John Hooker alias Vowell

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John Hooker (Vowell), MP

Also Known As: ""Hoker""
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Exeter, Devon, England, United Kingdom
Death: November 08, 1601 (76-77)
England, United Kingdom
Place of Burial: Exeter, Devon, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert Vowell alias Hooker and Agnes Ann Hooker (Doble)
Husband of Martha Tucker and Anastryce Hooker
Father of Robert Hooker alias Vowell; Alice Travers; Prothsaye Vowell alias Hooker; Andrew Vowell, alias Hooker; Thomas Vowell alias Hooker and 10 others
Brother of Anne Windyat; Alice Hooker; Julian Hooker; Mary Russell; Sidwell Monke and 2 others
Half brother of Richard Hooker; Lawrence Hooker alias Vowell and Alice (i) Hooker alias Vowell

Occupation: Writer, solicitor, antiquary, civic administrator, and member of Parliament, yeoman
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John Hooker alias Vowell

Wikipedia: John Hooker (English constitutionalist)

Family and Education b. c.1527, 2nd but 1st surv. s. of Robert Hooker alias Vowell of Exeter by his 3rd w. Agnes, da. of John Doble of Woodbridge, Suff. educ. Dr. Moreman’s sch., Exeter Coll. Oxf; studied law in Germany. m. (1) Martha, da. of Robert Toker of Exeter, 3s. 2da.; (2) Anastryce, da. of Edward Bridgeman of Exeter, 7s. 5da.

Offices Held Chamberlain, Exeter 1555, coroner by 1583; bailiff of Exiland 1564; judge of Admiralty ct. in Devon 1566.1

MP [I] 1568.

Biography Hooker’s father died from plague in 1537, leaving the boy well provided for. After a period at Oxford he went abroad, studied law at Cologne and lived for some time in the house of Peter Martyr at Strasbourg, attending the great theologian’s divinity lectures. Following a short visit to England, he planned a tour of France, Spain and Italy, but owing to the outbreak of war was ‘driven to shift himself homewards again’. He was in Exeter during the years 1543-4, and reported that when the Spanish ambassador, the Marquess of Nazarra, visited the city, he ‘would very fain have had [Hooker] with him, and did promise to keep and entertain him at his return home in the university of Salamanca’. But Hooker had adequate private means to support him while he studied astronomy and English history and began his antiquarian works. He was friendly with Sir Peter Carew and dedicated works to such west-country magnates as the 2nd Earl of Bedford and Sir Walter Ralegh. For Carew, he developed the deep admiration reflected in his Life of Sir Peter Carew.2

Hooker served his city for almost the whole of Elizabeth’s reign. He began to collect the records in the mayoral year 1558-9, and continued these ‘annals’ until 1590. One of the early Elizabethan entries notes that

in 1558 [1559 NS] upon the 30 [sic] of Jan. began a Parliament at Westminster, and many were the suitors to be burgesses of the city for the same. About 1561 he was put in charge of the rebuilding of the city high school. In 1568 he went over to Ireland on legal business connected with Sir Peter Carew’s lands. Writing in May to Carew, he asked to be commended to

Mr. Mayor and his brethren, with an excuse for my absence, and that I may be borne withal until I have exploited and brought to effect your matter and cause now taken in hand. While in Ireland he was returned as Member of Parliament there for Athenry, and a speech of his in support of the royal prerogative caused the sitting to break up in confusion: he had to be escorted to Carew’s house, for fear of violence. Among his writings is a journal of this Irish Parliament. He had apparently some success in dealing with his patron’s affairs, but on another visit to Ireland in 1572 he wrote to Carew:

If you do mind to save that you have purchased and to keep that you have gotten, you must determine to come over yourself. His connexion with Ireland ended at Carew’s death in 1575, though Carew’s will refers to a deed of 1574 appointing him a feoffee for the Irish property.3

Returned to the English House of Commons in 1571, ke kept a journal of the proceedings which was discovered in the nineteenth century ‘fast falling into decay, stowed away under the rafters of the roof of the Exeter Guildhall’ and published in the Transactions of the Devonshire Association. The Victorian editor had no great opinion of ‘the dry details recorded by the pen of Hoker, who only now and then departs from a mere catalogue of bills read and passed’. Hooker recorded his own appointment to the committee dealing with the bill for dissolving the Bristol merchants guild (12 Apr.). He disliked merchants

who attain to great wealth and riches, which for the most part they do employ in purchasing of lands, and by little and little they do creep and seek to be gentlemen. But he naturally favoured a new charter for the Merchant Adventurers of his own city, as being good for obedience, concord and unity. He drew up an account of his parliamentary expenses at 4s. a day, allowing eight days for travelling, including Sundays and Easter and adding a day to the session for good measure. He claimed a total of £13 8s. An ‘observer of moderate attention and ordinary intelligence’, Hooker was at this time collecting tracts on parliamentary procedure. Returned to another Parliament in 1586, Hooker had apparently lost interest. At any rate nothing is known to have been written by him on its proceedings, nor do the other surviving journals indicate that he contributed to its business.4

After the death of his patron Carew in 1575, information about Hooker is concerned mainly with his literary activities. His ‘Synopsis Chorographical of Devonshire’, written about 1599, circulated freely in manuscript, and Westcote and later writers borrowed, often verbatim, from it. Richard Carew used it in his Survey of Cornwall, describing the author as ‘the commendable, painful antiquary and my kind friend’. Hooker’s writings on Exeter, the Description, the Catalogue of the Bishops, and a number of other books and pamphlets give a vivid and detailed picture of the city and its government. His accounts of contemporary affairs are often coloured by his puritan outlook:

Be the preachers never so godly, and earnest to call, let all the great bells of St. Peter’s ring out never so loud, there will not be half so many gained into the church as one with a pipe and whistle shall gain into the streets to see vain and foolish spectacles. For let there be a bearbaiting, a bullbaiting, an interlude or any such vanity, every man is in haste to run headlong into it, and the time never too long to have their fill thereof. Few details of his domestic life survive. Writing to the Exeter corporation just before his death, he described himself as ‘unwieldy and imperfect ... my sight waxeth dim, my hearing very thick, my speech imperfect and my memory very feeble’. He died between 26 Jan. and 15 Sept. 1601, and was probably buried in Exeter cathedral. The John Hooker who died in November the same year, and was buried in St. Mary Major, was his son, whose will has been wrongly attributed to the father. Hooker’s own will has not been found.5

Ref Volumes: 1558-1603 Author: N. M. Fuidge Notes This biography is based upon the following: DNB; W. J. Harte, Gleanings from the Common Place Bk. of John Hooker; J. Hooker, Life of Sir Peter Carew, ed. Maclean.

1. C142/60/96; G. Oliver, Hist. Exeter, 219; Exeter mss 376; HMC Exeter, 57-9, 374; PCC 10, 16 Crumwell. 2. Holinshed, Chronicles (1807-8) vi. 101-10. 3.CSP For. 1564-5, pp. 186, 221, 246; Exeter ms 376; C. L. Falkiner, Essay Relating to Ireland, 204n, 210-11, 217, 237-40; PCC 1 Carew. 4.Trans. Dev. Assoc. xi. 442-92; lxxxii. 246; CJ, i. 84; Harl. 5827, f. 3v; W. T. MacCaffrey, Exeter 1540-1640, 272-4; Somers, Fourth Coll. of Tacts, ii. 335-44. 5. W. G. Hoskins and H. P. R. Finberg, Devonshire Studies, 421-2; Trans. Dev. Assoc. lxxxii. 246; Exeter city act bk. 57, f. 7; PCC 77 Woodhall; HMC Exeter, vii. 320, 354; J. Prince, Worthies of Devon (1810), 505-6.


Family

John Vowell Hooker, born c.1527 in Exeter,Devonshire, England; died 1601 in Exeter, Devonshire, England; In the 1540s he married Martha, daughter of Robert Tucker of Exeter and they had three sons and two daughters. By 1586, Martha had died and he had married Anastryce (c. 1540–1599), daughter of Edward Bridgeman of Exeter. They had seven sons and five daughters.

John Hooker had three wives but his daughter Mary is not mentioned. It would seem probable that she was his daughter by his second wife Anstice, daughter of Edmund Bridgman of Exeter.

Parents: Robert Vowell Hooker (b.1505-d. 1537) and Agnes Dobell (b. 1505-)


Biographical Summary

John Hooker, John Hoker or John Vowell (c. 1527–1601) was an English writer, solicitor, antiquary, civic administrator and advocate of republican government. He wrote an eye-witness account of the siege of Exeter that took place during the Prayer Book Rebellion in 1549. From 1555 to his death he was chamberlain of that city, though he spent several years in Ireland as legal adviser to Sir Peter Carew during his claim to lands there. He was, for short periods, a member of both the Irish and English parliaments and wrote an influential treatise on parliamentary procedure. He was one of the editors of the second edition of Raphael Holinshed's Chronicles, published in 1587. His last, unpublished and probably uncompleted work was the first topographical description of the county of Devon.

Hooker was born at Bourbridge Hall in Exeter, Devon, England. He was the second son of Robert Vowell or Hooker and Agnes Doble, his third wife. The Vowell family had acquired the name Hooker in the 15th century, but usually retained the earlier name; in fact John Hooker was known as John Vowell for much of his life. By the time he was born the family had been prominent in Exeter for several generations.[1] Hooker received an excellent classical education, reading Roman law at Oxford followed by a period in Europe studying with leading Protestant divines,[2] notably Pietro Martire Vermigli.[1] In the 1540s he married Martha, daughter of Robert Tucker of Exeter and they had three sons and two daughters. By 1586, Martha had died and he had married Anastryce (c. 1540–1599), daughter of Edward Bridgeman of Exeter. They had seven sons and five daughters. In later life his health failed[3] and he died in Exeter some time between 26 January and 15 September in 1601 and was probably buried in the cathedral.[1] He was the uncle of Richard Hooker, the influential Anglican theologian.

During the Prayer Book Rebellion in 1549 he experienced at first hand the siege of Exeter, leaving a vivid account of its events in which he made no effort to conceal his religious sympathies.[2] From 1551 to 1553 he was employed by Myles Coverdale during his short incumbency as Bishop of Exeter; and then in 1555 he became the first chamberlain of Exeter, a post that he held until his death.[1] As chamberlain he was responsible for the city's finances, he dealt with disputes between guilds and merchants, oversaw the rebuilding of the high school, planted many trees in the city, and collected and put in order the city's archives.[1] He used these archives to compile his "Annals" of the City in which he details the characteristics of every Tudor mayor of Exeter, and in 1578 he also wrote and published The Lives of the Bishops of Exeter.[2] At a time when it was deemed essential for cities and nations to have ancient lineage, Hooker described the foundation of Exeter by Corinaeus, nephew of Brutus of Britain, son of Aeneas. He advocated emulating the governmental institutions of the Roman Republic which, in his opinion, brought Rome to greatness, and held the municipal government of Exeter up as a model republican commonwealth worthy of emulation.

[I denounce those who chose] to supporte the authoritie of the Idoll of Rome whome they never sawe in contempte of their trewe & lawfull kinge, whom they knewe and oughte to obeye. ” —Hooker, on the siege of Exeter, in The description of the citie of Excester, 1.67

In 1568, possibly because he regarded himself as underpaid for the work he was doing for the city, Hooker was persuaded by Sir Peter Carew to go with him to Ireland to be his legal adviser. He also organised Carew's papers in support of his claim for the barony of Idrone, a task to which he committed himself so deeply that in 1569 he was returned to the Irish parliament as member for Athenry. Hooker later wrote a biography of Carew, The dyscourse and dyscoverye of the lyffe of Sir Peter Carew, in which he almost certainly understated the deceit and aggression behind Carew's Irish venture.[1][7][8] Until Carew's death in 1575, Hooker spent much time in Ireland, but he had also been returned to the English parliament in 1571 as one of the burgesses of Exeter. The session had only lasted a few weeks, but he kept a journal in which he accurately recorded the proceedings. His experiences in the Irish and English parliaments led him to write a treatise on parliamentary practice, The Order and Usage how to Keepe a Parlement in England, which was published in two editions in 1572. One edition had a preface addressed to William FitzWilliam, the Lord Deputy of Ireland and was clearly intended to bring order to the Irish assembly; the other was addressed to the Exeter city authorities, presumably to aid his successor burgesses. In writing his treatise Hooker took much inspiration from the Modus Tenendi Parliamentum, a treatise from the early 14th century.[1] In 1586 Hooker again represented Exeter in parliament. At this time he was one of the editors of the second edition of Raphael Holinshed's Chronicles, which was published in 1587. Hooker's Order and Usage was included and he contributed an updated history of Ireland, including parts of his Life of Carew and a translation of Expugnatio Hibernica ("Conquest of Ireland") by Gerald of Wales. In his Irish section he again made his religious and political sympathies very clear, repeatedly denouncing the Catholicism of the native Irish, seeing it as the cause both of their poverty and rebelliousness. Rome, he wrote, is "the pestilent hydra" and the pope "the sonne of sathan, and the manne of sinne, and the enimie unto the crosse of Christ, whose bloodthirstiness will never be quenched".

Hooker continued to serve Exeter in his later years, becoming coroner in 1583 and recorder in 1590. He was also appointed as steward of Bradninch by Sir Walter Raleigh in 1587.[1] By this time he was involved in the long task of organising and writing his historically-based description of his home county that he called Synopsis Corographical of the county of Devon. He probably started work on this before his friend Richard Carew began writing his similar Survey of Cornwall.[2] In writing his Synopsis, Hooker was influenced by the style and structure of William Harrison's Description of England, which had been published in 1577 as part of the first edition of Holinshed's Chronicles.[1] Although Hooker revised Synopsis many times, he probably never completed it to his satisfaction. The work exists today as two almost identical manuscripts[9] which were used as source material for many later topographical descriptions of the county: Thomas Westcote's Survey of Devon of 1630, and Tristram Risdon's Chorographical Description or Survey of the County of Devon (c. 1632) are examples.

a verye ancient towne … and maye be equall with some cities for it is the cheffe emporium of that countrie and most inhabited with merchantes whose cheffest trade in tyme of peace was with Spayne … it is a clene and sweete towne, very well paved… ” —Hooker, on Barnstaple, in Synopsis Corographical, 261-262

Works:

Orders Enacted for Orphans and for their Portions within the Citie of Exeter, London, 1575 The Antique Description and Account of the City of Exeter: In Three Parts, All Written Purely by John Vowell, Alias Hoker The order and usage of the keeping of a parlement in England, 1572 A pamphlet of the offices and duties of everie particular sworned officer of the citie of Excester (sic) 1584 The Life and Times of Sir Peter Carew

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hooker_(English_constitutionalist)


Born in 1524 in Exeter, England. Spouse was Alice Stanyerne. Parents were Thomas HOOKER and Cicely Priest (b. 1500 in Medbourne, Leicester, England).


Notes

John Hooker, alias Vowel, chamberlain of Exeter, was son of Robert Hooker and his wife Agnes, daughter of John Doble of Woodbridge in Suffolk.

This Robert Hooker was son of John Vowel and his wife, Alice Drewel, daughter and heiress of Richard Drewel of Exeter and his wife, Joan Kelly, daughter and heiress of John Kelly and his wife Julyan, daughter and co-heiress of Robert Wilford of Oxton.

John Hooker had three wives, but his daughter Mary is not mentioned. It would seem probable that she was his daughter by his second wife, Anstice, daughter of Edmund Bridgman of Exeter.

John Keble in his edition of the works of Richard Hooker, volume I, appendix to preface I, folding plate opposite page cvi, gives the pedigree of John Hooker as follows:

  • John Vowel alias Hooker was son of Robert Vowell alias Hooker and his wife Agnes daughter of John Doble of Woodbridge in Suffolk. This Robert was son of John Voell alias Hooker by Alice daughter and heir of Richard Druitt and his wife Joan Kelly daughter and heir of John Kelly and his wife Julian daughter and co-heir of Robert Wilforde of Oxenham in Devon.
  • John Voell alias Hooker was son of Robert Voell alias Hooker of Hants gent and his wife Margery daughter and heir of Roger Bolter of Bolterscombe, Devon.
  • Robert Voell alias Hooker was son of John Voell alias Hooker who was son of Jago Voell and his wife Alice daughter and the heir of Richard Hooker, of Hurst Castle, Hants. Jago Voell was son of Gevaph Voell of Pembroke in South Wales. No mention is made of John Hooker's daughter Mary.

It will be noted that the two pedigrees differ only in the spelling of names and such minor details. A slight amount of research work in England would probably settle all of the questions raised by the pedigrees and also disclose additional information.

Source

  • Rhode Island Historical Society collections, Volumes 11-14 By Rhode Island Historical Society
    Other spouse: Martha Tucker
    John Hooker (or "Hoker") alias John Vowell (c. 1527–1601) of Exeter in Devon, was an English historian, writer, solicitor, antiquary, and civic administrator. From 1555 to his death he was Chamberlain of Exeter. He was twice MP for Exeter in 1570/1 and 1586, and for Athenry in Ireland in 1569 and wrote an influential treatise on parliamentary procedure. He wrote an eye-witness account of the siege of Exeter during the Prayer Book Rebellion in 1549. He spent several years in Ireland as legal adviser to Sir Peter Carew, and following Carew's death in 1575 wrote his biography. He was one of the editors of the second edition of Raphael Holinshed's Chronicles, published in 1587. His last, unpublished and probably uncompleted work was the first topographical description of the county of Devon. He founded a guild of Merchant Adventurers under a charter from Queen Mary.[2] He was the uncle of Richard Hooker, the influential Anglican theologian.[3] Hooker was born at Bourbridge Hall in Exeter, Devon, England. He was the second son and eventual heir of Robert Vowell (d.1538) of Exeter[4] alias Hooker by his third wife Agnes Dobell (or Doble), daughter of John Dobell of Woodbridge in Suffolk.[5] His grandfather was John Vowell alias Hooker (d.1493), MP for Exeter.[4]

The earliest recorded member of the Vowell family was Jenaph (or Seraph[6]%29 Vowell of Pembroke in Wales, from whom John Hooker (d.1601) was 6th in descent. The original Welsh name was possibly ap-Howell .[6] Jenaph's son Jago Vowell married Alice Hooker, daughter and heiress of Richard Hooker of Hurst Castle, Southampton.[4] Thus, as was commonly required in former times on receipt of an inheritance, the Vowell family assumed the name Hooker in the 15th century, but frequently retained the earlier name; in fact John Hooker was known as John Vowell for much of his life. By the time he was born the family had been prominent in Exeter for several generations.[7] Hooker received an excellent classical education, reading Roman law at Oxford followed by a period in Europe studying with leading Protestant divines,[8] notably Pietro Martire Vermigli.[7] During the Prayer Book Rebellion of 1549 Hooker experienced at first hand the siege of Exeter, and left a vivid manuscript account of its events in which he made no effort to conceal his anti-Catholic sympathies.[8] From 1551 to 1553 he was employed by Myles Coverdale during his short incumbency as Bishop of Exeter. In 1555 he became the first chamberlain of Exeter, a post he held until his death.[7]

As chamberlain he was responsible for the city's finances, he dealt with disputes between guilds and merchants, oversaw the rebuilding of the high school, planted many trees in the city, and collected and put in order the city's archives.[7] He used these archives to compile his "Annals" of the City in which he details the characteristics of every Tudor mayor of Exeter, and in 1578 he wrote and published The Lives of the Bishops of Exeter.[8] In 1570/71 he was MP for Exeter.

At a time when it was deemed essential for cities and nations to have ancient lineage, Hooker described the supposed foundation of Exeter by Corinaeus, nephew of Brutus of Britain, son of Aeneas. He advocated emulating the governmental institutions of the Roman Republic, which in his opinion brought Rome to greatness, and held up the municipal government of Exeter as a model republican commonwealth worthy of emulation.[9][10] In 1568, possibly because he regarded himself as underpaid for the work he was doing for Exeter, Hooker was persuaded by Sir Peter Carew to accompany him to Ireland as his legal adviser. He organised Carew's papers in support of his claim for the barony of Idrone, a task to which he committed himself so deeply that in 1569 he was returned to the Irish parliament as member for Athenry. Hooker later wrote a biography of Carew, The dyscourse and dyscoverye of the lyffe of Sir Peter Carew, in which he almost certainly understated the deceit and aggression behind Carew's Irish venture.[7][11][12]

Until Carew's death in 1575, Hooker spent much time in Ireland, but he had also been returned to the English parliament in 1571 as one of the burgesses of Exeter. The session had lasted only a few weeks, but he kept a journal in which he accurately recorded the proceedings. His experiences in the Irish and English parliaments led him to write a treatise on parliamentary practice, The Order and Usage how to Keepe a Parlement in England, which was published in two editions in 1572. One edition had a preface addressed to William FitzWilliam, Lord Deputy of Ireland and was clearly intended to bring order to the Irish assembly; the other was addressed to the Exeter city authorities, presumably to aid his successor burgesses. In writing his treatise Hooker took much inspiration from the Modus Tenendi Parliamentum, a treatise from the early 14th century.[7]

In 1586 Hooker again represented Exeter in parliament. At this time he was one of the editors of the second edition of Raphael Holinshed's Chronicles, published in 1587. Hooker's Order and Usage was included within it and he contributed an updated history of Ireland, with parts of his Life of Carew and a translation of Expugnatio Hibernica ("Conquest of Ireland") by Gerald of Wales. In his Irish section he made his religious and political sympathies very clear, repeatedly denouncing the Catholicism of the native Irish, seeing it as the cause both of their poverty and rebelliousness. Rome he described as "the pestilent hydra" and the pope "the sonne of sathan, and the manne of sinne, and the enimie unto the crosse of Christ, whose bloodthirstiness will never be quenched". Hooker continued to serve Exeter in his later years, becoming coroner in 1583 and recorder in 1590. He was also appointed as steward of Bradninch by Sir Walter Raleigh in 1587.[7] By this time he was involved in the long task of organising and writing his historically-based description of his home county which he titled Synopsis Corographical of the county of Devon. He probably started work on this before his antiquary friend Richard Carew began writing his similar Survey of Cornwall.[8] In writing his Synopsis, Hooker was influenced by the style and structure of William Harrison's Description of England, which had been published in 1577 as part of the first edition of Holinshed's Chronicles.[7]

Although Hooker revised his Synopsis many times, he probably never completed it to his satisfaction. The work survives today as two almost identical manuscripts, one in the British Library the other in the Devon Record Office,[13] which were used as source material for many later topographical descriptions of the county, including Thomas Westcote's Survey of Devon (1630) and Tristram Risdon's Chorographical Description or Survey of the County of Devon (c. 1632).[8] He wrote an account of the Black Assize of Exeter in 1586 from which a virulent and deadly disease spread from prisoners in Exeter Prison to the courtroom in Exeter Castle and thence to the whole county.

In the 1540s he married Martha Tucker, daughter of Robert Tucker of Exeter by whom he had three sons and two daughters. Martha died before 1586 after which he re-married to Anastryce Bridgeman (c. 1540–1599), daughter of Edward Bridgeman of Exeter, by whom he had seven sons and five daughters.

In later life his health failed. He wrote: "...my sight waxeth Dymme my hyringe [hearing] very thycke my speache imperfecte and my memory very feeble". He died in Exeter on 8 November 1601 at the age of 76 and was buried at St Mary Major, Exeter. John (also John Hoker or John Vowell) was born at Bourbridge Hall, Exeter, Devon, England. He married first, Martha, daughter of Robert Tucker. He married second, Anastryce Bridgeman, daughter of Edward Bridgeman. Note: Documentation does NOT support that John Hooker was married to Rachel Grindal. John was buried without a monument in Exeter Cathedral. John was the uncle of Richard Hooker, the influential Anglican theologian

John was an English consitutionalist, writer, antiquary, administrator and advocate of republican government. From 1555 to 1601, he served as chamberlain of the city of Exeter. He also served for short periods of time in both the English and Irish parliaments.

Sources: Clarke, Louise Brownell Clarke, The Greenes of Rhode Island with Historical Records of English Ancestry 1534-1902, New York, 1903. Hate, , J. W. Schopp, and H. Tapley-Soper (1919 and 1947 Vowell alias Hooker, The Description of the Citie of Excester. Devon and Cornwall Record Society.

Mendyk, S, "Hooker , John (c.1527-1601)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2005, accessed 26 July 2008  Mendle, Michael, Dangerous Positions; Mixed Government, the Estates of the Realm, and the Making of the "Answer to the xix propositions", University of Alabama Press, 1985. pp 51 Moore, Thomas Moore, History of Devonshire, volume ii, p.125.

* Reference: Find A Grave Memorial - SmartCopy: Apr 14 2018, 16:52:02 UTC

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John Hooker alias Vowell's Timeline

1524
1524
Exeter, Devon, England, United Kingdom
1551
1551
1554
1554
Exeter, Devon, England
1555
1555
1556
1556
1559
1559
1562
June 6, 1562
Exeter, Devonshire, England
1563
1563
Exeter, Devonshire, England