John U-wa-ni Vann

Is your surname Vann?

Research the Vann family

John U-wa-ni Vann's Geni Profile

Records for John Vann

235,997 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

John U-wa-ni Vann

Birthdate:
Death: Died
Immediate Family:

Son of John "Cherokee" Vann, Translator / Interpreter and Catherine Hop (Cherokee Woman) Vann
Husband of Mary Vann
Father of Rebecca Schrimsher; Edith Schrimsher; Isaac Vann; Nancy Childress; Mary Vann and 2 others
Brother of O-Ti-Yu Bowles; Rebecca Moore and Lucinda Moore
Half brother of Keziah Maney; John Isaac Vann; George Vann; John Boy Vann and Nancy Vann

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John U-wa-ni Vann

Notes for JOHN U-WA-NI VANN IV:

http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/h/i/c/James-R-Hicks-VA/BOOK-0001/0021-0037.html#CHILD164

JOHN U-WA-NI VANN IV (JOHN CHEROKEE, SISTER OF RAVEN, A-NU-WE-GI MOYTOY, MOYTOY, A-MA-DO-YA) was born Abt. 1766, and died Abt. 1834 in CNW.

He married MARY HUGHES, daughter of CHARLES HUGHES.She was born Abt. 1770, and died Abt. 1831 in on the Arkansas River.

Notes for JOHN U-WA-NI VANN IV:

Cherokee by Blood, Misc Testimony, P4387, Lucien B Bell, 3/9/1909;

"By an act of the Cherokee Council in about the year 1846 this family was excluded from the Cherokee Nation on the grounds that they were not Cherokees.They questioned the legitimacy of John Vann, the father of Nancy Childres. They claimed that the mother of John Vann was of negro blood, a slave, but they did not have proof of this fact. It was simply a rumor in the country. He looked like an Indian, as much so, as any one else. When John Vann came to the Indian Territory he was recognized by the Old Settlers as one of their number. He was furnished with the same equipment as the other Indians -- with a gun, blanket, shot pouch, etc. by the government. After the[y] were excluded they were treated as white people and were not enrolled in 1851.

"Catherine left and went to Missouri, and Nancy and her husband remained in the Cherokee Nation.In 1886 the children of Catherine Childres were re-admitted on the ground that they were Cherokee by blood."

Notes for MARY HUGHES:

Questionable entry: There is an 1842 claim; Canadian, bk 1, #72, for Rachel Vann nee Watts.In part she states ...My husband Isaac Vann...Ned Vann his brother... [these are children of John U-we-ni Vann] ...took me and my husbands uncle Mr Hughes"This would mean that "Mr Hughes"was a brother of Mrs John U-we-ni Vann.From several applications I do have John as having married a Cherokee woman named Mary.One of the applications states that this woman fell from a steamboat on the way west and drowned.Grant Foreman in his book, Indian Removal, states that Mrs Vann, about 60 years old, a half blood, fell from a steamboat and drowned.My assumption is that this Mary is the woman who drowned and a sister of "Mr Hughes".Agewise, this Mary would have been a contemporary of Bernard Hughes (1777~aft1857), son of Charles Hughes.Bernard was also in Alabama in the same time period as this Mary would have been.

    

Children are listed under (160) Mary Hughes. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/h/i/c/James-R-Hicks-VA/BOOK-0001/0021-0036.html

MARY HUGHES (CHARLES, SISTER OF RAVEN, A-NU-WE-GI MOYTOY, MOYTOY, A-MA-DO-YA) was born Abt. 1770, and died Abt. 1831 in on the Arkansas River. She married JOHN U-WA-NI VANN IV, son of JOHN VANN and CHEROKEE WOMAN.He was born Abt. 1766, and died Abt. 1834 in CNW.

    

Children of MARY HUGHES and JOHN VANN are:

  • 518. i. EDITH7 VANN, b. Abt. 1788.
  • 519. ii. NANCY VANN, b. Abt. 1790.
  • 520. iii. ISAAC VANN, b. Abt. 1792; d. Aft. 1837.
  • 521. iv. MARY VANN, b. Abt. 1794; d. Abt. 1850.
  • 522. v. REBECCA VANN, b. Abt. 1800.
  • 523. vi. EDWARD VANN, b. Abt. 1802; d. Abt. 1851, California.
  • 524. vii. NELLIE VANN, b. Abt. 1805; d. Aft. 1851.


Cherokee by Blood, Misc Testimony, P4387, Lucien B Bell, 3/9/1909;

"By an act of the Cherokee Council in about the year 1846 this family was excluded from the Cherokee Nation on the grounds that they were not Cherokees. They questioned the legitimacy of John Vann, the father of Nancy Childres. They claimed that the mother of John Vann was of negro blood, a slave, but they did not have proof of this fact. It was simply a rumor in the country. He looked like an Indian, as much so, as any one else. When John Vann came to the Indian Territory he was recognized by the Old Settlers as one of their number. He was furnished with the same equipment as the other Indians -- with a gun, blanket, shot pouch, etc. by the government. After the[y] were excluded they were treated as white people and were not enrolled in 1851.

"Catherine left and went to Missouri, and Nancy and her husband remained in the Cherokee Nation. In 1886 the children of Catherine Childres were re-admitted on the ground that they were Cherokee by blood."

view all

John U-wa-ni Vann's Timeline