John Lowry, Sr.

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John Lowry, Sr.

Birthdate: (67)
Birthplace: Springfield, Robertson County, Tennessee, United States
Death: Died in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah, United States
Place of Burial: Manti, Sanpete, Utah, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of William Lowry and Mary Polly Lowry
Husband of Elizabeth Lowry; Anna Maria Lowry; Mary Anne Lowry and Susan Lowry
Father of James Hazard Lowry; Hyrum Madison Lowry; John Lowry, Jr.; Abner Lowry, Sr; Mary Artimesia Peacock and 8 others
Brother of James Lowry and Ira Lowry

Managed by: Della Dale Smith-Pistelli
Last Updated:

About John Lowry, Sr.

John Lowry, the son of William Lowry of Nashville, Tennessee, and Mary Polly Norris, was born August 10, 1799, at Nashville, Tennesee. He came to Utah on September 30, 1847 in the John Taylor company.

Spouse: Susan Groome, Marriage: 1817 Madison, Monroe, Missouri

Spouse: Mary Wilcox Marriage: 1 Feb 1824, in Shelby, Tennessee

John Lowry, "Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950"

https://familysearch.org/tree/person/KWJT-VHB/details

Spouse: Anna Maria Johnston, Marriage: 13 Feb 1853, Manti, Sanpete, Utah

Spouse: Elizabeth Haydock Crompton

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868

John Lowry, Birth Date: 10 Aug. 1799, Death Date: 7 Jan. 1867, Age: 47 at time of crossing, Company: Edward Hunter - Jacob Foutz Company (1847), Departure: 19 June 1847, Arrival: 1 October 1847. Company Information: 155 individuals and 59 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post on the Elkhorn River about 27 miles west of Winter Quarters, Nebraska. Pioneer Information: Captain of 5th Ten. His name and travel are mentioned in his daughter's obituary.

Biography of John Lowry Sr. - The following history was written by a grandson:

The records on the microfilm "Crossing the Plains" shows family of eight, John, Mary and children John, Jr., Abner, Susan L., Mary A., George, and Sarah Jane. 1847, Members of Capt. Edward Hunter's Hundred part of which arrived in G. S. L. Valley 29 Sep 1847.

In "Pioneer Immigrants to Utah Territory" it states that John was born in Springfield, Robinson, Tennessee to William Lowry and Polly Norris. His spouses were Susan Groome, Mary Wilcox, Anna Maria Johnston and Elizabeth Crompton. He traveled to Utah with his family and others including Justus Azel Seeley and his large family. Some of the places they settled before coming to Utah were: Madison, Marion, Clay and Caldwell Counties in Missouri, Lee County, Iowa, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois and finally Manti, Sanpete, Utah.

Deloras Lowry Middleton states that John Lowry married also Anna Maria Johnson, no issue.

John's main occupation was a farmer. He owned property in Nauvoo, Illinois HIBB 2 Block 7 Lot 4 1842, NAU 112 Lot 4 1846, L, Smith Block 10, Lot 1, 1842, Half Breed tract T 67.6. ,After moving from Nauvoo, John and family settled on a farm in Van Buren Township, Iowa Territory, until the expulsion of the Mormons and their journey to the Great Salt Lake area.

John was a Bishop of the Salt Lake City 2nd Ward from 1849/1850, and Bishop of the Manti Ward, South Sanpete Stake, Sanpete County, Utah, from 1850 to 1855. He was the Justice of the Peace at Manti. He was sent with John Crawford by Brigham Young to colonize Elk Mountain country, Nevada.

That his descendants may have in their possession the meager facts now obtainable and to perpetuate the memory of a pioneer of 1847, this brief sketch of the life of grandfather is compiled. He was the son of William and Polly Norris, and according to the statement of his, he was born August 10, 1799, in Robertson County but there is Robertson County directly north of Davidson County in which Nashville is located.

