Joseph Flood, Convict "Boddingtons" 1793

Is your surname Flood?

Research the Flood family

Joseph Flood, Convict "Boddingtons" 1793's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Joseph Flood

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Eire, Dublin, Ireland
Death: September 10, 1808 (40-49)
Parramatta, Sydney, Nsw, Australia
Place of Burial: St John's, Sydney, Nsw, Australia
Immediate Family:

Husband of Ann (Gorman / Germaine) Quin - Flood - Caffrey [Convict "Marquis Cornwallis" 1796]
Father of John Flood; John Flood; Joseph Flood; Thomas Flood; Edward Flood and 3 others

Managed by: Leanne M (Volunteer Curator - Au...
Last Updated:

About Joseph Flood, Convict "Boddingtons" 1793

GEDCOM Note

1797 sentenced to 7 years for stealing a horse. Sent to NSW aboard the ship "Boddingtons"


GEDCOM Note

<p>Transported to the Australia on the Boddingtons from Cork 1793. Joseph Flood, found guilty of having, on 15 August last, at Baggott St in the city of Dublin, stolen one horse, value$5, the property of George Vesey Esql AHe was also indicted for havingon the same day, and at the same place, feloniously taken two saddles and two bridles, value 10s sterling, the goods and property of Francis Vesey.The fist witnesss called was Mathew Cashin who seposed that on 15 August last he was in the employtment ofMr Vesey of Baggott St, that on that night he put up a horse in Mr Vesey's stables, that onthe next morning he found the stable door rooted under, the coach house door open and the horse taken away out of the stable. There were also taken away two saddles, three bridles and an old protmanteau. He found the saddles and bridles the evening following at Alderman Moncrieff';s office, found the horse tghe following day in a stable in Hendrick Street. The witenss was brought there by Benjamin McMahon, a policeman, and the horse which he found in Hendrick Street was Mr Vesey's.</p><p><p>Benjamin McMahon deposed that he is a police constable, remembers the night of 15</p><p><p>August last, saw the prisoner about two 0'clock the morning following on horseback with two saddles under him. Witness had a suspicion of him and he stopped him in Jervis Street and asked him where he was going. He said he had come from Dunleary and hewas going to the Black Rock. Witness askied where he got the horse. AHe said he got the horse standing in Capel Street. Witness left the prisoner in theLoft guardhouse and charged him on suspicion of robbery and he left the horse at a livery stablein Hendrick Street and the saddles at Alderman Moncrieff's office. One of them he put a mark on. The next day he brough Cashin, Mr Vesey's servant, to the livery stable and showed the horse to him. Cashin said it was Mr Vesey's horse and he gave oneof the saddles to Cashin.</p><p><p>Cashin proved that the saddle which he got from McMahon was one of the saddles that were taken out of Mr Vesey's stable. The prisoner called no witness. The jury found him guilty in both indictments.</p><p><p>Joseph Flood was sentenced to be transported for 7 years.</p></p><p><p>Previous charge in April 1791:</p></p><p><p>Mr Justic Wilson apprehended and committed to Kilmainham gaol one Joseph Flood for stealing four pairs of sheets out of the house of William Walsh of Donphin's Barn, in the county of Dublin. He was sentenced to be whip0ped at Dolphin's Barn and imprisoned.</p><p><p>1797 In May Joseph Flood gave evidnece in court against Sydney couple Matthew Kearns and Ann Farrelly (Sugar Cane) who were charged with stealing from the Governon's house. Flood deposed that\\</p><p><p>...he lived with the Governor in the month of May last, that a woman of teh name of Eleanor Howe (Marquis Cornwallis) lived there at the same time, that the keys of teh cellar where (Nathaniel) Franklin, the Governor's steward was away were entrusted toher care.</p><p><p>Eleanor How told Kearns that she would sell the Governor's spirits to him for 3shillings a bottle. Flood also alleged that How sold soap and tobacco to Ann Farrelly as well.</p><p><p>Matthew Kearns denied the charge, stating that "...the whole of Flood's evidence is false and malicious, that he has had dealings with Franklin to the value of $50. Kearns and Farrelly were found not guilty. Some time later it was reported that Nathaniel Franklin, steward to the Governor shot himself and was found dead in ye shrubbery near ye Governor's garden. Governor Hunter in a report to Portland in London that "...my principal servant had got himself link'd with a society of infamous charactersof both sexes in this place....and fear of detection atonce gave proof of his guilt'.