Joseph Broussard, dit Beausoleil

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Joseph Broussard, dit Beausoleil

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Chipoudy, Acadia Hopewell Hill, New Brunswick, Canada
Death: October 20, 1765 (63)
Camp Beausoleil, Broussard, St. Martin Parish, Louisiana
Place of Burial: Saint Martinville, St. Martin Parish, Louisiana, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Jean-François Broussard and Catherine Richard
Husband of Agnes Thibodeau; Marguerite Broussard and Anne-Agnès Thibodeau
Father of Francois Broussard; Jean Gregoire Broussard; Victor Gregoire Broussard; Marie-Isabelle "Elizabeth" Broussard; Raphael Broussard and 19 others
Brother of Madeleine Landry; Marie Madeleine Broussard; Pierre Broussard; Marie-Anne Broussard; Catherine-Josèphe Josephe Broussard and 7 others

Occupation: BONA ARSENAULT:V.6, P.2444, Militia Leader
Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Joseph Broussard, dit Beausoleil

"Capitain Commandant des Acadiens des Atakapas" [Commanding or leading captain (Leader) of the Acadians of Atakapas] bur. 20 Oct. 1765 at the Camp [place or location] named Beausoleil; recorded 25 Nov. 1765. Fr. Jean FRANCOIS (SM Ch.: v.1, p.78).

Event: Battle with English troups Military Service 1 Jul 1758

Joseph Broussard, dit Beausoleil. Acadian pioneer and resistance fighter Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil was born in Port-Royal, Acadia, in 1702. In 1740 he with his brother Alexandre established a community at Boundary Creek (above present day Moncton, New-Brunswick). During the 1755 expulsion, Broussard, his brother, and other Acadians evaded capture, conducting a guerilla campaign on land and sea against the British military. In 1759, however, Broussard and his partisans, facing starvation, were forced to surrender. Imprisoned at Halifax until 1764 when the treaty of Paris ended the French and Indian war, Beausoleil led one hundred ninety-three exiles to Saint Domingue (present-day Haiti). Member of the party was Beausoleil’s first cousin, Pierre Richard, direct ancestor of Zachary Richard. In February, 1765, the group arrived at New Orleans and continued onto the Attakapas region of south Louisiana. There, Joseph Broussard was named captain of the militia. He died on October 20, 1765 from an tropical disease which decimated the exile Acadian community in its first year in Louisiana. His gravesite remains unknown.

!BIRTH-PARENTS-MARRIAGE-BURIAL: Stephen A. White, DICTIONNAIRE GENEALOGIQUE DES FAMILLES ACAD IENNES; 1636-1714; Moncton, New Brunswick, Centre d'Etudes Acadiennes, 1999, 2 vols.; p. 285 ; own copy. #(5):

!CENSUS: 1703, Port Royal, Acadia, he would be the fifth of the five boys (with 3 girls) list ed under Francois BROSSARD and wife. [There were only 4 boys on the 1701 census, listed by na me.]

!BIRTH-NAME-RESIDENCES-MARRIAGE-CHIlDREN-DEATH: Bona Arsenault, HISTOIRE ET GENEALOGIE DES AC ADIENS, vols. 1-6; 1630-1775; Quebec, Le Conseil de la Vie Francaise en Amerique, 1965; p. 47 2 (Port Royal); Univ. of Calif., Berkeley Library, CS31 A77 MAIN. Born 1702, name spelled Jos eph BROSSARD dit BEAUSOLEIL, he settled at Chipoudy. On p. 1545 (Chipoudy & Petitcoudiac) h e is Joseph BROSSARD dit BEAUSOLEIL, born 1702, son of Jean-Francois & Catherine RICHARD of P ort Royal. He married at Port Royal on 11 Sep 1725 to Agnes THIBODEAU; four children. Josep h lived at Chipoudy and settled in Louisiana, where he was commandant at Attakapas. On p. 244 4 (Louisiana) he is listed as from Chipoudy, Acadia. Five children are listed on p. 2445. (Fo ur more are "probably" the sons of Joseph & Agnes THIBODEAUX, born from 1746 to 1749, liste d on p. 2416). Joseph died at St. Martinville on 5 Sep 1765 [sic, was this another Joseph?].

