Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles

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Lionel de Welles

Also Known As: "Leo", "Lionel De Welles KG"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Conisholme, Lincolnshire, England
Death: Died in Towton, Yorkshire, England
Cause of death: killed in the Battle of Towton
Place of Burial: Methley, West Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Son of Eudes de Welles and Maud de Greystoke, Lady Gainsby
Husband of Joan de Waterton and Margaret Beauchamp of Bletso, Lady Welles
Father of Eleanor Welles; Cecily ( De Welles) Willoughby; Richard de Welles, 7th Baron Welles; Margaret Dymoke de Welles; Catherine (Welles) and 3 others
Brother of Mary Laurence; Sir William Welles, Lord Chancellor of Ireland and Anne Welles

Occupation: Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, K. G.{Knight of the Garter], 6th Baron de Welles Knighted May 14 1426, KG, 6th Lord Welles, K.G., 6th Baron of Welles, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 6th Lord, Lieutenant of Ireland
Managed by: Private User
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About Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles

Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles

Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles, KG (c.1406 – 29 March 1461) was an English peer who served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and Joint Deputy of Calais. He was slain fighting on the Lancastrian side at the Battle of Towton, and was attainted on 21 December 1461. As a result of the attainder, his son, Richard Welles, 7th Baron Welles, did not succeed him in the barony of Welles until the attainder was reversed by Parliament in June 1467.

Born about 1406, Lionel Welles was the son of Eude Welles and Maud Greystoke. On his father's side, he was the grandson of John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles (d. 26 August 1421), and Eleanor Mowbray, and on his mother's side, the grandson of Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke and Katherine Clifford, daughter of Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford. He had one brother, Sir William Welles, Lord Chancellor of Ireland.[1]

Lionel Welles' father, Eude Welles, died sometime before 26 July 1417, predeceasing his own father, the 5th Baron. At the death of the 5th Baron in 1421, Lionel Welles thus inherited the Welles barony and lands, but as he was underage, his wardship was granted to his future father-in-law, Robert Waterton (d.1425), a 'trusted retainer of John of Gaunt and the Lancastrian Kings'.[2][3]

He was knighted at the Parliament at Leicester by the infant Henry VI on 19 May 1426, and had control of his lands on 5 December 1427. He accompanied Henry VI to France in 1430, was summoned to Parliament from 25 February 1432 to 30 July 1460 by writs directed Leoni de Welles, and was a privy councillor before 12 November 1434. In 1435 he was with Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, in the expedition sent to relieve the siege of Calais. He was a member of Henry VI's household before February 1438. From 12 February 1438 he resided in Ireland as Lord Lieutenant; according to Hicks, he 'failed to control the contending factions and resigned prematurely in 1442'. Together with Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers, he served as Joint Deputy of Calais for his brother-in-law, Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset, who was Lieutenant of Calais from 1451 to 1455, and apparently remained at Calais until 20 April 1456, when Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, took over as Lieutenant. Despite these appointments, according to Hicks, Welles was 'essentially a Lincolnshire landowner'; he was a Justice of the Peace and served on other commissions in that county.[4][2]

He was installed, together with John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury, as a Knight of the Garter on 14 May 1457, and in October of that year was sent with English reinforcements to Calais.[4]

He was taken prisoner by Yorkist forces at the Battle of Blore Heath on 23 September 1459. In 1461 he was with the army of Queen Margaret, which advanced on London, and won the Second Battle of St Albans on 17 February 1461. He was slain a month later at the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461. After his death he was attained by Act of Parliament on 21 December 1461, whereby all his honours were forfeited. He was buried with his first wife, Joan Waterton, in the parish church at Methley, Yorkshire.[5][2][6]

Welles married firstly Joan Waterton, daughter of Robert Waterton, esquire, of Methley, Yorkshire,[2] and his second wife, Cecily Fleming, daughter of Sir Robert Fleming, by whom he had one son and four daughters:[7]

  • Richard Welles, 7th Baron Welles.[8]
  • Cecily Welles, who married Sir Robert Willoughby of Parham, Suffolk and was the mother of Christopher Willoughby, 10th Baron Willoughby de Eresby.[9]
  • Margaret Welles (d. 13 July 1480), who married firstly Sir Thomas Dymoke (executed 12 March 1470), and secondly Robert Radcliffe, esquire.[10][9]
  • Eleanor Welles, who married Thomas Hoo, Baron Hoo and Hastings (d. 13 February 1455).[11]
  • Katherine Welles, who married firstly Sir Thomas de la Launde (executed 15 March 1469), and secondly Robert Tempest (d. 23 April 1509), esquire.[9]

He married secondly, by licence dated 14 April 1447, he married Margaret Beauchamp, widow successively of Sir Oliver St John (d.1437) and John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset (d. 27 May 1444), and daughter of Sir John Beauchamp of Bletsoe, Bedfordshire, by his second wife, Edith Stourton, daughter of Sir John Stourton, by whom he had one son:[7]

  • John Welles, 1st Viscount Welles, who married Cecily of York, the daughter of Edward IV of England.[7]

By his second marriage Welles became the stepfather of Margaret Beaufort, mother of Henry VII.

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lionel_de_Welles,_6th_Baron_Welles

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  • Sir Lionel Welles, 6th Baron Welles, Lt. of Ireland1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19
  • M, #15377, b. circa 1406, d. 29 March 1461
  • Father Eudo de Welles20,21,6,7,22,15,16,23 b. c 1387, d. b 26 Jul 1417
  • Mother Maud Greystoke21,20,6,7,22,15,16,23
  • Sir Lionel Welles, 6th Baron Welles, Lt. of Ireland was born circa 1406 at of Belleau, Bonthorp in Willougby, Cumberworth, Gainsby, Strubby, & Well, Lincolnshire, England; Age 15 in 1421.2,3,7,8,15,16,17 He married Joan Waterton, daughter of Robert Waterton, Esq., Master of the Horse & Hounds, Keeper of Pontefract Castle, Bailiff of Hatfield and Cecily Fleming, on 15 August 1417 at St. Oswald's, Methley, Yorkshire, England; They had 1 son (Sir Richard, 7th Lord Welles) and 4 daughters (Cecily, wife of Sir Robert Willoughby; Margaret, wife of Sir Thomas Dymoke; Eleanor, wife of Sir Thomas Hoo, of Sir James Lawrence, & of Hugh Hastings; & Katherine, wife of Sir Thomas de la Lounde, & of Robert Tempest, Esq.)2,3,5,8,9,13,14,17,18 Sir Lionel Welles, 6th Baron Welles, Lt. of Ireland and Margaret Beauchamp obtained a marriage license on 14 April 1447; They had 1 son (Sir John, Viscount & 10th Lord Welles).24,6,8,10,15,16,17,19 A settlement for the marriage Sir Lionel Welles, 6th Baron Welles, Lt. of Ireland and Margaret Beauchamp was made on 20 April 1447.24,25,2,3,7,8,15,16,17 Sir Lionel Welles, 6th Baron Welles, Lt. of Ireland left a will on 7 October 1457.15,17 He died on 29 March 1461 at Battle of Towton, Towton, Yorkshire, England; Buried with his 1st wife at Methley, Yorkshire.24,2,3,6,7,8,15,16,17
  • Family 1 Joan Waterton b. c 1400, d. bt 14 Oct 1434 - 14 Apr 1447
  • Children
    • Cicely Welles+26,3,8,9,17,18 b. c 1420, d. 1480
    • Margaret Welles+27,3,5,8,14,17 b. c 1422, d. 13 Jul 1480
    • Eleanor Welles+2,3,4,8,11,12,13,17 b. c 1424, d. b 1504
    • Katherine Welles+2,8,17 b. c 1426, d. 8 Nov 1505
    • Sir Richard Welles, 7th Lord Welles+8,17 b. c 1428, d. 12 Mar 1470
  • Family 2 Margaret Beauchamp b. c 1410, d. c 3 Jun 1482
  • Child
    • Sir John Welles, 1st Viscount Welles, 10th Lord Welles, Constable of Bolingbroke & Rockingham Castles+28,2,29,6,8,10,15,17,19 b. c 1449, d. 9 Feb 1499
  • Citations
  • [S4129] Unknown author, The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants, by Gary Boyd Roberts, p. 246; Ancestral Roots of 60 Colonists, p. 166.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 758-759.
  • [S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 875-876.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 193.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 428.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 475.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 221-222.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 305.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 339.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 413-414.
  • [S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 227.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 358.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 307-308.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 461-462.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 526-527.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 199-201.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 331-332.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 365.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 462.
  • [S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 875.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 758.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 304.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 331.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 627.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 724.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 762.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 605.
  • [S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. XII/2, p. 448-450.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 799.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p512.htm#i15377

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  • Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles1
  • M, #107347, b. 1406, d. 29 March 1461
  • Last Edited=12 Jun 2016
  • Consanguinity Index=0.21%
  • Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles was born in 1406.2 He was the son of Eudes de Welles and Maud de Greystoke.2 He married, firstly, Joan de Waterton, daughter of Sir Robert de Waterton, on 15 August 1417 at St. Oswald's Church, Methely, Yorkshire, England.2 He married, secondly, Margaret Beauchamp, daughter of John Beauchamp and Edith de Stourton, circa April 1447.1 He died on 29 March 1461 at Towton, Yorkshire, England, killed in action.1
  • He gained the title of 6th Lord Welles. He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) on 25 February 1431.2 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.)2 He fought in the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461.2
  • Children of Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles and Joan de Waterton
    • Cicely Welles+
    • Margaret de Welles+2 d. 13 Jul 1480
    • Eleanor Welles+3
    • Richard de Welles, 7th Baron Welles+ b. bt 1428 - 1430, d. 1470
  • Child of Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles and Margaret Beauchamp
    • John de Welles, 1st Viscount Welles+1 b. a 1448, d. 9 Feb 1499
  • Citations
  • [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 104. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  • [S1545] Mitchell Adams, "re: West Ancestors," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 - 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: West Ancestors."
  • [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume VI, page 564. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  • From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p10735.htm#i107347

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  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 60
  • Welles, Lionel de by William Arthur Jobson Archbold
  • WELLES, LIONEL, LEO, or LYON de, sixth Baron Welles (1405?–1461), soldier, born about 1405, was son of Eudo de Welles by Maud, daughter of Ralph, lord Greystock. From Adam de Welles, first baron Welles [q. v.], descended John de Welles, fifth baron, summoned to parliament as baron from 20 Jan. 1376 to 26 Feb. 1421, and distinguished in the French and Scottish wars. He died in 1421, leaving by his second wife, Margaret (or Eleanor), daughter of John, lord Mowbray, the son Eudo above-mentioned, who predeceased him. Eudo's younger son, William, occasionally acted as deputy to his brother when lord lieutenant of Ireland, of which he was in 1465 lord chancellor (O'Flanagan, Lord Chancellors of Ireland).
  • Lionel, the eldest son, succeeded his grandfather in 1421, was knighted with Henry VI at Leicester by the Duke of Bedford on 19 May 1426, and went with the young king to France in 1430. He was summoned to parliament as sixth Baron Welles from 25 Feb. 1432 to 30 July 1460. In 1434 he became a privy councillor. He was sent to relieve Calais in 1436, when the town was feebly besieged by the Burgundians. He served as lord lieutenant of Ireland from about 1438, and was afterwards specially exempted from acts of resumption, because of the sums owed him by the crown in respect of his expenditure. He was a friend—indeed a connection—of the king, and constantly at court. In 1450 he was appointed a trier of petitions for Gascony and the parts beyond the seas. In 1454 he was stated to be beyond the sea by the king's commandment. He was probably then at Calais, where he had been sent in 1451, with Lord Rivers; he remained in command as lieutenant of the Duke of Somerset until 20 April 1456, when Warwick secured possession. He was elected K.G. before 13 May 1457. As a Lancastrian he took the oath of allegiance at Coventry in 1459. He joined Margaret of Anjou on her march south, was at the second battle of St. Albans on 7 Feb. 1460–1, and was killed at Towton on 29 March, and attainted in the parliament which followed. He was buried in Waterton church, Methley, Yorkshire.
  • He married, first, about 1426, Joan (or Cecilia), only daughter of Sir Robert Waterton of Waterton and Methley, and had issue a son, Richard (see below), and four daughters; and, secondly, between 27 May 1444 and 31 Aug. 1447, Margaret, daughter of Sir John Beauchamp of Bletsoe; she was widow of Sir Oliver St. John and of John Beaufort, duke of Somerset, by whom she had had a daughter, the Lady Margaret Beaufort [q. v.]; by her Welles had a son John (see below).
  • Richard Welles, seventh Baron Welles (1431–1470), son of Lionel, sixth baron, by his first wife, married Joane, daughter of Robert, lord Willoughby de Eresby, and was summoned in her right as Lord Willoughby from 26 May 1455 to 28 Feb. 1466. His first wife died before 1460, and he married secondly Margaret, daughter of Sir James Strangways and widow of John Ingleby, who took the veil in 1475. He was a Lancastrian and present at the second battle of St. Albans (7 Feb. 1460–1), but soon managed to make his peace with Edward, who pardoned him at Gloucester, in the first year of his reign; and so he soon got his family property again, and in 1468 his honours. Doubtless his family connection with the Nevilles helped him. His son Robert, however, took part in Warwick's plots, and in March 1470 attacked the house of Sir Thomas Borough, a knight of the king's body, spoiled it, and drove its owner away. Edward now summoned Lord Welles (the father) and his brother-in-law, Sir Thomas Dymock, to London. At first Welles refused to go on the plea of illness; but afterwards went, took sanctuary at Westminster, and then rashly quitted it on promise of pardon. Edward made Welles write to his son telling him to give up Warwick's cause, and then took him down to Lincolnshire. Angry at the obstinacy of the son, he beheaded Lord Welles and Dymock at Huntingdon. His son then risked a battle near Stamford, but was defeated, taken, and executed on 19 March 1470. His confession is printed in ‘Excerpta Historica’ (pp. 382, &c.). Both father and son were attainted in the parliament of 1475, but the attainders were reversed in the first parliament of Henry VII. Richard Welles left a daughter Joane, who married, first, Richard Piggot of London, and, secondly, before 1470, Sir Richard Hastings. Hastings, in consequence, was afterwards summoned to parliament as Baron Welles, 15 Nov. 1482; he died in 1503, and his widow in 1505, both without issue, and the barony of Welles fell into abeyance between the descendants of Lionel Welles's four daughters. Sir Robert Welles had married Elizabeth, daughter of John Bourchier, lord Berners. She died a year after his execution, and was buried by his side in Doncaster church. Her will is printed in ‘Testamenta Vetusta.’
  • John Welles, first Viscount Welles (d. 1499), son of Lionel, sixth baron, by his second wife, was a Lancastrian, but he is mentioned as a watcher at Edward IV's funeral. He was at the coronation of Richard III, but opposed him at once, and after the insurrection of Buckingham fled to Brittany. He took part in the Bosworth campaign, and was created Viscount Welles by summons to parliament on 1 Sept. 1487. Doubtless as a safe man of the second rank he was allowed to marry, before December 1487, Cecily, daughter of Edward IV, who had been promised to the king of Scotland. He was elected K.G. before 29 Sept. 1488, and died on 9 Feb. 1498–9; he was buried in Westminster Abbey. By his wife Cecily he had two daughters, Elizabeth and Anne, both of whom died young; the viscounty of Welles thus became extinct.
  • [Excerpta Historica, pp. 282, &c.; Rot. Parl. v. 182, &c., vi. 144, 246, &c.; Wars of English in France (Rolls Ser.), ii. 776, 778; Cal. Pat. Rolls, Edw. IV, pp. 113, &c.; Cooper's Life of the Lady Margaret, p. 6; Paston Letters, ed. Gairdner, i. 96, &c., ii. 3, &c.; Beaucourt's Hist. de Charles VII, vi. 47; Gilbert's Viceroys of Ireland, p. 334; Camden Miscellany, vol. i.; Warkworth's Chron. (Camd. Soc.), pp. 8, 52, 59; Polydore Vergil (Camd. Soc. transl.), pp. 126, 127; Testamenta Vetusta, p. 310; Ramsay's Lancaster and York, i. 415, ii. 185, &c.; G. E. C[okayne]'s Peerage; Burke's Extinct and Dormant Peerage.]
  • From: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Welles,_Lionel_de_(DNB00)

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  • Maud GREYSTOKE (B. Welles)
  • Born: ABT 1340, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England
  • Father: Ralph GREYSTOKE (5º B. Greystoke of Greystoke)
  • Mother: Catherine CLIFFORD (B. Greystoke of Greystoke)
  • Married: Eudo De WELLES (B. Welles)
  • Children:
    • 1. Lionel De WELLS (B. Welles)
    • 2. William De WELLES
    • 3. Mary De WELLES
  • From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/GREYSTOKE.htm#Maud GREYSTOKE (B. Welles)

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http://www.geneall.net/U/per_page.php?id=239961

http://www.e-familytree.net/F13/F13076.htm

Sir Leo, or Lionel de Welles, as 6th baron, summoned to parliament from 25 February, 1432, to 30 July, 1460. This nobleman received the honour of knighthood in the 4th Henry VI[1426] from the Duke of Bedford at Leicester, with the young king himself and divers other persons of rank. His lordship for several years after served with great honour in France and was made lieutenant of Ireland for seven years in the 16th of thesame reign. When the fatal feud between the houses of York and Lancaster broke out, Lord Welles arrayed himself under the banner of the latter, and adhering to his colours with unbending fidelity, fell at the battle of Towton field on Palm Sunday,1461. His remains were deposited in Waterton Chapel, at Methley, co. York. His lordship m. 1st, Joan, or by some accounts,Cecilia, only dau. of Sir Robert Waterton, of Waterton andMethley, co. York, and sister and heir of Sir Robert Waterton,also of Waterton, Knt., and had issue, Richard, Alianore,Cecily, Margaret, and Catherine. Lord Welles m. 2ndly, Margaret,sister and heir of Sir John Beauchamp, of Bletshoe, and widow of John Beaufort, Earl of Somerset (by whom she was mother ofMargaret, Countess of Richmond, mother of King Henry VII) andhad another son, John, created Viscount Welles. An attainder followed his lordship's decease, under which the Barony of Welles became forfeited. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant,Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London,England, 1883, p. 572, Welles, Barons Welles]

The rolls of parliament show that, in the first year of HenryVII [1485], a statute passed finally reversing all acts of attainder or forfeiture which had ever been enacted aginst the Barony of Welles.

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From Stirnet's "Welles01" page (membership required to view without interruption): "<This> Lionel supported the House of Lancaster in the War of the Roses and was attainted after his death. His barony was forfeited but later pardoned."

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Lionel "Leo" de Welles, 6th Baron Welles Place of Burial: Waterton Chapel, Methley Birth: 1406 Welle, Lincolnshire, England Death: March 29, 1461 (55) Yorkshire,England (Killed in the Battle of Towton) Immediate Family: Hide Show

Son of Sir Eudo de Welles, 5th Baron de Welles and Maude de Greystoke Husband of Joan de Waterton and Margaret Beauchamp of Bletso, Lady Welles Father of Margaret Dymoke, Eleanor Wells / Welles, Cecily de Welles, Richard Welles, Catherine (Welles) and 1 other, and John de Welles, 1st Viscount Welles « less Brother of Mary Laurence and Sir William de WELLES

Sir Leo, or Lionel de Welles, as 6th baron, summoned to parliament from 25 February, 1432, to 30 July, 1460. This nobleman received the honour of knighthood in the 4th Henry VI[1426] from the Duke of Bedford at Leicester, with the young king himself and divers other persons of rank. His lordship for several years after served with great honour in France and was made lieutenant of Ireland for seven years in the 16th of thesame reign. When the fatal feud between the houses of York and Lancaster broke out, Lord Welles arrayed himself under the banner of the latter, and adhering to his colours with unbending fidelity, fell at the battle of Towton field on Palm Sunday,1461. His remains were deposited in Waterton Chapel, at Methley, co. York. His lordship m. 1st, Joan, or by some accounts,Cecilia, only dau. of Sir Robert Waterton, of Waterton andMethley, co. York, and sister and heir of Sir Robert Waterton,also of Waterton, Knt., and had issue, Richard, Alianore,Cecily, Margaret, and Catherine. Lord Welles m. 2ndly, Margaret,sister and heir of Sir John Beauchamp, of Bletshoe, and widow of John Beaufort, Earl of Somerset (by whom she was mother ofMargaret, Countess of Richmond, mother of King Henry VII) andhad another son, John, created Viscount Welles. An attainder followed his lordship's decease, under which the Barony of Welles became forfeited. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant,Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London,England, 1883, p. 572, Welles, Barons Welles]

The rolls of parliament show that, in the first year of HenryVII [1485], a statute passed finally reversing all acts of attainder or forfeiture which had ever been enacted aginst the Barony of Welles.

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Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles's Timeline

1406
1406
Conisholme, Lincolnshire, England
1428
1428
Age 22
Welles, Lincolnshire, England
1429
1429
Age 23
Welle, Lincolnshire, , England
1431
1431
Age 25
Welle, Lincolnshire, , England
1434
1434
Age 28
Wells, Lincolnshire, England
1442
1442
Age 36
Welle, Lincolnshire, , England
1450
1450
Age 44
Welle, Lincolnshire, England
1461
March 29, 1461
Age 55
Towton, Yorkshire, England