</p><p><p>1797 September. John Flood son of Joseph Flood and Ann G was born in Sydney and baptised in December. Their other children were Joseph (1799), Thomas (1802),Edward (1805) and James (1807). Ann Gorman had been charged in Dublin in 1793 with committinga felony to the value of 4.9d. Found guilty, she was sentenced to be transported for seven years and arrived on the Marquis Cornwallis in Feb 1796. On 19 December 1795, about the time the ship was leaving Cape Town for the final part of the journey toNSW Ann gave birth to William quin, whose father wasalso named as William Quin. The captain of the Marquis Cornwallis, Michael Hogan, noted the event in his journal. "Myt stock of convicts are increasing in number for last night one of the Dublin dames was brought by the lee and introduced a son of Mars. The child was baptised in Sydney on 21 February 1796 but did not survive infancey.</p><p><p>1801 Muster. Both Ann and Joseph were free and living in Sydney. Joseph Flood was named as a private with the Sydney Loyalists and when the Irish convicts staged their Battle of Vinegar Hill in March 1804, Flood was one of the soldiers who took part inthe confrontation.</p><p><p>1804. In June Ann Gorman gave evidence against Patrick Caffrey of Shaffery (Sugar Cane) who was charged with stealing money, shirts and a towel from the Buffalo. She deposed that the items which were found in her house in Pitts Row by the constable hadbeen brought there by the prisoner.</p><p><p>1806 Muster. Flood was a boatman, living with Gorman, who was recordedin Mardsen's Female Muster as a concubine with their children.</p><p><p>1808. On 8 February an agreement was registered between Henry Neil (Marquis Cornwalls) and Joseph Flood "...the sale of 30 acrs of land known by the name of Knight's Farm, situate at the Seven Hills, for $150 in eighteen months from this date.</p><p><p>Joseph Flood died on 12 September 1808. At the time of his death he was $4.14.0 ind ebt to the government, owing from the time of Governor King.</p><p><p>In January 1809, the Knights Farm was sold to henry Neil for $170.</p></p><p><p>It seems likely that after Joseph Flood's death, Ann Gorman lived with Patrick Caffrey and may have been the mother of Hugh Caffrey, born about 1813. Aftern Ann Gorman's death at the age of 36, on 24 August 1814, Caffrey acted as her children's guardian. Ten year old James Flood was admitted to the Orphan School in Sydney in January 1819. He had been living with waterman Patt Caffrey, a poor man of King Street. By 1822 Hugh Caffrey was a servant in Sydney to John Flood, the oldest of Joseph and Ann's sons.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>The above from Of Infamous Character. The Convicts of the Boddingtons, Ireland to Botany Bay 1793 Barbara Hall</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>One birth for the right time</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Name JS FLOOD</p></p><p><p>Date of Birth N/R N/R N/R</p></p><p><p>Address N/R</p></p><p><p>Father JOHN FLOOD</p></p><p><p>Mother ESTHER</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Further details in the record</p></p><p><p>Sponsor 1 JS HYENS</p></p><p><p>Sponsor 2 ANN COUVANDELL</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>About the record</p></p><p><p>Book Number Page Entry Number Record_Identifier</p></p><p><p>2 178 6802 DU-RC-BA-312161</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Area - DUBLIN (RC) , Parish/Church/Congregation - ST. CATHERINE</p></p><p><p>Marriage of JOHN FLOOD of N/R and ESTHER HINO of N/R on 21 January 1759</p><p><p>Husband Wife</p></p><p><p>Name JOHN FLOOD ESTHER HINO</p></p><p><p>Address N/R N/R</p></p><p><p>Occupation N/R N/R</p></p><p><p>Father FLOOD HINO</p></p><p><p>Mother N/R N/R</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Further details in the record</p></p><p><p>Witness 1 LUKE FLOOD</p></p><p><p>Witness 2 JAMES HIANS</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>About the record</p></p><p><p>Book Number Page Entry Number Record_Identifier</p></p><p><p>N/R N/R N/R DU-RC-MA-54110</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>The church register page containing this record has not yet been imaged.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>With the curent enquiries concerning James Flood's mother I am posting</p></p><p><p>this summary on Anne Gorman as I see it. Any additional information is</p></p><p><p>welcome & I hope the typing turns out OK.</p></p><p><p>In August 1982 I was corresponding with Bill Gamage who had access to</p></p><p><p>his grandfather's papers while he (Bill) was writing the " Narrandera</p></p><p><p>Shire" book. Bill's Grandfather was the Editor of The Narrandera Argus</p></p><p><p>in the early years & Bill is an experienced researcher having gone on</p></p><p><p>to be a noted War Historian & Author. Bill advised me that he believed</p></p><p><p>Nancy Fitzgerald was an earlier "acquaintance" of Joseph Flood's & that</p><p><p>some of the older Flood children would have known of her & passed her</p></p><p><p>name down, however he got the impression & believed that Anne Gorman</p></p><p><p>was actually James's mother. I also believe that Anne Gorman had to be</p></p><p><p>the correct Mother and have relied on this Date Line to support my</p></p><p><p>belief given the shortage of information available.</p></p><p><p>1793 Anne tried in Dublin</p></p><p><p>1795 Gave birth to a son by William Quinn at sea</p></p><p><p>1796 11/2/1796 Anne arived Sydney on the Marquis Cornwallis</p></p><p><p>21/2/1796 Son William Quin baptised St Phillips Sydney</p></p><p><p>(William died in infancy)</p></p><p><p>27/12/1796 Anne witnessed the marriage of Harriet Willard &</p></p><p><p>William Webster in Sydney</p></p><p><p>1797 It was stated that Joseph Flood was living with Anne</p></p><p><p>Gorman when he testified against persons alleged of</p></p><p><p>stealing from Governor Hunter's Household when Joseph</p></p><p><p>was a servant of the Governors</p></p><p><p>24/9/1797 John Flood was born (BDM says mother Ann Germaine)</p></p><p><p>1799 Joseph Flood jnr born</p></p><p><p>1800 Muster shows Anne Gorman and Joseph Flood living together</p></p><p><p>in Sydney</p></p><p><p>1802 Thomas Flood born</p></p><p><p>1802 Muster states "With Whom" as expired for Anne</p></p><p><p>1805 24/6/1805 Edward born</p></p><p><p>1805-6 Muster lists Anne Gorman as living with Joseph Flood</p></p><p><p>1807 James Flood born</p></p><p><p>1808 12/9/1808 Joseph snr dies</p></p><p><p>1809 Anne refers to herself as Anne Flood when dealing with</p></p><p><p>Joseph's estate</p></p><p><p>1811 Anne listed as Anne Gorman widow</p></p><p><p>25/2/1811 Anne granted Certificate of Freedom</p></p><p><p>1814 22/8/1814 Anne died as Anne Flood</p></p><p><p>1818 11/8/1818 Anne Flood's son James recommended for the Male</p></p><p><p>Orphan's School</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>I hope all this will seem credible and will not raise more confusion</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Joseph Flood</p></p><p><p>Death Date: 1808</p></p><p><p>Death Place: New South Wales</p></p><p><p>Registration Year: 1808</p></p><p><p>Registration Place: Parramatta, New South Wales</p></p><p><p>Volume Number: V1808824 14B</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>From: "Rob & Edie McArthur" <robmc@our.net.au></p></p><p><p>Subject: [PJ] Joseph Flood</p></p><p><p>Date: Wed, 4 Jul 2001 22:39:04 +1000</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Hi,</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Our Convict is:</p></p><p><p>Convict; Joseph Flood</p></p><p><p>Tried at Dublin,left Cork 15 February 1793</p></p><p><p>Arrived, Port Jackson, August, 1793 on board the "Boddington"</p></p><p><p>Had children to at least three women. Ann Germaine, Nina Fitzgerald and Ann Gorman. Only seen original information on Ann Germaine.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>John Flood Born 24 September 1797, NSW, Married Margaret Watson (Born 1799 NSW) in 1818 at St Philips church, Sydney; John died 4th April 1854, Longford, Tasmania and Margaaret died 15 September 1869, Longford Tasmania. This is our line.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Other children to Joseph, though we are not sure which woman are,</p></p><p><p>Thomas born 1802, married Sophia Roberts. Thomas died 1867</p></p><p><p>Joseph born 1805, married Augusta Smart 1827, Joseph died 1871</p></p><p><p>Edward born 1805, married Charlotte Hannan 1826, Edward died 1888.</p></p><p><p>James born 1807, think his mother was Nina or Nancy Fitzgerald. He married Mary Foster, 1828 and he died 1880?.</p><p><p>Eleanor born 1829? to Joseph and ?</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Edie McArthur</p></p><p><p>Tasmania</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>With the curent enquiries concerning James Flood's mother I am posting</p></p><p><p>this summary on Anne Gorman as I see it. Any additional information is</p></p><p><p>welcome & I hope the typing turns out OK.</p></p><p><p>In August 1982 I was corresponding with Bill Gamage who had access to</p></p><p><p>his grandfather's papers while he (Bill) was writing the " Narrandera</p></p><p><p>Shire" book. Bill's Grandfather was the Editor of The Narrandera Argus</p></p><p><p>in the early years & Bill is an experienced researcher having gone on</p></p><p><p>to be a noted War Historian & Author. Bill advised me that he believed</p></p><p><p>Nancy Fitzgerald was an earlier "acquaintance" of Joseph Flood's & that</p><p><p>some of the older Flood children would have known of her & passed her</p></p><p><p>name down, however he got the impression & believed that Anne Gorman</p></p><p><p>was actually James's mother. I also believe that Anne Gorman had to be</p></p><p><p>the correctMother and have relied on this Date Line to support my</p></p><p><p>belief given the shortage of information available.</p></p><p><p>1793 Anne tried in Dublin</p></p><p><p>1795 Gave birth to a son byWilliam Quinn at sea</p></p><p><p>1796 11/2/1796 Anne arived Sydney on the Marquis Cornwallis</p></p><p><p>21/2/1796 Son William Quin baptised St Phillips Sydney</p></p><p><p>(William died in infancy)</p></p><p><p>27/12/1796 Anne witnessed the marriage of Harriet Willard &</p></p><p><p>William Webster in Sydney</p></p><p><p>1797 It was stated that Joseph Flood was living with Anne</p></p><p><p>Gorman when he testified against persons alleged of</p></p><p><p>stealing from Governor Hunter's Household when Joseph</p></p><p><p>was a servant of the Governors</p></p><p><p>24/9/1797 John Flood was born (BDM says mother Ann Germaine)</p></p><p><p>1799 Joseph Flood jnr born</p></p><p><p>1800 Muster shows Anne Gorman and Joseph Flood living together</p></p><p><p>in Sydney</p></p><p><p>1802 Thomas Flood born</p></p><p><p>1802 Muster states "With Whom" as expired for Anne</p></p><p><p>1805 24/6/1805 Edward born</p></p><p><p>1805-6 Muster lists Anne Gorman as living with Joseph Flood</p></p><p><p>1807 James Flood born</p></p><p><p>1808 12/9/1808 Joseph snr dies</p></p><p><p>1809 Anne refers to herself as Anne Flood when dealing with</p></p><p><p>Joseph's estate</p></p><p><p>1811 Anne listed asAnne Gorman widow</p></p><p><p>25/2/1811 Anne granted Certificate of Freedom</p></p><p><p>1814 22/8/1814 Anne died as Anne Flood</p></p><p><p>1818 11/8/1818 Anne Flood's son James recommended for theMale</p></p><p><p>Orphan's School</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>oseph Flood</p></p><p><p>Death Date: 1808</p></p><p><p>Death Place: New South Wales</p></p><p><p>Registration Year: 1808</p></p><p><p>Registration Place: Sydney, New South Wales</p></p><p><p>Volume Number: V18082324 2A</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>http://churchrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/details/b13e98...</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Name JOSEPHUS FLOOD</p></p><p><p>Date of Birth N/R N/R N/R</p></p><p><p>Address N/R</p></p><p><p>Father LAURENTII FLOOD</p></p><p><p>Mother SERA</p></p><p><p>Further details in the record</p></p><p><p>Sponsor 1 GUILLIELMUS BRENNAN</p></p><p><p>Sponsor 2 ALLICIA CRILLY</p></p><p><p>About the record</p></p><p><p>Book Number Page Entry Number Record_Identifier</p></p><p><p>2 215 7319 DU-RC-BA-127068</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Joseph Flood, Age: 30, Convicted: Dec 1791 Dublin (City) [DUB IRL] 7 years; Transported per Boddingtons, Arrived 07 Aug 1793 Sydney [NSW AUS]</p><p><p>Convict Indents &c. SRNSW ref: SZ115 pp256-9; SRNSW ref: 4/4003; Boddingtons 1793 Entry No. 15425</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Joseph Flood; Arrived per Boddingtons, Status: Expired; Occupation/Residence &c, Sydney[NSW AUS]; Victualling: Off Stores; List No: 010 R</p><p><p>List all persons</p></p><p><p>Census &c: NSW Settlers' Muster Book 1801 - List 5</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Joseph Flood; Arrived per Boddingtons, Status: FBS (Free by Servitude); Occupation/Residence &c: Boatman</p><p><p>List all persons</p></p><p><p>Census &c: NSW General Muster 1806</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann Gorman; Arrived per Marquis Cornwallis, Status: FBS (Free by Servitude); Occupation/Residence &c, [Lives with] Joseph Flood</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Joseph Flood; Abode: Parramatta [NSW AUS]; Died [1808] [Parramatta] [NSW AUS]; Buried 12 Sep 1808 [Parramatta] [NSW AUS] by [Reverend] William Pascoe Crook; Registered at St John's Church of England Parramatta [NSW AUS]</p><p><p>List all persons</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Biographic record</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>The Hon. Edward Flood, Esquire, M.L.C. It is not given to all to get to the very summit of the ladder. We may all begin to climb from the bottom rung, but we found that gradually the climbers get fewer as the higher rungs are reached, and on the lower rungs will be found clinging the greater number of those who started with high hopes. But that such is the case must not discourage us from attempting to win our way upward. If every man considered that it was not worth striving because he did not see his way to the top of the ladder, all effort would be paralysed, and the life of the world would cease. When we see that highly successful men are few; that we can find but few great poets, soldiers, statesmen, and divines, it must be acknowledged thatNature works in a way best for the world, though not to be understood by the crowd. The combination of circumstances and qualities that go to make up a millionaire is not often found, and when it is it makes us stand in wonder and admiration. The memoir which follows shows the career of a man who, to all seeming against all expectation, succeeded in amassing great wealth, and from a small and humble beginning made his way to a leading position in the community. Nature endows some men with certain faculties so that they cannot help succeeding, and while the majority of their fellows are fighting a losing fight they are being borne upwards on the wings of success.</p><p><p>Edward Flood was born in Sydney in the year 1805, in a house which stood a little to the north of where the General Post-office now stands. In that year the population of New South Wales was but 7083 persons, which is enough to show the primitive condition of things then in Australia. In the year 1887, one year beforeMr. Flood died, the population of Sydney alone was 350, 866, while that of the whole colony was 1,042, 919 persons. But a change which makes itself more felt has been the growth of the city of Sydneyduring the lifetime of this gentleman. Where he was born, a stream of fresh water flowed down to Sydney Cove, past the house of his father, which stream had been the inducement for Arthur Phillip to fix upon a site for his settlement in the year 1788. The Tank stream, as it was called, was a recognised waterway for boats from the harbour, and on its banks stood, here and there, the houses of the early settlers. The city was a small collection of buildings down near the waters of the harbour, and what have since become the busiest sites of the metropolis-as the Redfern station-were then in a state of primitive bush. Now the Tank stream has disappeared, and in its place is a busy street, lined with magnificent warehouses, in which the merchant princes of the city carry on their wide-stretching and vast businesses. The site of the place where Mr. Flood was born is hidden by a maze of offices and stores and rich shops, in which a flourishing and prosperous community transact the necessarymercantile operations of their lives. Another great change, and the most important of all to the welfare of Australians, has been that from a condition of military rule to constitutional government, which has brought in its train most of the blessings which have visited us. Sydney in 1805 was but a station garrisoned by the military, to which were sent the scourings of the British gaols. Convicted felons were the people of this fair land, and the settlement on the harbour of Port Jackson was but a large prison. One of the richest and most favourable of the countries on God's earth was given up to the habitation of criminals, nor was a thought bestowed upon the likelihood of there being potentialities for greatness to be found in the new continent. Now, at the end of the century, more thaneighty years since that sad time, there are in existence in Australia, in place of the convict settlement on Port Jackson, five great colonies, or rather states, all possessed by the same race, whichuses the same language, are ruled by similar laws, and which have the same great aspirations. The people of the great continent of Australia may now be counted by millions, their wealth is untold, and they are fast making way, under constitutional government, to a place in the assembly of nations. Mr. Flood's father, Joseph Flood, was a man of strong and resolute character, which also showed out in his son Edward, and to which may be attributed the success which ever attended him. Mr. Joseph Flood, although not one of the great men of the place, was always active in the life of Sydney, and onone occasion, which has become historical, he took a prominent part in a remarkable episode. In the year 1808 Governor Bligh, who is better known as Captain Bligh of the Bounty, was in power in New South Wales. It is not the purpose of this work to discuss his character, but from the various accounts of the mutiny of the Bounty it may be gathered that he was severe and despotic in his conduct. Hewas appointed to New South Wales in 1806, but in a short time he became disliked by the colonists, while the severity of his measures made his future conduct to be dreaded. To such a degree did he carry his despotic conduct that, for the good of the colony, the civil and military officers of the colony deemed it their duty to place him under arrest., A requisition was signed by many of the colonists, to which the name of Mr. Joseph Flood was appended, and acting upon it, Major Johnston, who was in command of the New South Wales corps, arrested the Governor on 26th January, 1808. The fact of being one to sign this requisition shows the determined and distinct stand which Mr. Joseph Flood could take when the occasion demanded it. Mr. Edward Flood grew up in Sydney, and as the times were rough and ready, he was not able to obtain a high education. It was before the days of primary schools, and his father was not in the position to give his son the advantage of instruction by a private tutor or in a private school. Edward had to make his own living from an early age, and as soon as he was able, he learned the carpentry trade. At this he worked steadily for years, and such was his energy and perseverance, that he gradually rose from the position of a workman to that of an employer. This was not a beginning full of promise of the future success to which he attained, and the hardworking carpenter could not well be looked upon as the future millionaire. But we can never tell what is coming, and the threads of destiny are plaited together in patterns of which we have not the least knowledge, and with results which we cannot well foresee. Circumstances are so powerful in making the man, and their combinations are so varied and so unforeseen, that we cannot say with any certaintythat any particular event will or will not happen. Mr. Flood, after some years, when he had got some money together, became a builder and contractor, and in many of the old buildings in Sydney can befound evidence of the substantial nature of the work done by him. At this business he continued for some time, until his attention was drawn to pastoral pursuits.</p><p><p>It was as a pioneer squatter more than anything else that Mr. Flood was best known and was most successful. A quarter of a century ago life in the interior was very different to what it is now, and the man who then took up country and stocked it, required to be possessed of the highest courage, energy, and strength. Life in the bush meant a continued warfare with Nature, struggles with drought, heat, and losses, and also hostility of the wild blackfellows. The comforts of life were abandoned when the squatter left the capital, and but the bare necessaries of life were available for him in his life on the frontier of civilisation. Mr. Flood took up runs on the Lachlan and the Murrumbidgee Rivers, and on the Merri Merri Creek. He also made his way to Queensland, where he formed stations on the Maranoa and upon the Upper Warrego. This was in the rough old days, when the pioneer had to cut a way for his dray and his stock through the scrub, and had to fight with, and overcome step by step, the native savagery of theland. But times have changed much since then, and on the land where he then settled with his flocks and herds, there have sprung up populous and flourishing townships, in which busy men ply their trades and businesses, and over the plains which he had travelled wearily and toilfully, with tired stock, the well-appointed railway train carries the tourist and the commercial traveller. The harshnessof that early life proved too much for many, and numbers succumbed to it, but the iron will and stern determination of Mr. Flood carried him through all his difficulties, and he lived to see the fruit of his work multiply a thousandfold.</p><p><p>Like his father, Mr. Edward Flood was always a champion of our political liberties, and took a lively part in all that affected the constitutional government of the country. When the Constitution Act of 1843 was in force Mr. Flood took an active part in the elections which followed, and busied himself a good deal with the return of members of the Council. This Council consisted of fifty-four members, of whom thirty-six were to be elected by the people and eighteen were to be nominated by the Crown. Among those who were returned to the first Council were Dr. Lang, Charles Cowper, William C. Wentworth, Bland, Terence Murray, Windeyer, and many others whose names have become historical in the colony. In 1857 Mr. Flood was himself elected to represent the North-Eastern Boroughs, of which Newcastle was the chief. He at the outset of his political career joined the liberal party, and was ever prominent in the struggle for constitutional rights.When Wentworth's Constitution Bill was under discussion, Mr. Flood was foremost in opposing those provisions for the establishment of Colonial titles, a nominee Upper House, and that a two-thirds majority of the Parliament should be necessary for any alteration of the Act. These illiberal measures met with his strongest opposition. When the New Constitution came into operation, Mr. Flood was elected in 1856 to the Legislative Assembly, and took his place among the liberal party then led by Charles Cowper. For several years he continued to represent the North-Eastern Boroughs, South Cumberland, and Canterbury, but he was forced to retire from Parliamentary life owing to pressure of private business. On his retirement, he was offered a seat in the Legislative Council by Sir Henry Parkes, but he was unable to accept it. However, he found time amid his various engagements to take an active interest in all that tended to the furtherance of the welfare of his fellow-citizens. In the year 1848 he was Mayor of Sydney, and was mainly instrumental in the establishment of the Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts, as well as of other institutions for the education and the improvement of the people.</p><p><p>Mr. Flood held the portfolio of Minister for Works in the Cowper Administration of 1859, but in a month after accepting it his party went out of power. In 1879 he was appointed to a seat in the Legislative Council, and held that position till he died. Ever regular in his attendance in his place, he was an example to many of his fellow-councillors. Quiet and unobtrusive in his character, he still was keen in observation and shrewd in advice, and in the debates upon any subjects in which he was interested, or of which he possessed any knowledge, he took part in such a way as to show him possessed of strong common sense and wise discretion. He continued to attend the Council up to two years before his death, when his failing powers compelled his absence. The fine block of wool stores at Circular Quay, known as the "Blackwall Stores," were erected by Mr. Flood, and there he established the wool-pressing business in Sydney. He had a family of three daughters and five sons, all of whom are married, with one exception. For several months before his death he lived quietly at his residence, situated at the corner of Elizabeth and Devonshire streets, Sydney, where he died on Sunday, the 9th September, 1888, in his eighty-third year. He left his native land but once, when he took a trip to Europe. Possessed of an iron constitution, he retained his faculties up to the last, andto show how he had retained them, it may be here stated that on the Saturday before his death he signed a cheque with a steady hand, and without the aid of spectacles. He was a fine, tall, aristocratic-looking man, showing energy in all he did, and expecting all others to work hard, as he had worked himself. Without being favored by birth or education, he made his way by sheer force of character,and won a fortune which entitled him to be called a millionaire. Thus it will be seen that individual character is all powerful to make a man a success, if he but so desire it. The example of Mr. Edward Flood may well be placed for the imitation of succeeding generations.</p><p></p>

view all 16

Joseph Flood, Convict "Boddingtons" 1793's Timeline

1763
1763
Eire, Dublin, Ireland
1797
September 24, 1797
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
September 24, 1797
Sydney, New South Wales (Cert), Australia

NSW Birth Record
John FLOOD born 1797, father Joseph, mother Ann GERMAINE - 494/1797

Name: John Flood
Gender: Female
Baptism Age: 0
Birth Date: 24 Sep 1797
Baptism Date: 24 Dec 1797
Baptism Place: Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Residence Date: 1797
Residence Place: New South Wales, Australia
Father: Joseph Flood
Mother: Ann Germaine
FHL Film Number: 993949

1799
1799
Sydney Cove, Australia
1802
1802
Sydney, New Sourh Wales, Australia

NSW Death Record
Thomas FLOOD died 1867, father Joseph, mother Ann - Sydney 1122/1867

1805
June 25, 1805
Sydney, New South Wales Australia
1806
1806
Age 43
1808
September 10, 1808
Age 45
Parramatta, Sydney, Nsw, Australia