The tradition is that William (John's father) was in the employ of the United States Government as mail carrier and that during one of the regular trips over his route, (from which he never returned,) a heavy storm arose and a stream which he had to cross was over-running its banks. His hat was afterward. found on the bank of this stream, but no further trace of rider or horse was ever discovered. It was a query in the minds of his family and friends whether he lost his life by drowning or was murdered for the money that might have been in the mail.

Just how many children were left in care of the widowed mother is not definitely known. There were three sons, John, James and Ira. John and his younger brother were apprenticed or "bound out" to a wheelwright. Their master was a cruel man with a violent temper, sometimes beating them unmercifully. After one of these beatings Ira sickened and died. John decided to run away from his master. Doubtless the death of his brother was the deciding factor in his determination to escape the cruelty of his present condition.

His mother encouraged him in this, directing him as best she could how to find his uncle, Nicholas Norris, who lived in the State of Missouri. Did Mother and son realize that they would never meet again on earth? What emotions must have stirred in that mother's heart as she sent forth her son in his thirteenth year, barefoot and alone, clad in torn trousers and shirt and ragged hat. More than two hundred miles lay between the lad's home in Nashville and the home of his uncle in Madison County, Missouri. Aunt Jane Seeley in relating this to the writer said she had been told there was a light fall of snow on the ground when John left his mother, never to see her face again. However, he found his uncle and grew to manhood without even having been to school.

It is said that John was unusually strong and robust, and at 18 years equaled any man in strength and hunting skill. He became a great hunter and was known as a very brave man, never shunning a fight. His prowess as fighter won him the respect of his associates.

Madison County lies in the southeastern part of Missouri, not many miles inland from the Mississippi River which at that time was the great artery of commerce between the Great Lakes region and the fertile fields of the South. John became a successful river pilot, as was also his brother James, and the two brothers met for the last time in the city of Natchez. James going down and John up-river, each piloting a boat.

In the year of 1817, John married Susan Groome. Their son, William was born February 10, 1818 and a daughter Sarah, was born October 10, 1820. Susan died March 20, 1823. No record of birthplace of ancestry has been found. Her son William was accidently killed in Warsaw, Illinois, September 20, 1838. Her daughter, Sarah married George Peacock, April 4, 1841, in Lee County, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Peacock lived the greater part of their married life in Manti, Utah, where they died and were buried.

February 1, 1824, John was married again to Mary Wilcox, who was born in upper Canada, October 6, 1802. She was a daughter of Hazard and Sarah Seeley Wilcox. Hazzard Wilcox, a soldier in the American Revolution was killed in battle. This Hazzard was the grandfather of Mary Wilcox Lowry. His wife, caring for her four year old son, Hazard (three spellings of Hazard!) walked forty miles to the battlefield where she identified the blackened, swollen corpses of her husband by his silver belt buckle, on which was engraved his initials, H. W. and to this day the silver belt buckle is cherished as a precious heirloom in the Wilcox family.

Mary was a woman of superior intelligence, possessing rare courage and great presence of mind. She taught her husband to read and write, was his staunch supporter in the various phases of their pioneer life. John must have continued to live near, and perhaps to work for his Uncle Nicholas, as Mary's son James Hazard, was born in Madison County, June 3, 1825. This was her first child.

Later, Uncle Nicholas decided he would move south into the state of Arkansas. John intended going with him, helped his uncle to get started with his teams and herds of loose stock, and returned to hitch his already harnessed team to the wagon. When ready to drive off with the family in the loaded wagon, he picked up an old gun barrel lying in the yard of the house he was leaving and said to his wife, "Mary, which ever way this barrel falls that is the way I am going to drive." He stood it on end and it fell North; so, John took up his journey in that direction and never saw his uncle again. Their next home was in Lewis County, in the extreme northeast corner of the State of Missouri, bordering on the Mississippi River. It seems more reasonable to conclude that it was while here that he became a river pilot.

In Lewis County, three sons were called to the family; Hyrum, born March 15, 1827; John, born January 31, 1829; Abner, born October 12, 1831, and here also occurred an event which shaped the future destined the abiding place of this family. It was here that John and Mary first heard the Gospel as proclaimed by the Latter Day Saints. Here in 1835 (1833) they were baptized into the Church by George N. Hinkle, who afterward turned traitor to the church and betrayed its leaders into hands of the mob. In the fall of this year they decided to cast their lot with the saints in Jackson County, arriving in the midst of much persecution.

In a revelation given through Joseph Smith in Jackson County, Missouri, August 1, 1831, the law of consecration was given to the Church. Martin Harris was the man selected by the Lord to be the first to obey. His command to lay "his monies before the Bishop of the Church, and also this is a law unto every man who cometh into this land to receive and inheritance; and he shall do with monies as the law directs." (Doc & Cov. Sec 59 v. 35, 36.)

Obedient to this command John, upon his arrival, went immediately to Bishop Edward Partridge and told him he was ready to turn over to the Church all he owned; which act in itself is an evidence of his sincere acceptance of the restored Gospel. Bishop Partridge said he could not accept the property as he could do nothing with it on account of the troubles of persecution the Saints were having, and advised him to buy a farm. Accordingly, he and his family shared the hardships and persecutions of the saints, participating in what is known as the "Surrender". An agreement to vacate Jackson County and the expulsion into Clay County.

In Clay County he bought the improvements on an 80 acre tract of land, on which he filed. When the time came to make final proof on the land, the time fell on Sunday. As no business could be transacted on that day, his intention was to go to the land office on Monday, a distance of sixty miles. However, while working on the farm Saturday afternoon, John observed two men ride by. They were avowed enemies of the church, and who had on a previous occasion shown their animosity in a very positive manner. Charles Hubbard, a church member, was on his way to town when these two men overtook him and began to lash him with a rawhide. Hubbard whipped up his horse, thinking he could outrun them but their horses were just as good as Hubbard's and for four miles they raced and the lashing continued.

On this Saturday these men who attacked Hubbard rode on past Lowry's and stopped at Squire Dozier's, one of the Lowry's neighbors, and laughingly told him that they were on the way to the land office to file on Lowry's land and cheat him out of it. When they had passed on out of sight Bozier unhitched his horses from the plow, went into his house and got some money, rode a distance of four miles to Lowry's farm and told him the story, also offered to lend him the money with which to secure the land. Lowry said to his friend, "I will not let them get it without a struggle."

Early in the evening he started on the sixty mile trip. Soon a severe storm arose but all night he rode through darkness and raging elements, and came to the Missouri River, which he must cross early Sunday morning. It so happened that there was a lull in the storm, and the crossing was safely made. He went immediately to the Receiver's office, but that gentleman would not transact any business nor allow him to deposit money on Sunday. From his hotel window the next morning he eagerly watched for the first indication of someone stirring about the office. When he presented himself at the office and desired to complete the business at once, the receiver was busy with his morning duties of carrying out ashes, starting fires, sweeping, which preliminaries he would finish. When he finally accepted the money and while the receipt was being written, Lowry walked to the window, and saw approaching him two friends who had crossed the river early that morning. They saw him and one exclaimed, "There's Lowry now." As they entered, the receipt was handed to him and turning to greet them Lowry said, "Gentlemen, I am through with my business here, but have to go to another office, will you accompany me?" The three went to the office, after the business was attended to Lowry told them that he had not had breakfast and all three went to the same hotel for the morning meal. Then Lowry said he was going home. "Perhaps you are going home, too." Yes, they were through with their business and all started home together

On their return trip Lowry told them of how they had whipped Hubbard and other "low, mean tricks' and made them so angry they were furious and wanted to fight. Lowry said, "We will tie our horses right here and I will whip you both," but they did not accept the challenge, and later when a particularly lonely section of the road was reached Lowry told them that it would be a good place to whip him, and again dared them to fight but they wanted none of it. This incident clearly portrays John's fearless nature. He took an active part in defending the Saints, his boldness of speech incurred the hatred of the persecutors of the Church. Some of the ruffians plotted to take his life.

As he had enemies he also had some good friends outside the church who revealed the details of the plot to him. The night on which the deed was to be done, some of these good friends came to Lowry's home. When the plotters knocked, Lowry admitted them asking them to be seated around the fireplace. He observed they were all armed and finally asked them if they wanted anything there. They said "no' and shortly left the house. Watching them, John saw them go to the corn crib which they set on fire. Seeing the blaze he rushed out and extinguished the fire by tearing off the burning slats, scorching his hands but not seriously.

During the four years of residency in Clay County, three children were added to the family; twin daughters, Sarah Lucretia and Mary Artemisia born March 14, 1834 and George A. born August 9, 1836.

When the Saints left Clay County John made no disposition of his farm. Just left it. In Caldwell County he again acquired some land. He was an active member of the Church, ever ready to perform any duty. When the friends of the Prophet would have rescued him from his illegal confinement in Liberty jail, John and a Brother Bagley were chosen to effect the deliverance. The attempt was made in a night ride across the prairie, but for some reason failed of it's purpose. The faithful animal that John so many times had ridden from sunset to sunrise stood in her stall and trembled from sheer exhaustion. When one of the children asked, "What is the matter?" the mother said nothing, merely put her finger on her lips. But later, when the child was more mature, and there was no necessity for secrecy, the mother told the boy of his father's fruitless ride.

When in consequence of persecution which soon developed in Caldwell County, the Saints were again compelled to move and Brigham Young asked the brethren to sign an agreement to move the poor, the widows and orphans from the county, John signed and faithfully kept his pledge. For three months he was seldom at home, being constantly on the road between Far West and Mississippi River. His own family was left for the last trip that he would make. Some of the enemies of the Saints who were the leaders in forcing this move onto them, rode up to the Lowry's home and told Mrs. Lowry that if she was not out of that house by ten o'clock next day they would burn it over their head. She told them that she was just as anxious to leave as they were to have her go, but she could not till the team came back. They repeated the threat and Mary, standing in the open door, reached behind it and bringing into view her old flintlock rifle, shook her fist at them, her eyes flashing with the same heroic spirit that fired her grandfather who fought and died for American Liberty, exclaimed: "Come on, gentlemen, but I'll promise that one of you will bite the dust."That night the husband returned and in the early morning they packed their few belongings and drove away without seeing any of the lawless men who had threatened them the night before. It was at this time, when the family was on the road to find another home with 13 year old James as team master, that John went back into Jackson, and sold his farm, the "Big Blue" and donated the proceeds of sale to the Church. From Caldwell County, Missouri, they went to Nauvoo but the Prophet advised going into Iowa to acquire land just across the river from Nauvoo. On the farm he bought in Lee county, Iowa, they lived three years. The Prophet advised John to go to Zarahemla, which he did and built a house there, but did not move his family into it as he was called into Nauvoo. The next four years were years of activity and service, not only for the head of the family, but the sons also were assisting in the building up of the city and the Temple, a beautiful edifice, in course of construction and which was finished only through much sacrifice and perseverance on the part of the faithful Saints. In the year 1843 John was called to fill a short mission in one of the near by states.

After the death of the prophet and Patriarch, and the preparations were being made for the general exodus of the Church to the unknown regions of the west the knowledge John had gained from his cruel master in his boyhood proved to be valuable to himself as well as others. During the winter of 1845-46 he built two wagons for himself and some for other parties. In February, 1846 when the first companies were completing their equipment for the long journey across the plains, he gave his last team for their use. The following (iuse) (?)he moved his family just across the Mississippi River where they lived in tents till the last of August when he was again in possession of teams and they started out in the direction of Winter Quarters. At Des Moines, Iowa they stopped on account of sickness. Here occurred the death of little five year old Elizabeth on August 18th and a lonely grave was left by the roadside. The journey was resumed and at Mt. Pisgah the youngest son of the family, five month old William passed away on the 16th of September.

When they arrived at Winter Quarters John took a drove of stock up the Missouri to herd for the winter, taking his son John with him to assist in caring for the cattle. The eldest son, James Hazard had married the previous summer. Hyrum, then in his twenty-first year was left to look after the needs of the family. On March 16, 1847 he attempted to cross the river on the ice and was drowned. There were no means of communicating this news to the absent father and son. Some weeks later they returned with the cattle they had cared for through the winter, and preparations were made to continue the journey to the valleys in the west. John was made Captain of the fifth "ten" in John Taylor's company reaching the valley of the Great Salt Lake in September of 1847. Immediately after arrival, the first consideration was some adequate shelter for the winter, and a log room was constructed in a short time.

One of the first things done after reaching the valley was to weigh the bread stuffs, dividing with those who had none, and putting his own family to follow a strict rationing of food. In the spring of 1848 again the food supply was divided with others and the family rations reduced so that there would be just a little bread for each day till the first crop could be harvested. Edward was called to preside over the little band who had "found the place which God for them prepared, far, far away in the West," and John was one of his Counselors.

Having brought his turning lathe with him, the first chairs made in Utah were made by him from native oak, during the first winter. On February 22, 1849, John was appointed to preside as Bishop of the second Ward of the City of Great Salt Lake--as it was called at that time. At the October Conference of the Church of the same year, a company was called to go to settle Manti, under the Presidency of Isaac Morley, Charles Shumway and Seth Taft. Starting on October 28th, it was November 22nd before they reached the present site of Manti, due to so many difficulties being encountered on the way. John's wife, Mary, sprained her ankle at the camp of Salt Creek Canyon, which is east from the present site of Nephi. (This last statement is a personal remembrance of Mrs. Sidwell, who was a member of the company and who lived in Manti many years.)

That was a winter never to be forgotten by those who lived in tents, wagon boxes, or"dug-outs". The snow fell deeper than it ever has done since, covering the tallest sage-bush. The task of the men every day was to shovel snow that the stock might find something to eat. Many of the men were snow-blind from the glare on that white expanse of valley and the snow clad mountains, having to be led to the place where the shoveling was done by the youngsters who were not strong enough to wield a shovel. Only 100 head of stock lived throughout that first winter. 149 died of cold and starvation. To get the plowing done for the spring crops in 1850 it was necessary to send to Salt Lake City for teams to assist in the work. The first camp had been made on the banks of the stream that meandered through the valley, but the biting winds forced them to find shelter on the south side of the hill on which now stands the Manti Temple. After an unusually warm day in the spring the rattle snakes by the hundreds came from their winters hibernation on the rocky slopes and invading the camp, challenged a demonstration of the "Survival of the fittest." The slaughter which was begun as a means of defense was continued by the light of long torches till after midnight. Strange to say not one of the reptiles inflicted a deadly bite and literally hundreds of them were killed. On Sunday, August 4, 1850 President Brigham Young and other Church authorities made their first visit to what was then called Sanpete Fort. On Monday the 5th, president Young designated a Temple site on the hill where the Manti Temple was later erected. The visiting company remained until Thursday when they departed for Great Salt Lake City.

In Church history no date is recorded for the organization of a ward at Manti or the installation of the first Bishop, but it is reasonable to suppose that at this visit of President Young, John Lowry was made Bishop of the new settlement. (Aunt Mary Wilcox told me that grandfather was ordained a Bishop in August, 1850.)

The first winter was a very severe one for these courageous pioneers who made their homes in Manti. The snow was very deep and all through the winter father shoveled snow so that his cattle might browse in the sagebrush. When a ward was organized father was again chosen for the position of Bishop, and a very good one he made, looking after those who needed help and acting as a father to the little flock in his charge. (From dictation of his son John.)

Two other important items appeared in the Deseret News. One, dated January 20, 1867, told of the death of a faithful pioneer and colonizer. The other was a letter which thanked the News for publishing articles in the Danish language since Sanpete County had become known as "Little Denmark", and many of the settlers could not as yet, read or speak any but the Danish tongue, this accommodation was greatly appreciated.

The two items follow:

Died at Manti, Sanpete County, on Monday January 7, 1867, Elder John Lowry, Sen. aged 67 years and 5 months, after a severe illness of the lungs from protracted colds. Deceased was born in Robinson County, Tennessee. He was baptized in Lewis County, Missouri, by Elder Hinkle in 1832. He removed with his family to Jackson county in 1833 and was expelled with the Saints from the county in the same year. He passed through the subsequent mobbings and drivings in various counties where the Saints had located, and finally was expelled from the State under the exterminating order of Governor Boggs. He settled afterward in Lee County, Iowa and then in Nauvoo, where he remained until the exodus of the Saints in 1846, and arrived in Salt Lake Valley in 1847. He acted as Bishop of the second Ward in Great Salt Lake City until 1849 when he was selected with others to pioneer and settle Sanpete Valley continuing the duties of Bishop several years as Bishop of Manti and was a faithful and energetic man. A few days before his death he called his family around his bed, blessed and exhorted them to remain faithful and after leaving instructions in relation to business, distribution of property, etc. he felt reconciled and departed in peace in full hope of a glorious resurrection. His remains were interred in the Manti Cemetery on Wednesday 9th upon which occasion a very large and orderly procession was in attendance.

Second item:

Manti, Sanpete County, March 20th. Editor Deseret News: Permit me in behalf of the Danish Saints in Manti, to express our gratitude and the obligation felt for your courtesy extended in publishing articles of Danish reading in the Deseret News. i read them myself with much interest and feel confident that they will be productive of much good to the Danish people, many of whom can neither speak, nor read nor understand the English language and imagine themselves too old or for other reason to learn it. We hope for the continuation of articles in the Danish language.

We have had some pretty severe cold weather for the last ten or twelve days which has suspended all kinds of work with the exception of hauling wood, which the people are carrying on with considerable energy and perseverance, to prevent the necessity of going into the mountains and hills by the time when there may be danger of meeting Black Hawk or some of his associates. We are also gathering up our stock from the south, to keep it a little nearer by. A general inspection of Arms has been ordered and the people are generally anxious to procure good firearms and ammunition and are trying to prepare themselves for any emergency that may arise through Indian depredations. The necessity for these and other precautionary measures has been decreed upon us by our Bishop as well as by President Orson Hyde, who has lately been here speaking unto us and imparting much valuable instruction, counsel and admonition. At present we are favored with the company of Brother Van Cott, who is blessing and comforting the people with words of edification, instruction and counsel. The Danish Saints particularly appreciate his visit as he addresses them in their own language.

About a week ago we completed a good substantial rock wall eight feet high around our public square or what is commonly called Temple block. We also made a good start toward completing the wall around our cemetery. (This was the end of his journal.)

John Lowry's Obituary : In Manti, Sanpete County on Monday, January 7, 1867, Elder John Lowry Senior, aged 67 years and five months, after a severe illness of the lungs from protracted colds, died.

Deceased was born in Robinson County, Tennessee. He was baptized in Lewis County, Missouri by Elder Hinkle in 1832. He removed with his family to Jackson County in 1833 and was expelled with the Saints from that County in the same year. He passed through the subsequent mobbings and drivings in various counties where the Saints had located and finally was expelled from the State, under the exterminating order of Gov. Boggs. He settled afterwards in Lee County, Iowa, and then in Nauvoo, where he remained until the exodus of the Saints in 1846, and arrived in Salt Lake Valley in 1847. He acted as Bishop of the 2nd Ward in G. S. L. until 1849, when he was selected with others to pioneer and settle Sanpete Valley, continuing the duties of Bishop several years as Bishop at Manti and was a faithful and energetic man.

2nd Ward in G. S. L. until 1849, when he was selected with others to pioneer and settle Sanpete Valley, continuing the duties of Bishop several years as Bishop at Manti and was a faithful and energetic man. A few days before his death he called his family around his bed, blessed and exhorted them to remain faithful, and after giving instructions in relation to business, distribution of property, etc. he felt reconciled and departed in peace, in full hope of a glorious resurrection. His remains were interred in the Manti Cemetery on Wednesday 9th, upon which occasion a very large and orderly procession was in attendance. The ceremonies were conducted by Bishop A. J. Moffatt. (Communicated by George Peacock). [JL63]

Sources: _________________________________________________________________________

"Mrs. M. A. Peacock Dead," Herald-Republican, 20 Apr. 1910, page 3.

He married Susan Groome, who died in Missouri. Their children were: William; Sarah, m. George Peacock April 4, 1840.

Married Mary Wilcox (daughter of Hazard Wilcox and Sarah Seeley, latter came to Utah Sept. 30, 1847, John Taylor company). Their children: James Hazard b. June 3, 1825, m. Mary Ann Bryerly; Hyrum b. March 15, 1827, d. March 16, 1847; John b. Jan. 31, 1829, m. Sarah Jane Brown, m. Mary A. Allen; Abner b. Oct. 12, 1831, m. Louisa Bradley; Susan Lucretia b. March 13, 1834 (d. Oct. 21, 1859), m. William George Pettey Dec. 13, 1854; Mary Artemesia b. March 13, 1834, m. George Peacock Aug. 5, 1854; George Moroni b. Aug. 9, 1836, d. May 26, 1856; Sarah Jane b. Jan. 26, 1838, m. Nelson D. Higgins; Elizabeth b. March 16, 1841, d. Aug. 18, 1846; William Mahonri b. April 28, 1844, d. Sept. 14, 1846.

Family home Manti, Utah.

First counselor to Bishop Hunter, the first bishop of Salt Lake City; also bishop of second ward, Salt Lake City, 1849; first bishop of Manti 1850. Justice of peace at Manti. Farmer and stockraiser. Sent with John Crawford, by Brigham Young, to colonize Elk Mountain country, Nevada. Died Jan. 7, 1867, at Manti, Utah.


Spouses:

 

Elizabeth Crompton Lowry 1800 - 1862

 

Mary Wilcox Lowry 1802 - 1859

 

Anna Maria Johnston Lowry 1815 - 1867


Children:

 

Sarah C. Lowry Peacock 1820 - 1892

 

James Hazard Lowry 1825 - 1913

 

Hyrum Madison Lowry 1827 - 1847

 

John Lowry 1829 - 1915

 

Abner Lowry 1831 - 1900

 

Mary Artimesia Lowry Peacock 1834 - 1910

 

Susan Lucretia Lowry Petty 1834 - 1859

 

George Moroni Lowry 1836 - 1865

 

Sarah Jane Lowry Higgins 1839 - 1875

 

William Mahonri Lowry 1844 - 1846


William Alexander Lowry 1854 - 1854


Headstone Inscription: 2D Lt Utah Territory Militia Indian Wars


Originally Created by: Dawnetta

Record added: Oct 09, 2009

Find A Grave Memorial# 42881297

Read his complete Biography Under Sources


Son of William Lowry and Mary (Polly) Norris

  

Spouse: Susan Grooms (who died in Missouri)


Marriage: 1817 Madison, Monroe, Missouri

Their children were: William; Sarah, m. George Peacock April 4, 1840.

Spouse: Mary Wilcox (daughter of Hazard Wilcox and Sarah Seeley, latter came to Utah Sept. 30, 1847, John Taylor company).

Marriage: 1 Feb 1824 Madison, Monroe, Missouri

Their children: James Hazard b. June 3, 1825, m. Mary Ann Bryerly; Hyrum b. March 15, 1827, d. March 16, 1847; John b. Jan. 31, 1829, m. Sarah Jane Brown, m. Mary A. Allen; Abner b. Oct. 12, 1831, m. Louisa Bradley; Susan Lucretia b. March 13, 1834 (d. Oct. 21, 1859), m. William George Pettey Dec. 13, 1854; Mary Artemesia b. March 13, 1834, m. George Peacock Aug. 5, 1854; George Moroni b. Aug. 9, 1836, d. May 26, 1856; Sarah Jane b. Jan. 26, 1838, m. Nelson D. Higgins; Elizabeth b. March 16, 1841, d. Aug. 18, 1846; William Mahonri b. April 28, 1844, d. Sept. 14, 1846.

Spouse: Anna Maria Johnston Marriage: 13 Feb 1853 Manti, Sanpete, Utah

Spouse: Elizabeth Haydock Crompton

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868


First counselor to Bishop Hunter, the first bishop of Salt Lake City; also bishop of second ward, Salt Lake City, 1849; first bishop of Manti 1850. Justice of peace at Manti. Farmer and stockraiser. Sent with John Crawford, by Brigham Young, to colonize Elk Mountain country, Nevada. Died Jan. 7, 1867, at Manti, Utah.

Published in The Deseret News January 30, 1867 -- DIED--In Manti, Sanpete County, on Monday, January 7, 1867, Elder John Lowry, Sen., aged 67 years and 5 months, after a severe illness of the lungs, from protracted colds. Deceased was born in Robinson (Robertson) County, Tennessee. He was baptized in Lewis County, Missouri, by Elder Hinkle, in 1832. He removed with his family to Jackson County in 1838 and was expelled with the Saints from that county in the same year. He passed through the subsequent mobbings and drivings in various counties where the Saints had located, and finally was expelled from the State, under the extermination order of Gov. Boggs. He settled afterwards in Lee County, Iowa, and then in Nauvoo, where he remained until the exodus of the Saints in 1846 and arrived in Salt Lake Valley in 1847. He acted as Bishop of the 2nd Ward in G.S.L. City until 1849 when he was selected with others to pioneer and settle Sanpete Valley, continuing the duties of bishop several years, as Bishop of Manti, and was a faithful and energetic man. A few days before his death he called his family around his bed, blessed and exhorted them to remain faithful; and after giving instructions in relation to business, distribution of property, &c., he felt reconciled and departed in peace, in full hope of a glorious resurrection. His remains were interred in the Manti Cemetery on Wednesday 9th, upon which occasion a very large and orderly procession was in attendance. The ceremonies were conducted by Bishop A. J. Moffitt. {Communicated by George Peacock} Inscription:

John Lowry Sr. (1799-1867), his first wife, Susan Groome (d. 1823), his second wife, Mary Wilcox (b. 1802), and their ten children were converted to the LDS Church in Missouri in 1833. They moved around Missouri, then to Nauvoo, Illinois, where they were present at the death of Joseph Smith. They traveled with the Joseph Taylor Company to the Salt Lake Valley. They lived in Salt Lake for a year and then moved to Sanpete or Sanpitch Valley in 1849, becoming some of the first farmers in Manti. John Lowry Jr. joined Parley P. Pratt's exploration party to southern Utah and then joined the Elk Mountain (now LaSal) Mission in 1855. The mission was short-lived, but he learned to speak Ute which allowed him to serve as interpreter and diplomat between Chief Walker, Arropeen, and Brigham Young.

2D Lt Utah Ter Militia Indian Wars

In Land Patents - Mississippi https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10087-125832/john-lowry-in-land-patents-mississippi

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John Lowry, Sr.'s Timeline

1799
August 10, 1799
Springfield, Robertson County, Tennessee, United States
1818
February 10, 1818
Age 18
1820
October 16, 1820
Age 21
Madison County, Missouri, United States
1825
June 3, 1825
Age 25
Madison County, Missouri, United States
1827
March 15, 1827
Age 27
Madison, Monroe, MO
1829
January 31, 1829
Age 29
Palmyra, Marion County, Missouri, United States
1831
October 12, 1831
Age 32
Palmyra, Marion, MO, USA
1834
March 14, 1834
Age 34
Liberty, Clay County, Missouri, United States
March 14, 1834
Age 34
Liberty, Clay County, Missouri, United States