Lieut. Anthony Morse II

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Lieut. Anthony Morse, II

Birthdate: (79)
Birthplace: Marlborough, Wiltshire, England
Death: October 12, 1686 (79)
Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
Place of Burial: Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Anthony Morse, I and Christian Morse
Husband of Ann Elizabeth Morse (Cox)
Father of Lt. Anthony Morse, III; Richard Morse; Joseph Morse, Sr; Benjamin Morse; Robert Morse, Sr and 7 others
Brother of Elinor Germbrey; Nicholas Morse; William Morse and Philip Morse

Occupation: Shoemaker arrived in Mass 1635
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Lieut. Anthony Morse II

The Pioneers of Massachusetts,

  1. 52 on the https://www.geni.com/projects/First-Settlers-of-Newbury-Massachusetts-1635/12191 List

Anthony, shoemaker, of Marlborough, Eng., came in the James April 5, 1635. Settled at Newbury. Farm. May 25, 1636.

Prope.. He deposed 9 May, 1665, age about 58 years. Wife ( Mary) ch. recorded

His will dated 29 April, 1680, prob. 23 Nov. 1686, beq. to sons Robert, Peter,, Anthony Joseph, Benjamin and Joshua and their children; to daus. Thurlo, Stickney, Newman and Smith, or their ch.; to dau. Reccea Horns; to gr. ch Rich. Thurlo. Signed Anthony Morse.

Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families page 187

Morse, Anthony, Newbury came in the James in 1635,, and by wife Mary, had Anthony, Benjamin, Sarah, Hannah, Lydia, Mary, Esther and Joshua.


Traveled to the Massachusetts colony in 1635 on the ship "James" with his brother William, Settled in Newbury


Anthony and his brother, William, came to America from Marlborough, Wiltshire, England (no evidence of his place of residence) sailing from London on the ship James arriving in Boston, MA, 3 June 1635. Anthony settled in Newbury, MA, where he built a house in what is called "Newbury Old Town" on a slight "eminence" in a field about half a mile south of the old cemetery. I have read that it is still known as "Morse's Field."

Anthony and his brother were shoemakers. Anthony was made a "freeman" in 1636 and took the oath of allegiance in 1678. He and his wife were members of the Newbury, MA, church in 1674. It states in one of the town records that Anthony Morse, Senior, is to keep the meeting house and ring the bell and "see that the house be cleane swept, and the glasse of the windows to be carefully look't unto, if any should happen to be loosed with the wind, to be nailed close again."

I have found several different sources listing the children of Anthony Morse, none of them say by which wife, and the lists do not agree completely as to names and dates. I have not been able to research these lists of names and dates in person. Perhaps a future family historian might be able to correct any errors herein as more information is gathered, compared, and collated on computers.


Arrived in Boston on the "JAMES" in 1635


http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mainegenie/MORSE.htm

______________________________________________________

http://minerdescent.com/2010/06/05/anthony-morse/ Anthony MORSE (1607 – 1686) Anthony Morse was born 6 May 1607, at Marlborough, Wiltshire, England. His parents were Anthony MORSE Sr. and Christian [__?__]. He married Ann COX on 2 May 1629 at St Mary the Virgin, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England.

Parents

   Anthony MORSS (MORSE) ca 1580-1620 (Shoemaker)
   Christina (Christian) BELLSIRE ca 1590-

The family sailed to the Massachusetts colony aboard the ship James from London in April 5, 1635. Anthony’s brother William was also aboard and also listed as a shoemaker. Anthony died on 12 Oct 1686 at Newbury, Essex., Mass.

Ann Cox born about 1607 in Marlborough, Wiltshire, England. Her parents were Ambrose COX and Alice HEALE. Ann died 8 Mar 1680 in Newberry, Mass.

Some genealogies say Anthony second married Eliabeth Waldron (Waldro). This is a confusion of a cousin of the same name Anthony Morice who married An Waldro 27 Nov 1616 in St Mary’s, Marlborough, Wiltshire. They had six children between 1617 and 1628, all baptized at St Mary’s, Marlborough: Elizabeth,. Anthony, Margaret, William, John and Joseph. No burial of either appears so far as records published show.

Children of Anthony and Ann : Name Born Married Departed 1. Robert Morse 27 Dec 1629 Marlborough Wiltshire, England Anne Lewis 20 Oct 1654 Newbury 3 Feb 1700/01 Elizabethtown, NJ 2. Esther Morse 4 Dec 1630 Marlborough 3. Anthony Morse 29 Jan 1631/32 Marlborough Elizabeth Knight 8 MAY 1660 Newbury, Mass. . Mary Barnard 10 Nov 1669 in Newberry, Essex, Mass 25 Feb 1677/78 Newbury 4. Anne MORSE baptized 6 Feb 1633/34 Marlborough Francis THURLOW 5 Feb 1654/55 Newbury a 1681/82 5. Richard Morse 6 Dec 1635 6. Peter Morse c 1636/37 Newbury 26 Oct 1701 7. Joseph Morse c 1637/38 Newbury Mary Woodhouse 1667 in Newbury, Essex, Mass 15 Jan 1678/79 Newbury 8. Benjamin Morse 28 Mar 1640 Newbury Ruth Sawyer 27 Aug 1667 Newbury 22 Jun 1714 Newbury 9. Sarah Morse 1 May 1641 Newbury Amos Stickney 24 Jun 1663 Newbury . Stephen Ackerman 17 Dec 1684 Newbury 7 Dec 1711 Newbury 10. Hannah MORSE c 1644/45 Newbury Thomas NEWMAN 8 Jun 1665 Ipswich, Mass. b 1679/80 11. Lydia Morse 7 Oct 1647 Newbury 19 May 1648 Newbury 12. Mary Morse 9 Apr 1649 Newbury 14 Jun 1662 Newbury 13. Esther Morse 3 May 1651 Newbury Robert Holmes 26 Feb 1668/69 Newbury . Thomas Smith 25 Oct 1675 in Ipswich, Essex, Mass ~ 1689/90 14. Joshua Morse 24 Jul 1653 Newbury Joanna Kimball 1680 Newbury Aft. Mar 1720/21 Newbury

________________________________

Issue-

I. Robert- bpt. 27 Dec. 1629, St. Mary's Marlborough, m.1. Eliabeth ______, 2. 30 Oct. 1654 Newubury, Ann Lewis, d. after 3 Feb. 1700/01 Elizabeth NJ. II. Esther- bpt 4. Dec. 1631, St. Mary's Marlborough III. Anthony- bpt. 29 Jan. 1631/32, St. Mary's Marlborough, m.1. 8 May 1660 Newbury, Elizabeth Knight (d. 29 July 1667 Newbury), 2. 10 Nov. 1669 Newbury, Mary Barnard, d. 22 Feb. 1676/77 Newbury, MA. IV. Anne- bpt. 16 Feb. 1633/34, St. Peters Parish, Marlborough, m. 5 Feb. 1654/5 Newbury, Francis Thurlow, d. after 1682 . V. Richard- bpt. 6 Dec. 1635 VI. Peter- b.c. 1637; m. Mary ______, d.c. 1702 Rahway, NJ. 4VII. BENJAMIN- b. 4 Mar. 1639/40, Newbury, MA, m. 27 Aug. 1667 Newbury, RUTH SAWYER, d. after 1707 VIII. Sarah- b. 1 May 1641, Newbury, m.1. 24 June 1663 Newbury, Amos Stickney, 2. 17 Dec. 1684 Newbury, Stephan Acreman, d. 7 Dec. 1711, Newbury, MA IX. Joseph- b.c. 1643, m. Mary ______, d. 15 Jan. 1678/79 Newbury X. Hannah- b. 1645 Newbury, m. 8 June 1665 Ipswich,Thomas Newman, d. before 1680 XI. Lydia- b. 7 Oct. 1647 Newbury, d. 19 May 1648 XII. Mary- b. 9 Apr. 1649 Newbury, d. 14 June 1662 Newbury XIII. Esther- b. 3 May 1651 Newbury, m.1 26 Feb. 1667/8 Newbury, Robert Holmes, m. 2. c.1675 Thomas Smith, d. after 1690 XIV. Joshua- b. 24 July 1653 Newbury, m.c.1680 Joanna Kimball, d. 28 Mar. 1691 Newbury

Ref:

(1) Winthrop Journal- Vol. I, p. 156 (2) Essex County Court- docket No. 18903

Descendants of Samuel MOrse of Worthington, Massachusetts- Harriet Morse Weeks, Eagle Printing, Pittsfield, MA, 1907


Anthony & his brother William on the ship 'James', April 5, 1635. They were shoemakers in Newbury. Williams wife, Elizabeth was on trial several times for witchcraft in the 1670's.

Anthony Mors was born about 1607, as he deposed May 9, 1665 that his age was about 58.[1] He was "of Marlborough," however the place of his birth is not certain. The Planters of the Commonwealth[2], shows that the ship "James" of London, William Cooper, Master, three hundred tons, sailed from Southampton April 5, 1635, and arrived June 3 with passengers and cattle. The manifest includes Anthony Morse age 29 of Marlborough, county Wilts, shoemaker destined for Newbury. The next line has Mrs. Mary Morse indented as it would for a wife. Also coming on this ship was William Morse of Marlborough, county Wilts, Shoemaker also destined for Newbury.

Robert Charles Anderson in The Great Migration Begins mentions only one wife, Ann Cox, to whom Anthony was married on May 2, 1629 at St. Mary's, Marlborough, Wiltshire. Anderson attributes all children to Ann, showing that the oldest child, Robert, was christened at the same church on December 27, 1629.[3] However, in the Genealogical Dictionary of New England, Savage attributes all children to a first wife who he says was Mary, and he states that Ann was the second wife.[4] Henry Dutch Lord indicates that Anthony had two wives but does not specify which children were born to which wife. Lord indicates that Anthony remarried while still in England.[5]

Cutter in his "Historic Homes" gives the following, with no citation for the information: "Anthony Morse, the immigrant ancestor of the honorable family of Morse in America, was born about 1606, son of Anthony Morse of Marlborough, England, born about 1575. ... Anthony Morse, Jr., came from Wiltshire, England, to the New England Colonies, taking ship at Southampton, England, on board the "Susan and Ellen," March 11, 1635, and having as fellow passengers the Thomas Parker Colony, and Morse landed with them and other colonists in (Lynn), Massachusetts Bay Colony, in 1635, and settled in Newbury." [6] Anthony was a devout Puritan who had tried to continue in the Established Church until his emigration to New England. One of the early and best know New England ministers, Rev. Abner Morse says this of Anthony. "...he was a man of moral courage, energy and perseverance; that he was enterprising and capable in business, and laid the foundation of the competence and wealth of his family; that he was called to public trusts of civil and sacred character; that he reared pious and distinguished children; led a long life of strict integrity and humble piety, fearing God and loving his people, no one can doubt who attends to the records of the community in which he lived and died."[7] He lived about 1/2 mile from the most ancient cemetery in Newbury, Massachusetts. His home was located on a slight hill in a field still called Morse Field.[8]

 Will[9] 

Anthony's Will was dated April 29, 1680, and is on file at Salem, but never recorded, although some give a probate date of November 23, 1686. He made bequests to : • sons Robert, Peter, Anthony, Joseph, Benjamin and Joshua and their children • daughters Thurlo, Stikney, Newman and Smith or their children • daughter Rebecca Homs • grandchild Rich Thurlo, grandson Robard.

"The last Will and Testament of Anthony Morse of Newbury, Mass. I anthony Morse of Newbury in the name of god amen i being sensible of my own frality and mortality being of parfit memory due make this as my last Will and testament cominding my sole to god that gaue it and my body to the dust in hope of a joyful rasurixtion and as for my wourly goods I dispose of as foloieth,

"I gue and bequeth to my son Joshua Morse making him my lawful eaire all my housing and lands both upland and meddow with my freehould and privilidge in all comon lands both upland and meddow alweais provided that if the toen of Newbury dou divide any part of the comon lands that then the on half part of that land which belongeth to me which cometh by uartu of my freehould shall be the lawful inheritance of my son benieman morse all so I geue to my son Joshua morse all mv cattell an horsis and sheep swuine and all my toules for the shumaking trade as allso my carte wheles dung pot plow harrow youkes chains houes forkes shovel spad grin stone yt as allso on father bed which he lieth on with a bouister and pillo and a pair of blinkets and covrlitt and tou pair of shetes a bed sted and mat a pot and a brass cetell the best of tou cettles and a belmetell scillet and tou platars and a paringer and a drinking pot and tou spoons and the water pails and barils and tobes all these about named I geue to my son Joshua and his eaires of his own body begoten lawfully than then all aboue geuen to my son Joshua shall Return to the Rest of my children upon the peayment on good peay to my sons widow besides what estate she att any time brought to her husband she the said widdo shall enjoy the houl estate on half year before she shall surrender - also I geue to my son Robard Morse Eighteen pounds or his children to my son Peter morse or children £3, to my son Anthony morse children I geue £L3 to my son Joseph morses children I geue £12 to my son Benieman Morse or children I geue £12 to my dafter Thorlo or children £12 to my dafter Stickney or children I geue £12 to my dafter Newman children I geue £12. to my dafter Smith or children I gieu £12. to my grand son Richard Thorlo I geue an sheep to my grandson Robard Homes I gieu fieu pounds allso I geue the Remainder of my housall which is not in partikelar geuen to my son Joshua in the former part of this my will to all my children equally to be devided between them and my grand children hous parents are dead, namely anthonys children, Josephs children hanahs children, allso I dou by this my last will allow and geue loberty to my son Joshua morse hou is my Eaire to make sail and dispose of that land by the pine swamp which I had of Benieman lacon of that pece of land by John Akisons hous if he see Resan so to do. allso I du by this will apoynt my son Joshua morse to be my sole executor to peay all debtes and legacies by this will geuen and to Receue all debtes allso I dou apoynt my louing and crisian frinds Cap danil Pears and Tristram Coffin and thomas noyes to be oversers of this my last Will Allso I dou apoynt my Exicutor to peay my son Robard and son peter within on yeare after my death on the other to be peaid within three years the plas of peayment to be newbury my will is that my son benieman shal haue the on half of all comon lands when devided as above said in witnes thereof I anthony morse have hearunto Set my hand and seall this 28 Aprell, 1680. "ANTHONY MORSE (seal) "Sinid selid and onid in the presense of us JAMES COFFIN MARY BROWN that whereas I anthony morse in this my will abou said have geuen on half of all comon lands if devided to my sonn benieman mors; my meaning iss that my sonn benieman shall haeu the on half of my proportion of lands when devided, but my sonn Joshua to haeu all my Rights in the lower comon this is my mind and will as witnes my seall this 20 of aprell 1680 ANTHONY MORSE (seal) "Witness to this part of my Will James Coffin Mary Brown

"Joshua Morse is allowed Exer to this will."

The inventory of the estate was worth £348 6s 7d.

 Sources 

• Source: S22 Title: Great Migration 1634-1635, M-P. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2010.) Originally published as: The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume V, M-P, by Robert Charles Anderson. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2007. • Source: S24 Abner Morse. Memorial of the Morses. Boston, Mass: William Veazie, 1850. Open Library 1.↑ #S22 Page 161 2.↑ Charles Howard Banks. The Planters of the Commonwealth. Genealogical Publishing Co., 1930; reprinted 1997. [ ] , Page 135-136 3.↑ #S22 Page 159 4.↑ Savage, James. A genealogical dictionary of the first settlers of New England. Vol. 3, K-R. Boston: Little, Brown and company, 1860. Open Library Page 237 5.↑ Lord, Henry Dutch. Memorial of the family of Morse compiled from the original records for the Honorable Asa Porter Morse by Henry Dutch Lord. original: Harvard Printing; microreproduction: Salt Lake City, Utah : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1977, 1896. FamilySearch.org Pages 40ff 6.↑ William Richard Cutter. Historic Homes and Places and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Middlesex County Massachusetts. Vol. 2. Lewis Historical Publishing Co., 1908. GoogleBooks Page 417 7.↑ #S24 Appendix LXXIX 8.↑ #S24 Appendix LXXIX 9.↑ Morse, J. Howard. Morse genealogy : comprising the descendants of Samuel Anthony, William, and Joseph Morse and John Moss : being a revision of the Memorial of the Morses published by Rev. Abner Morse in 1850. New York: unknown, 1903; Pages 1-2 of section on Anthony Morse Sr.


https://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bakerpublic&id=I28501

Name: Anthony Morse 1 Sex: M Birth: 09 MAY 1606 in Marlborough, Wiltshire, England 1 Death: 12 OCT 1686 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, USA 1

Note:

   Morse, Anthony (1606 - 1686) - male
   b. 9 MAY 1606 in Marlborough, Wiltshire, England
   d. 12 OCT 1686 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
   Oath of allegiance 1678.
   Came from Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, and settled in Newbury in 1635. With his brother William, both registering as shoemakers, he sailed in the ship James from London, April 5, 1635. He built a house about half a mile south of the old cemetery, in what is called Newbury Old Town, on a slight eminence in a field which was later owned by Michael Little, and which is still called Morse's field; traces of his house are still visible a few rods from the road.
   spouse: Cox, Ann (*1611 - )
   - m. 2 MAY 1629 in Marlborough, Wiltshire, England
   ----------child: Morse, Ann (~1635 - >1680)
   ----------child: Morse, Anthony (*1636 - 1678)
   ----------child: Morse, Joseph (~1638 - )
   ----------child: Morse, Benjamin (1640 - <1716)
   ----------child: Morse, Robert (*1641 - )
   ----------child: Morse, Sarah (1641 - 1711)
   ----------child: Morse, ? (*1641 - )
   ----------child: Morse, Peter (*1641 - )
   ----------child: Morse, Hannah (1642 - <1680)
   ----------child: Morse, Lydia (1647 - 1648)
   ----------child: Morse, Mary (1649 - 1662)
   ----------child: Morse, Esther (1651 - )
   ----------child: Morse, Joshua (1653 - 1692)
   spouse: [Morse], Mary (*1610 - )
   - m. BEF 1629
   -------------------------------------------------------------
   ORIGIN: Marlborough, Wiltshire.
   MIGRATION: 1635 on the James (on or about 5 April 1635, "Anthony Morse" and "William Morse," of "Marlborough, shoemakers," were adjacent entries in the passenger list of the James, about to set sail from Southampton for New England [Drake's Founders 56]).
   FIRST RESIDENCE: Newbury.
   OCCUPATION: Shoemaker [Drake's Founders 56].
   CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: Admission to Newbury church prior to 3 March 1635/6 implied by freemanship. In the 1671 Newbury church dispute between Rev. Thomas Parker and Edward Woodman, William Morse sided with Parker [EQC 4:350-67].
   FREEMAN: 3 March 1635/6 (as "Will[ia]m Mosse") [MBCR 1:371].
   EDUCATION: Signed the petition of 23 April 1677 [EQC 6:260]. His inventory included "wearing apparel & books, . a hat & gun & 4 chairs," valued at ?3 15s. [EPR 304:51].
   OFFICEHOLDING: Ipswich petit jury, 28 March 1648, 31 March 1657, 26 September 1665, 24 September 1667, 31 March 1668, 29 September 1668, 28 September 1669, 26 March 1672, 24 September 1672, 26 September 1676 [EQC 1:139, 2:11, 3:270, 436, 4:1, 46, 175, 5:1, 79, 6:196].
   His inventory included "wearing apparel & books, . a hat & gun & 4 chairs," valued at ?3 15s. [EPR 304:51].
   ESTATE: On 10 February 1664[/5?], "William Morse of Newbury . and Elizabeth my wife" sold to "John Baily of the abovesaid town . a parcel of dividend land in the plains of Newbury containing by estimation seven acres and a half acre . of upland being part of my dividend land" [ILR 3:262].
   In his will, dated 8 August 1683 and proved 25 March 1684, "William Morse of Newbury" bequeathed to "my beloved wife during her natural life my house & barn, & and all my land adjoining to the house & all my marsh & meadows which I have in Newbury with my freehold, . as also all my living stock of cattle, & all my household goods & all other utensils and after my wife's death all abovenamed I give to my daughter Abigail Hendrick, & her children if she die before my wife, she or they paying these legacies following to the rest of my children within three years after my wife's decease"; to "my son Jonathan Morse five shillings"; to "Obadiah Morse 20 shillings"; to "my daughter Eliz[a]b[eth] 5s. & to her four children I give 20 shillings apiece"; to "my daughter Han[n]ah three pounds & to her son John Stiles five pounds"; "my daughter Abigail & her husband Jno. Hendrick [to] live as they now do with my wife, for the managing that estate I leave them for the comfort & supply of my wife in her age & if my son-in-law John Hendrick & his wife or their children do neglect or refuse to take such care of my wife in providing for her as need doth require for her comfortable supply on all accounts while she doth live that then I do hereby will & empower my overseers hereafter named to sell & dispose of any part of my meadows as they shall think meet for the supply of my wife to help her with what she doth need"; "my wife & my son-in-law John Hendrick & my daughter Abigail Hendrick" to be executors; "my loving friends Capt. Dan[ie]ll Pearce & Tristram Coffin & Nathan[ie]ll Clarke" to be overseers [EPR 304:50].
   The inventory of the estate of "William Morse late of Newbury," presented at court on 25 March 1684, totalled ?137 2s., of which ?100 was real estate: "his dwelling house & three acres of land & ? adjoining & freehold & fourteen acres of meadow," ?100 [EPR 304:51].
   BIRTH: Baptized St. Peters, Marlborough, Wiltshire, 17 May 1614 [Pillsbury Anc 55] (deposed in late 1679 or early 1680 "aged about sixty-five years" [EQC 7:355]; deposed on 27 March 1682 "aged sixty-seven years" [EQC 8:263, 289]), son of Anthony Morse [Pillsbury Anc 54-55].
   DEATH: Newbury 29 November 1683 [EQC 9:166].
   MARRIAGE: By about 1640 Elizabeth _____. She died after 8 August 1683 [EPR 304:50].
   CHILDREN:
   ELIZABETH MORSE, b. say 1640; on 8 August 1683, "my daughter Eliz[a]b[eth] . & . her four children" received bequests in the will of William Morse [EPR 304:50]; her husband has not been identified.
   HANNAH MORSE, b. Newbury 6 March 1641[/2?]; m. by 1669 m. John Stiles (eldest known child b. Boston 31 March 1669 [BVR 112]).
   JONATHAN MORSE, b. say 1644; m. Newbury 3 May 1671 Mary Clarke.
   OBADIAH MORSE, b. about 1646 (aged 49 in 1694 [GDMNH 495, source not stated]; aged about 66 in 1713 [GDMNH 495, source not stated]); m. by 1670 Elizabeth Rawlins, daughter of JAMES RAWLINS {1633, Newbury} [GDMNH 495, 595; GMB 3:1552-55].
   TIMOTHY MORSE, b. Newbury 16 June 1648; d. Newbury 10 December 1659.
   ABIGAIL MORSE, b. Newbury 14 February 1651; m. (1) by 1678 John Hendrick (eldest known child b. Newbury 21 October 1678); m. (2) by 1695 Moses Pingry. (On 16 September 1676, Hannah, daughter of Abigail Morse, was born at Newbury. On 26 September 1676, "Richard Woolery being the reputed father of the child of Abigail Morse, court ordered that he pay to her 3s. per week in corn toward the maintenance of the child, and to give security or be committed to prison [EQC 6:206]. On 27 March 1677, "Abigaill Morse was ordered to be whipped for fornication unless she pay a fine" [EQC 6:256].)
   ASSOCIATIONS: William Morse was brother of ANTHONY MORSE {1635, Newbury} [Pillsbury Anc 55]. On 8 November 1679, in the course of the witchcraft accusations brought by William Morse and his wife, "Anthony Mores testified that occasionally being at his brother's house he was a witness to the things which had happened there" [EQC 7:359].
   COMMENTS: In his will, aside from the initial bequest to his daughter Abigail, William Morse named his children in the following order: Jonathan, Obadiah, Elizabeth, Hannah and Abigail [EQC 304:50]. Given the chronological information available for these children, we conclude that William Morse first named his sons in birth order, then his daughters in birth order. On this basis we have placed Elizabeth as the eldest child.
   Savage included among the children of William Morse "Elizabeth who died 18 March 1655" and "probably Edmund" [Savage 3:242]. Unless the daughter Elizabeth named in the will of William Morse is a second daughter of that name, born after the death of the first, this death record must pertain to an Elizabeth of some other family. There are two good reasons to believe that the Elizabeth who died in 1655 was not of this family. First, the death record does not state that she was daughter of William, which it would normally have done for a child not yet sixteen. Second, as noted above, the order in which the daughters were named in the will indicates that Elizabeth was the eldest daughter.
   There was an Edmund Moore or Mooers in the early Newbury records. His surname is sometimes, but not often given as Morse, but the frequency of other spellings argues that he was not a Morse and not related to William Morse.
   On 23 April 1677, William Morse was one of seventy-nine Newbury men who signed a petition asking the court to mitigate the sentence imposed on three young Newbury men who had vanalized the meeting house [EQC 6:260].
   From late 1679 into early 1681, William Morse and his wife were embroiled in a series of accusations of witchcraft. In late 1679 their grandson John Stiles was living with them, and they began to experience a series of supernatural afflictions, involving household objects flying about. A transient mariner, Caleb Powell, claimed to have the power to correct the problem, which he thought was the work of John Stiles. In the short run Powell made good on his claims, but was then himself suspected of practicing the black arts. As the proceedings against him advanced, the tables were turned, and Elizabeth Morse was accused of witchcraft. Many depositions were gathered, reciting events of the previous two decades which could be interpreted as witchery on her part. She was tried at Boston, convicted as a witch and sentenced to be executed. She languished in jail for the better part of a year, then, in 1681 was allowed to go home. Although never formally exonerated, she was not troubled with further legal proceedings and died a natural death [EQC 7:355-57; RCA 1:159, 189-90; Magnalia 2:450-52; Witchhunting 230-59; Entertaining Satan 132-52].
   --------------------------------------------------------------
   Anthony arrived at Boston with his brother William, on the "James" June 3, 1635 which sailed from Southampton on April 5, 1635.
   Anthony built a house about 1/2 mile south of the cemetery in what is now called Newbury old town. He is listed along with his brother on the ship's passenger roster as being a shoemaker. He was admitted as a Freeman May 25, 1636.
   Last Will and Testament of Anthony Morse of Newbury, Mass
   I anthony Morss of Newbury in the name of god amen i being sensible of my own frality and mortality being of parfit memory due make this as my last will and testamnet cominding my sole to god that gave it and my body to the dust in hope of a joyful resurixition and as for my wourly good I dispose of as foloieth.
   I gve and bequeth to my son Joshua Morse making him my lawful eaire all my housing and lands both upland and meddow with my freehould and privilidge in all comon land both upland and meddow alweais provided that it the town of Newbury dou divide any part of the comon lands that then the on half part of that land which belongeth to me which cometh by vartu of my freehould shall be the lawful inheritance of my son benieman (Benjamin)morse all so I geve to my son Joshua morse all my cattell an horsis and sheep, swuine and all my toules for the shumaking trade as allso my carte wheles dung pot plow harrow youkes chains houses forkes shovel spad grin stone yt as allso on father bed which he lieth on with a bouister and pillo and a pair of blinkets and covrlitt and tou pair of shetes scillet and to platars and a paringer and a drinking pot and tou spoons and the water pails and barils and tobes all these about named I geve to my son Joshua and his eaires of his own body begotten lawfully than then all aboue geven to my son Joshua shall Return to the Rest of my children upon the peayment on good peay to my sons widow besides waht estate she att any time brought to her husband she the said widdow shall enjoy the houl estate on half year before she shall surrenter - also I geve to my son Robard (Robert) Morse Eighteen pounds or his children to my son Peter Morse or children L3, to my son Anthony Morse children I geve L3 to my son Joseph Morses children I geve L12 to my son Benieman Morse or children I geve L12 to my dafter Thorlo or children L12 to my dafter Skickney or children I geve L12 to my dafter Newman children I geve L12 to my dafter Smith or children I geve L12 to my grandson Richard Thorlo I geve an sheep, to my grandson Robard Homes I giev fiev pounds allso I geve the Remainder of my housall which is not in partikelar geven to my son Joshua in the former part of this my will to all my children equally to be devided between them and my grand children hous parents are dead, namely anthonys children, Josephs children hanahs children, allso I dou by this my last will allow and geve loberty to mu son Joshua morse hou is my Eaire to make said and dispose of that land by the pine swamp which I had of Nenieman lacon of that pece of land by John Akisons hous if he see Resan so to do. also I du by this my will apoynt my son Joshua morse to be my sole esecutor to peay all debts and legacies by this will geven and to Rceve all debtes allso I dou apoynt my loving and crisian frinds Cap danil Pears and Tristram Coffin and thomas noyes to be oversers of this my last will also I dou apoynt my Exicutor to peay my son Robard and son peter within one yeare after my death on the the other to be peaid within three years the plas of peayment to be newbury my will is tyhat my son benieman shall have the on half of all comon lands when devided as above said in witness thereof I anthony morse have hereunto Set my hand and seall this 28th Aprell, 1680.
   Sinid selid and onid in the presense of us
   James Coffin
   Mary Brown
   that whereas I anthong Morse in this my will abou said have geven on half of all common lands if devided to my sonn benieman mors; my meaning iss that my sons benieman shall haev the on half of my proportion of lands when devided, but my sonn Joshua to haev all my Rights in the lower comon this is my mind and will as witnes my seall this 20 of aprell 1680.
   Anthony Morse (Seal)
   Witness to this part of my will
   James Coffin
   Mary Brown
   Joshua Morse is allowed Exer to this will.
   from - The Morse Genealogy, 1903-05 - Will is on file at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts.
   From History of Newbury - Newbury MA Web site:
   The settlers of Newbury were much like those of what is now northern Essex county. They were not religious enthusiasts or pilgrims who fled from religious persecution in England. The were substantial, law abiding, loyal English tradesmen of that staunch middle class that was the backbone of England.
   Those that settled Newbury came at different times and on different ships between the end of April 1634 and July 1635. In one of the first ships arriving in 1645, was Thomas Parker, a minister who came along with a small company of settlers. They were first at Agawan (Ipswich) and later along with their countrymen, who came from Wiltshire England to Newbury.
   The first settlers came by water from Ipswich through Plum Island Sound and up the Quascacunquen River, which was later renamed the Parker River. There had been a few fisherman occupying the banks of the Merrimac and Parker rivers before this, but they were not permanent settlers. These settlers came to New bury in May or June of 1635. Ships from England began to arrive almost immediately with cattle and more settlers. Governor Winthrop in his history of New England under the date of June 3, 1635, records the arrival of two ships with Dutch cattle along with the ship James from Southampton bringing more settlers.
   Newbury was therefore begun as a stock raising enterprise and the settlers came to engage in that business and to establish homes for themselves. In total 15 ships came in June and one each in August, November and December, bringing still more families to the settlement.
   There is no record of how many families arrived in the first year. Houses were erected on both sides of the Parker River. The principal settlement was around the meeting house on the lower green. The first church in Newbury could not have been formed before June as some of those recorded at its formation are not recorded as having arrived until June.
   In the division of land, the first settlers recognized the scripture rule "to him that hath shall be given" and the wealth of each grantee can be estimated by the number of acres given him.
   The reason for establishing Newbury, as stated above, was not from fleeing religious persecutions, but to utilize vacant lands and to establish a profitable business for the members of a stock-raising company.
   When they arrived in Massachusetts, the settlers found that the state had established the Congregational form of religion. Everyone was taxed to support the Congregational Society and was commanded to attend worship at the meeting house. The Reverend Thomas Parker was a member of the stock raising company and was also the minister of the settlers.
   The outlying settlers had a long journey to the meeting house. The congregations were in danger of attacks from Indians and wild beasts on their way to and from worship. There was a constant dread of attack during the time of services and all able bodied inhabitants were required to bring their weapons to church. Sentinels were posted at the doors.
   In spite of the hardship and danger, the population steadily increased in number and gradually improved its worldly condition. Being cramped for room, the settlers moved up to the upper or training green. This was in order to get tillable land and engage in commercial pursuits. This movement began in 1642. Each had been allotted half an acre for a building lot on the lower green. On the upper green each was to have four acres for a house lot. Also on the upper green a new pond was artificially formed for watering cattle.
   The new town gradually extended along the Merrimac River to the mouth of the Artichoke River. It appears that all desirable land in this region was apportioned among the freeholders by October 1646. The land beyond was ordered to lie perpetually common. This tract of common land was a part of Newbury and what is now West Newbury. The Indian threat had disappeared as most of the Indians in the region had been exterminated by an epidemic. The first record of an Indian living in Newbury is in January 1644, when a lot was granted to "John Indian".
   In 1639 Edward Rawson began the manufacture of gun powder in what was probably America's first powder mill.
   Newbury had a trial for witchcraft thirteen years before the trials in Salem. In 1679 Elizabeth Morse, sister-in-law to our ancestor, Anthony, was accused. She was condemned three times to die, but was reprieved and spent her last years in her home at what is now Market square in Newburyport.
   The first American born silversmith was Jeremiah Dummer of Newbury, who apprenticed to John Hull, an Englishman. He practiced his trade at what is now Newburyport. Jeremiah was the father of Governor William Dummer the founder of Gov. Dummer Academy. Jeremiah's brother-in-law John Coney, engraved the plates for the first paper money made in America.
   In 1686, when the upper Commons (West Newbury) were divided among the freeholders of the town of Newbury, Pipestave Hill was covered with a dense forest of oak and birch. These trees were cut and used to make staves for wine casks and molasses hogsheads. For many years, this industry, the first of its kind in American, flourished and the place is still called Pipestave Hill.
   Limestone was discovered in Newbury in 1697. Previous to this all the lime used for building was obtained from oyster and clam shells. Mortar made from this lime was very durable and came in time, to be almost as hard as granite. This business prospered for many years until a superior quality of lime was discovered elsewhere.
   The first toll bridge and shipyard in America were also in Newbury. The latter giving rise to the ship building industry, which was to determine the prosperity of Newburyport in the coming centuries.
   In West Newbury, in 1759, Enoch Noyes began making horn buttons and coarse combs of various kinds. This was the beginning of the comb making business in Newbury and other places. This business continued and grew, moving to Newburyport inn its later years, closing in 1934.
   Lt Gov. William Dummer, in his will of 1761 directing that a school house be erected on the most convenient part of his farm. In 1762, the first schoolhouse was erected, a low one story building about twenty feet square commencing its sessions in 1783, this is the oldest boarding school in America.
   In 1764, that part of Newbury, which had become the commercial center was divided off and made Newburyport. This action relegated Newbury to a rural and fishing community.
   Today Newbury is a quiet New England town, rich in heritage, the birthplace of many things American, not the least of which is an abiding reverence for our past.
   The Landing at Parker River
   from Ould Newbury - Historical and Biographical Sketches by John L. Currier *196 - Damrell and Upham, Boston, Mass.
   ------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Anthony?s brother William Morse [1614-1683] was a key figure in the only recorded case of supposed witchcraft in Newbury that was ever subjected to a full legal investigation. The principal sufferer was William?s wife Elizabeth who resided with him in a house at the head of Market St. [later actually in Newburyport] across from St. Paul?s Church for which William had received in the lot in 1645.
   William was then 65 years of age, a very worthy, but credulous and unsuspecting man who consequently was very easy prey to the taunting antics of a very roguish grandson who lived with them. Not suspecting any deception, the good man readily attributed all his troubles and strange afflictions to the supernatural instead of carefully analyzing the actions of those around him. With a belief in witchcraft almost universal at the time, it afforded a ready solution to anything strange and mysterious.
   The only person to have suspected the boy as the author of the mischief was a seaman Caleb Powell who visited the house frequently enough to suspect that the Morse?s troubles had human, rather than supernatural, origins. Caleb informed Goodman Morse that he believed he could readily find and the source of the trouble and solve it. To add credibility to his claims, he hinted that in his many travels he had gained an extensive knowledge of astrology and astronomy. That claim, however innocently intended, led to Caleb being accused of dealing in the black arts himself-he was tried and narrowly escaped with his own life. Anthony Morse gave the following testimony about the strange goings-on at his brother?s house on Dec 8, 1679:
   ?I Anthony Mors ocationlly being att my brother Morse?s hous, my brother showed me a pece of a brick which had several tims come down the chimne. I sitting in the cornar towck the pece of brik in my hand. Within a littel spas of tiem the pece of brik was gon from me I know not by what meanes. Quickly aftar, the pece of brik came down the chimne. Also in the chimny corar I saw a hamar on the ground. Their being no person near the hamar it was soddenly gone; by what means I know not, but within a littel spas after, the hamar came down the chimny and within a littell spas of tiem aftar that, came a pece of woud, about a fute loung, and within a littell after that came down a fiar brand, the fiar being out.?
   William Morse was also asked to give testimony on the same day and reported instances of being in bed and hearing stones and sticks being thrown against the roof or house with great violence, finding a large hog in the house after midnight, and many strange objects being dropped down the chimney. Items in the barn were mysteriously overturned or out-of-place, shoes unexpectedly seemed to fly through the air as if thrown, and doors unexpectedly would open or close.
   The handwritten testimony concludes with the telling statement:
   ?A mate of of a ship coming often to me [ie: Caleb Powell] said he much grefed for me and said the boye [William's grandson] was the cause of all my truble and my wife was much Ronged, and was no wich, and if I would let him have the boye but one day, he would warrant me no more truble. I being persuaded to it, he Com the nex day at the brek of day, and the boy was with him untel night and I had not any truble since.? When Caleb was finally acquitted, the judges looked for some other person guilty ?of being instigated by the devil? for accomplishing such pranks, and for some reason selected Elizabeth Morse , William?s wife, as the culprit. [Elizabeth often served as a town midwife, and perhaps had incurred some male or professional' jealousies?]
   At a Court of Assistants held at Boston on May 20, 1680, Elizabeth Morse was indicted as ?having familiarity with the Divil contrary to the peace of our sovereign lord the King? and the laws of God. In spite of her protesting her complete innocense, she was found guilty and sentenced by the governor on May 27th as follows:
   ?Elizabeth MORSE, you are to goe from hence to the place from when you came and thence to the place of execution and there to be hanged by the neck, till you be dead, and the Lord have mercy on your soul.?
   Then, for an unexplained reason, Elizabeth was granted a reprieve on June 1, 1680 by Governor Bradstreet. The deputies of the local court did not agree with the decision, however, and complained in Nov 1680 to have the case reopened. Testimony was again heard in the general court through May 1681.
   William sent several petitions pleading his wife?s innocence and attempting to answer the hysterical allegations of 17 Newbury residents who submitted testimony in writing offering their reasons why they had concluded that Goody Morse must be a witch and should be hung according to old Mosaic law. Reading the list of ?reasons? today quickly strikes the 20th century mind as a dredging up of every petty annoyance, every grudge or neighborhood misunderstanding the townspeople could think of from sick cows to being snubbed in public.
   It was owing to the firmness of Gov. Bradstreet in his initial decision that the life of Elizabeth Morse was saved and the town of Newbury prevented from offering the first victim in Essex County to the witchcraft hysteria. Later town records and other contemporary sources fail to record what happened to the ?vile and roguish? grandson whose attempts to torment his elderly grandparents nearly resulted in his grandmother?s untimely death.
   ?This last Will and Testament of Anthony Morse of Newbury, Mass.
   I anthony Morse of Newbury in the name of god amen i being sensible of my own frality and mortality being of parfit memory due make this as my last Will and testament cominding my sole to god that gaue it and my body to the dust in hope of a joyful rasurixtion and as for my wourly goods I dispose of as foloieth,
   ?I gue and bequeth to my son Joshua Morse making him my lawful eaire all lmy housing and lands both upland and meddow alweais probided that if the toen of Newbury dou fivifr sny part of the common lands that then the on half part of that land which belongeth to me which cometh by uartu of my freehould shall be the lawful inheritance of my son benieman morse all so I geue to my son Joshua morse all my carte wheles dung pot plow harrow youkes chains houes forkes shovel spad grin stone yt as allso on father bed which he lieth on with a boulster and pillo and a pair of blinkets and courlitt and tou pair of shetes a bed sted and mat a pot and a brass cetell the best of tou cettels and a belmetell scillet and tou platars and a paringer and a drinking pot and tou spoons and the water pails and barils and tobes all these about named I geue to my son Joshua and his eaires of his own body begoten lawfully than then all aboue geuen to my son Joshua shall Return to the Rest of my children upon the peayment on good peay to my sons widow besides what estates she att any time brought to her husband she the said widdo shall injoy the houl estate one half year before she shall surrender--also I geue to my son Robert Norse Eighteen pounds or his children to my son Peter morse or children L3. to my son Anthony morse children I geue L3 to my son Joseph morses children I geue L12 to my son Benieman Morse or children I geue L12 to my dafter Thorlo or children L12 to my dafter Stickney or children I geue L12 to my dafter Newman children I geue L12 to my dafter Smith or children I gieu L12. to my grand son Richard Thorlo I geue an sheep to my grandson Robard Homs I gieu Fieu pounds allso I geue the Remainder of my housall which is not in partikelar geuen to my son Joshua in the former part of this my will to all my children equally to be devided between them and my grand children hous parents are dead, namely anthonys children. Josephs children hanahs children, allso I dou by this my last will allow and geue loberty to my son Joshua morse hou is my Eaire to make sail and dispose of that land by the pine swamp which I had of Benieman lacon of that pece of land by John Akisons hous if he see Resan so to do. allso I du by this will apoynt my son Joshus morse to be my sole executor to peay all debtes and legacies by this will geuen and to Receue all debtes allso I dou apoynt my louing and crisian friends Cap danil Pears and Tristram Coffin and thomas noyes to be oversers of this my last Will Allso I dou apoynt my Exicutor to peay my son Robard and son peter within on yeare after my death on the other to be peaid within three years the plas of peayment to be newbury my will is that my son beieman shal haue the on half of all common lands when devided as aboue said in witness therof I anthony morse have hearunto set my hand and seall this 28 Aprell, 1680.

Father: Anthony Morse b: 1588 in Marlboro, Wiltshire, England Mother: Christian b: 1580 in Marlboro, Wiltshire, England

Marriage 1 Mary Waldro b: ABT 1620 in Prob England

   Married: 1639 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts

Children

   Has Children Sarah Morse b: 01 MAY 1641 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
   Has No Children Benjamin Morse b: 28 MAR 1640 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
   Has No Children Hannah Morse b: 1642 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
   Has No Children Lydia Morse b: 07 OCT 1647 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
   Has No Children Mary Morse b: 09 APR 1649 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
   Has No Children Esther Morse b: 03 MAY 1651 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
   Has No Children Joshua Morse b: 24 JUL 1653 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, USA

Marriage 2 Ann Cox b: ABT 1609 in England

   Married: 02 MAY 1629 in St Marys, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England 1

Children

   Has No Children Robert Morse b: 27 DEC 1629 in Marlboro, Wiltshire, England
   Has No Children Esther Morse b: 04 DEC 1630 in Marlboro, Wiltshire, England
   Has No Children Anthony Morse b: 29 JAN 1632 in Marlboro, Wiltshire, England
   Has No Children Anne Morse b: 06 FEB 1634 in Marlboro, Wiltshire, England
   Has No Children Richard Morse b: 06 DEC 1635 in Marlboro, Wiltshire, England
   Has No Children Peter Morse b: ABT 1637 in Marlborough, Wiltshire, England

Anthony Morse was born about 1607, as he deposed May 9, 1665 that his age was about 58. He was "of Marlborough," however the place of his birth is not certain. The Planters of the Commonwealth, shows that the ship "James" of London, William Cooper, Master, three hundred tons, sailed from Southampton April 5, 1635, and arrived June 3 with passengers and cattle. The manifest includes Anthony Morse age 29 of Marlborough, county Wilts, shoemaker destined for Newbury. The next line has Mrs. Mary Morse indented as it would for a wife. Also coming on this ship was William Morse of Marlborough, county Wilts, Shoemaker also destined for Newbury.

Anderson in The Great Migration Begins mentions only one wife, Ann Cox, to whom Anthony Morse was married on May 2, 1629 at St. Mary's, Marlborough, Wiltshire. Anderson attributes all children to Ann, showing that the oldest child, Robert Morse, was christened at the same church on December 27, 1629.However, in the Genealogical Dictionary of New England, Savage attributes all children to a first wife who he says was Mary, and he states that Ann was the second wife. Henry Dutch Lord indicates that Anthony had two wives but does not specify which children were born to which wife. Lord indicates that Anthony remarried while still in England

According to Anderson, Anthony Morse and Ann Cox had twelve children Robert Morse, bp. St. Mary, Marlborough, Wiltshire, 27 Dec 1629; m. Newbury 30 Oct 1654 Ann Lewis Anthony Morse, bp. St. Mary, Marlborough, Wiltshire, 29 Jan 1631/2; d. 27 Mar 1677 aged about forty-five years; m. (1) Newbury 8 May 1660 Elizabeth Knight; m (2) Newbury 11 Nov 1669 Mary Barnard Ann Morse, bp. St. Peter and St. Paul, Marlborough, Wiltshire, 16 Feb 1633/4 d. 22 Nov 1678 aged about forty-four years; m. Newbury 5 Feb 1654/5 Francis Thurlow. Peter Morse, b. abt 1635; m. by 1685 Mary —, they had at least seven children. Joseph Morse, b. abt 1637 (aged 40 in 1678); m. abt 1669 Mary (Woodis) Pierce, daughter of Richard Woodis and widow of George Pierce. Benjamin Morse, b. abt 1639 (aged 37 in 1678); m. Newbury 27 Aug 1667 Ruth Sawyer. Sarah Morse, b. Newbury 1 May 1641; m. Newbury 24 June 1663 Amos Stickney Hannah Morse, b. abt 1643; m. Ispwich 8 June 1665 Thomas Newman, son of Thomas Newman Lydia Morse, b. Newbury 7 Oct 1647; d. Newbury 19 May 1648 Mary Morse, b. Newbury 9 Apr 1649; d. Newbury 14 June 1662 Hester Morse, b. Newbury, 3 May 1651; m. (1) Newbury 25 Jan or 26 Feb 1668/9 Robert Homes; m (2) Thomas Smith Joshua Morse, b. Newbury 24 July 1653; m. by 1681 Joanna — b. Feb 1681. (secondary sources without evidence identify her as Joanna Kimball, daughter of Thomas Kimball). Joshua is connected to Joanna Kimball Wikitree. He is also connected to another spouse Mary Morse.

Cutter in his "Historic Homes" gives the following, with no citation for the information:

"Anthony Morse, the immigrant ancestor of the honorable family of Morse in America, was born about 1606, son of Anthony Morse of Marlborough, England, born about 1575. ... Anthony Morse, Jr., came from Wiltshire, England, to the New England Colonies, taking ship at Southampton, England, on board the "Susan and Ellen," March 11, 1635, and having as fellow passengers the Thomas Parker Colony, and Morse landed with them and other colonists in (Lynn), Massachusetts Bay Colony, in 1635, and settled in Newbury." Anthony Morse was a devout Puritan who had tried to continue in the Established Church until his emigration to New England. One of the early and best know New England ministers, Rev. Abner Morse says this of Anthony.

"...he was a man of moral courage, energy and perseverance; that he was enterprising and capable in business, and laid the foundation of the competence and wealth of his family; that he was called to public trusts of civil and sacred character; that he reared pious and distinguished children; led a long life of strict integrity and humble piety, fearing God and loving his people, no one can doubt who attends to the records of the community in which he lived and died." Anthony Morse lived about 1/2 mile from the most ancient cemetery in Newbury, Massachusetts. His home was located on a slight hill in a field still called Morse Field.

The Will of Anthony Morse Anthony Morse's Will was dated April 29, 1680, and is on file at Salem, but never recorded, although some give a probate date of November 23, 1686. He made bequests to :

sons Robert, Peter, Anthony, Joseph, Benjamin and Joshua and their children daughters Thurlo, Stikney, Newman and Smith or their children daughter Rebecca Homs grandchild Rich Thurlo, grandson Robard. "The last Will and Testament of Anthony Morse of Newbury, Mass. I anthony Morse of Newbury in the name of god amen i being sensible of my own frality and mortality being of parfit memory due make this as my last Will and testament cominding my sole to god that gaue it and my body to the dust in hope of a joyful rasurixtion and as for my wourly goods I dispose of as foloieth,

"I gue and bequeth to my son Joshua Morse making him my lawful eaire all my housing and lands both upland and meddow with my freehould and privilidge in all comon lands both upland and meddow alweais provided that if the toen of Newbury dou divide any part of the comon lands that then the on half part of that land which belongeth to me which cometh by uartu of my freehould shall be the lawful inheritance of my son benieman morse all so I geue to my son Joshua morse all mv cattell an horsis and sheep swuine and all my toules for the shumaking trade as allso my carte wheles dung pot plow harrow youkes chains houes forkes shovel spad grin stone yt as allso on father bed which he lieth on with a bouister and pillo and a pair of blinkets and covrlitt and tou pair of shetes a bed sted and mat a pot and a brass cetell the best of tou cettles and a belmetell scillet and tou platars and a paringer and a drinking pot and tou spoons and the water pails and barils and tobes all these about named I geue to my son Joshua and his eaires of his own body begoten lawfully than then all aboue geuen to my son Joshua shall Return to the Rest of my children upon the peayment on good peay to my sons widow besides what estate she att any time brought to her husband she the said widdo shall enjoy the houl estate on half year before she shall surrender - also I geue to my son Robard Morse Eighteen pounds or his children to my son Peter morse or children £3, to my son Anthony morse children I geue £L3 to my son Joseph morses children I geue £12 to my son Benieman Morse or children I geue £12 to my dafter Thorlo or children £12 to my dafter Stickney or children I geue £12 to my dafter Newman children I geue £12. to my dafter Smith or children I gieu £12. to my grand son Richard Thorlo I geue an sheep to my grandson Robard Homes I gieu fieu pounds allso I geue the Remainder of my housall which is not in partikelar geuen to my son Joshua in the former part of this my will to all my children equally to be devided between them and my grand children hous parents are dead, namely anthonys children, Josephs children hanahs children, allso I dou by this my last will allow and geue loberty to my son Joshua morse hou is my Eaire to make sail and dispose of that land by the pine swamp which I had of Benieman lacon of that pece of land by John Akisons hous if he see Resan so to do. allso I du by this will apoynt my son Joshua morse to be my sole executor to peay all debtes and legacies by this will geuen and to Receue all debtes allso I dou apoynt my louing and crisian frinds Cap danil Pears and Tristram Coffin and thomas noyes to be oversers of this my last Will Allso I dou apoynt my Exicutor to peay my son Robard and son peter within on yeare after my death on the other to be peaid within three years the plas of peayment to be newbury my will is that my son benieman shal haue the on half of all comon lands when devided as above said in witnes thereof I anthony morse have hearunto Set my hand and seall this 28 Aprell, 1680.

"ANTHONY MORSE (seal) "Sinid selid and onid in the presense of us

JAMES COFFIN

MARY BROWN

that whereas I anthony morse in this my will abou said have geuen on half of all comon lands if devided to my sonn benieman mors; my meaning iss that my sonn benieman shall haeu the on half of my proportion of lands when devided, but my sonn Joshua to haeu all my Rights in the lower comon this is my mind and will as witnes my seall this 20 of aprell 1680 ANTHONY MORSE (seal) "Witness to this part of my Will

James Coffin

Mary Brown

"Joshua Morse is allowed Exer to this will."

An envintory of the estate of Anthony morse late of newbury takenthis 16 day of November 1686

To a dweling hows and barne and 16 akars of upland and 15 akars of meddo: and the frehould and orchard......................250 00 00 to tow oxen and 4 Cows and seven young cattell...............................................................020 00 00 to mare and to tow cow [ ] to 20 shep: cows and lams..........................................................008 00 00 to 12 swine great and small..........................004 10 00 to a Bed & bolster & a coverlid & a pare of blinkits & a pare of shets and beadsted & cord and mat.04 12 00 To tow platars and a skillet & a pot and a kettell..................................................................01 2 00 To a pillow 2s and 2 pails & a barrill & tubes.00 10 00 To a saw 8s: & plow & irons & tow chains.....01 4 00 To cart & whels & Round pins & cops & pins & shed................................................................1 6 06 To a ax to 3 hows and a spade dung pot ....00 12 00 To [ ] chain 6s: and fowar Rakes...................00 12 00 To corne 9£ to heay 7£ Indean corne & Inglish.16 00 00 To a musket and sword 12s: and bookes: 6s:.00 18 00 To [ ] to a carte pomp: 6d to sieths: and takling:...............................................................00 17 00 To [ ] 6d to waring aparill 2£.....................03 00 06 To bedall rings: and wedgis: 5s: to a half bowshill: 2s.........................................................................0 07 00 To debts due to the estate: 27s......................01 07 00 To a father bead 30s to a bowstar 6s: to a pillo: 2s................................................................01 18 0 To a flok bead 10s: to a bowstar 3s to a bowstar case: 6d...............................................................00 13 6 To 3 coverlids: 3£ to a Roudg [?] 20s: to a small Roudg: 4s........................................................... 04 4 0 To a cradell Roudg: 1s: to fowar blinkits: 20s.01 01 0 To a beadsted & cord 3s: to a trundell beadsted 2s.........................................................................00 05 0 To a saw 6d to 2 meaill trows 3s to a Chist: 6s: a box 6d..............................................................00 10 0 To tow cortings: 1s to a pare of cortings & valliants 6s..........................................................00 07 0 To a charne: 3s: to a cubard: 5s: to two charis 4s..............................................................00 12 0 To a [ ]: 1s: to a friing pan: 1s: to a spite: 3s: to a gridiron...............................................................00 06 6 To a pot 6d to tow tramils 6s: to a pan of pot houk....................................................................00 07 6 To a pare of tongs and smashing iron: and a bason.................................................................. 00 04 0 To a warming pan 4s: to a skillet: 7s to a skillet: 18d.......................................................... 00 12 6 To a bras ketell:20: to a Iron ketil 4s: to a lamp.01 4 6 To a pare of skals & a pound waight: 18d.......00 1 6 To fowar trais 2s: to a arthen pot 4d:.............00 2 4 To a tabell 6s to [ ] 18d to a chist 3s.............00 10 6 To a sac 6 to a blinket 3s: to 3 cortin rodes: 3s.00 6 6 To a [ ] 3d.......................................................... 00 0 3 ...........................................................................348 6 7

To debtis due from the estate 13 12 0

This 23d Novr 1676"

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/128326812/anthony-morse#

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Lieut. Anthony Morse II's Timeline

1607
May 9, 1607
Marlborough, Wiltshire, England
1618
January 24, 1618
Age 10
Marlborough, Wiltshire, England
1629
December 27, 1629
Age 22
Marlboro, Wiltshire, England
1632
January 29, 1632
Age 24
Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, (Present UK)
1635
April 5, 1635
Age 27
Sailed from Southampton, England aboard the ship "James". Arrived in Boston, Mass June 3 1635
December 9, 1635
Age 28
St Peters,Marlboro,Wiltshire,Eng
1637
1637
Age 29
Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
1637
Age 29
Marlborough, Wiltshire, England
1640
March 28, 1640
Age 32
Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)