!LEGAL: ORIGINAL MINUTES OF HIS MAJESTY'S COUNCIL AT ANNAPOLIS ROYAL; 1720-1739; ed. by Archi bald M. MacMechan; Halifax [Public Archives of Nova Scotia], 1908; pp. 67-69 & 112-113 & 121- 122; Salt Lake City Family History Library, US/CAN 971.6 H2O. At a Council dated 10 Aug 172 4 Lewis TIBEAU complained against Joseph BRUSAR "for Maltreating & Useing him Unjustly." Whe n THIBAULT tried to deliver orders to BROUSSARD to appear in answer to the charge, "he not on ly Beat him, but took the Orders & Despitefully throw [sic] them on the Ground." Summoned onc e more, Joseph did not appear, despite the Governor's order. The Acadian deputies were calle d to account, and responded that "they were Extreemly [sic] Sorry for Such Misdemeanours of S ome amongst them But were apt to belevie [sic] all Tibeaus affidavit was not true... And Ackn owledged that for his Contumacy he Deserved to be Severely punished," but asked for pardon. T he [Lt.] Governor [John DOUCETT] answered that for his "Audacious Impudence in Disobeying hi s Orders, and Other Rebellious practices against this His Majestys Government," BROUSSARD wou ld have to appear before the Board. Two days later, Joseph and two other men were brought to the Council by the Deputies, bu t upon apologizing and promising "Dutifully to behave themselves in all Respects to the Gover nment" were set free. On 20 Apr 1727 Joseph was accused of fathering an illegitimate child with Mary D'AIGRE , [illegimate] daughter of Mary D'AIGRE, [now] married to James GONSILE [sic]. He denied it , but was ordered to pay maintenance of 3 shillings and 9 pence every week, and give good sec urity or go to prison. [Could the charges have been trumped up?] Two months later, his widowe d mother prayed relief in behalf of her Son Joseph "in Relation to the Bastard Child." It wa s argued that the mother should maintain the child "at as Cheep a Rate as other Nurses in th e Country would." Jeanne DUPUIS, wife of Guillaume BLANCHARD, offered to take the child fo r 5 shillings per month, with Joseph LEBLANC and Joseph BOURGEOIS as surety. Jacques GOUSILE , the father-in-law [stepfather] to the mother of the child and his wife answered that they w ould rather keep the child for nothing than the mother of the child might accept the 5 shilli ngs or give it to said DUPUIS. So that was done, although Jacques GOUSILE demanded the allowa nce up to the time of the new arrangement. [Apparently Joseph no longer had to pay maintenanc e.] Deputy Charles LANDRY offered to keep mother and child at his house for one year.

!RESIDENCES: Bona Arsenault, HISTORY OF THE ACADIANS; 1600-1800; Ottawa, Lemeac, 1978; p. 50 ; own copy. Joseph BROSSARD and his brother Alexandre founded Boundary Creek around 1740, als o called Beausoleil. Joseph was to become a legendary figure both in the Maritimes and in Louisiana.

!RESIDENCES: Paul Delaney, "Acadian Settlements in the Maritimes: 1763-1810," in ACADIAN GENE ALOGY EXCHANGE; vol.XXIX, no.1 (May 2000); pp.41-42. Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil was one of the leaders of the Halifax prisoners. He and brother Alexandre had lived on the Petitcod iac River before 1755, and escaped the first wave of deportations by the British. In 1758 they fought the soldiers and became leaders in the Acadian resistance.

IMMIGRATION: In talk by Wayne Perrin in Nova Scotia at the Grand-Pré National Historic Site o n 9 Aug 2004: Cited Diane Marshall on Beausoleil's imprisonment. In 1763 a petition from Acad ians was signed in Philadelphia (cites Dudley LeBlanc's book). Joseph led two groups to Saint Domingue in 1764-1765. He spent 60 days in New Orleans, called "Le chef de Nouvelle Acadie. "

!BIRTH-MARRIAGE-CHILDREN-IMMIGRATION-DEATH: May R. Newhouse, A BROUSSARD & ROMERO ANCESTRY; 1 600-1940; Author, 1992; p. 3; Salt Lake City Family History Library. Joseph BROSSARD (BROUSSA RD) dit BEAUSOLEIL, born at Port Royal, Acadia in 1702, son of Jean Francois & Catherine RICHARD. He married at Port Royal on 11 Sep 1725 to Agnes THIBODEAU, daughter of Michel & Agnes DUGAS; nine children. Joseph was organizer and "Captain" of the voyage for a group of Acadian s who settled in Louisiana in 1765. He settled in the Attakapas District of LA, where he wa s buried on 20 Oct 1765 (Reference: AM-318).

