writes in his notes in May 2010:

Or "John nepos Waleran".

Burke says he was called John Monoculus as he had lost an eye. CP also gives him this name.

Keats-Rohan calls his son Pagan "son of John nephew of Waleran, a Domesday tenant in Essex" - and this led me to find John, with a mention of his father Radulf in Domesday people p. 284...

K-R: "son of Richard fitz Ranulf the Moneyer of Caen and nephew of Waleran fitz ranulf" and she lists his five children: Payn, Eustache, William and Alice, abbess of Barking, and Alice [PW: should be Agnes], wife of Roger de Valoignes. And she then led me to CP's Vescy article where many of them are listed in even greater detail.

Paul Remfry at his talk on 31 Oct 2009 at the AGM of the FMG firmly asserted that this John m. a daughter of Ralph de Mortimer (d. c. 1130).


John "Monoculus" Fitz Richard [a] b abt 1055, of Knaresborough, Yorkshire, England. The name of his wife is not known.

Children of John "Monoculus" were:

   * Eustace Fitz John b abt 1080. See LINE A
   * Payn Fitz John b at 1089. See LINE B
   * Agnes Fitz John b abt 1096, of Yorkshire, England. She md Roger de Valoignes abt 1114, son of Peter de Valoignes and Albreda de Saint-Sauveur.

Notes:

a. Known as John "Monoculus", a Domesday tenant, CP states he was the son of one "John the Moneyer". But recent findings indicate he was the son of Richard Fitz Ranulph and nephew of Waleran Fitz Ranulph, another Domesday tenant.

SOURCES:

CP Vol VII[675-680 and lineage chart therein], Vol IX[424-426], Vol XII/2[269-274]; AR: Line 246D[26-28], Line 54[29-30]; SGM: Dave Utzinger, Christopher Nash, Gordon Fisher[ref: The Lacy Family in England and Normandy, 1066-1194, by W. E. Wightman], Douglas Richardson; Royal Ancestry of the Warkworths, contributors Michael Anne Guido, John Ravilious, Andrew B.W. MacEwen, et al.


"Monoculus, Lord of Saxlingham, One Eye"

He was a great feudal baron and friend of King Henry I, who gave him great grants of land and the governorship of Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland. He was later deprived of Bamburgh by King Stephen, even though his wife was the king's aunt.

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John "Monoculus" de Burgh, of Saxlingham, Lord of Knaresborough's Timeline

1060
1060
Knaresborough, Yorkshire, England
1086
1086
Age 26
Ewyas, Herefordshire, England
1088
1088
Age 28
Knaresborough, Yorkshire, England
1102
1102
Age 42
Knaresborough, North Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
1104
1104
Age 44
Barking, Essex, England
1125
1125
Age 65
Knaresborough, Yorkshire, England
1138
1138
Age 78
Saxlingham, Walsingham, Norfolk, England