Karen Marie Pederson

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Karen Marie Pederson

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Denmark
Death: March 09, 1898 (68)
Vermilion, Sevier, Utah, United States
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Peder Christen Jensen and Anne Christensen
Wife of Jens Gottfredson
Mother of Platine Platina Gottfredson; Caroline Gottfredson; Maria Gottfredson; Jacob Gottfredson; Thomas Gottfredson and 2 others
Sister of Peder Pedersen; Karen Pedersen; mette Katrine Pedersen; Peder Pedersen; Jens Pedersen and 1 other

Managed by: Arthur Rexford Whittaker
Last Updated:

About Karen Marie Pederson

Karen Marie Pedersen:

My Great Grandmother Gottfredson was a native of Denmark. Her father died when she was seven years old and from then o n she made her own living. Her first job was that of tending turkeys. In the old country the people had flocks of turkeys and hired a herd girl to care for them. Later she too k up the weavers trade and was able to make a living weaving for various people. (Insert written Oct. 22, 1933, By Maxine Steele, Signed by Caroline Gottfredson Peterson. "The Gospel Message". When great grandmother Gottfredson live d in Denmark she was a weaver. One day some Mormon missionaries came to her door and engaged her in religious conversation. This was at the time that the gospel was first preached in Denmark. My great grandmother believed that it could be true but was not sure enough that she wished to join without further proof. She wanted a testimony to be sure.

My great grandmother and her brother lived together. He was a tailor. They had another sister who was a cook working around the neighborhood. About this time this older sister became ill and came to live with her brother and sister until she should die as she knew that she could not live long. My great grandmother cared for her tenderly but i t was soon apparent that her days on earth were few. Knowing that the end was near for her, great grandmother said, "now when you die, come back and tell me whether the gospel is true or not". The sister promised that if it were possible that she would comeback and tell her. A short time after this she passed away.

One day after this great-grandmother was sitting weaving and wondering about the gospel when all at once her sister appeared to her and told her to join the church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, that it was the true religion. This was the testimony that she had been waiting for so she knew beyond doubt that the gospel was true and she was soon baptized. Her tailor brother joined too. He worked as a missionary while he remained in Denmark. He was a very intelligent man. He composed many Danish Hymns and his teaching s were of great benefit to the church.

As soon as these two could earn enough money to pay their passage to America, they left Denmark and came over to join the Saints.)

She received the gospel when she was a young woman and as soon as she had enough money saved up she took passage o n a boat in order to come to Utah to be with the other saints.

On the same boat there was a family with whom she became very intimate. The family consisted of a husband, a wife an d four children and they also were bound for the land of th e saints. The wife bad consumption and was ill a great deal so Great Grandmother assisted her in caring for the children.

The voyage was uneventful and as soon after landing at New York as was possible, this party made their way to St. Louis, Illinois. While there the sick lady died and was buried. Great Grandmother still cared for the mother-less children.

Later she married the man who became my Great Grandfather Gottfredson. Taking the four children by the previous marriage, they joined a handcart company to come to Utah. When they came to the Platte River, Great Grandmother became ill nd the company left them. A little girl was born there b t died. The family then went back to Omaha.

After saying in Omaha about a year a rather well-to-do uncle and aunt came along. They had two wagons with two yoke of oxen on each wagon. They loaded my great grandparents in and brought them to Utah, coming along in the rear of Johnson s army.

Johnson s Army was supposed to be hard on them. Of course the officers would not associate with them, but the soldier s near the end of the company took the women and children t o ride in the heavy army wagons and helped them in any way that they could. When an officer was discerned coming for inspection, the soldiers would help the saints out of th e back of the wagon and present a bland and smiling countenance to the hard boiled officers.

After reaching Utah the army was sent to the Civil War and their wagons, buffalo robes and coats were sold to the "Mormons" at a very nominal figure. The first year or so after my great grandparents arrived in Utah their entire wardrobe was made from the blue soldiers coats.

My Great Grandmother located in Salt Lake City where my grandmother was born the next winter.

Written by Ellen Maxine Steele Fannin, Oct. 18, 1933, Salmon, Idaho

Attested by my Grandmother Caroline Gottfredson Peterson

History Background:

Was born on an estate called Meilhede. She was out working at the age of 10 and completely on her own after 14. At age 19 built a brick house for herself and a sister, and did weaving for the public. She sailed for America at age 27 on the same ship as the GOTTFREDSEN family, the John J. Boyd, although they did not know each other.

RESIDENCES: Same as Jens GOTTFREDSEN except in Denmark she lived in Gjottrup Soga, Thisted Amt, West Hanherd, North Jeiliani.

HISTORY OF KAREN MARIE PEDERSEN GOTTFREDSON by Adell Gottfredson Jensen

From a sketch by Estella Payne Poulson as told by her mother

Step Grandmother, Karen Marie Pedersen, was born on an estate called Mielhede, April 12, 1829, at Gjottrup, Thisted, Denmark to Peder Christian Jensen and Ane CHRISTENSEN (Jensen). Her Grandfather's name was Jens Pedersen, hence the na me. She joined the Church in October 1855, at age 25. Her father died when she was eight years old, when he was 52 . According to the record her mother lived until she was 82.

Her mother, now a widow, Karen Marie was on her own, out working when she was ten, and took full care of herself after she was fourteen. (She wasn't so different, this writer A dell G. Jensen did the same). After working for other people until she was 19 years old, she then built herself a brick house and lived in it and did weaving for the public. Sh e says, in a part of a letter found after her death, "I was very religious while young." She often prayed that she could die before she was 14, as they were taught that their God-mother would answer for their sins until that time . She went to church every Sunday. Being very ambitious , she says she worked each night until 1 a.m. then read a chapter or two in her testament before going to bed. She wished she had lived when the Savior and his Apostles were o n the earth. They could have told her how to live, and he r Priest, or church leader only confused her.

In 1854 two Mormon Missionaries called on her and taught her the Gospel. She investigated for six months. She tell s how she received her testimony. It seems that one of he r sisters lived with her. She and her sister were weaving each day and would talk about the Gospel and its principles as told them by the Missionaries. They did not know wha t to do or whether to join, and were very worried and prayed often to know what to do.

One day they made a promise to each other that the one who should die first would come back and tell the other if th e Gospel was true. During this time of investigation the sister passed away, and one day as grandmother saw her the sister said, "Mormonism is true". Not another word, and the n she was gone. Grandmother now felt assured of what she should do. She was baptized in October 1855. She sold her be longings and left for Utah on November 24 1855. She was alone as far as her family were concerned, but there were other saints leaving from Denmark.

They first went to Copenhagen and from there they crossed the North Sea to Hamburg, Germany, and then by rail from Germany to Liverpool, England, and sailed from there on the 1 2th of December 1855 in the Ship John J. Boyd, under the leadership of Knud, or Canute Petersen of Ephraim, Utah. (The Gottfredson family was on this same ship, and as I have written up this trip in detail in my sketch of Jens Gottfred son, I will skip most of the details in Stella's sketch) . She was an obedient and self sacrificing woman 27 year s old now, and at the suggestion of Christian Christiansen , a returning missionary who was in charge of the Saints in St. Louis, Missouri, she joined the Gottfredson family, the mother having died, to help the father with his four children. Brother Christiansen suggested it would be a good thing for them to marry which seemed to be satisfactory to both and he, having the proper authority, performed the ceremony on August 12, 1856. They were in St. Louis about a year , or until the spring of 1857, when they joined Christian Christiansen's handcart company to go to Utah. When they had traveled about 120 miles from Florence, Nebraska to Loup Fork river, they crossed the river and made camp. That night grandmother gave birth to a premature baby girl July 17, 1857. They named her Platine for the Platte river of which the Loup Fork is a tributary. The company went on and left them. This baby died and was buried there. They placed Grandmother on a hand cart and pulled her back over the river and up north about a mile to a small settlement of Mormons called Genoa. Grandfather staked off a quarter section of land, built a dug-out in a hill, and leaving all the provisions which were remaining, took the hand cart to Omaha and got work for the summer at the availing low wages.

Grandfather Jens had no way to send them food and by August they were short. They were able to get some frosted corn and some buckwheat which had matured. They ground this in a coffee mill and mixed it with wild plum and sour grapes that were plentiful along Beaver Creek. They lived o n that for a month when Jens got a chance to send them a sack of flour and bacon from Omaha. They had not seen bread during this time.

In the fall grandmother hired a man with a yoke of oxen to take her and the children to Omaha. They stayed there until the Spring of 1858. At that time her sister, Maren Pedersen (Mielhede) and her brother, Peder Pedersen (Mielhede ) and a man named Rasmus Olsen to whom Maren was engaged to be married, arrived in Omaha on their way to Utah. Mr. Ra smus Olsen was well to do and bought a yoke of oxen and a new Shuttler wagon and took the Gottfredson's with them to Salt Lake. This company consisted of six wagons under the leadership of Iver M. Iverson, a returning missionary from Pleasant Grove. They reached Salt Lake September 20, 1858. They had the usual Pioneer experiences as told in Peters history. Grandmother mentions something personal, when they lived in Mt. Pleasant that is not mentioned in my father Peters history. She says, about the rock house they built of rock gathered from the land they bought, that Grandfather had a lame back and she loaded and unloaded the heaviest rock, and mixed all the mud and carried it to him. In August she made adobes for a stable, and in September gleaned five bushels of wheat. She says in October 1861 she bound five acres of wheat by moonlight because the sun was to o hot in the daytime. This was a hard summer. They lived mostly on bran bread and potatoes. The boys, Peter 14 and Hans 12, were working away from home, Peter for Oscar Winter. In November 1860 Stella's mother, Aunt Maria, was born. She was a sickly child and never did have good health t hough she lived until she was 79 years old and bore seven children, four of whom lived to adulthood and had families.

In 1864 they were called to help settle Sevier valley and moved to Richfield. In 1868 they moved to Fountain Green on account of Indian troubles, and back to Richfield in 1871 . They sold their holdings and moved in Glenwood where they lived Until 1879 when they moved to Vermillion where they had bought a house and 1 1/2 acres of ground of Joseph S . Gottfredson, Jen's youngest son by the first wife. Joseph built the larger house just north and both homes were just across the street from Peters large two story rock house.

Stella's sketch says this younger family had more peace and happiness in Glenwood than they had before. There were regular church services, an organized ward and social life. The children talked more of life in Glenwood than anywhere. All the younger children were married while they lived there. One time the Indians were on the war path and the bell was rung for the people to gather in the fort. Grand father went in the cellar to pray. When he returned he tol d the family they wouldn't need to go in the fort, that he knew they would be protected. Maria said that was her first testimony of prayer being answered. Stella tells another incident concerning a dealing between her two grandfathers Edward Payne and Jens, as told her by her mother, Maria G . Payne.

It seemed Edward Payne had brought some fish down from Fish Lake and had sold some to Jens, and they were paid for. Because Maria was married to Edward's son George her grandfather Payne wanted to give him a good measure. When grandfather Jens got home he weighed the fish and found he had a pound he had not paid for. He walked eight or ten blocks to Brother Payne's with the extra money. Brother Payne told him he was giving him that much extra. Jens paid him saying he must always pay for what he got. That was his policy through life. This couple lived in Vermilion until their deaths, both in 1898. The younger grandchildren remember them as elderly people whom they loved very much.

Stella, who was only 9 when they died remembers grandfather walking with a cane. He seemed stern to his children as my father did to me when I was small. Perhaps most fathers seem that way to young children. He seemed so kind to me as my father did later. Stella says grandfather was home bound for 3 1/2 years before his death (two years bedfast ) so grandmother stayed very closely. We used to visit her . She always gave us butter cookies and grandfather had wooden buckets of candy and was very generous with the grandchildren. Grandmother made malt beer and she made it fresh once a week. Grandfather kept one keg for visitors and another for themselves to use with their meals. Stella would sometimes stay with her grandmother a few days when she was not feeling well. She remembers helping her feed the chickens, watching her canary, and enjoying her stay. She was also the last grandchild to see her alive.

I got this from Addie, daughter of Jacob Gottfredson: She said she had been staying with Grandma for two weeks at night, and would go through the fence to school in the daytime, and she was homesick. Her father, Uncle Jake, came after school the day before grandmother died and chopped a pile of wood. Addie asked him if she could go home with him . Grandma said yes let her go. Next day when she heard grandma had died she said she was heart broken because she had gone home, but she needn't have been. It seems that after she and her father had gone Aunt Maria and Stella came to see grandma and when they left they left Stella to sleep with her that night. Next day at recess Addie came over and invited Stella to come and visit school with her. Grandma gave her consent.

When Stella came back from school grandmother was lying down and did not speak. Stella thought she was cross with her because she stayed at school. Stella fixed grandpa his supper, bread and milk, and took it to him in his room, ate something herself and got in bed with grandma. Grandma put her arm around her and loved her. The child wondered why she didn't talk to her when she loved her. The next morning when Stella got out of bed she went in to see grandpa and told him grandma didn't talk to her. He immediately sent for the neighbor, Mrs. Aufe who was a nurse. They knew it was a stroke. The children were sent for and Stella say s her parents came before she died, but it was too late f r the others. Stella says she was always glad she had stay ed but sorry she hadn't got help for her sooner.

I, Adell, remember some things about grandma. I was 10 years old in 1898, a little older than Stella and Addie. I remember my stepmother fixed grandpas bread and milk (that is all he would eat the last while.) She would boil the milk and crumb the bread in and then have me take it to him . The spring of 1897 my father sold his home and farm to Hyrum Colby and built a house of black rock up by the railroad track. I remember taking grandpa his meals from there , especially during a snow storm. I put on a pair of knee boots too big for me and trudged in the deep snow. When I got to grandmas she had me stay and get warm and heated some home made beer and crumbed cookies in it and had me eat it. I had my school book with me and she wanted me to read to her. The story had something about a cat. She said "let me see some of the words". She said "Is this cat? " I said yes and she seemed disgusted. She said "That is no way to spell cat, it should be spelled with a "k" . I remember seeing her at church. The large house Uncle Joe had built just north from grandpa and grandmas had been sold to the ward, the petitions taken out and used for a ward house. This was after Uncle Joe had died in 1891 . It was also used for the school house. I remember I liked the beer and cookies very much. Another time I took her some milk in a lard bucket. When I got there grandma was sitting on a kitchen chair holding a basin on her lap and trying to vomit. I said "Grandma, aren't you feeling well?" She said, "Oh I'm so sick." but she got up and poured the milk in a pan then drained the bucket until she got the east drop.

Ethel Stringham (Dastrup), a neighbor girl who lived across the street and a little north told me of a few things she remembered about grandma. She said her folks sold milk to her and the children would take it over. One day when Ethel took it over grandma was holding her stomach and saying "I have to do my chores but I can't I'm too sick." Her chores consisted of a few hens and baby chicks. Ethel went home and told her mother who went right over. Ethel thinks she died the next day about noon. I remember looking over to her place from the school grounds and seeing a lot of people and I was told grandma had died. Ethel remembers other times tending grandma's chickens while she went to Salina and Aurora to visit her children. I used to think I looked like her but that wouldn't be possible because he was my step-grandmother.

KAREN MARIE'S STORY

I, Karen Marie Peders Datter (Danish for daughter), was born on an Estate called Meilhede. Gjottrup Soga, Thisted Amt ., West Hanherd, North Jeiliani, Denmark.

I was born of goodly parents. My father's name was Peter Christian Jensen. He was born on an Estate, Orum Thisted Amt. My mother was born in the same house I was. I was born April 12, 1829. My father died in 1837.

I was ten years old when I commenced working out. When I was 14, I began to take care of myself. I worked out until I was 19 years old. Then I built a brick house. Then I thought I would sit and weave and earn money enough to live on when I got old. I was very religious while young.

I often cried and prayed in my heart that I might die before I was 14 years old for we were taught that those who had held us in their Godmother's arms were the ones to answer for our sins until then. I was very ambitious. I worked until one o'clock every night, but I always read a chapter or two in the Testament before I went to bed.

I went to church every Sunday. Then the priest stood hollering about heaven and hell till he frightened me. I went home crying for I wanted to do the Lord's will but I didn't know how and no one knew how to tell me.

I thought and wished many times that I might have lived when the Savior and his Apostles were upon the earth. They could have told me how to live, but now there was no one.

In 1854 there came two missionaries. They could tell me, and it took me six months to investigate and find out for sure.

Karen Marie and her sister, Margaret, lived in her little house. They talked often of what the missionaries had said , and they made a pact. When the first one died, she was t o come back and tell the other if Mormonism was true. Quite unexpectedly, Margaret died. One day as Karen Marie sat weaving, Margaret appeared, all she said was "Mormonism is true." Karen went immediately to be baptized. I was baptized in October 1855 in Olborg, and I immigrated to America on November 24, 1855.

Karen Marie came to America on the same ship as the Gottfredson's. She was 27 years old, unmarried with no family in America. When Elder Christiansen asked her to help the motherless Gottfredson family she didn't hesitate, but went immediately where she was needed. Her heart went out to those four children who were trying so valiantly to manage. Jens was working long hours to earn money to go on. Karen Marie moved in and soon the household was humming. She cleaned and cooked and cared for the children.

One day Brother Christiansen came back to see them. It was a big change and he smiled as he saw the well-scrubbed children and the neat house. He could smell bread baking. After dinner when the children were tucked in bed he talked to Jens and Karen Marie. "You should marry" he said. "It' s not right for an unmarried woman to live here."

It must have been very hard. Jens beloved Karen had been dead only a month. Karen Marie looked at Jens sad face. No , there was no question of love, but he needed her and she knew that a woman needed the care and protection of a husband in this rugged new land.

Jens looked at Karen Marie and thought about the changes she had made. A man could not do it alone. He needed a help mate, a mother, a wife. Slowly he looked up and caught her eye. Then nodded. It was right. On August 12, 1856 they were married by Elder Christian Christiansen who had manipulated the whole thing.

Every day now Jens was free to work at the foundry and Karen Marie was a good manager. All that year they saved and planned and talked of going to Utah. One day Elder Christiansen came to tell them about the handcart companies and that the was going to lead one group. Jens and Karen Marie decided to go. Karen Marie was going to have a baby, but so were many others. They felt equal to any hardship. The children were more than eager to join their friends "Riding to Zion" on their stick horses.

One hundred twenty miles later the handcart company crossed the Loup Fork River to a camping spot. The Loup Fork was a tributary of the Platte River and six miles away was a Mormon settlement called Genoa. They camped in a lovely spot in the cottonwood trees. The river and the trees cooled the air that had been so hot. The women had struggled in their long dresses which pulled at their bodies and gathered dirt from the wilderness paths upon which they had traveled. They had grown bone-weary from walking, walking in a cloud of dust raised by the handcarts. They had struggled to push and pull, and move boulders that blocked their way as they had pushed on.

Now in Nebraska they rested by the river, but not for long. The children welcomed a bath in the river. Women began washing clothes and soon the trees and bushes were loaded with drying clothes. Dinner was cooking over a campfire.

That night Karen Marie knew that her baby was going to be born, not on time but early. She woke Jens and sent him to find a woman who could help her. There on July 17, 1857 a baby girl was born. Karen Marie looked down at her first-born, a tiny delicate little child who looked at her with wise eyes. The tiny rosebud fingers curled around hers. For three days the fragile life clung to this world. The Elders blessed her and gave her the name of Platine for the river, and she died. Sadly they buried her beside the Platte River.

The handcart Company moved on, but Karen Marie was not able to travel. Jens lifted her on to their handcart and pulled her back over the river to the little community of Genoa. Jens staked off a quarter section of land on the side of the hill. He and the boys dug out a shelter, unloaded the handcart and arranged all provisions around the dugout so the family could use them.

He cautioned each child to help their mother, to be good and told them how much he needed their help. He hugged Kare n Marie and left them to go to Omaha. He took the handcar t in which he planned to bring back supplies so that they m ight proceed to Utah.

Karen budgeted supplies and kept an eagle-eye out for anything edible, but as the summer drew to a close, so did their supplies. The boys walked along Beaver Creek to gather wild berries and plums. A neighbor gave her some corn that had been damaged by the frost. Another gave her some buckwheat. She ground it in a coffee mill and for a month they barely survived. Then in September Jens was able to send a sack of flour and bacon.

By November their food was nearly gone and as Karen looked at the children she saw starvation and the bitter cold of winter ahead. She knew they must leave or perish. She hired a man with a yoke of oxen to take the family to Omaha.

The next spring news traveled through the Mormon camps that Johnson's Army was heading for Zion to fight the Mormon s and wipe out polygamy. Their Nebraska neighbors warned th em to stay away. How could you travel with an army bound t o fight your people? Jens and Karen Marie saw only that this was a chance to go on, and they were determined to try a gain.

About that time a small company of Danish emigrants came from Denmark. What excitement for the Gottfredsons. Karen Marie's sister and brother were in that group. Peder had brought his wife and Karen's sister was engaged to Rasmus Olsen who was better off than most of the emigrants, he was a loving, generous man. He had a new Schuttler wagon and four yoke of oxen, best of all he was very willing to take the Gottfredsons along.

There were just six wagons in this company and they were led by Iver N. Iverson, a missionary who was returning to Pleasant Grove. Two other men had wagons filled with merchandise to furnish their pioneer homes.

Shortly before they reached Fort Laramie they met a group of soldiers bound for Utah. The soldiers had been back east to get supplies for Johnson's Army. The emigrants traveled with them until they reached Sweetwater, Wyoming. The army allowed them to camp just outside their picket lines. The soldiers made friends with the families, and especially liked the children. Often times they would bring over so me groceries to share.

It helped to let the soldiers night-herd their oxen along with the army stock. The soldiers used big mule teams.

The journey was going so well it was almost too good to last. Sure enough, trouble came again to delay them. Some of their oxen drank alkaline water and died. Now there were just not enough oxen to pull the heavily loaded wagons.

They unloaded everything and carefully sorted through their belongings to decide what could be left behind. All heavy things had to be abandoned. Stoves were the first to go. The pioneers buried them in hopes that they could come back and get them. Everyone able to walk did so.

Peter was now 12 years old, an adventuresome sort of boy who had proved to be a big help to the soldiers. They invite d him to go along with them to help drive the loose stock , Jens let him go. What adventure! Peters eyes shone. The soldiers gave him a mule to ride. He felt mighty important as he rode off, waving good by to Hans, Christine and Joe.

The troops could travel much faster than the crippled Mormon company. Peter was waiting for his family when they finally arrived at Fort Bridger.

Jens and Karen Marie arrived in Salt Lake City on September 20, 1858. It was a strange sight, a city deserted. Abandoned homes stared with blank windows as the pioneers drove s lowly through the city. People had moved south fearing Johnson's Army. Houses could be bought for almost nothing.

Jens was not a polygamist and his experiences with the soldiers had all been good. He bought a house and lot containing 1-1/4 acres on 5th South and 5th East for $60.00. He paid for it with a plush overcoat valued at $30.00 and a Colt revolver that Hans had found on the plains valued at $30.00.

The house was one large room built of adobe bricks and slab with a dirt roof. It was a real joy to be in a home once more. The following summer Jens planted wheat and ha d a bumper crop of 35 bushels worth $2.00 per bushel. What a windfall.

In Salt Lake Jens at last had a chance to work at his Cooper's trade. He made casks, barrels, kegs, tubs, and that fall there was a fair. He entered his work and took first prize, and again in 1859. Things were looking better.

That same year Karen Marie had a baby girl and named her Caroline. She was now thirty years old.

The children set out to do odd jobs. Peter was 13 and could do a man's work. Hans was 11, Christine 9, and Joe was 7 . They started school and as soon as school let out in the spring Peter got a job. That summer he earned enough money to buy a young cow and an old wagon.

All of Jens older children loved Karen Marie as their own mother. As a Danish woman she was obedient to her husband , but Jens had a temper and Karen Marie had a hard time when she felt he was too harsh with the children. One day when Hans had been disobedient, Jens decided to take him out to the woodshed to give him an old fashioned whipping. Karen Marie’s tender heart could not bear it and she got between Jens and Hans. In his anger Jens struck Karen Marie. There was dead silence, and then Jens turned and rushed from the house. Karen Marie looked thunder struck and went by herself outside.


KAREN MARIE’S STORY; by herself.

"I, Karen Marie Peders Datter, was born on an Estate called Meilhede, Gottrup Soga Thisted Amt. West Hanherd, North Jeiliani, Denmark.

I was born of goodly parents. My father’s name was Peter Christian Jensen. He was born on an estate, Orum Thidste, Amt. My mother was born in the same house I was. I was born April 12, 1829. My father died in 1837.

I was ten years old when I commenced working out. When I was 14 I began to take care of myself. I worked out until I was 19 years old. Then I built a brick house. Then I thought I would sit and weave and earn money enough to live on when I got old.

I was very religious while young.

I often cried and prayed in my heart that I might die before I was 14 years old for we were taught that those who had held us in their Godmother’s arms were the ones to answer for our sins until then. I was very ambitious. I worked until one o’clock every night; but I always read a chapter or two in the Testament before I went to bed.

I went to church every Sunday. Then the Priest stood hollering about heaven and hell till he frightened me. I went home crying for I wanted to do the Lord’s will, but I didn’t know how and no one knew how to tell me.

I thought and wished many times that I might have lived when the Savior and his Apostles were upon the earth. They could have told me how to live, but now there was no one.

In 1854 there came two missionaries. They could tell me and it took me six months to investigate and find out for sure.

Karen Marie and her sister, Margaret, lived in her little house. They talked often of what the missionaries had said, and they made a pact. When the first one died, she was to come back and tell the other if Mormonism was true. Quite unexpectedly, Margaret died. One day as Karen Marie sat weaving, Margaret appeared. All she said was "Mormonism is true."

Karen went immediately to be baptized.

I was baptized in October, 1855 in Olborg, and I immigrated to America on November 24, 1855.

Karen Marie came to America on the same ship as the Gottfredson’s. She was 27 years old, unmarried with no family in America. When Elder Christiansen asked her to help the mother-less Gottfredson family, she didn’t hesitate, but went immediately where she was needed. Her heart went out to those four children who were trying so valiantly to manage. Jens was working long hours to earn money to go on. So Karen Marie moved in and soon the household was humming. She cleaned and cooked and cared for the children.

One day Brother Christiansen came back to see them. It was a big change and he smiled as he saw the well-scrubbed children and the neat house. He could smell bread baking.

After dinner when the children were tucked in bed he talked to Jens and Karen Marie. "You should marry," he said. "It is not right for an unmarried woman to live here."

It must have been very hard. Jens’ beloved Karen had been dead only a month. Karen Marie looked at Jens’ sad face. No, there was no question of love, but he needed her and she knew that a woman needed the care and protection of a husband in this rugged new land.

Jens looked at Karen Marie and thought about the changes she had made. A man could not do it alone. He needed a helpmate, a mother, a wife. Slowly he looked up and caught her eye. Then he nodded. It was right. On August 12, 1856, they were married by Elder Christian Christ-iansen, who had manipulated the whole thing.

Every day now Jens was free to work at the foundry and Karen Marie was a good manager. All that year they saved and planned and talked of going to Utah. One day Elder Christ-iansen came to tell them about the handcart companies and that he was going to lead one group.

Jens and Karen Marie decided to go. Karen Marie was going to have a baby, but so were many others. They felt equal to any hardship. The children were more than eager to join their friends "riding to Zion" on their stick horses.

One hundred twenty miles later the handcart company crossed the Loup Fork River to a camping spot. The Loup Fork was a tributary of the Platte River and six miles away was a Mormon settlement called Genoa. They camped in a lovely spot in the cottonwood trees. The river and the trees cooled the air and it had been so hot! The women, struggling along in their heavy clothes, long dresses that pulled at their bodies, and gathered the dirt of the wilderness paths they traveled, had grown bone-weary. Walking, walking in a cloud of dust raised by the hand-carts, struggling to push and pull, to move boulders that blocked their way, they had pushed on. Missouri in July was hot!

Now in Nebraska they rested by the river, but not for long. The children welcomed a bath in the river. Women began washing clothes and soon the trees and bushes were loaded with drying clothes. Dinner was cooking over a campfire.

That night Karen Marie knew that her baby was going to be born, not on time, but early. She woke Jens and sent him to find a woman who could help her. There on July 17, 1857, a baby girl was born. Karen Marie looked down at her first-born, a tiny delicate little child who looked at her with wise eyes. The tiny rosebud fingers curled around hers. For three days the fragile life clung to this world. The Elders blessed her and gave her the name of Plattina for the river, and she died. Sadly they buried her beside the Platte River.

The handcart Company moved on, but Karen Marie was not able to travel. Jens lifted her on to their handcart and pulled her back over the river to the little community of Genoa. Jens staked off a quarter section of land on the side of the hill. He and the boys dug out a shelter, unloaded the handcart and arranged all the provisions around the dugout so the family could use them.

He cautioned each child to help their mother, to be good and told them how much he needed their help. He hugged Karen Marie and left them to go to Omaha. He took the handcart. In it he planned to bring supplies so that they might proceed to Utah.

Karen budgeted supplies and kept an eagle-eye out for anything edible, but as the summer drew to a close, so did their supplies. The boys walked along Beaver Creek to gather wild berries and plums. A neighbor gave her some corn that had been damaged by the frost. Another gave her some buckwheat. She ground it in a coffee mill and for a month they barely survived. Then in September, Jens was able to send a sack of flour and some bacon.

By November their food was nearly gone and as Karen looked at the children she saw starvation and the bitter cold of winter ahead. She knew they must leave or perish. She hired a man with a yoke of oxen to take the family to Omaha. Once more the family was together.

The next spring news traveled through the Mormon camps that Johnson’s Army was head-ing for Zion to fight the Mormons and wipe out polygamy. Their Nebraska neighbors warned them to stay away. How could you travel with an army bound to fight your people? Jens and Karen Marie saw only that this was a chance to go on, and they were determined to try again.

At about that time a small company of Danish emigrants came from Denmark. What excite-ment for the Gottfredson’s. Karen Marie’s sister and brother were in that group. Peder had brought his wife and Karen’s sister was engaged to Rasmus Olsen. Rasmus was better off than most of the emigrants and he was a loving, generous man. He had a new Schuttler wagon and four yoke of oxen, and best of all, he was very willing to take the Gottfredson’s along.

There were just six wagons in this company and they were led by Iver N. Iverson, a missionary who was returning to Pleasant Grove. Two other men had wagons filled with mer-chandise to furnish their pioneer homes.

Shortly before they reached Fort Laramie they met a group of soldiers bound for Utah. The soldiers had been back east to get supplies for Johnson’s Army. The emigrants traveled with them until they reached Sweetwater, Wyoming. The army allowed them to camp just outside their picket lines. The soldiers made friends with the families, and especially liked the children. Often times they would bring over some groceries to share.

It helped to let the soldiers night-herd their oxen along with the army stock. The soldiers used big mule teams.

The journey was going so well it was almost too good to last. Sure enough, trouble came again to delay them. Some of their oxen drank alkaline water and died. Now there were just not enough oxen to pull the heavily loaded wagons.

They unloaded everything and carefully sorted through their belongings to decide what could be left behind. All heavy things had to be abandoned. Stoves were the first to go. The pioneers buried them in hopes that they could come back and get them. Everyone able to walk did so.

Peter was now 12 years old, an adventuresome sort of boy who had proved to be a big help to the soldiers. They invited him to go along with them to help drive the loose stock. Jens let him go. What adventure! Peter’s eyes shone. The soldiers gave him a mule to ride and he felt mighty important as he rode off, waving good-bye to Hans, Christine and Joe.

The troops could travel much faster than the crippled Mormon company. Peter was waiting for his family when they finally arrived at Fort Bridger.

Jens and Karen Marie arrived in Salt Lake City on September 20, 1858. It was a strange sight, a city deserted. Abandoned homes stared with blank windows as the pioneers drove slowly through the city. People had moved south fearing Johnson’s army. Houses could be bought for almost nothing.

Jens was not a polygamist and his experiences with the soldiers had all been good. He bought a house and lot containing 1¼ acres on 5th South and 5th East for $60.00. He paid for it with a plush overcoat valued at $30.00 and a Colt revolver that Hans had found on the plains, valued at $30.00.

The house was one large room built of adobe bricks and slab with a dirt roof. It was a real joy to be in a home once more. The following summer, Jens planted wheat and had a bumper crop of 35 bushels worth $2.00 per bushel. What a windfall!

In Salt Lake, Jens at last had a chance to work at his Cooper’s trade. He made casks, barrels, kegs, tubs, and that fall there was a fair. He entered his work and took first prize, and again in 1859. Things were looking better.

That same year Karen Marie had a baby girl and named her Caroline. She was now thirty years old.

The children set out to do odd jobs. Peter was 13 and could do a man’s work. Hans was 11, Christine 9, and Joe was 7. They started school and as soon as school let out in the spring, Peter got a job. That summer he earned enough money to buy a young cow and an old wagon.

All of Jens older children loved Karen Marie as their own mother. As a Danish woman, she was obedient to her husband, but Jens had a temper and Karen Marie had a hard time when she felt he was too harsh with the children. One day when Hans had been disobedient, Jens decided to take him out to the woodshed to give him an old fashioned whipping. Karen Marie’s tender heart could not bear it and she got between Jens and Hans. In his anger Jens struck Karen Marie. There was dead silence, and then Jens turned and rushed from the house. Karen Marie looked thunder struck and went by herself outside. No word was ever spoken of the episode, but the boys remembered it all their lives.

Again it was time to move on. They sold the house for a yoke of oxen and the family moved to Fort Ephraim in Sanpete County. It was just a temporary move while Jens found a good spot to settle. In the spring Jens moved his family to Mt. Pleasant. He bought a piece of land on the northwestern part of town. Karen Marie’s story continues:

"We moved to Mt. Pleasant in April, 1860. Then we had our worst trouble. We lived on bran and potatoes the first summer. We built a rock house 1½ stories high. As Father was troubled with a lame back, I had to load and unload the heavy rocks and mix all the mud and carry it to him. In August I made adobes for a stable. In September I gleaned five bushels of wheat. In the middle of October I bound five acres of wheat by moonlight. The sun was so hot through the day, I could not do it. On the first of November, 1860, Mariah was born."

Two years later Karen Marie had her first son, Jacob, our grandfather. It was December 3, 1862.

Jens was always looking for opportunities, and in the spring of 1864 he made a contract with the people of Mt. Pleasant, Moroni and Fairview, to take all of the "dry stock" (non-nursing cattle) and part of the sheep herd in Thistle Valley.

They built a "herder house" and he hired an old man named Jensen, and put his three eldest sons to work. Peter was now 18 years old. He was put in charge of the enterprise. Hans and Joe were to herd sheep.

One day an Indian rode up to the old man Jensen and demanded his dinner. Jensen had wrapped it up in his coat. He refused to give it up. The Indian made a sudden grab for it and got the coat with the dinner and laid it across the saddle in front of him. The old man was furious. He caught the Indian’s horse by the bridle and grabbed his coat from the Indian. The action was so quick that the Indian lost his balance. As he struggled he regained it, Jensen turned around and rode after his sheep. He had gone about 75 yards when a bullet whistled by his face, just grazing his cheek, and one of his sheep fell dead. A second shot killed another sheep. Peter and Hans were close to the herd house watching when suddenly another Indian rode in, surrounded by a pack of dogs all jumping and barking and running in wild circles. The Indian gave a command and the dogs came after Peter and Hans. The two boys made a run for the house, got inside and closed the door. Outside they could hear the yelping dogs as they scratched and lunged at the door trying to get in.

Peter and Hans owned a big brindle dog that had been given to the boys. They sicked the dog through the window and he bounded out tearing after the Indian dogs. But now the Indians came after Peter. He had a gun and bows and arrows, but he also had a large brightly painted wagon spoke with a string through the small end, which he swung in a circle around and around. He kept riding in circles around Peter, swinging the wagon spoke and with each circle getting closer. Peter kept dodging and asking, "What do you want?"

The Indian said nothing. Peter couldn’t get away. The Indian came closer swinging the wagon spoke. Suddenly Peter squatted down, cocked his gun and pointed at the Indian’s face, keeping his finger on the trigger. The Indian jerked his horse back so hard and fast that he fell back on his haunches. However, he managed to stay with his horse. Then he began to talk.

As he talked a lot of Indians gathered behind Peter at the herd house. They broke down the door and carried away all their bedding, cooking utensils and provisions.

One day a band of Indians drove up saying they wanted a beef.

"We can’t give it to you. The animals aren’t ours. You’ll have to get an order from Bishop Selly," Peter explained.

There was a large five-year-old steer belonging to Chris Wintergreen. One of the Indians raised his gun and shot it. Hans made a grab and got hold of the gun. He pulled hard. Just then another Indian struck him in the face with his lariat and blood gushed from the cut.

Hans was so angry that he just glared at the Indian, completely speechless. The Indian looked at him scornfully.

"Can’t you cry?" he asked, and then turned and shot the steer. The Indians skinned the hind quarters, cut out the choice part of the meat and rode off.

It was nearly the end of summer. Every day the Indians drove in to harass the boys. Finally the boys decided to go home. The left the cattle and herded the sheep down the mountain to Mt. Pleasant. Jens and some of the other men went to Thistle Valley and rounded up the cattle.

During the summer there had been a gold rush in Idaho and Montana. Gold seekers came in droves on horses, mules, donkeys, even on foot, all bent on making a fortune in gold. Throughout Utah the price of provisions arose like a rocket. In Montana the gold seekers paid as high as a hundred dollars for a sack of flour. In Salt Lake wheat sold for $6.00 a bushel.

Farmers who had contracted to pay Jens in wheat wanted to sell their wheat and pay Jens in greenbacks. It was the end of the Civil War. Greenbacks were only worth .33 cents on the dollar, and of course Confederate greenbacks were worthless.

Jens said, "No deal!" Finally the farmers paid as contracted and that year Jens and his sons did very well.

Earlier that same year Jens had been called to start a new town of Omni. Omni soon became Richfield because of the fertile soil. The call came in the spring, but because Jens had already contracted to herd, he was excused until fall.

Now Jens and Karen Marie sold the home they had worked so hard to build for $1,000. He took most of the pay in stock and teams. He sent 18 year-old Peter and 14 year-old Christine ahead with provisions. It was November and the weather was fickle. The distance was only 71 miles. It did not seem far, but the first day a blizzard hit and the two young people nearly froze to death. Their clothes got soaked through and then froze on their bodies. Peter knew they had to keep moving or die. Two days later they arrived in Richfield.

That winter was a wonderful time for Peter and Christine. They had never been able to relax and have fun. In Richfield they lived in a neat little house of sawed logs. Peter played the fiddle and their little house became a gathering place for all the young people in town.

Jens and Karen Marie brought the family in the spring. This year Karen Marie turned 35 and in November had a baby boy. They named him Thomas, but Thomas did not thrive. Nine months later they buried him.

Other settlers had been in Richfield nearly a year when the Gottfredson’s arrived. Log houses were scattered here and there. There were dug-outs on most lots. A fort wall had been started around the public square. On the southwest corner stood a stone church.

Jens got two town lots a block west of the northwest corner of the fort. The boys helped him build a dugout shelter for their protection once more until he could build an adobe house. He sold some of his stock and Bishop Higgins joined in a partnership with him to build a grist mill.

The townspeople had met and decided to build a canal to carry water from the Sevier River. All men worked with a pick and shovel to build that canal 9 miles long, 12 feet wide at the top, tapering to ten feet wide at the bottom. Anyone who could work on the canal was paid in land. For ten rods of digging the pay was five acres of land. Jens and his two boys each dug ten rods. Peter used his to trade for a town lot.

That year the Black Hawk Indian War started. Peter, Hans and Jens all enlisted under Colonel Higgins.

After the canal was finished it was customary to drive cattle down on the river bottom for feed. One Saturday evening there were about 150 cattle feeding about a mile north of Glenwood Ford. Ten of these belonged to Jens. Some Richfield boys, including several Gottfredson child-ren, were sent to watch the cattle. The boys liked the job. They could watch the cattle and fish a little and brag a lot. About sundown the boys made a final check. All cattle were present and accounted for. The boys went home.

Monday morning Hans and Peter rode out to get some oxen so that Jens could finish putting in grain. No oxen! No cattle! Hans found tracks that led to a cattle ford, and that was where the cattle had been driven across the river.

The water was high. Hans wanted to go home, but Peter stripped off his cloths. He carried his clothes and his gun above his head and waded into the water. The water reached his waist and then his armpits, but he got across. Hurriedly he dressed and followed the tracks. They led into the Glenwood mountains. He stopped and examined the tracks. It looked as though there were about five Indians driving the cattle.

Peter decided that he could take them back. He ran from one bend of the dry wash to another, carefully going to the points of the ridges and there looking in all directions. About four miles later he saw two oxen that had broken away from the herd. They had been shot several times. One of them was a black Texas ox that was Peter’s own, and it had two arrows sticking in its side. Peter gave up hunting the herd and drove the two oxen down the mountain into a corral. He tugged and pulled at the arrows until he got them out, and then drove them down the mountain, past the canal to home.

Long before he got home others had begun missing their cattle and had gone out to hunt them. The townspeople feared that the Indians had killed Peter or at least had taken him prisoner. Hans’ story frightened Jens and Karen Marie.

Peter arrived home about noon. The men hunted until nearly dark. Anger exploded when they found he was home.

"What the hell did you think you were doing, going after the Indians like that?"

"You should have come for help."

"Damn fool kid, needs a good lesson."

"He’s in the army. He should be court martialed."

"They wanted him punished."

So Colonel Higgins notified the Gottfredson’s that Peter was to appear that evening to be court martialed.

By evening tempers had simmered down. Some still argued that Peter should be given extra guard duty. One major came to his defense.

"Let him go. I’ve done some mighty foolish things in my day and so have you." A few grumbled, but the majority agreed and that settled it.

Karen Marie had a baby in 1886. They named her Petra and she lived two months.

The Black Hawk Indian War was hard on people just establishing themselves in a rugged pioneer environment. Many people were driven from their homes. By 1867 the war had just about wiped the Gottfredson’s out. They had come to Richfield fairly prosperous. They left it with nothing but a small pony team and a couple of cows. Everything else had been stolen by the Indians.

Once again they had to move. This time they went to American Fork and here Karen Marie had their last child, a baby girl. Jens said that made an even dozen so they named her Sarah Dozina.

The move was harder this time. It seemed to Karen Marie that each time was harder. Jens was no longer a young man at 57, worn out from a hard life. First they went to Fountain Green and in 1871 they returned to Richfield.

Jens traded his interest in the old grist mill for a Schuttler wagon and some stock. He traded his house in Richfield for property in Glenwood. This became the happiest time of their lives. The children loved it. It was an organized town with regular organized church services; a ward with social life and there were a lot of young people there. Indian trouble seemed far away, but once in a while a raiding party would swoop down, stealing stock and shooting up the com-munity. In Glenwood there was a fort and when the bell sounded everyone was to go there immediately.

One day rumor went around that the Indians were once more on the war path. The fort bell rang and through the windows the Gottfredson children watched the people hurry to the fort. Jens went down in the cellar to pray. When he came back he told his family that they wouldn’t need to go to the fort. They would be protected.

Mariah put her hand in her father’s and waited. It was true. No harm came and Mariah had her first lesson in the power of prayer.

Mariah married a man named Edward Payne Jr. One day Edward Payne Sr. went fishing at Fish Lake and brought home a fine catch of fish to sell. He sold some to Jens and they were paid for, but Edward figured that Mariah was a fine daughter-in-law, so threw in an extra pound of fish. When Jens got home he weighed the fish and discovered the extra pound. Back he went ten blocks to pay for the rest of the fish. Edward explained that he had meant it as a good will gift, but Jens would have none of it.

"I always pay for what I get," he said, and Edward said no more.

One by one the children grew up, married and moved away. Finally Jens and Karen Marie found themselves alone in Glenwood. They wanted to be near their children and grandchildren. So they sold their home in Glenwood and bought a house on 1½ acres from their son Joseph Smith Gottfredson. It was in Vermilion. Jacob and Angeline lived there with their family. It was good to have the children close.

On May 27, 1875, the family felt a real thrill as Jens and Karen Marie became citizens of the United States of America.

Grandpa Jens was a stern man. He walked with a cane and he had made a wooden bucket to hold candy for the grandchildren. He and Karen Marie always spoke Danish to each other, and to some of their children. His back, so bad all his life, finally sent him to bed for the last three years of his life. His sons made a pulley over his bed so he could turn himself over. He had to have constant care. He ate bread and milk three times a day.

Karen Marie made malt beer fresh every week as she had in the old country. The choicest beer was kept for guests, but the family had another keg that was used for meals so everyone in the family drank this mild beer. She also kept a constant supply of Danish butter cookies on had to please the children.

In March of 1898, Karen Marie got sick. Mariah came to visit and found her ill. She could not stay, so left her daughter, Estella, who was nine years old, to help her grandmother.

In the morning Estella and Grandma went outside and fed the chickens. They visited and watched the canary in its wicker cage. The school house was just across the fence from the Gottfredson home. At recess, Addie Gottfredson ran over to see Grandma. Addie loved her grandmother very much and often spent her recess time there. Sometimes she went to Grandma’s for lunch. This day she found Estella there. Addie invited her to go play on the school yard. Grandma gave permission and the two girls ran happily away.

Estella stayed longer than she intended, and when she got home, Grandma Karen Marie was lying in bed and did not speak. Estella felt bad. She thought Grandma was angry with her for staying so long on the playground.

She went into the kitchen and fixed Grandpa’s bread and milk and ate some herself. At bedtime Grandma still didn’t speak, but she put her arms around the child and loved her.

The next morning Estella went into Grandpa’s room and told him Grandma still wouldn’t talk to her. Jens knew immediately that something was very wrong so he sent Estella to a neighbor’s house for help. Karen Marie had had a stroke.

Jens sent for Jacob and he sent word for all the brothers and sisters to come at once. Only Jacob and Mariah, were able to be there when she died. It was March 9, 1898. Karen Marie was 69 years old.

For three months Jens lived on. He sold his house and went to live with Peter. In June of 1898 he died quietly in his sleep.

Jens and Karen Marie were buried side by side in the Glenwood cemetery. A marble shaft marks the grave and a fence was built around it. Later an aluminum marker was placed to show that he was an Indian War Veteran.

With all their troubles, Jens and Karen somehow managed to save for their old age. They never had to depend on their children. Jens had loaned money out for which he received interest, and when he died there was money in the bank. They paid the funeral expenses and each of his eight living children received $100.

The family divided all of Jens’ and Karen Marie’s personal belongings into eight piles, as near equal in value as possible. Numbers were put on each pile and each child drew a number from a hat to determine which pile was his. After that they could trade if they wanted something special. Probably the most lasting and prized possession were a Danish Bible and a lovely old clock.

Jens and Karen Marie may not have married in love, but years of devoted service, of helping, facing troubles, sharing a family, always together as a team, had to have ended in love. They were rich in the love of their children and grandchildren.

More about Karen Marie Pedersen:

My Great Grandmother Gottfredson was a native of Denmark. Her father died when she was seven years old and from then o n she made her own living. Her first job was that of tendin g turkeys. In the old country the people had flocks of turk eys and hired a herd girl to care for them. Later she too k up the weavers trade and was able to make a living weavin g for various people. (Insert written Oct. 22, 1933, By Maxine Steele, Signed by Caroline Gottfredson Peterson. "Th e Gospel Message". When great grandmother Gottfredson live d in Denmark she was a weaver. One day some Mormon mission aries came to her door and engaged her in religious convers ation. This was at the time that the gospel was first preac hed in Denmark. My great grandmother believed that it coul d be true but was not sure enough that she wished to join w ithout further proof. She wanted a testimony to be sure.

My great grandmother and her brother lived together. He was a tailor. They had another sister who was a cook workin g around the neighborhood. About this time this older sist er became ill and came to live with her brother and siste r until she should die as she knew that she could not liv e long. My great grandmother cared for her tenderly but i t was soon apparent that her days on earth were few. Knowin g that the end was near for her, great grandmother said, "n ow when you die, come back and tell me whether the gospel i s true or not". The sister promised that if it were possib le that she would comeback and tell her. A short time afte r this she passed away.

One day after this great-grandmother was sitting weaving and wondering about the gospel when all at once her sister ap peared to her and told her to join the church of Jesus Chri st of Latter Day Saints, that it was the true religion. Thi s was the testimony that she had been waiting for so she kn ew beyond doubt that the gospel was true and she was soon b aptized. Her tailor brother joined too. He worked as a mi ssionary while he remained in Denmark. He was a very intell igent man. He composed many Danish Hymns and his teaching s were of great benefit to the church.

As soon as these two could earn enough money to pay their passage to America, they left Denmark and came over to joi n the Saints.)

She received the gospel when she was a young woman and as soon as she had enough money saved up she took passage o n a boat in order to come to Utah to be with the other sain ts.

On the same boat there was a family with whom she became very intimate. The family consisted of a husband, a wife an d four children and they also were bound for the land of th e saints. The wife bad consumption and was ill a great dea l so Great Grandmother assisted her in caring for the children.

The voyage was uneventful and as soon after landing at New York as was possible, this party made their way to St. Louis, Illinois. While there the sick lady died and was buried. Great Grandmother still cared for the mother-less children.

Later she married the man who became my Great Grandfather Gottfredson. Taking the four children by the previous marria ge, they joined a handcart company to come to Utah. When they came to the Platte River, Great Grandmother became ill a nd the company left them. A little girl was born there b t died. The family then went back to Omaha.

After saying in Omaha about a year a rather well-to-do uncle and aunt came along. They had two wagons with two yoke of oxen on each wagon. They loaded my great grandparents in and brought them to Utah, coming along in the rear of Joh nson s army.

Johnson s Army was supposed to be hard on them. Of course the officers would not associate with them, but the soldier s near the end of the company took the women and children t o ride in the heavy army wagons and helped them in any wa y that they could. When an officer was discerned coming for inspection, the soldiers would help the saints out of th e back of the wagon and present a bland and smiling counten ance to the hard boiled officers.

After reaching Utah the army was sent to the Civil War and their wagons, buffalo robes and coats were sold to the "Mormons" at a very nominal figure. The first year or so after my great grandparents arrived in Utah their entire wardro be was made from the blue soldiers coats.

My Great Grandmother located in Salt Lake City where my grandmother was born the next winter.

Written by Ellen Maxine Steele Fannin, Oct. 18, 1933, Salmon, Idaho

Attested by my Grandmother Caroline Gottfredson Peterson

History Background:

Was born on an estate called Meilhede. She was out working at the age of 10 and completely on her own af ter 14. At age 19 built a brick house for herself and a si ster, and did weaving for the public. She sailed for America at age 27 on the same ship as the GOTTFREDSEN family, the John J. Boyd, although they did not know each other.

RESIDENCES: Same as Jens GOTTFREDSEN except in Denmark she lived in Gjottrup Soga, Thisted Amt, West Hanherd, North Jeiliani.

HISTORY OF KAREN MARIE PEDERSEN GOTTFREDSON by Adell Gottfredson Jensen

From a sketch by Estella Payne Poulson as told by her mother

Step Grandmother, Karen Marie Pedersen, was born on an estate called Mielhede, April 12, 1829, at Gjottrup, Thisted, Denmark to Peder Christian Jensen and Ane CHRISTENSEN (Jensen). Her Grandfather's name was Jens Pedersen, hence the na me. She joined the Church in October 1855, at age 25. Her father died when she was eight years old, when he was 52 . According to the record her mother lived until she was 82.

Her mother, now a widow, Karen Marie was on her own, out working when she was ten, and took full care of herself afte r she was fourteen. (She wasn't so different, this writer A dell G. Jensen did the same). After working for other peopl e until she was 19 years old, she then built herself a bric k house and lived in it and did weaving for the public. Sh e says, in a part of a letter found after her death, "I wa s very religious while young." She often prayed that she c ould die before she was 14, as they were taught that thei r God-mother would answer for their sins until that time . She went to church every Sunday. Being very ambitious , she says she worked each night until 1 a.m. then read a c hapter or two in her testament before going to bed. She wis hed she had lived when the Savior and his Apostles were o n the earth. They could have told her how to live, and he r Priest, or church leader only confused her.

In 1854 two Mormon Missionaries called on her and taught her the Gospel. She investigated for six months. She tell s how she received her testimony. It seems that one of he r sisters lived with her. She and her sister were weavin g each day and would talk about the Gospel and its principl es as told them by the Missionaries. They did not know wha t to do or whether to join, and were very worried and praye d often to know what to do.

One day they made a promise to each other that the one who should die first would come back and tell the other if th e Gospel was true. During this time of investigation the s ister passed away, and one day as grandmother saw her the s ister said, "Mormonism is true". Not another word, and the n she was gone. Grandmother now felt assured of what she sh ould do. She was baptized in October 1855. She sold her be longings and left for Utah on November 24 1855. She was al one as far as her family were concerned, but there were oth er saints leaving from Denmark.

They first went to Copenhagen and from there they crossed the North Sea to Hamburg, Germany, and then by rail from Ge rmany to Liverpool, England, and sailed from there on the 1 2th of December 1855 in the Ship John J. Boyd, under the l eadership of Knud, or Canute Petersen of Ephraim, Utah. (The Gottfredson family was on this same ship, and as I have w ritten up this trip in detail in my sketch of Jens Gottfred son, I will skip most of the details in Stella's sketch) . She was an obedient and self sacrificing woman 27 year s old now, and at the suggestion of Christian Christiansen , a returning missionary who was in charge of the Saints in St. Louis, Missouri, she joined the Gottfredson family, the mother having died, to help the father with his four chi ldren. Brother Christiansen suggested it would be a good th ing for them to marry which seemed to be satisfactory to bo th and he, having the proper authority, performed the cerem ony on August 12, 1856. They were in St. Louis about a year , or until the spring of 1857, when they joined Christian Christiansen's handcart company to go to Utah. When they had traveled about 120 miles from Florence, Nebraska to Loup Fork river, they crossed the river and made camp. That night grandmother gave birth to a premature baby girl July 17 , 1857. They named her Platine for the Platte river of which the Loup Fork is a tributary. The company went on and left them. This baby died and was buried there. They placed Grandmother on a hand cart and pulled her back over the

river and up north about a mile to a small settlement of Mormons called Genoa. Grandfather staked off a quarter section of land, built a dug-out in a hill, and leaving all the provisions which were remaining, took the hand cart to Omaha and got work for the summer at the availing low wages.

Grandfather Jens had no way to send them food and by August they were short. They were able to get some frosted corn and some buckwheat which had matured. They ground this in a coffee mill and mixed it with wild plum and sour grapes that were plentiful along Beaver Creek. They lived o n that for a month when Jens got a chance to send them a sack of flour and bacon from Omaha. They had not seen bread during this time.

In the fall grandmother hired a man with a yoke of oxen to take her and the children to Omaha. They stayed there un til the Spring of 1858. At that time her sister, Maren Pedersen (Mielhede) and her brother, Peder Pedersen (Mielhede ) and a man named Rasmus Olsen to whom Maren was engaged to be married, arrived in Omaha on their way to Utah. Mr Ra smus Olsen was well to do and bought a yoke of oxen and a new Shuttler wagon and took the Gottfredson's with them to Salt Lake. This company consisted of six wagons under the leadership of Iver M. Iverson, a returning missionary from Pleasant Grove. They reached Salt Lake September 20, 1858. They had the usual Pioneer experiences as told in Peters history. Grandmother mentions something personal, when they ived in Mt. Pleasant that is not mentioned in my father Peters history. She says, about the rock house they built of rock gathered from the land they bought, that Grandfather had a lame back and she loaded and unloaded the heaviest rock, and mixed all the mud and carried it to him. In August she made adobes for a stable, and in September gleaned five bushels of wheat. She says in October 1861 she boun d five acres of wheat by moonlight because the sun was to o hot in the daytime. This was a hard summer. They lived mostly on bran bread and potatoes. The boys, Peter 14 and Hans 12, were working away from home, Peter for Oscar Winter. In November 1860 Stella's mother, Aunt Maria, was born. She was a sickly child and never did have good health t hough she lived until she was 79 years old and bore seven children, four of whom lived to adulthood and had families.

In 1864 they were called to help settle Sevier valley and moved to Richfield. In 1868 they moved to Fountain Green o n account of Indian troubles, and back to Richfield in 1871 . They sold their holdings and moved in Glenwood where they lived Until 1879 when they moved to Vermillion where they had bought a house and 1 1/2 acres of ground of Joseph S . Gottfredson, Jen's youngest son by the first wife. Joseph built the larger house just north and both homes were just across the street from Peters large two story rock house.

Stella's sketch says this younger family had more peace and happiness in Glenwood than they had before. There were regular church services, an organized ward and social life. The children talked more of life in Glenwood than anywhere. All the younger children were married while they lived there. One time the Indians were on the war path and the bell was rung for the people to gather in the fort. Grand father went in the cellar to pray. When he returned he tol d the family they wouldn't need to go in the fort, that he knew they would be protected. Maria said that was her first testimony of prayer being answered. Stella tells another incident concerning a dealing between her two grandfathers Edward Payne and Jens, as told her by her mother, Maria G . Payne.

It seemed Edward Payne had brought some fish down from Fish Lake and had sold some to Jens, and they were paid for. B ecause Maria was married to Edward's son George her grandfa ther Payne wanted to give him a good measure. When grandfa ther Jens got home he weighed the fish and found he had a p ound he had not paid for. He walked eight or ten blocks to Brother Payne's with the extra money. Brother Payne tol d him he was giving him that much extra. Jens paid him say ing he must always pay for what he got. That was his polic y through life. This couple lived in Vermillion until thei r deaths, both in 1898. The younger grandchildren remember them as elderly people whom they loved very much.

Stella, who was only 9 when they died remembers grandfather walking with a cane. He seemed stern to his children as my father did to me when I was small. Perhaps most fathers seem that way to young children. He seemed so kind to me as my father did later. Stella says grandfather was home bound for 3 1/2 years before his death (two years bedfast ) so grandmother stayed very closely. We used to visit her . She always gave us butter cookies and grandfather had wooden buckets of candy and was very generous with the grandchildren. Grandmother made malt beer and she made it fresh once a week. Grandfather kept one keg for visitors and another for themselves to use with their meals. Stella would sometimes stay with her grandmother a few days when she was not feeling well. She remembers helping her feed the chickens, watching her canary, and enjoying her stay. She was also the last grandchild to see her alive.

I got this from Addie, daughter of Jacob Gottfredson: She said she had been staying with Grandma for two weeks at n ight, and would go through the fence to school in the daytime, and she was homesick. Her father, Uncle Jake, came after school the day before grandmother died and chopped a pile of wood. Addie asked him if she could go home with him . Grandma said yes let her go. Next day when she heard grandma had died she said she was heart broken because she had gone home, but she needn't have been. It seems that after she and her father had gone Aunt Maria and Stella came to see grandma and when they left they left Stella to sleep with her that night. Next day at recess Addie came over and invited Stella to come and visit school with her. Grandma gave her consent.

When Stella came back from school grandmother was lying down and did not speak. Stella thought she was cross with her because she stayed at school. Stella fixed grandpa his supper, bread and milk, and took it to him in his room, ate something herself and got in bed with grandma. Grandma put her arm around her and loved her. The child wondered why she didn't talk to her when she loved her. The next morning when Stella got out of bed she went in to see grandpa and told him grandma didn't talk to her. He immediately sent for the neighbor, Mrs. Aufe who was a nurse. They knew it was a stroke. The children were sent for and Stella say s her parents came before she died, but it was too late f r the others. Stella says she was always glad she had stay ed but sorry she hadn't got help for her sooner.

I, Adell, remember some things about grandma. I was 10 years old in 1898, a little older than Stella and Addie. I remember my stepmother fixed grandpas bread and milk (that is all he would eat the last while.) She would boil the milk and crumb the bread in and then have me take it to him . The spring of 1897 my father sold his home and farm to Hyrum Colby and built a house of black rock up by the railro ad track. I remember taking grandpa his meals from there , especially during a snow storm. I put on a pair of knee boots too big for me and trudged in the deep snow. When I got to grandmas she had me stay and get warm and heate d some home made beer and crumbed cookies in it and had me eat it. I had my school book with me and she wanted me to read to her. The story had something about a cat. She said "let me see some of the words". She said "Is this cat? " I said yes and she seemed disgusted. She said "That is no way to spell cat, it should be spelled with a "k" . I remember seeing her at church. The large house Uncle Joe had built just north from grandpa and grandmas had been sold to the ward, the petitions taken out and used for a ward house. This was after Uncle Joe had died in 1891 . It was also used for the school house. I remember I liked the beer and cookies very much. Another time I took her some milk in a lard bucket. When I got there grandma was sitting on a kitchen chair holding a basin on her lap and trying to vomit. I said "Grandma, aren't you feeling wel l?" She said, "Oh I'm so sick." but she got up and poured the milk in a pan then drained the bucket until she got the east drop.

Ethel Stringham (Dastrup), a neighbor girl who lived across the street and a litle north told me of a few things she remembered about grandma. She said her folks sold milk to her and the children would take it over. One day when Ethel took it over grandma was holding her stomach and saying "I have to do my chores but I can't I'm too sick." Her chores consisted of a few hens and baby chicks. Ethel went home and told her mother who went right over. Ethel thinks she died the next day about noon. I remember looking over to her place from the school grounds and seeing a lot of people and I was told grandma had died. Ethel remembers other times tending grandma's chickens while she went to Salina and Aurora to visit her children. I used to think I looked like her but that wouldn't be possible becauses he was my step-grandmother.

KAREN MARIE'S STORY

I, Karen Marie Peders Datter (Danish for daughter), was born on an Estate called Meilhede. Gjottrup Soga, Thisted Amt ., West Hanherd, North Jeiliani, Denmark.

I was born of goodly parents. My father's name was Peter Christian Jensen. He was born on an Estate, Orum Thisted Amt. My mother was born in the same house I was. I was born April 12, 1829. My father died in 1837.

I was ten years old when I commenced working out. When I was 14, I began to take care of myself. I worked out until I was 19 years old. Then I built a brick house. Then I thought I would sit and weave and earn money enough to live on when I got old. I was very religious while young.

I often cried and prayed in my heart that I might die before I was 14 years old for we were taught that those who had held us in their Godmother's arms were the ones to answer for our sins until then. I was very ambitious. I worked until one o'clock every night, but I always read a chapter or two in the Testament before I went to bed.

I went to church every Sunday. Then the priest stood hollering about heaven and hell till he frightened me. I went home crying for I wanted to do the Lord's will but I didn' t know how and no one knew how to tell me.

I thought and wished many times that I might have lived when the Savior and his Apostles were upon the earth. They co uld have told me how to live, but now there was no one.

In 1854 there came two missionaries. They could tell me, and it took me six months to investigate and find out for sure.

Karen Marie and her sister, Margaret, lived in her little house. They talked often of what the missionaries had said , and they made a pact. When the first one died, she was t o come back and tell the other if Mormonism was true. Quite unexpectedly, Margaret died. One day as Karen Marie sat weaving, Margaret appeared, all she said was "Mormonism is true." Karen went immediately to be baptized. I was baptized in October 1855 in Olborg, and I immigrated to America on November 24, 1855.

Karen Marie came to America on the same ship as the Gottfredson's. She was 27 years old, unmarried with no family in America. When Elder Christiansen asked her to help the motherless Gottfredson family she didn't hesitate, but went immediately where she was needed. Her heart went out to those four children who were trying so valiantly to manage. Jens was working long hours to earn money to go on. Karen Marie moved in and soon the household was humming. She cleaned and cooked and cared for the children.

One day Brother Christiansen came back to see them. It was a big change and he smiled as he saw the well-scrubbed children and the neat house. He could smell bread baking. After dinner when the children were tucked in bed he talked to Jens and Karen Marie. "You should marry" he said. "It' s not right for an unmarried woman to live here."

It must have been very hard. Jens beloved Karen had been dead only a month. Karen Marie looked at Jens sad face. No , there was no question of love, but he needed her and she knew that a woman needed the care and protection of a husband in this rugged new land.

Jens looked at Karen Marie and thought about the changes she had made. A man could not do it alone. He needed a help mate, a mother, a wife. Slowly he looked up and caught her eye. Then nodded. It was right. On August 12, 1856 they were married by Elder Christian Christiansen who had manipulated the whole thing.

Every day now Jens was free to work at the foundry and Karen Marie was a good manager. All that year they saved and planned and talked of going to Utah. One day Elder Christiansen came to tell them about the handcart companies and tha the was going to lead one group. Jens and Karen Marie decided to go. Karen Marie was going to have a baby, but so were many others. They felt equal to any hardship. The children were more than eager to join their friends "Riding to Zion" on their stick horses.

One hundred twenty miles later the handcart company crossed the Loup Fork River to a camping spot. The Loup Fork wa s a tributary of the Platte River and six miles away was a Mormon settlement called Genoa. They camped in a lovely spot in the cottonwood trees. The river and the trees cooled the air that had been so hot. The women had struggled in their long dresses which pulled at their bodies and

gathered dirt from the wilderness paths upon which they had traveled. They had grown bone-weary from walking, walking in a cloud of dust raised by the handcarts. They had struggled to push and pull, and move boulders that blocked their way as they had pushed on.

Now in Nebraska they rested by the river, but not for long. The children welcomed a bath in the river. Women began washing clothes and soon the trees and bushes were loaded with drying clothes. Dinner was cooking over a campfire.

That night Karen Marie knew that her baby was going to be born, not on time but early. She woke Jens and sent him to find a woman who could help her. There on July 17, 1857 a baby girl was born. Karen Marie looked down at her first-born, a tiny delicate little child who looked at her with wise eyes. The tiny rosebud fingers curled around hers. For three days the fragile life clung to this world. The Elders blessed her and gave her the name of Platine for the river, and she died. Sadly they buried her beside the Platte River.

The handcart Company moved on, but Karen Marie was not able to travel. Jens lifted her on to their handcart and pulled her back over the river to the little community of Genoa. Jens staked off a quarter section of land on the side of the hill. He and the boys dug out a shelter, unloaded the handcart and arranged all provisions around the dugout so the family could use them.

He cautioned each child to help their mother, to be good an

d told them how much he needed their help. He hugged Kare n Marie and left them to go to Omaha. He took the handcar t in which he planned to bring back supplies so that they m ight proceed to Utah.

Karen budgeted supplies and kept an eagle-eye out for anything edible, but as the summer drew to a close, so did their supplies. The boys walked along Beaver Creek to gather wild berries and plums. A neighbor gave her some corn that had been damaged by the frost. Another gave her some buckwheat. She ground it in a coffee mill and for a month they barely survived. Then in September Jens was able to send a sack of flour and bacon.

By November their food was nearly gone and as Karen looked at the children she saw starvation and the bitter cold of winter ahead. She knew they must leave or perish. She hired a man with a yoke of oxen to take the family to Omaha.

The next spring news traveled through the Mormon camps that Johnson's Army was heading for Zion to fight the Mormon s and wipe out polygamy. Their Nebraska neighbors warned th em to stay away. How could you travel with an army bound t o fight your people? Jens and Karen Marie saw only that this was a chance to go on, and they were determined to try a gain.

About that time a small company of Danish emigrants came from Denmark. What excitement for the Gottfredsons. Karen Marie's sister and brother were in that group. Peder had brought his wife and Karen's sister was engaged to Rasmus Olsen who was better off than most of the emigrants, he was a loving, generous man. He had a new Schuttler wagon and four yoke of oxen, best of all he was very willing to take the Gottfredsons along.

There were just six wagons in this company and they were led by Iver N. Iverson, a missionary who was returning to Pleasant Grove. Two other men had wagons filled with merchandise to furnish their pioneer homes.

Shortly before they reached Fort Laramie they met a group of soldiers bound for Utah. The soldiers had been back east to get supplies for Johnson's Army. The emigrants traveled with them until they reached Sweetwater, Wyoming. The army allowed them to camp just outside their picket lines. The soldiers made friends with the families, and especially liked the children. Often times they would bring over so me groceries to share.

It helped to let the soldiers night-herd their oxen along with the army stock. The soldiers used big mule teams.

The journey was going so well it was almost too good to last. Sure enough, trouble came again to delay them. Some of their oxen drank alkaline water and died. Now there were just not enough oxen to pull the heavily loaded wagons.

They unloaded everything and carefully sorted through their belongings to decide what could be left behind. All heavy things had to be abandoned. Stoves were the first to go. The pioneers buried them in hopes that they could come back and get them. Everyone able to walk did so.

Peter was now 12 years old, an adventuresome sort of boy who had proved to be a big help to the soldiers. They invite d him to go along with them to help drive the loose stock , Jens let him go. What adventure! Peters eyes shone. The soldiers gave him a mule to ride. He felt mighty important as he rode off, waving goodby to Hans, Christine and Joe.

The troops could travel much faster than the crippled Mormo

n company. Peter was waiting for his family when they final ly arrived at Fort Bridger.

Jens and Karen Marie arrived in Salt Lake City on September 20, 1858. It was a strange sight, a city deserted. Abandoned homes stared with blank windows as the pioneers drove s lowly through the city. People had moved south fearing Johnson's Army. Houses could be bought for almost nothing.

Jens was not a polygamist and his experiences with the soldiers had all been good. He bought a house and lot containing 1-1/4 acres on 5th South and 5th East for $60.00. He paid for it with a plush overcoat valued at $30.00 and a Colt revolver that Hans had found on the plains valued at $30. 00.

The house was one large room built of adobe bricks and slab with a dirt roof. It was a real joy to be in a home once more. The following summer Jens planted wheat and ha d a bumper crop of 35 bushels worth $2.00 per bushel. What a windfall.

In Salt Lake Jens at last had a chance to work at his Cooper's trade. He made casks, barrels, kegs, tubs, and that fall there was a fair. He entered his work and took first prize, and again in 1859. Things were looking better.

That same year Karen Marie had a baby girl and named her Caroline. She was now thirty years old.

The children set out to do odd jobs. Peter was 13 and could do a man's work. Hans was 11, Christine 9, and Joe was 7 . They started school and as soon as school let out in the spring Peter got a job. That summer he earned enough money to buy a young cow and an old wagon.

All of Jens older children loved Karen Marie as their own mother. As a Danish woman she was obedient to her husband , but Jens had a temper and Karen Marie had a hard time when she felt he was too harsh with the children. One day when Hans had been disobedient, Jens decided to take him out to the woodshed to give him an old fashioned whipping. Karen Marie’s tender heart could not bear it and she got between Jens and Hans. In his anger Jens struck Karen Marie. There was dead silence, and then Jens turned and rushed from the house. Karen Marie looked thunder struck and went by herself outside.

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Karen Marie Pederson's Timeline

1829
April 12, 1829
Denmark
1857
July 17, 1857
Age 28
1859
February 15, 1859
Age 29
Salt Lake City, SLC, Utah, United States
1860
November 1, 1860
Age 31
1862
December 3, 1862
Age 33
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah, United States
1864
1864
Age 34
1866
June 24, 1866
Age 37
1867
November 6, 1867
Age 38
1898
March 9, 1898
Age 68
Vermilion, Sevier, Utah, United States