!IMMIGRATION: Joseph BROUSSARD led 231 individuals from Halifax, Nova Scotia to Louisiana, wh ere in Apr 1765 they settled in the Attakapas-Opelousas Districts.

!NAME-OCCUPATION: This is Joseph "Beausoleil" BROUSSARD who on 8 Apr 1765 was appointed commandant of the garrison at Poste des Attakapas in Louisiana. He was a resistance leader in Acad ia. He is also signatory to the historic pact on 24 Apr 1765 between the Louisiana Acadians a nd Bernard d'Auterive, by which he loans them cattle to relaunch their herds. After six years , they are to return the original number of animals, plus half the offspring.

!OCCUPATION: Grover Rees, trans., "The Dauterive Compact: The Foundation of the Acadian Cattl e Industry," in ATTAKAPAS GAZETTE; vol. XI, no. 2 (summer 1976); p. 91. On 4 Apr 1765, befor e GARIC the royal notary of the province of LA, in New Orleans, personally appeared Joseph BR OUSSARD called Beausoleil, and seven other Acadian chiefs also residing in this city. They me t with Antoine Bernard DAUTERIVE, a former infantry captain, residing in New Orleans, in pres ence (and in office of) the commandant Charles Philip AUBRY, and acting commissaire-ordonnate ur Denis-Nicolas FOUCAULT. (Translation follows of the six-year cattle agreement.) Witnesses : (Surgeon) COUTURIER; Leonard MAZANGE; de la PLACE [councillor assessor]. None of the Acadia n men knew how to sign their names.

!NAME: Virginia Lobdell Jennings, THE PLAINS AND THE PEOPLE; ; 1989; p. 219; Salt Lake City Family History Library, US/CAN 976.318 H2j 1989: A HISTORY OF UPPER EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH. Known by several names, Noel, "Beau Soleil," and the Spanish [sic] in LA called him Gaurhept B ROUSSARD. An account is given of his hardships, written by Gov. M. deVaudrevil [sic] to M. d e Danjac on 15 Jun 1760 (Reference: THE BULLETIN OF HISTORIC RESEARCH; 1903; p. 314). Joseph lost his mother, his wife, and all but two of his ten children after the British attack o n Chipoudy, Acadia in 1755 under the command of Major FRYE. After that he headed a group of partisans who hunted the English for five years. Family story says that he notched his gun 2 8 times, for each time he struck down an enemy. He was recommended in the memo as a commissio ned officer to command in LA.

!BIRTH-NAME-RESIDENCES-MILITARY-IMMIGRATION-DEATH-BURIAL: Encyclopedia of Cajun Culture, on i nternet at <http://www.cajunculture.com/People/broussardJ.htm>, citing reference to sourceS : Brasseaux, FOUNDING OF NEW ACADIA; and DICTIONARY OF LOUISIANA BIOGRAPHY. Acadian pioneer a nd resistance fighter Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil, born in 1702 in Port-Royal, Acadia, br other of Alexandre. Together they established a community at Boundary Creek [Acadia]. Josep h was a former militia captain, and evaded capture by the British during the 1755 expulsion . With a group of Acadians he conducted a guerilla campaign on land and sea, but in 1759 he a nd his partisans were forced to surrender and were imprisoned at Halifax until 1764. Joseph t hen led 193 exiles to Saint Domingue [Haiti today], then early the next year [1765] to sout h LA, where he continued to serve as leader of the Acadian community until his death [sic, bu rial] on 20 Oct 1765. He was buried near the present town of Broussard.

