Kalaunuiohua Kalaunuiohua, 7th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii

public profile

Is your surname Kalaunuiohua?

Research the Kalaunuiohua family

Kalaunuiohua Kalaunuiohua, 7th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii's Geni Profile

Records for Kalaunuiohua Kalaunuiohua

51 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Kalaunuiohua Kalaunuiohua, 7th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
Death: Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
Place of Burial: Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Kahaimoelea / Kahai'moeloaaikaaikapu... Kahai-moelea-ikaaikapukupou, 6th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii; KAHAIMOELEAIKAAIKUPOU; Kahaimoeleaikaaikapukupou; KAPO-A-KAULUHAILEA (KAPOAKAULUKAILAA); Kapo'aka'uluhaila'a / Huailikapu and 1 other
Husband of Kaheka / Kaheke KAHEKA
Father of Kuaiwa (Mo'i, Ruler of Hawaii), 8th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii and Kapapa'limulimu

Occupation: Sovereign Hawaiian Chief
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Kalaunuiohua Kalaunuiohua, 7th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii

Kalaunuiohua ruled as the 7th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii from 1315 - 1345. He was the sovereign king or chief of the island of Hawaii. He is represented in the legends as a warlike and enterprising king.

War of Kawelewele

In an old story heard by Kamehameha I, he was said to have been the ambitious chief of Hawaii who had attempted to seize Kauai, was routed in battle outside Ka'ie'ie'waho and taken prisoner to Kauai by Kukona King of Kauai.

He was son of Kahaemo'elea'ika'ikupou (also known as Kahaimoelea) and grandson of Kalapana of the southern Pili-kaaiea line, which came in the time of Paao, and had obtained the titular sovereignty of the island of Hawaii. After having confirmed his sway on Hawaii, he felt ambitious of extending it over the neighboring islands. His warriors and his fleets were collected, and invaded the island of Maui, where Kamaluohua was the reigning or principal chief. A battle was fought, in which Kamaluohua was defeated and taken prisoner.

Elated with the first success, Kalaunuiohua invaded the island of Molokai, where Kahokuohua was the principal chief or Moi. After another obstinate battle Kahokuohua was conquered, and surrendered himself to the victor. Kalaunuiohua now aimed at subjugating the entire group, and hastened to Oahu, taking his royal prisoners with him. It is doubtful if Oahu had any recognised Moi or titular sovereign at the time. The invasion of Kalaunuiohua must have occurred while Moku-a-Loe ruled over the Koolau division and Kahuoi ruled over the Kona division of that island. For without attacking either of those chiefs, Kalaunuiohua landed his forces at Waianae and gave battle to Huapouleilei, principal chief of the Ewa and Waianae division of the island. Again victory perched on Kalaunuiohua's banners, and Huapouleilei was defeated and captured. What steps, if any, Kalaunuiohua might have taken to consolidate his conquests is not mentioned in the legend. At least he did not stop to subdue the other portions of Oahu,

After the victory at Waianae he set sail for the island of Kauai with the three captive kings in his train. At this time Kukona, the great-grandson of Akukini-a-Laa, was the Moi or sovereign of Kauai. Kalaunuiohua made his descent on the coast of Koloa, and in that neighborhood was met by Kukona and all the Kauai chiefs. A desperate engagement ensued in which Kalaunuiohua was thoroughly defeated, himself taken a prisoner by Kukona, and his fleet surrendered. Having delieverd his country from the invaders, Kukona immediately set the three captive kings at liberty, and furnished them with the means of returning to their own possessions, but he kept Kalaunuiohua a close prisoner for a long time; the legend says for several years.

At length negotiations were entered into with the Hawaii chiefs for the release of their king, and, though the conditions are not mentioned in the legend, the result proved favourable to Kalaunuiohua, and he was allowed to return to Hawaii, where he ended his days without indulging in more warlike adventures. (This war is remembered in the legends as the war of Kawelewele).

[edit] The Prophetess

In the time of Kalaunuiohua the priestly power had not yet been firmly established, for the legends represent him as a chief who had no fear of the priesthood, but killed both priests and prophets when it suited his humour.

It is said that in the reign of Kalaunuiohua there lived a prophetess, or kaula, of great power named Waahia. Kalaunuiohua had frequently sought to put her to death, but without success. She had been thrown into the sea, beaten with rods, and rolled down steep declivities; but still she survived, and the king's patience became exhausted because she would not die. Then this prophetess said to Kalaunuiohua, "Do you really wish me to die?" "Yes, that is my wish," said the king." "I shall not die if you attempt to put me to death at any other place save one," said the woman.

"If you are in earnest in your wish to kill me, thrust me into the heiau and burn me up with the temple, then I shall dies." The heiau she meant was at Keeku in Kona. "On the day you set fire to the heiau to destroy me, you must stay quietly in the house from morning till night and by no means go out of doors. If the people make an outcry at some portent in the heavens you must not go out to look at it. Nor must you open the doors of the house in order to observe the heavenly phenomenon. If you do so, you will die. You must wait patiently all day in the house, and only when night comes may you go out of doors. In this way will you and your kingdom be saved from destruction. But if you do not obey my injunctions, disaster will fall upon you and your kingdom. My god, Kane-ope-nui-o-alakai, will afflict you and your kingdom because of your disobedience to his wishes (e like me ke akua). He has granted your desire. I die by your hand." Thus ended her speech.

Then Kalaunuiohua had the woman burnt with fire, and the smoke of the burning heiau went up to heaven and took the shape of two game-cocks that fought together in the heavens. When the people saw this portent, they raised a great shout, and Kalaunuiohua asked, "What means this great uproar?" The answer was "It is a cloud in the heavens that resembles two cocks fighting." "I will look at it," said Kalaunuiohua. "The prophetess strenuously commanded you not to look lest you die," said his men, and the king yielded. Then that appearance passed away and another portent made its appearance. The same smoke cloud assumed the shape of a pig which moved about from one place to another in the heavens. Again the people raised a great shout, and again Kalaunuiohua declared his wish to look; but his people entreated him not to look out until the thing had disappeared from the heavens. After this the clouds took on a singular appearance, some were white, some glistening, some green, yellow, red, black, blue black, blach and glistening; and the sky sparkled and flashed with light. Again the people raised a shout and again Kalaunuiohua wished to look, but his men restrained him.

When it came evening and the sun was about to set, two clouds resembling mudhens flew down from the heavens, and, having alighted close to the end of Kalaunuiohua's house, stood and fought with each other, at the sight of which the people again raised a tremendous shout. Kalaunuiohua had now become greatly excited and could no longer master his impatience. He reached out his hand to the side of the house and tearing away the thatch gazed upon the mudhens (alae) of cloud. Then the prophetess took spiritual possession of Kalaunuiohua's hand. The deity that inspired was Kane-nui-akea. Kalaunuiohua became very powerful, he had only to point with his hand and direct war against another country and that country would be at his mercy.

Kalaunuiohua pointed hither to Maui, Molokai, and Oahu and subjected them. His hand pointed next towards Kauai, and he waged war against that island, a war which was called Ka-welewele-iwi. After the arrival of Kalaunuiohua at Kauai, the deity (good luck) deserted that king's hand and took possession of Kaulia, a man of Kauai. The hand of Kalaunuiohua lost the magic power it once had when it pointed. In the battle with Kukona, king of Kauai, Kalaunuiohua was defeated; but his life and the lives of his allies, were spared.

Reference

Samuel M. Kamakau, Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii, Revised Edition, (Honolulu: Kamehameha Schools Press, 1992).

David Malo, Hawaiian Antiquities, Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press, 1951.

Abraham Fornander, An Account of the Polynesian Race: Its Origin and Migrations, Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1969.


War of Kawelewele-

In an old story heard by Kamehameha I, he was said to have been the ambitious chief of Hawaii who had attempted to seize Kauai, was routed in battle outside Ka'ie'ie'waho and taken prisoner to Kauai by Kukona King of Kauai.

He was son of Kahaemo'elea'ika'ikupou (also known as Kahaimoelea) and grandson of Kalapana of the southern Pili-kaaiea line, which came in the time of Paao, and had obtained the titular sovereignty of the island of Hawaii. After having confirmed his sway on Hawaii, he felt ambitious of extending it over the neighboring islands. His warriors and his fleets were collected, and invaded the island of Maui, where Kamaluohua was the reigning or principal chief. A battle was fought, in which Kamaluohua was defeated and taken prisoner.

Elated with the first success, Kalaunuiohua invaded the island of Molokai, where Kahokuohua was the principal chief or Moi. After another obstinate battle Kahokuohua was conquered, and surrendered himself to the victor. Kalaunuiohua now aimed at subjugating the entire group, and hastened to Oahu, taking his royal prisoners with him. It is doubtful if Oahu had any recognised Moi or titular sovereign at the time. The invasion of Kalaunuiohua must have occurred while Moku-a-Loe ruled over the Koolau division and Kahuoi ruled over the Kona division of that island. For without attacking either of those chiefs, Kalaunuiohua landed his forces at Waianae and gave battle to Huapouleilei, Principal Chief of the Ewa and Waianae division of the island. Again victory perched on Kalaunuiohua's banners, and Huapouleilei was defeated and captured.

What steps, if any, Kalaunuiohua might have taken to consolidate his conquests is not mentioned in the legend. At least he did not stop to subdue the other portions of Oahu.

After the victory at Waianae he set sail for the island of Kauai with the three captive kings in his train. At this time Kukona, the great-grandson of Akukini-a-Laa, was the Moi or sovereign of Kauai. Kalaunuiohua made his descent on the coast of Koloa, and in that neighborhood was met by Kukona and all the Kauai chiefs. A desperate engagement ensued in which Kalaunuiohua was thoroughly defeated, himself taken a prisoner by Kukona, and his fleet surrendered. Having delieverd his country from the invaders, Kukona immediately set the three captive Cheifs at liberty, and furnished them with the means of returning to their own possessions, but he kept Kalaunuiohua a close prisoner for a long time; the legend says for several years.

At length negotiations were entered into with the Hawaii chiefs for the release of their king, and, though the conditions are not mentioned in the legend, the result proved favourable to Kalaunuiohua, and he was allowed to return to Hawaii, where he ended his days without indulging in more warlike adventures. (This war is remembered in the legends as the war of Kawelewele).

The Prophetess -

In the time of Kalaunuiohua the priestly power had not yet been firmly established, for the legends represent him as a Chief who had no fear of the priesthood, but killed both priests and prophets when it suited his humour.

It is said that in the reign of Kalaunuiohua there lived a Prophetess, or Kaula, of great power named Waahia. Kalaunuiohua had frequently sought to put her to death, but without success. She had been thrown into the sea, beaten with rods, and rolled down steep declivities; but still she survived, and the king's patience became exhausted because she would not die. Then this prophetess said to Kalaunuiohua, "Do you really wish me to die?" "Yes, that is my wish," said the Cheif." "I shall not die if you attempt to put me to death at any other place save one," said the woman.

"If you are in earnest in your wish to kill me, thrust me into the heiau and burn me up with the temple, then I shall dies." The heiau she meant was at Keeku in Kona. "On the day you set fire to the heiau to destroy me, you must stay quietly in the house from morning till night and by no means go out of doors. If the people make an outcry at some portent in the heavens you must not go out to look at it. Nor must you open the doors of the house in order to observe the heavenly phenomenon. If you do so, you will die. You must wait patiently all day in the house, and only when night comes may you go out of doors. In this way will you and your kingdom be saved from destruction. But if you do not obey my injunctions, disaster will fall upon you and your kingdom. My god, Kane-ope-nui-o-alakai, will afflict you and your kingdom because of your disobedience to his wishes (e like me ke akua). He has granted your desire. I die by your hand." Thus ended her speech.

Then Kalaunuiohua had the woman burnt with fire, and the smoke of the burning heiau went up to heaven and took the shape of two game-cocks that fought together in the heavens. When the people saw this portent, they raised a great shout, and Kalaunuiohua asked, "What means this great uproar?" The answer was "It is a cloud in the heavens that resembles two cocks fighting." "I will look at it," said Kalaunuiohua. "The prophetess strenuously commanded you not to look lest you die," said his men, and the Cheif yielded. Then that appearance passed away and another portent made its appearance. The same smoke cloud assumed the shape of a pig which moved about from one place to another in the heavens. Again the people raised a great shout, and again Kalaunuiohua declared his wish to look; but his people entreated him not to look out until the thing had disappeared from the heavens. After this the clouds took on a singular appearance, some were white, some glistening, some green, yellow, red, black, blue black, blach and glistening; and the sky sparkled and flashed with light. Again the people raised a shout and again Kalaunuiohua wished to look, but his men restrained him.

When it came evening and the sun was about to set, two clouds resembling mudhens flew down from the heavens, and, having alighted close to the end of Kalaunuiohua's house, stood and fought with each other, at the sight of which the people again raised a tremendous shout. Kalaunuiohua had now become greatly excited and could no longer master his impatience. He reached out his hand to the side of the house and tearing away the thatch gazed upon the mudhens (alae) of cloud. Then the prophetess took spiritual possession of Kalaunuiohua's hand. The deity that inspired was Kane-nui-akea. Kalaunuiohua became very powerful, he had only to point with his hand and direct war against another country and that country would be at his mercy.

Kalaunuiohua pointed hither to Maui, Molokai, and Oahu and subjected them. His hand pointed next towards Kauai, and he waged war against that island, a war which was called Ka-welewele-iwi. After the arrival of Kalaunuiohua at Kauai, the deity (good luck) deserted that king's hand and took possession of Kaulia, a man of Kauai. The hand of Kalaunuiohua lost the magic power it once had when it pointed. In the battle with Kukona, king of Kauai, Kalaunuiohua was defeated; but his life and the lives of his allies, were spared.

view all

Kalaunuiohua Kalaunuiohua, 7th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii's Timeline

1390
1390
Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
1415
1415
Age 25
Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
1417
1417
Age 27
Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
????
December
Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
????
????
????
????
Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA