Capt. John Mason

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Capt. John Mason

Birthdate: (49)
Birthplace: Kings Lynn, Norfolkshire, England
Death: December 1635 (45-53)
Probably, City of Westminster, Greater London, England, United Kingdom
Place of Burial: Greater London, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Son of John Mason and Isabel Mason
Husband of Anne Mason
Father of Anne Tufton

Occupation: sailor; colonizer; appointed the second Proprietory Governor of Newfoundland's Cuper's Cove colony in 1615
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Capt. John Mason

name: John Mason born c. 1586 Kings Linn, Norfolkshire, England, d. c.1635 England

title: captain

occupation:

  • sailor
  • colonizer
  • appointed second Proprietary Governor of Newfoundland's Cuper's Cove colony in 1615

parents: John Mason b. 1560 Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, d. June 29, 1625 Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England and Isabel Stead b. 1565 Yorkshire, England, d. England

wife:

  • Ann Greene b. 1590 Saint Margaret, King Linn, Norfolkshire, England, d. 1655 Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England

children:

  • with Ann Green: Ann Mason b. c.1605 St. Matthew, England, d. 1659. Married Joseph Tufton

biography

From http://www.heritage.nf.ca/articles/politics/proprietary-john-mason.php

Mason, John

Governor of Cuper's Cove, 1615-1621

John Mason, born in 1586 at King's Lynn, Norfolk, was renowned as an explorer, cartographer and colonizer. His parents were John and Isabella (nee Steed) Mason, and he married Anne Greene in 1606. He matriculated from Magdalen College, Oxford, in 1602, and possibly held a position in a commercial house in London.

It is also likely that Mason spent several years serving in the navy before being promoted to commander in 1610 and sent by James I to help Andrew Knox reclaim the Hebrides. The Scottish Privy Council rewarded Mason with herring, but when the Dutch refused to pay, Mason was imprisoned by Scottish fishermen. Despite being jailed, again, for piracy in Edinburgh in 1615, Mason was named governor of John Guy's colony at Cuper's Cove (now Cupid's) in Newfoundland. The reason for the appointment is unclear, but his extensive naval experience may have procured him this post. Or it may have been to compensate him for the expenditures incurred on his expeditions in Scotland.

Mason, and possibly his wife, landed at Cuper's Cove in June 1616. During his stay in Newfoundland, Mason set out on a series of voyages and drew up the first known English map of the island. Published in William Vaughan's Cambrensium Caroleia in 1625, the map included previously established placenames as well as new ones such as Bristol's Hope and Butter Pots, near Renews.

Mason probably stayed on at the colony without interruption until the fall of 1619. Tired of the disputes between his settlers and the migratory fishermen, he returned to England at this time in an attempt to have settlers' rights increased. Back in Cuper's Cove, the colonists, who were still at odds with the fishermen, were uncertain if their governor would ever return. In an attempt to give an accurate account of the island's geography, climate and natural resources, in 1620 Mason published a book while in England entitled A Briefe Discourse of the New-Found-Land with the situation, temperature, and commodities thereof, inciting our nation to go forward in the hopefull plantation begunne.

After 1620, he appears to have cut his ties with Newfoundland. In 1620 he was commissioned by the Lord Admiral to resolve the problem of piracy, and he may have indeed returned to the island at that time. However, in 1621, Mason was in New England consulting with Sir William Alexander about the possible colonization of Nova Scotia and with Sir Ferdinando Gorges about founding a colony in the province of Maine. He founded the colony of New Hampshire in 1629, and in 1635 he was appointed first vice-admiral of New England. He died in December of the same year as he was about to return to the plantations there.


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Mason_%28governor%29

Captain John Mason (1586 to 1635) was born at King's Lynn, Norfolk, England, and educated at Peterhouse College, Cambridge.[1] He was a sailor and colonizer. Mason was appointed the second Proprietary Governor of Newfoundland's Cuper's Cove colony in 1615, succeeding John Guy. Mason arrived on the island in 1616 and explored much of the territory. He compiled a map of the island and wrote and published a short tract (or "Discourse") of his findings.

Mason drew up the first known English map of the island of Newfoundland. Published in William Vaughan's Cambrensium Caroleia in 1625, the map included previously established placenames as well as new ones such as Bristol's Hope and Butter Pots, near Renews. His tract entitled A Briefe Discourse of the New-Found-Land with the situation, temperature, and commodities thereof, inciting our nation to go forward in the hopefull plantation begunne, was published in 1620 by Mason while in England.

In 1620 King James I's Privy Council issued Mason a commission and provided him with a ship to suppress piracy in Newfoundland. Mason ceased to be Cuper's Cove governor in 1621 and apparently he was not replaced, although the settlement continued to be occupied throughout the seventeenth century.

Upon returning to England, Mason consulted with Sir William Alexander about possibly colonizing Nova Scotia. In 1622, Mason and Sir Ferdinando Gorges received a patent from the Council for New England for all the territory lying between the Merrimack and Kennebec rivers.[2] In 1629 they divided the grant along the Piscataqua River, with Mason receiving the southern portion.[2] The colony was recharted as the Province of New Hampshire. It included most of the southeastern part of the current state of New Hampshire, as well as portions of present-day Massachusetts north of the Merrimack.

Although Mason never set foot in New England, he was appointed first vice-admiral of New England in 1635. He died that same year while preparing for his first voyage to the new colony

family and legacy

From Dictionary of National Biography

... Before, however, he could revisit the plantations, he was taken ill and died early in December 1635. The death of so energetic a churchman and royalist was regarded as a divine favour by the puritans of Massachusetts Bay. By his will, dated 26 Nov. and proved on 22 Dec. 1635, he left one thousand acres of land towards the maintenance of a church, and another thousand acres for that of a school in New Hampshire. He was buried in Westminster Abbey. A brass monument was erected to his memory in the church of the Domus Dei at Portsmouth by some residents in New Hampshire (including some of Mason's own descendants) in 1874.

.... Mason was married on 29 Oct. 1606 to Anne, second daughter of Edward Greene (d. 1619) of London, goldsmith, by whom he left one daughter, Anne, who married Joseph Tufton of Betchworth, Surrey. Robert Hayman in his Quodlibets (1628, p. 31) addressed verses to the worshipfull Captaine, John Mason and to the modest and discreet gentlewoman Mistress Mason. Mason's widow died in 1655.

Mason's rights in New Hampshire were sold to Governor Samuel Allen in 1691, and proved a fruitful source of litigation to that official and his heirs; in January 1746 John Tufton Mason, a descendant, disposed of his rights for 1,500l. to twelve gentlemen of Portsmouth, henceforth called the Masonian Proprietors (cf. C. L. Woodbury, Old Planter in New England, 1885).

From http://www.americanantiquarian.org/proceedings/44806616.pdf The Mason Title by Otis Grant Hammond (1916) page 3

Captain John Mason died late in 1635, and in his will was dated November 26 of that year. He devised his province of New Hampshire to his grandson, John Tufton, on condition that he should take the name Mason, and of he should die without issue the lands were to go to his brother, Robert Tufton, on the same condition. These were the sons of Mason's only child, Ann, who married Joseph Tufton.

the plaque

From http://www.memorialsinportsmouth.co.uk/churches/royal_garrison/mason.htm

DD: John Scribner Jenness. Charles Levy Woodbury. Charles Wesley Tuttle. Alexander Hamilton Ladd. Charles Henry Bell. Eliza Appleton Haven. Charlotte Maria Haven (All of New Hampshire U.S.)

  • TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF CAPTN
  • JOHN MASON, CAPTAIN IN THE ROYAL NAVY
  • TREASURER OF THE ARMY-CAPTAIN OF SOUTH
  • SEA CASTLE-GOVERNOR OF THE COLONY OF
  • NEWFOUNDLAND-PATENTEE AND FOUNDER OF
  • NEW HAMPSHIRE IN AMERICA-VICE ADMIRAL
  • OF NEW ENGLAND-BORN 1586 DIED 1635
  • THIS FAITHFUL CHURCHMAN DEVOTED PATRIOT
  • AND GALLANT OFFICER OF WHOM ENGLAND AND
  • AMERICA WILL EVER BE PROUD WAS BURIED
  • IN WESTMINSTER ABBEY.
  • RESPUBLICA NEO HANTONIEN SIS 1784.

A Second Plaque.

There is no record of the exact date when the plaque in the Garrison Church was unveiled but it may have been in 1877. The logic for picking this date is that a century later in 1977 some of the Piscataqua Pioneers from New Hampshire donated an almost identically worded memorial plaque to the Cathedral of St. Thomas's in High Street. A suitable moment for doing so may have been the centenary of the unveiling of the original plaque.

supporting data

From Cambridge Alumni Database link

John MASON

  • Approx. lifespan: 1586 to 1635
  • Matric. pens. from Peterhouse 1602:10MT:
  • doubtless s. of John MASON of Lynn, Norfolk
  • Bapt. at St Margaret's, Lynn 1586:12:11
  • Resided two years
  • Engaged in trade in London but early attracted to foreign adventure
  • In 1610 appointed by James I in command of a Squadron sent to reclaim the New, Hebrides
  • Governor of the plantation of Newfoundland Canada , 1615
  • In 1626 Commissary-General for victualling Buckingham's expedition
  • Treasurer and Paymaster of the Army 1627
  • Returned to New England , USA 1631
  • Received a patent, with Sir F. Gorges, under which New Hampshire , USA was founded
  • Vice-Admiral of New England , USA 1635
  • Died 1635
  • Buried in Westminster Abbey. Will, P.C.C.
  • ( D.N.B.; T. A. Walker ; a different identification is given in Al. Oxon. )
  • http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/m/i/s/Stacia-Misner/GENE2-0078.html
  • https://www.mun.ca/rels/hrollmann/relsoc/texts/mason.html
  • https://www.landofthebrave.info/john-mason.htm
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Capt. John Mason's Timeline

1586
1586
Kings Lynn, Norfolkshire, England
1605
1605
Age 19
St Matthew, , , England
1635
December 1635
Age 49
City of Westminster, Greater London, England, United Kingdom
????
Greater London, England, United Kingdom