!BIRTH-MARRIAGE-CHILD-DEATH: Terrebonne Genealogical Society, BOOK OF CHARTS; 1600-1850; vol . 2, Society; Chart No. 154; Salt Lake City Family History Library, US/CAN 976.341 D2b v.2. J oseph BROUSSARD, born around 1702 at Port Royal, Acadia, married on 11 Sep 1725 there to Agnes THIBODEAUX; son Claude born around 1747. Joseph died on 4 Feb [sic] 1765 at St. Martinville , LA.

!BURIAL: Donald J. Hebert, SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA RECORDS; 1750-1800; vol. 1-A, rev. ed., Rayne , LA, Hebert Publications, 1996; p. 137; own copy; contains church and civil records. Two entries: Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil, Captain Commandant of the Acadians at Atakapas, buried on 20 Oct 1765 at the place named Beausoleil. Recorded on 25 Nov 1765 in two places by Fr . Jean FRANCOIS, Cappucin: St. Martin of Tours Catholic Church, St. Martinville, LA (SM Ch. : v.1, p. 78) & (SM Ch.: Folio B-1, Funeral). ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Shortly after his paternity trial, Joseph and his older brother, Alexandre, settled in the Chipoudy area with their wives, the sisters Agnes and Marguerite Thibodeaux. In 1740, they relocated their families to the middle reaches of the Petitcodiac, founding a village they christened Beausoleil, after the hamlet of their birth.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Broussard

Sources:

Broussard, Joseph d. 4 Sept. 1765; bur. 5 Sept. 1765; funeral recorded: 7 Sept. 1765. Fr. Jean Francois (SM Ch.: v.1, p.12).

Broussard, Joseph d. 4 Sept. 1765; buried 5 Sept. 1765 "au dernier camp enbas" [at the last camp or burial place on the lower section]; funeral recorded: 7 Sept. 1765 Fr. Jean Francois, cure of the new Acadia. (SM Ch.: Slave Register - Funerals: v.1, #20).


He helped lead the Acadians from Canada to Poste des Attakapas (St. Martinville Louisiana).

In late February 1765 a group of about 193 Acadian refugees from detention camps at Halifax led by Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil arrived in the port of New Orleans. The intention of this group was to go to the Upper Mississippi Valley (Illinois) but they were sent to the Attakapas District - later St. Martin County & Parish that was eventually divided into 5 parishes

born c1702, haute rivière, Port-Royal; son of Francois BROUSSARD & Catherine RICHARD; brother of Alexandre dit Beausoleil; in Acadian census, 1703, Port-Royal, unnamed, with parents & siblings; brought before Annapolis Council, 1724, for assault against fellow colonist Louis THIBAULT & for consorting with Indians, & briefly imprisoned; married, age 23, Agnès, called Nanette, THIBODEAUX, daughter of Michel THIBODEAUX & Agnès DUGAS of Chepoudy, & sister of brother Alexandre's wife Marguerite, 11 Sep 1725, Port-Royal; brought before Annapolis Council again, 1726, this time accused of fathering an illegitimate child, imprisoned for refusing to provide for the child's care; settled Village-des-Beausoleil, upper Petitcoudiac, near present-day Moncton, NB, c1730; participated in Acadian resistance against British rule, King George's War, 1744-48, including French raid on British forces at Grand-Pré 31 Jan 1747; held by the British in forts Cumberland (formerly Beauséjour) & Lawrence (formerly Beaubassin), Aug-Oct 1755; probably escaped from Fort Lawrence with 85 other Acadians, 1 Oct 1755; a leader of the Acadian resistance in present-day southeastern NB, Oct 1755-Nov 1761; surrendered to British authorities, Fort Cumberland, 16 Nov 1759, but did not come in until Nov 1761; held at Georges Island, Halifax, as prisoner of war, 1762; held at Fort Edward (formerly Pigiguit) as prisoner of war, 1762-63; arrested Windsor (formerly Pigiguit) 1763 for illegal communication with French authorities, convicted by governor's council in Halifax, & held prisoner under close confinement at Georges Island, Halifax, until 1764; leader of exiles from Halifax to LA via St.-Domingue, late 1764-early 1765; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 63, a widower; secured in New Orleans a land & cattle deal from Jean-Antoine-Bernard DAUTERIVE, major cattle rancher in the Atakapas District, for his people, 4 Apr 1765, signed by 7 other leaders of his party, including brother Alexandre, son Victor, & nephew Jean-Baptiste; appointed Capitaine Commandant des Acadiens aux Atakapas by acting-governor AUBRY, 8 Apr 1765; died Atakapas, buried "at place called Beausoleil" 20 Oct 1765, age 63; depicted front & center in Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville; the most famous Acadian of them all


Joseph Brossard (Broussard), dit Beausoleil, settler, member of the militia; b. 1702 at Port-Royal (Annapolis Royal, N.S.), son of Jean-Francois Brossard and Catherine Richard; d. 1765 in Louisiana.

Joseph Brossard is still revered today, particularly by the Acadians in Louisiana where he has become a legendary figure, for his bravery as leader of the resistance of the Acadians in the upper reaches of the Petitcodiac River at the time of the deportation. It must, however, be noted that not all of his exploits are recorded in the archives.

In September 1725, at Annapolis Royal, Brossard married Agnès, the daughter of Michel Thibodeau (Tibaudeau) and Agnès Dugas. Some years later he went to settle at Chipoudy (Shepody, N.B.), with his brother Alexandre. In this period Joseph was twice brought before the council of Annapolis. In 1724 he was accused of having treated an Acadian roughly, and in 1726 of being the father of an illegitimate child. Although he denied the latter accusation, he was imprisoned for some time for refusing to provide for the child’s maintenance.

Brossard settled at Le Cran (Stoney Creek, south of Moncton, N.B.) about 1740. At the time of the battle of Minas at the beginning of 1747, Brossard gave assistance to Nicolas-Antoine Coulon de Villiers’s troops. On 21 October William Shirley, governor of Massachusetts, outlawed Brossard and 11 others for having provisioned the French troops.

In June 1755 the British, who were disputing possession of the Chignecto isthmus with the French, laid siege to Fort Beauséjour (near Sackville, N.B.). Brossard engaged in some skirmishes against the invaders and, in one outing, captured a British officer. In relating this incident the French officer Louis-Thomas Jacau de Fiedmont testified that Brossard was recognized to be one of the bravest and most enterprising of the Acadians. On 16 June, the very day the fort capitulated, he was so bold as to attack the British camp with 60 men, French and Indians; he lost only one man. Two days later, provided with a safe conduct, he went to see Colonel Robert Monckton for he proposed acting as mediator between the British and Indians on condition that he be granted an amnesty. Monckton agreed to this arrangement, subject, however, to Charles Lawrence’s approval.

Brossard and his family probably took to the woods at the time of the deportation of the Acadians. It is possible that he joined forces with Charles Deschamps de Boishébert, along with the other heads of families in the region, to resist a British detachment which had come to devastate Chipoudy and Petitcodiac in September 1755. Shortly afterwards, Brossard, under orders from Governor Pierre de Rigaud de Vaudreuil, fitted out a small privateer and was successful in capturing some prizes in the Bay of Fundy. Aided by his four sons and the Acadians who had taken refuge along the Petitcodiac River, he continued to harass the British forces. It was perhaps during an encounter with the troops commanded by George Scott which had come to lay waste the Petitcodiac region in November 1758 that he was wounded in the foot and obliged to go for a time to the other side of the Miramichi River.

A few Acadians were still resisting the British authorities in 1761 after the fall of Quebec and Louisbourg, Cape Breton Island. William Forster, a British colonel, wrote to General Jeffery Amherst in August 1761: “These people are Spirited up in their obstinacy by one BeauSoleil . . . and one or two others who have already rendered themselves so obnoxious to the English that they are conscious of the treatment they deserve at our hands.” Brossard was reduced to a state of famine by November, and had no recourse but to surrender, along with a group of settlers, to Colonel Joseph Frye, the commandant of Fort Cumberland (formerly Fort Beauséjour). In October of the following year Brossard and his family were among the prisoners held in Fort Edward (Windsor, N.S.). Subsequently, they were sent to Halifax where they were confined until the treaty of Paris in 1763. Later in the year Brossard was arrested at Pisiquid (Windsor) and found to be in possession of a letter written by the ambassador of France in London in which the Acadians were urged to leave and go to France. Brought once more before the governor’s council in Halifax, he was not released until the following year; it was then, it seems, that he chartered a schooner to sail to Saint-Domingue (Hispaniola) with some other Acadians. The climate overcame many of them, and Brossard is believed to have taken the survivors to Louisiana at the beginning of 1765.

On 8 April 1765, in New Orleans, Charles-Philippe Aubry, the commandant of Louisiana, appointed Joseph Brossard captain of the militia and commandant of the Acadians in the region of the Attackapas, which included the parishes of Saint-Landry, Saint-Martin, and Lafayette. He died a few months later and was buried on 20 October at Beausoleil, near the site of the present-day town of Broussard, a few miles south of Lafayette.

C. J. d’Entremont

PAC, MG 9, B8, 24 (Registres de Saint-Jean-Baptiste du Port-Royal) (original of the volume for 1702–28 is at PANS and that for 1727–55 is at the Diocesan Archives, Yarmouth, N.S.), pt.i, p.222. [L.-T. Jacau de Fiedmont], The siege of Beauséjour in 1755; a journal of the attack on Beauséjour, written by Jacau de Fiedmont . . . , ed. J. C. Webster (N.B. Museum, Historical Studies, no.1, Saint John, 1936), 41. Knox, Historical journal (Doughty), I, app., 3–4. Mémoires sur le Canada, depuis 1749 jusqu’à 1760. Northcliffe coll. N.S. Archives, III. “Les papiers Amherst,” La Société historique acadienne (Moncton), 27e cahier (1970), 304, 307. Arseneau, Hist. et généal. des Acadiens. Antoine Bernard, Histoire de la Louisiane de ses origines à nos jours (Québec, [1953]), 157, 158, 410. D. J. Le Blanc, The true story of the Acadians . . . ([Lafayette, La,] 1932), 65–67. Murdoch, History of Nova-Scotia, II, 117, 314, 431. J. C. Webster, The forts of Chignecto; a study of the eighteenth century conflict between France and Great Britain in Acadia (n.p., 1930), 55, 71, 87, 113.


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@R-2138817487@ Family Data Collection - Births Edmund West, comp. Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2001. 1,5769::0

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http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genepoolb&h=599717&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1702 Birth place: Port Royal, Acadia, Ns, Canada 1,5769::599717

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@R-2138817487@ Family Data Collection - Births Edmund West, comp. Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2001. 1,5769::0

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http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genepoolb&h=599717&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1702 Birth place: Port Royal, Acadia, Ns, Canada 1,5769::599717

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@R-2142968248@ U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

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1,60525::77464177

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@R-2142968248@ U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

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1,60525::77464177

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@R-2142968248@ U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

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1,60525::77464177

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Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Quebec, Genealogical Dictionary of Canadian Families (Tanguay Collection), 1608-1890 - Ancestry.com - 1,2177::0 Volume: Vol. 7 Sect. 1 : Rob-Tra; Page: 290 1,2177::587349 Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current - Ancestry.com - 1,60525::0 1,60525::117633905 Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Family Data Collection- Individual Records - Edmund West, comp. - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. - 1,4725::0 Birth year: 1702; Birth city: Annapolis; Birth state: Ns 1,4725::3825205 Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-2015 - Ancestry.com - 1,9289::0 1,9289::25097330 Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots - Hatcher, Patricia Law - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.Original data - Hatcher, Patricia Law. Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots. Dallas, TX, USA: Pioneer Heritage Press, 1987.Original data: Hatcher, Patricia Law. Abstract of Grav - 1,4110::0 Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots; Volume: 1 1,4110::7084

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Joseph Broussard, dit Beausoleil's Timeline

1702
October 19, 1702
Chipoudy, Acadia Hopewell Hill, New Brunswick, Canada
1726
April 15, 1726
Chipoudy, Acadia, New Brunswick, Canada
April 22, 1726
Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada
June 24, 1726
Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Canada
1728
1728
Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Canada
1730
1730
Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada
1733
1733
Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada