Lord William Grey, Baron of Werke

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Lord William Grey, Baron of Werke

Also Known As: "Grey of Warke"
Birthdate: (80)
Birthplace: Werke, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom
Death: July 29, 1674 (76-84)
Epping, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Place of Burial: Epping, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir Ralph Grey, Kt., of Chillingham, MP and Jane Grey
Husband of Cecilia Wentworth, Baroness Grey of Warke (Werke)
Father of William Grey; Lady Mary Elisabeth Grey; John Grey; Elisabeth Grey; Catherine Grey and 4 others
Brother of Isabel Grey; Jane Huddleston; Margaret Maulson; Mary Grey; Elizabeth Brandling and 6 others
Half brother of Sir Edward Grey, MP; Arthur Grey; Robert Grey and Martha Grey

Occupation: Baron Grey of Werke
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Lord William Grey, Baron of Werke

http://www.klarskov.org/humble/grove.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_Grey_of_Werke

http://fabpedigree.com/s096/f164290.htm

Family and Education b. c.Aug. 1593,1 1st s. of Sir Ralph Grey* and his 1st w. Jane, da. of William Ardington of Ardington, Berks.; half-bro. of Edward†.2 educ. Univ. Coll. Oxf., BA 1611; G. Inn 1613;3 travelled abroad 1614-17?4 m. 1619,5 Cecilia (bur. 1 Feb. 1668), da. of Sir John Wentworth of Gosfield, Essex, 6s. (5 d.v.p.) 2da. (1 d.v.p.).6 cr. bt. 15 June 1619;7 suc. fa. 1623;8 cr. Bar. Grey of Warke 11 Feb. 1624.9 d. 29 July 1674.10

Offices Held

Commr. oyer and terminer, Cumb., Northumb., Westmld. 1624-5, 1663-at least 1667,11 Northern circ. 1624-?7, 1629-41, 1654-at least 1673,12 London 1625-7, 1628-41, 1644-5, 1654-at least 1672,13 Mdx. 1625-7, 1628-41, 1644-5, 1660-at least 1671,14 Home circ. 1637-42, 1654-9,15 Essex 1644-5,16 Norf. circ. 1659,17 Yorks. 1663,18 subsidy, Northumb. 1624;19 j.p. Northumb. 1624-7, 1628-at least 1640, by 1650-at least 1666,20 co. Dur. 1624-7,21 Mdx. 1625-7, 1628-42, by 1650-3, 1660-at least 1666,22 Essex 1636-42, by 1644-53, by 1656-at least 1666,23 Herts. and Westmld. by 1650-at least 1653, Westminster by 1650-3;24 commr. Forced Loan, Northumb. 1627,25 swans, Home cos. 1629,26 perambulation, Waltham forest, Essex 1641;27 ld. lt. Cumb. from 1642;28 commr. ct. martial, London and Westminster 1644,29 Northern Assoc. 1645,30 sewers, Mdx. 1645, 1654-7, London 1645, Northumb. 1659,31 appeals, Oxf. univ. visitation 1647;32 elder of classis, Epping, Essex 1648;33 commr. militia, northern cos. 1648, Essex 1648, 1660,34 assessment, Essex 1657.35

Speaker, House of Lords Sept.-Nov. 1642, 1643-6.36

Maj.-gen., Eastern Assoc. 1642-3.37

Jt. kpr., duchy of Lancaster’s seal 1645-8;38 commr. regulate excise 1645,39 excommunication 1646, sale of bps.’ lands 1646-8,40 member, cttee. for compounding with delinquents 1647, commr. indemnity 1647,41 Navy 1647, Gt. Seal 1648, scandalous offences 1648.42

Biography The son of one of Northumberland’s leading gentlemen, Grey boasted two very distinguished godparents, the 1st Lord Burghley (Sir William Cecil†) and Queen Elizabeth’s cousin, Lord Hunsdon (Henry Carey†).43 However, Grey’s mother was a recusant, and he himself spent part of his early life as a household servant of the Catholic Lord William Howard of Naworth. A survey of religious affiliations in Northumberland in 1607 found that Grey was not attending Anglican services.44 Such leanings help to explain why, despite a very thorough education, he played no discernible part in public life until he acquired a baronetcy in 1619. The customary payment for this honour was apparently waived in Grey’s case.45

Two years later, Grey was elected to represent Northumberland in Parliament. Because of his baronetcy he was accorded the status of senior knight of the shire, a fact which offended his junior colleague, the older and much more experienced Sir Henry Widdrington. The latter even attacked Grey indirectly on 27 Apr. 1621, when he condemned the order of baronets, stating that ‘it grieved him to see skipjacks prank before men whose ancestors have gained place in the commonwealth and by blood’ simply on account of an honour that they had purchased.46 Grey had an almost immediate impact at Westminster, intervening on behalf of a fellow Member who was abused by a guard when the Commons presented its new Speaker to the king (3 February). His two recorded speeches both concerned northern matters. On 9 May he noted that the bill to ban imports of Irish cattle would need a clause to guard against livestock being brought into England via Scotland. He also supported a proviso to exempt Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland from the bill against wool exports, affirming that the surrounding districts would be impoverished by this legislation, as the local wool was too coarse to be used for cloth manufacture (30 November).47 Grey attracted only one personal committee nomination, to consider the bill against foreign bribes, but he was also entitled as a Northumberland Member to attend the legislative committee on Sir Richard Lumley’s estates (19 Mar. and 25 May).48

Grey succeeded to his patrimony in September 1623. Two months later he was summoned before the Privy Council, after his servants were caught smuggling wool across the Scottish border, in breach of a royal Proclamation of 1622.49 His lenient treatment was conceivably influenced by the fact that he was negotiating to purchase a peerage. A warrant for his patent was issued on 3 Feb. 1624, only two days after his appearance before the Council. At the last moment, the duke of Buckingham intervened to ensure that his client Sir Edward Conway I* received the £4,000 fee. While revised payment terms were agreed, Conway delayed the patent, much to the annoyance of Grey, who needed a rapid resolution because he was also standing again as a knight of the shire. In the event, the patent passed the Great Seal on 11 February. The Northumberland election was held on the following day, and Grey was returned before news arrived that he was no longer eligible to sit.50 The inevitable by-election was ordered by the House on 27 February.51

Grey was dismissed from most of his offices in 1627, apparently for opposing the Forced Loan, though he was quickly restored again once he made his peace with the Crown in the following year.52 In 1629 he was licensed to empark his Chillingham estate, and he probably modernized the house around the same time. However, he found life in the south more congenial, and purchased Epping Place in 1636 from one of his wife’s relatives, subsequently making it his main seat.53 During the Civil War Grey sided with Parliament, though his record as commander of the Eastern Association’s forces in 1642-3 was undistinguished.54 He also acted as Speaker of the residual House of Lords for two-and-a-half years, despite being briefly imprisoned by his fellow peers in July 1643 for refusing to negotiate a military alliance with the Scots.55 Grey was appointed to the new Council of State in February 1649, but questioned its legitimacy and refused to serve on it. Thereafter, he was appointed only to local commissions, though he successfully made his peace with Charles II at the Restoration, and apparently retained many of his offices until his death.56 Grey was a Presbyterian in later life, and the godly Protestant sentiments of his will, drafted on 2 Mar. 1672, contrasted sharply with his Catholic upbringing. He died in July 1674, and was buried at Epping. His younger son Thomas sat for Ludgershall in the Cavalier Parliament.57

Ref Volumes: 1604-1629 Author: Paul Hunneyball Notes 1. CBP, 1560-94, p. 485. 2. Hist. Northumb. (Northumb. Co. Hist. Cttee.), xiv. 328. 3. Al. Ox.; GI Admiss. 4. CSP Dom. 1611-18, p. 235. 5. CP. 6. Hist. Northumb. xiv. 328; PROB 11/345, f. 369. 7. CB. 8. WARD 7/70/192. 9. CP. 10. Hist. Northumb. xiv. 328. 11. C181/3, f. 106v; C181/7, pp. 194, 392. 12. Ibid. ff. 120v, 209, 262; C181/5, f. 203; 181/6, p. 17; 181/7, p. 640. 13. C181/3, ff. 182, 211, 242v; 181/5, ff. 214, 230, 264v; 181/6, p. 1; 181/7, p. 630. 14. C181/3, ff. 183, 219, 243v; 181/5, ff. 213, 231, 246v; 181/7, pp. 3, 589. 15. C181/5, ff. 64v, 221v; 181/6, pp. 12, 372. 16. C181/5, ff. 237, 254. 17. C181/6, p. 378. 18. C181/7, p. 220. 19. C212/22/23. 20. C231/4, ff. 167v, 228v, 259v; C66/2859; C193/13/3, f. 49; C66/3074. 21. C231/4, f. 168; E163/18/12, f. 20v. 22. C231/4, ff. 185, 259; 231/5, p. 533; E163/18/12, f. 49v; C193/13/3, f. 40v; 13/4, f. 59; C220/9/4, f. 52v; C66/3074. 23. C231/5, pp. 218, 530; HMC 10th Rep. iv. 508; C193/13/4, f. 34v; 13/6, f. 31v; C66/3074. 24. C193/13/3, ff. 30, 66v, 81v; 13/4, ff. 43v, 104v, 127v. 25. C193/12/2, f. 42v. 26. C181/3, f. 267v. 27. C181/5, f. 208. 28. A. and O. i. 1. 29. Ibid. 487. 30. Ibid. 707. 31. C181/5, ff. 262, 266; C181/6, pp. 4, 200, 359. 32. A. and O. i. 927. 33. Division of Co. of Essex into Several Classes (1648), p. 11. 34. A. and O. i. 1141, 1235-6, 1241; ii. 1431. 35. Ibid. ii. 1068. 36. LJ, v. 350b-455a; vi. 194a; viii. 122b. 37. A. and O. i. 52, 242. 38. Duchy of Lancaster Office-Holders ed. R. Somerville, 2. 39. A. and O. i. 691. 40. Ibid. 853, 905, 1227. 41. Ibid. 914, 937. 42. Ibid. 1047, 1107, 1208. 43. CBP, 1560-94, p. 485. 44. HMC Hatfield, xix. 3. 45. SCL, EM1284 (b). 46. OR; CD 1621, v. 109. 47. CD 1621, ii. 16, 478; Nicholas, Procs. 1621, ii. 49, 255; CJ, i. 653a. 48. CJ, i. 562a, 626b. 49. APC, 1623-5, pp. 120, 184-5; CSP Dom. 1623-5, pp. 101, 133, 172-3. 50. CSP Dom. 1623-5, pp. 159, 161, 173; Chamberlain Letters ed. N.E. McClure, ii. 546; APC, 1623-5, p. 172; OR. 51. CJ, i. 722a. 52. R. Cust, Forced Loan, 102 n., 109; Lords Procs. 1628, v. 464-5. 53. CSP Dom. 1628-9, p. 498; S.J. and S.J. Watts, From Border to Middle Shire: Northumb. 1586-1625, p. 175; J.H. Holmes, ‘Epping Place’, Trans. Essex Arch. Soc. n.s. xxv, 329-30. 54. C. Holmes, Eastern Association in Eng. Civil War, 55, 66, 69-70; HMC 7th Rep. 550-1. 55. LJ, vi. 122a, 124a, 134a-b, 148a. 56. CSP Dom. 1649-50, pp. 6, 9; 1660-1, p. 37. 57. PROB 11/345, ff. 368v-9v; Hist. Northumb. xiv. 328

Om Lord William Grey, Baron of Werke (Norsk)

William Grey, 1. Baron Grey av Warke (Werke) grevskapet Northumberland

  • 1619 Wilhiam og Cecilia (Prisilla) giftet seg De fikk 9 barn som oppført i slektstavler.
  • 1619 Han opprettet baroniet Chillingham, Northumberland
  • 1621 til 1622 Han ble valgt som han medlem av parlamentet for Northumberland og støttet den parlamentariske årsak i den engelske borgerkrigen.
  • 1624 Han overtok eiendommene Chillingham og Werke når hans far døde og fikk adelstittelen Baron Grey av Werke den 11 februar
  • 1642 Grey var kommandør av parlamentariske styrker i øst.
  • 1643 Han ble fengslet for han nektet å reise som kommissær til Skottland.
  • 1643 Han var speaker av House of Lords i 1643 var en av de lov mennene på Westminster forsamlingen fra 1643 til 1649.
  • 1648 William Gray han utnevnt til kommissær for Det store segl, men ble nektet i 1649.

http://www.klarskov.org/humble/grove.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_Grey_of_Werke

http://fabpedigree.com/s096/f164290.htm

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Lord William Grey, Baron of Werke's Timeline

1593
August 1593
Werke, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom
1620
1620
Age 26
Werke, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom
1621
1621
Age 27
Werke, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom
1625
1625
Age 31
1626
1626
Age 32
Werke, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom
1630
1630
Age 36
Werke, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom
1630
Age 36
Werke, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom
1631
1631
Age 37
Werke, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom
1632
1632
Age 38
Werkw, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom