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Louis Gaston Hébert

French: René Hubert ou Hébert
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois, Paris, Isle de France, France
Death: January 23, 1627 (51)
Québec, Québec, Canada (Fell on the ice)
Place of Burial: Québec, Québec, Canada
Immediate Family:

Son of Nicolas René Hébert and Jacqueline-Marie Pageau dit Pajot
Husband of Marie Roulette and Marie Rollet
Father of Jean-Baptiste Hubert; Anne Hébert; Marie-Guillemette Hébert; Jean-Guillaume Hébert and Joseph Hébert
Brother of Charlotte Hébert; Madeline Hebert; Jacques Nicolas Hébert; Thomas Billiou; Marie Hébert and 1 other
Half brother of Madeleine Hébert

Occupation: apothicaire, commerçant, cultivateur, Apothicaire, In Paris, a merchant-apothecary, griocer, and a bourgeois de Paris. In Quebec, a farmer and Sieur de Lespinay. First permanet European farmer in Quebec. Arrived in Quebec on 15 July 1617., Seigneur
Managed by: Clyde Frederic Hibbard
Last Updated:

About Louis Hébert

Notes

==Louis Hébert==

Louis Hébert (c. 1575 – 25 January 1627) is widely considered to be the first Canadian apothecary as well as the first European to farm in Canada. He was born around 1575 at 129 de la rue Saint-Honoré in Paris to Nicolas Hébert and Jacqueline Pajot. He married Marie Rollet on 19 February 1601 at the Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris.[1]

In 1606, he accompanied his cousin in law, Jean de Biencourt de Poutrincourt et de Saint-Just, to Acadia along with Samuel Champlain. He lived at Port-Royal (now Annapolis, in southern Nova Scotia) from 1606 to 1607 and from 1611 to 1613 when Port-Royal was destroyed by the English deputy governor of Virginia Samuel Argall.

In 1617, with his wife, Marie Rollet, and their three children, Guillaume (3 years old), Guillaumette (9 years old), and Anne (14 years old), he left Paris forever to live in Quebec City. He died there 10 years later because of an injury that occurred when he fell on a patch of ice.

Statues of Louis Hébert, Marie Rollet, and their children are prominent in Parc Montmorency overlooking the St. Lawrence River in Quebec City.

Early life Louis Hébert was born in Paris in 1575, the son of Nicolas Hébert and Jacqueline Pajot. Nicolas was an apothecary with a practice in Paris.[2] In the tradition of the day, Louis followed in his father's profession. Louis was trained in medical arts and science, becoming a specialist in pharmacology. It was from this that he developed what was to become a lifelong interest in plants and gardening. By 1600, Louis was established in Paris as an apothecary and spice merchant. In 1601,[1] he married Marie Rollet.[3]

Meeting with Champlain and Settling in New France In 1604, Louis' cousin, Pierre de Gue, Sieur de Monts, led an expedition to L'Ile Sainte croix in hopes of making a fortune in the fur trade. The expedition's first winter was very hard. There was a shortage of fresh water and firewood, and 36 of the 80 expedition members died of scurvy. In the following summer of 1605, the expedition relocated across the bay at Port-Royal (today known as Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia).

Louis Hébert, apothecary at Port-Royal, Acadia, painted by C. W. Jefferys, collection of the National Historical site of Port-Royal. In 1606, Louis joined the expedition, now located at Port-Royal. As a pharmacist, he was interested in plants and enjoyed horticulture, seeming to possess a "green thumb", growing hemp and other plants. He was highly regarded, and particular note was made of his knowledge and pleasure in cultivating the land. He participated in the construction of a grist-mill on the Allain River near present-day Annapolis Royal. Experimental farming activities were conducted, with various grains being seeded in the local fields. He looked after the health of the pioneers, and cultivated native drug plants introduced to him by the Micmac Indians. He returned to France in 1607, after the trade concession that had been granted to the de Monts expedition had expired.

In 1610, Louis Hébert returned to Port Royal with Jean de Biencourt de Poutrincourt. It has been claimed that a few months later his wife joined him and became one of the first French women to come to New France, but the claim has not been documented. Louis continued his agricultural interests, sowing wheat and planting vines. The colony at Port Royal seemed to take root, but in 1613 it was destroyed by the English coming up from Virginia. The French colonists returned to France, and Louis established a medical practice and apothecary shop (pharmacy) in Paris.

At this time, Quebec was a settlement of some fifty white men who were all transient soldiers, fur trappers, or missionaries. The economy of the settlement was dependent on some 20,000 beaver pelts that were annually returned to French merchants in exchange for supplies. The "Compagnie de Canada", made up of merchants from Rouen, St. Malo, and La Rochelle, had a trading monopoly that controlled the fur trade in Quebec.

Champlain, who founded Quebec in 1608, saw a desperate need for medical service and agricultural self-sufficiency for Quebec. Champlain had met Louis Hébert during the earlier expedition to Port Royal, and had recognized Louis' outstanding qualities. Champlain approached Louis with an offer from the "Compagnie de Canada". He had met Louis when they were both in Acadie. They mutually respected each other.

Compagnie de Canada and Permanent Settlement in Quebec Champlain spent the winter of 1616-1617 in Paris searching for support for his colony of Quebec. Hébert was allured, believing that there would be good opportunities for him in the St. Lawrence Valley. The Compagnie de Canada made Hébert an offer: If he would take his family to Quebec for three years and practice medicine in the settlement and establish farming, the company would pay him an annual salary of 600 livres (pounds) and grant him ten acres of land at the settlement on which to build his house and farm. Louis agreed to the terms and signed the contract.

Louis sold his practice and his home, and proceeded with his wife, son, and two daughters to the port of Honfleur, France. When he arrived, Louis was told by the ship's master that instructions from the Compagnie de Canada were that they could only board if Louis agreed to sign a new contract with the company. The new provision reduced his annual salary to 300 livres per year, required him to serve as the physician and surgeon at the settlement, and required him to farm ten aces of land and give the company exclusive right to buy all of his agricultural products at the prevailing price in France. Having already sold his house and left his practice, Louis reluctantly accepted and signed the new contract.

On April 11, 1617, Hébert and his family left Honfleur aboard the Saint-Etienne (captained by Normand Morin) and arrived in Quebec on 15 July. Only five other French families were to follow them on similar voyages to New France in the next 10 years.

In the spring of 1617 Louis became the first private individual to receive a grant of land in the New World from the French Government.

Upon his arrival in Quebec, Louis selected ten acres on a site that is today located in the city of Quebec between Ste. Famille and Couillard Streets, on the grounds of the Seminary of Quebec and Basilica of Notre Dame. Soon afterward, Louis started clearing out some old-growth forest so he could plant crops. This put him in conflict with the fur trading company, who was strongly opposed to deforestation for farming because of its adverse effect on the fur business. Louis had to work very hard, doing all the work by hand. The fur trading company would not let him import a plough from France. On this land, Louis, his son Guillaume, and an unnamed servant with the help of only an axe, a pick and a spade, broke the soil and raised corn, winter wheat, beans, peas, and livestock including cattle, swine, and fowl. He also established an apple orchard and a vineyard.

In 1621, his daughter Guillemette married Guillaume Couillard who joined the family business.

By 1620, Louis' hard work was finally recognized as having been of great service to the colony: for being the physician and surgeon; for being its principal provider of food; and for having fostered good relationships with the natives. He was appointed Procurator to the King, which allowed him to personally intervene in matters in the name of the King.[2]

In 1623, Louis became the first "Seigneur" of New France when he was granted the noble fief of "Sault-au-Matelot". In 1626 he was further granted "le fief de la riviere, St Charles" in recognition of his meritorious service.[2]

His Death Louis died on January 25, 1627 from injuries suffered after slipping on ice. The colony held a funeral for its first colonist. Louis was as respected by the Native Americans as he was by the other Frenchmen. He was first buried in the cemetery of the Recollets, but in 1678 his remains inside his cedar coffin were transported to the newly built vault of the Recollets (the Franciscans)[4] with the remains of brother Pacifique Duplessis. Hébert was the first to be laid to rest in this new structure.

Descendants

Marie Rollet and her children At the beginning of 1800, Louis Hébert and Marie Rollet had 4,592 descendants married in Quebec, according to the PRDH (Historical Demography Research Program) of the Université de Montréal, making the couple the tenth most important one in French-Canadian ancestry at that time. Given the migratory routes of French-Canadians, their descendants thus live mainly in Canada (especially Quebec and Manitoba), but also in communities in New England, upstate New York, and the Midwest (especially Michigan, Missouri, Illinois, Minnesota).

Louis Hébert and Marie Rollet had two daughters, Anne and Guillaumette, and one son, Guillaume. Guillaume married Hélène Desportes, said to be the first white child born in New France.[5] Guillaume and Hélène had a daughter, Françoise Hébert, and a son, Joseph who married Marie-Charlotte de Poytiers in 1660. Joseph and Marie-Charlotte had a single son, Joseph in 1661, born while his father was captured and killed by Iroquois. As there is no further mention of this boy, he is presumed to have died as a small child, and there were no other children.[6]

Granddaughter Françoise Hébert married Guillaume Fournier, which ended the surname Hébert descended from Louis. However, some descendants of Louis Hébert and Marie Rollet may also share the name Hébert through marriage of female descendants with other men named Hébert as there were several other male Hébert immigrants to New France or Acadia with male descendants.

As their first child, daughter Anne died in her first pregnancy, the descendants of Louis Hébert and his wife Marie Rollet arise from their second child, daughter Guillaumette, and her husband Guillaume Couillard; or from their granddaughter Françoise Hébert (child of son Guillaume) and her husband Guillaume Fournier.

See René Jetté, Dictionnaire généalogique des familles du Québec des origines à 1730, Montréal, Les Presses de l'Université de Montréal, 1983, pp. 561–562. See also Robert Prévost, Portraits de familles pionnières, Montréal, Éditions Libre Expression, 1993, Tome 1, pp. 149–154.

Madame Hebért teaching Lasting Recognition in Canada

Detail of statue atop memorial Hébert overcame the hardships and became the first Canadian to support his family from the soil. He imported from France the first ox to pull a plough in Canada, but unfortunately, the first plough did not arrive until a year after his death.

Jacques Lacoursiere noted that Hébert had many firsts. He was the first colonist of Quebec, first colonist to live off the land, his daughter Anne's marriage to Etienne Jonquet in 1617 was the first in New France, and he was the first lord of New France.

When English corsairs David Kirke and his brothers took possession of Quebec, his family did not leave, but waited out the three years until Quebec was returned to France.

Marie Rollet quietly remarried, to Guillaume Hubou, two years after Louis' death. After the three year occupation by the English, Champlain asked her to move to Quebec and Louis' house became a residence for Indian youth entrusted to the Jesuits for their education.

There is a monument to Louis Hébert in Montmorency Park, that symbolizes the importance of Louis Hébert and his family in the beginnings of Quebec. On top is Louis Hébert holding a sheaf of grain (wheat or barley) in one hand and a sickle in the other. On one side of the base, Marie Rollet clasps her three children in her arms. On the other, son-in-law Guillaume Couillard has a plough in hand.

References "L'acte de mariage de Louis Hébert et Marie Rollet retrouvé" [Record of marriage of Louis Hébert and Marie Rollet found]. Le Journal de Montréal (in French). Retrieved 2 March 2017. Bennett, Ethel M. G. (2003). "HÉBERT, LOUIS". Dictionary of Canadian Biography. University of Toronto/Université Laval. Retrieved June 17, 2016. Rabideau, Mark (March 9, 2010). "Marie Rollet, Pioneer". Many Roads. Retrieved March 6, 2017. "Récollets". Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved June 17, 2016. Bennett, Ethel M. G. "Hélène Desportes". Dictionary of Canadian Biography. Retrieved 14 November 2013. Bennett, Ethel M. G. "Joseph Hébert, grandson of Louis". Dictionary of Canadian Biography. Retrieved 14 November 2013. Bibliography Goulet, George; Goulet, Terry (2007). Louis Hébert and Marie Rollet, Canada's Premier Pioneers. FabJob, Calgary. ISBN 1-897286-15-5. A history of Canada's first permanent colonial settlers. External links Biography at the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online Picture of statue in Montmorency Parc in Quebec City, Quebec French article on Louis Hébert and photo of his statue. https://www.revolvy.com/page/Louis-H%C3%A9bert?cr=1

Biographie Biography

Louis Hébert est né à Paris vers 1575 et décédé à Québec en janvier 1627. Il exerçait à Paris, au « Mortier d'or » sur l'Île de la Cité près du Louvre, comme jadis son défunt père, Nicolas Hébert (vers 1540-1600), la profession d'apothicaire-épicier, lorsque, marié (en juillet 1602) et père d'un premier enfant (la bambine Anne, née en 1603), le désir lui prit, à l'âge de presque 30 ans, de connaître le Nouveau-Monde, où (qui sait?) l'avenir pourrait s'avérer plus doux et plus prometteur qu'à Paris ou ailleurs en France, pour une jeune famille et dans la profession.

Louis Hébert fut membre de « l'expédition sans femme ni enfant » [1] de Pierre Dugua de Mons, partant en 1606 joindre l'expédition commencée en 1604 pour un premier séjour en Acadie, avec Jean de Poutrincourt, son cousin par alliance, de petite noblesse et partenaire ami de ce Dugua. Il y naviguera, explorera et jardinera amicalement avec Samuel Champlain (de 5 ans son puîné et navigateur, explorateur, cartographe), échangera avec les Amérindiens des connaissances sur les plantes médicinales, soignera quelques personnes et participera à « l'Ordre de Bon Temps ».

En 1607, la perte du monopole de Dugua de Mons les força tous à rentrer en France.

Louis Hébert repartit pour l'Acadie en 1610 avec ce Jean de Poutrincourt, alors successeur de Dugua, et y séjourna jusqu'en 1613. La colonie, cette année-là, fut attaquée par les Anglais.

Fait prisonnier comme les autres, Louis fut ramené en France.

Mais en 1616, convaincu par Samuel de Champlain de s'établir à Québec et vendant tous ses biens, il repartit pour le Canada avec sa femme, quadragénaire comme lui, et leurs 3 enfants survivants, alors âgés de 14, 9 et 3 ans.

Travaillant pour la compagnie des marchands de fourrures, prodiguant, en dehors de cette tâche, des soins et de l'aide aux plus démunis, Louis Hébert entreprit également de défricher la terre, sans boeuf ni charrue mais avec l'aide de son beau-frère Claude Rollet, et d'y subsister de ses propres ressources.

En 1620, Champlain le nomma procureur du roi dans la cité de Québec et en 1625, il devenait le premier propriétaire de ses terres agricoles.

— Avant 1634, seules les familles de Louis Hébert et de son gendre Guillaume Couillard avaient bâti maison à Québec. Tous les autres qui y séjournaient habitaient dans l'un ou l'autre fort, nommés « l'Habitation » (sur l'actuelle Place royale, près du fleuve) ou, depuis environ 1624, le « fort Saint-Louis » (sur la falaise, au sud de l'actuel hôtel « Château Frontenac ») ou dans les habitations des Récollets ou des Jésuites.

Décédé des suites d'une mauvaise chute sur la glace pendant l'hiver 1626-1627, Louis Hébert fut inhumé à Québec le 25 janvier 1627.

   Louis Hébert, premier véritable colon, défricheur, cultivateur, et premier pharmacien en Nouvelle-France, est aujourd'hui une figure emblématique des premières heures de cette histoire, laissant le souvenir d'un homme courageux, d'une grande générosité, aimé de tous, Français comme Amérindiens. Il fut aussi le premier à cultiver le Cannabis en Nouvelle-France. D'autant plus que la Compagnie des marchands n'a jamais voulu lui apporter ni un bœuf ni une charrue. C'est son gendre, Guillaume Couillard, ancien commis au magasin de la Compagnie des marchands, qui reçut la première charrue et le premier bœuf : c'était à l'été 1627.

Quant à sa femme Marie Rollet, qu'il avait épousée au début de juillet 1602 à Paris, elle épousa à Québec en 1629 un certain Guillaume Hubou, un nouvel arrivant que tous admiraient.

Elle s'occupa de former à l'Européenne au moins 2 jeunes Amérindiennes, nées vers 1630, qui ensuite épousèrent des Français et comptent aujourd'hui une assez nombreuse postérité : la fille d'un certain chef nommé Manitouabéouich et la fille que Jean Nicolet eut de sa première épouse, une Algonquine du Lac Nipissing (une excroissance vers le nord-est de l'actuel Lac Huron, près de Sturgeon Fall, Ontario).

Marie Rollet eut la douleur de perdre sa fille aînée Anne (décédée à l'âge de 16 ans à Québec en 1619, à son premier accouchement), d'assister au déclin et à la mort de Champlain (paralysé à l'automne 1635, décédé le 25 décembre 1635) et de son jeune fils Guillaume, marié à 20 ans en 1634 et décédé en 1639. Mais elle eut la joie de connaître, de choyer et de voir grandir plusieurs de ses petits-enfants, ses voisins immédiats.

Marie Rollet et sa famille furent les seuls à demeurer en permanence à Québec de 1629 à 1632 ou 1633, quand des forbans franco-anglais, les frères Kirke avaient fait prisonniers et déporté en Angleterre tous les autres résidents de Québec, y compris Champlain et Abraham Martin, et maîtrisaient les lieux, alors que la paix venait d'être faite entre les royaumes de France et d'Angleterre.

Marie Rollet fut inhumée à Québec le 27 mai 1649, à l'âge d'environ 74 ans — ce qui était pour l'époque un âge très avancé.


Tanguay Vol 1 Page 301: Premier famille a Quebec, Canada, etabli en 1617. (One of The first families of Quebec, Canada, established in 1617). There are three or four paragraphs pertaining to this family on Page 301. Samuel De Champlain, Father of New France, by Samuel Elliot Morrison. Page 89, paragraph 1. Louis sailed from France on the "Jonas" and was in Port Royal, L'Acadia on Nov. 14, 1606.

From the web site: http://www.touribec.com/quebec02.html

[1617] Louis Hebert, Le premier agriculteur De La colonie, setablit à Quebec, Canada avec son epouse, Marie Rollet, et leurs trois enfants.... Translation.... In 1617 Louis Hebert, the first farmer of the colony, settles in Quebec with his wife, Marie Rollet, and their three children. In 1620one of the girls of Louis Hebert and Marie Rollet gives rise to the first child in the colony.

The young Parisian apothecary Louis Hebert answered the call of the New World in 1604, when he helped Pierre Du Gua, sieur De Monts, and Samuel De Champlain build the first European settlement of North America. The Habitation, as it was called, referred to a number of wood buildings located on Sainte Croix Island. There, Hebert looked after the health of the pioneers, and cultivated native drug plants offered by Micmac Indians. The settlement at Sainte Croix Island wasn't successful. In the spring of 1605, the small colony, already greatly reduced in number, moved to the north shore of the Baie Francaise, then built and settled at Port Royal (today Annapolis Royal, N.S.) for about two year. Forced to move again, Champlain built a second Habitation at Quebec, Canada in 1608. The latter was destroyed by the English in 1613, so Louis Hebert returned to his Parisian apothecary shop. The lure of Canada was strong, however, and in 1617, Louis and his family returned with Champlain to Quebec, Canada, where Hebert's "green thumb" gained him lasting fame as the first successful farmer in what is now Canada. He was listed as a druggist, the same profession that his father practiced in the Royal House of Queen Catherine De Medicis.

Father and mother of Louis Hebert Nicolas Hebert b. Paris m. bef 1580 Jacqueline Pajot, daughter of Simon Pajot and Jehanne Guerineau.

[Roger Blanchard.FTW]

Died from a fall on the ice.


Hébert, Louis (Ancêtre) X Rollet, Marie Louis Hébert est le chef de la première famille

établie à Québec, "le premier colon canadien". La vie de Louis Hébert fait partie de l'histoire du pays. C'est lui qui après Champlain prit la plus grande part à l'établissement de Québec. Il est décédé des suites d'une chute sur la glace à l'âge de 52 ans.

Son épouse Marie Rollet avait 25 ans de moins que son mari et ils eurent 3 enfants, Guillaume, Anne et Guillaumette. Sa fille Anne fut la première à se marier en

Nouvelle-France. L'époux d'Anne était Etienne Jonquest. Guillaumette fut mariée à Guillaume Couillard.

Marie Rollet se maria pour la deuxième fois avec Guillaume Hubou le 16 mai 1629. Ils n'auront pas d'enfants.

Louis Hébert, comme premier colon du Québec, avait devancé les Récollets dans ce lieu, non en élevant des bâtiments, mais en défrichant des terres sur lesquelles il avait dessein de s'établir.

Voici ce que l'historien Faillon, dans son "Histoire de la Colonie Française en Canada", nous dit de ce personnage célèbre que nous avons parmi nos ancêtres.

"Par suite d'un calcul misérable pour ne pas dire cruel, les diverses sociétés des

marchands qui étaient allés s'établir à Québec n'y avaient pas défriché, après 22 ans, un arpent et demi de terre, au témoignage de Champlain, et n'avaient jamais voulu donner aux habitants la moyen de cultiver des terres.

"L'un de ces habitants, Louis Hébert, obtint cependant, peu après son arrivée, une

concession de terre où il entreprit le défrichement pour y semer le printemps suivant: Hébert qui possédait dix arpents, était le seul qui put se maintenir avec sa famille.

"Ce fut, sur les instances de Champlain que, l'année 1617, Louis Hébert se détermina à

passer au Canada avec sa famille. Peut-être que, pour faire consentir plus aisement les associés à recevoir ce premier colon, Champlain leur allégua un autre motif d'utilité publique plus propre à faire impression sur ces marchands intéressés; car Hébert était apothicaire et pouvait se rendre utile aux employés de ces messieurs. Hébert justifia les

espérances de Champlain en s'appliquant le premier en Canada à l'agriculture."

Sur la concession de terre qu'il avait obtenue, notre ancêtre se construisit un humble logi : La base de cette construction était en pierre et le pignon en bois.

Parlant du pionnier Louis Hébert notre ancêtre, reprenons les mots d'un historien:

"On peut l'appeler l'Abraham de la colonie, le père des vivants et des croyants, puisque sa postérité a été si nombreuse, qu'elle a produit quantité d'officiers, de robe et d'épée, de marchands habiles pour le négoce, de très dignes ecclésiastiques; enfin un grand nombre de colons chrétiens dont plusieurs même ont beaucoup souffert et d'autres ont été tués par les sauvages, pour les intérêts du pays."

Hébert compte parmi ses nombreux descendants quelques-unes des plus illustres familles du Canada; Joliette, DeLéry, De Ramesay, Fournier et de non

moins illustres personnages, Monseigneur Taschereau. Monseigneur Blanchet, Monseigneur Taché.


Louis Herbert, apothecary, first officer of justice in New France, first Canadian settler to support himself from the soil, married Marrie Rollet; born in Paris 1575? died in Quebeck, Jan. 1627.

According to his descendant, Couillard Despres, he was the son of Louis Hebert who was apothecary at the court of Catherine de' Medici. Documents more recently discovered in Paris indicate that his father was Nicolas Hebert, an apothecary, and that Louis was born in the Mortier d' Or, a house near the Louvre. The niece of Niclas Hebert's wife married Jean de Biencort de Poutrincourt, in 1590. This relationship would explain Louis Hebert's interest inthe early settlements in Acadia and his presence in Du Gua de Monts's expedition.

Lescarbot, in Port-Royal (Annapolis Royal, N.S.) in 1606, speaks with respect of his skill in hunting and his pleasure in excavating the soil, and a river named Hebert. In the summer of 1606, Hebert sailed with Champlain and Poutrincourt along the coast to the southwest, seeking other sites suitable for settlement. Poutrincourt and Hebert were so attracted by what is now Gloucester, Mass. that they planted a clearing there to test the soils fertility. Both hoped to bring their families to settle in the New World. On this voyage, Hebert showed that , though intent on peaceful pursuits, he could be counted on for quick and courageous action in an emergency. With Champlain, Poutrincourt, and several others, he leaped from the ship into a small boat,unclothed, in the middle of the night, in response to some frantic cries from some foolhardy men who, having defied orders, remained on shore, were being attacked by Indians. The JONAS arriving from France in June 1607 brought unwelcome news that, becouse of the cancellation of de Monts's concessions, the company must return to France.

In 1610, Hebert was again in Port-Royal, with the group whom Poutrincourt hoped to establish there. As apothecary, he treated both French and Indian patients. Apparently meals as well as medication received his consideration; he prepared and administered to chief Membertou in his last illness. He was in charge of the settlement when, in 1613, Rene Le Coq de Saussaye came with the Marquise de Guerchevill's colonists, withdrew the two Jesuit fathers from Port-Royal, and sailed away to start a new settlement elsewhere. The capture of his expedition at Ile des Monts Deserts by English that same summer was followed by their distruction of Port-Royal (Nov. 1613), and once more Hebert was forced to return to France.

In the winter of 1616-17, he renewed acquantance with Champlain who was in Paris seeking support for his colony in Quebec. This post, having survived for nine years, probably seemed to Hebert a safe place for settlers, especially as Champlain obtained for him a favorable contract from the fur-tradingcompany in control of the St. Lawrence region. Relying on these promises-200 crwns a year for his services as apothecary, and food and shelter for his family while getting land cleared-Hebert sold his house and garden in Paris and took his wife MarieRollet and three children, Anne, Guillemette, and Guillaume, to Honfluer ready to embark. Ther he discovered the company had no intention of honoring his agreement. The best he could obtain was a new contract, halving his salary and land grant, and stipulating that his family and servant should be at the service of the company without pay. Having no alternative, he accepted and sailed with his family 11 March 1617.

In Quebec his apothecary's skill and his small store of grain were a godsend to the sick and starving winterers. In spite of the company's demands on his and his servant's time, he succeded in clearing and planting some land. Champlain, on his brief visit in 1618, found cultivated land "filled with fine Grain" and gardens in wich flourished a variety of vegtables.

For many years Hebert was the only man besides Champlain himself who took any interest in cultivating land. The trading company did their utmost to discourage him. Both Champlain and Sagard say that the unlawful restrictions they imposed upon him and upon the disposal of his products prevented him from enjoying the fruits of his labours.

When in 1620 Champlain returned from France with (nominally) full authority over the colony, he gave Hebert responsibility in the administration of justice, appointing him king's attorney. In his capacity he signed the colony's petition to the king in 1621. Hebert enjoyed the confidence also of the Indians, whom he, in contrast to his contemporaries, considered as intelligent human beings lacking only education. Many instances bear witness to their respect and admiration for him There is some question of trade relations with Guillaume de Caen, but in view of the fact that the surnameHebert is a very common one, this may be a case of mistaken identity. In 1622 he petitioned the viceroy for a title to his land and on Feb 4, 1623 recieved the grant guarenteeing him possesion. Known later as the fief Sault-au-Matelot, the land included sites at the present occupied by the Basilica, the seminary, and Hebert and Couillard streets. This was ratified on 28 Feb 1626 by the suceeding viceroy and some acres along the St. Charles-the fief Saint-Joseph, later known as fief de Lespinay-were added, both holdings to be enjoyed "en fief noble". Hebert had achieved his cherished ambition: he had brought under his control enough of the wild land of the New World to support himself and his family in independence. The meadows along the St. Charles afforded pasture for cattle; on higher ground he had grain fields, vegetable table gardens, and an orchard planted with apple trees brought from Normandy. All this had been achieved in spite of the company's opposition. Moreover,it had been acomplished with handtools only, not even a plough. (It was not until a year after the death of Hebert, that land was worked with plough and oxen, and agriculture on a larger scale could begin.)

The winter of 1626, he had a fall on the ice which proved fatal. He died 25 Jan. 1627, and was buried in the Recollet cemetary. In 1678, his bones, still in their cedar coffin, were transfered to the vault of the newly erected Recollet chapel and with those of Brother Pacifique Duplessis were the first to rest there.


Louis Hébert was born in Paris in 1575, he marries the Parisian Marie Rollet in 1601. Louis Hébert appeared for the first time in 1606, with Port-Royal, in Acadie. He sets out again l?année following to return in 1610, but the English s?emparent of l?Acadie and the French drive out some. He is made prisoner by the English with l?Île Deserted Mounts. Then, Port-Royal is destroyed in 1613. Once more Hébert is constrained to turn over to France.

With l?hiver 1616-17, he joins again knowledge with Samuel de Champlain who obtains to him a contract with the company of draft of furs for News-France. Hébert sells his house and his garden in Paris and brings his Marie wife and her three children, Anne, Guillemette and Guillaume Hébert.

During many years, Hébert is only, in addition to Champlain itself to cultivate the ground and to live of its harvests. Louis Hébert does not count descendants bearing his name

His son Guillaume Hébert heir to half of the paternal strongholds, marries the 1 er October 1634, in Quebec, Helene Desportes, girl of Pierre Desportes and Francoise Langlois, sister of Marguerite Langlois, married to Abraham Martin Pierre, Francoise and Helene are turned over to France, after the catch of Quebec, by Kirke, July 24, 1629. Helene Desportes returned to Quebec, a little before her marriage, in 1634. After the death of Guillaume Hébert, September 23, 1639, she remarries in 1640, with Noël Morin and among the children of this couple, two Morin girls is related to this genealogy.

Thus, the only downward one of Guillaume Hébert, the son of Louis Hébert and Marie Rollet, c?est Francoise Hébert, born in 1638. It s?est married on November 20, 1651, in Guillaume Baker originating in Coulmer in Normandy, born about 1619. It becomes in News-France, Co-lord of Saint-Charles, it dies in 1699, in Montmagny. Of l?union of Francoise Hébert and Guillaume Baker, four their children form branches which concern us in this genealogy.

Two girls marry the first, Marie Fournier, in 1670, with Pierre Blanchet and Francoise Fournier, in 1686, with Jacques Boulay Then the son Jean Baker Marie with Marie-Jeanne Roy(Le) in 1687. Finally, Simon Baker, in 1691, wife Marie-Catherine Rousseau whose two their girls come to be grafted to also give us a little blood from the first colonist d?Acadie and News-France, is Genevieve Fournier, in 1713, with Pierre Gagné and Marie-madeleine Fournier, in 1715, with Étienne Fontaine

L?ancêtre Louis Hébert dies on January 25, 1627, with the continuation d?une malencontreuse fall qu?il makes on the ice. He is buried with the cemetery of Récollets. Marie Rollet remarie in 1629, with Guillaume Hubou. She dies on May 27, 1649, in Quebec.

Champlain written of him qu?il was "the first head of family residing at the country which lived of this qu?il cultivated, " therefore, the pioneer. our pioneers. June 14: (I)-Louis Hebert (1575-1627), a retired Paris chemist, arrived in Tadoussac, Quebec with his wife, (I)-Marie Rollet (d-1649), and their three children. He is considered by many to be one of the first Europeans to arrive with a primary focus on agriculture. He died from a fall in 1627. They say he cleared a small plot of land for cultivation and began raising cattle. Others suggest agriculture didn't start until 1628 and that Hebert is only allowed to emigrate if he promised not to serve the Natives as (I)-Samuel de Champlain (1567-1635) didn't want the Indians hanging around a (drugstore) settlement. (I)-Samuel de Champlain (1567-1635), however, said he is the first man in Kebec to live on what he grows. It is noteworthy that (I)-Guillaume Couillard ,at this time, is also classified as farmer. It is noteworthy that Hebert had planted crops in Acadia in 1606-1607.

The Compagnie des Marchands de Rouen et de Saint Malo would not give settlers the equipment for agriculture. Even Louis Hebert (1575-1627) had to sell any surplus to the Company at their price. It is noteworthy that Hebert had planted his first crop in Acadia in 1606-1607. The Priests, however, were allowed to do agriculture to teach the savages by example to form a sedentary life. This is an interesting notion, given the savages have been involved in agriculture for some 5,000 years or more. Other accounts suggest the savages were master farmers who taught the French Canadian agriculture. It is very clear that the various New France Fur Companies did not serve the interests of the settlers, but only their own interests.


Louis était apothicaire. On dirait aujourd'hui pharmacien. A l'époque, on soignait et guérissait par les plantes qu'on appelait parfois des simples. On en faisait des potions, tisannes et autres décoctions. On peut présumer que Louis avait apporté avec lui en Nouvelle-France certaine graines nécessaires à la pratique de son art. On peut aussi supposé qu'il en a semé quelques-unes. De là à en faire notre premier agriculteur, il n'y a qu'un pas...vite franchi par nos historiens. Les améridiens qu'il a cotoyés lui firent sûrement découvrir celles que leur chaman utilisaient.


Louis Hébert

Louis Hébert est né vers 1575 dans la région parisienne. Il était le fils de Nicolas Hébert et de Jacqueline Pajot. Il exercera, comme son père, le métier d'apothicaire. Nicolas exerçait sa profession à St-Germain-des-Prés (Paris). Jacqueline décéda vers l'an 1580 et Nicolas quitta également ce monde vers l'an 1600.

Jean de Biencourt fondera Port-Royal (Acadie) en 1605. Louis Hébert y viendra l'année suivante.

Il avait préalablement marié Marie Rollet en 1602, à Paris. Elle était de Paris et avait un frère nommé Claude. Après la mort de Louis, Marie mariera Guillaume Hubou en 1629.

Après avoir fait quelques voyages dans le Nouveau monde et exploré une partie du continent, il décida de s'y installer. C'est ainsi qu"il arrive à Québec le 15 juillet 1617, accompagné de son épouse et de trois enfants (Guillaume, Guillemette et Anne). Il sera le premier à cultiver la terre et y vivre de ce qu'elle produisait.

Louis devait quitter définitivement ce monde le 23 janvier 1627, mort écrasé par un arbre. Son seul fils, Guillaume, maria Hélène Desportes. De leur union est né un seul fils qui ne laissa aucune progéniture.

C'est donc d'autres origines qui donnèrent naissance à la grande famille des Hébert d'Amérique.

   * Paul Pierre Marie Hubert dit Hébert. Nous ne connaissons ni lieu ni date de naissance de Paul Pierre Marie Hubert dit Hébert . Il est né vers 1689 . Il a épousé à Contrecoeur circa 1716 Suzanne Laporte St Georges dit Labonté. Suzanne est la petite fille de Jacques Laporte dit St Georges et la fille de Jacques Laporte St Georges dit Labonté et de Made-leine Paviot . Les parents de Madeleine sont Jacques Paviot dit Lapensée, soldat du régiment Carignan de Salières, et Anne Michel, fille du roi . A Contrecoeur, le couple Paul Pierre Marie Hubert dit Hébert et Suzanne Laporte St Georges dit Labonté habitaient sur le rang du fleuve , 13 enfants sont issus de leur union . La seigneurie de St Denis sur le Richelieu n'est officielle qu'en 1740 et pourtant dès 1729 les Hubert dit Hébert et les familles affiliées par les mariages sont présentes dans ce bourg ( Les Laporte dit St Georges et dit Labonté, les Lacroix dit Bourgault ) Paul Pierre Marie Hubert dit Hébert est décédé à St Denis sur Richelieu le 10 Octobre 1758 à l'âge de 69 ans . Ses enfants et les générations qui ont suivi ont été des pionniers pour l'ouverture de bourgs devenues seigneuries et villages entre la Richelieu et la Yamaska : St Hugues de Bagot , Upton et Chambly . A Contrecoeur la rue Hébert à l'arière de l'Eglise de la Sainte Trinité est ainsi nommée en mémoire des pionniers Hubert dit Hébert . A St Denis sur Richelieu il en est de même pour la rue St Hubert.
   * Michel Hébert, dit Laverdure, vint au Canada un peu avant 1670. Il faisait partie du régiment de Carignan. Le 1er septembre 1670, il épousa Anne Galais à Québec. Michel était le fils d'Antoine et de Jeanne Leroy de Saint-Médéric-de-Paris.
   * Jean Augustin Hébert, dit Jolicoeur, originaire de Caen, en Normandie, est arrivé à Montréal en 1641. Marié à Adrienne du Vivier avaient trois enfants: Jeanne, Léger et Ignace. Leurs deux fils se marièrent et eurent une progéniture nombreuse. On leur compte vingt-et-un fils. La plupart des québécois descendent de cette lignée.
   * Thomas Hébert, dit Larose, originaire de Saint-Omer, diocèse de Bayeux, en Normandie, vint également au Canada. Il était le fils de Thomas Hébert et d'Elisabeth L'Homme. Le 7 février 1679, il se maria avec Barbe Benoît à Boucherville et ils eurent 5 filles et un fils (Jean-Baptiste).
   * François Hébert, dit Lecompte de Roussy, était marié à Anne Fauconnier et étaient originaires du Mont Saint-Aignan, près de Rouen, en Normandie. Il vinrent au Canada en 1654 avec leur fils Nicolas. Ils eurent cinq autres enfants dont trois fils.
   * Antoine Hébert, dit l'Espérance, était originaire de Creuilly, diocèse de Caen, en Normandie. Il épousa en 1701, à Québec, Marguerite Gonthier, fille de Bernard Gonthier et de Marguerite Paquet.

A travers les âges, d'autres Hébert virent renforcer les rangs de cette famille nombreuse en terre d'Amérique et perpétuer le nom du plus célèbre d'entre eux, celui qui est condidéré comme le premier colon du Nouveau monde et qui, ironiquement, n'aura pas eu de descendance.

Source: Le Centre de généalogie francophone d'Amérique Armoiries: "D'azur à deux palmes d'or, passées en saut, accostées de deux étoiles du même, une en chef et une en pointe."

Source: Le Centre de généalogie francophone d'Amérique URL: http://www.genealogie.org Conception et réalisation: Le Cid (Le Centre internet de développement) 1997

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How HEBERTs Arrived in the New World HEBERTs Arrive in Canada

    The first HEBERT to come to the new world was Louis HEBERT in 1604. Louis was born about 1575 in the vicinity of Paris. He worked as an apothecary, as did his father. Louis was the son of Nicolas HEBERT and Jacqueline PAJOT. Nicolas was married to Jacqueline about 1564 in Paris. Nicolas worked as an apothecary at St-Germain-des Pres in Paris. Nicolas died around 1600, and Jacqueline passed away between 27 June 1579 and 15 July 1580 in Paris. Jacqueline's father was Simon PAJOT. he was "maitre chandelier de suif, bourgeois de Paris, paroisse St-Gervais. His inventory is dated before 9 Nov 1553 in Paris. Jacqueline's mother was Jeanne GUERINEAU. Her testament is dated after 3 OCT 1572 in Paris.
    Louis married Marie in Paris. Marie ROLET (or ROLLET) was from Paris and had a brother named Claude. After Louis' death, Marie (sister of Claude) married Guillaume HUBOU in 1629.
    He first came to help explore the land to be settled. He was the apothecary of Acadia (at Port Royal) in 1696-1697 and 1611-1613. After spending some time exploring the New World, he moved there (arriving at Quebec on 15 July 1617) with his wife, Marie ROLLET, and three children (Guillaume, Guillemette, and Anne).
    Although there are descendants who can trace their ancestry back to Louis, none of them get their SURNAME from him. Louis passed away on 23 Jan 1627. His only son, Guillaume, married (b. 1634) Helene DESPORTES. Their union produced only one son, who left no surviving son. Of Louis & Marie's daughters ... Guillemette (b. 1608) married Guillaume COUILLARD in 1621, and Anne married Etienne JONQUEST in 1618. More information the family of Louis HEBERT can be found in Rene Jette's Dictionary ... the source of much of the above information. Jette also lists where he obtained the information, so you can find more if you're willing to do some research.

Louis Hébert est le chef de la première famille établie à Québec, "le premier colon canadien". La vie de Louis Hébert fait partie de l'histoire du pays.

Louis Hébert est né à Paris en 1575, il épouse la parisienne Marie Rollet en 1601.

Louis Hébert est apparu pour la première fois au Canada en 1606, à Port-Royal, en Acadie.

Il repart l’année suivante pour revenir en 1610, mais les Anglais s’emparent de l’Acadie et en chassent les Français. Il est fait prisonnier par les Anglais à l’Île des Monts Déserts. Puis, Port-Royal est détruit en 1613. Une fois de plus Hébert est contraint de retourner en France.

À l’hiver 1616-17, il renoue connaissance avec Samuel de Champlain qui lui obtient un contrat avec la compagnie de traite de fourrures pour la Nouvelle-France. Hébert vend sa maison et son jardin à Paris et amène sa femme Marie et ses trois enfants, Anne, Guillemette et Guillaume Hébert.

C'est lui qui, après Champlain, prit la plus grande part à l'établissement de Québec. Il est décédé des suites d'une chute sur la glace à l'âge de 51 ans.

Sa fille Anne fut la première à se marier en Nouvelle-France. L'époux d'Anne était Etienne Jonquest. Guillaumette fut mariée à Guillaume Couillard.

Marie Rollet se maria pour la deuxième fois avec Guillaume Hubou le 16 mai 1629. Ils n'auront pas d'enfants.

Louis Hébert, comme premier colon du Québec, avait devancé les Récollets dans ce lieu, non en élevant des bâtiments, mais en défrichant des terres sur lesquelles il avait dessein de s'établir.

Voici ce que l'historien Faillon, dans son "Histoire de la Colonie Française en Canada", nous dit de ce personnage célèbre que nous avons parmi nos ancêtres:

"Par suite d'un calcul misérable pour ne pas dire cruel, les diverses sociétés des marchands qui étaient allés s'établir à Québec n'y avaient pas défriché, après 22 ans, un arpent et demi de terre, au témoignage de Champlain, et n'avaient jamais voulu donner aux habitants le moyen de cultiver des terres. "L'un de ces habitants, Louis Hébert, obtint cependant, peu après son arrivée, une concession de terre où il entreprit le défrichement pour y semer le printemps suivant: Hébert qui possédait dix arpents, était le seul qui put se maintenir avec sa famille. "Ce fut, sur les instances de Champlain que, l'année 1617, Louis Hébert se détermina à passer au Canada avec sa famille. Peut-être que, pour faire consentir plus aisement les associés à recevoir ce premier colon, Champlain leur allégua un autre motif d'utilité publique plus propre à faire impression sur ces marchands intéressés; car Hébert était apothicaire et pouvait se rendre utile aux employés de ces messieurs. Hébert justifia les espérances de Champlain en s'appliquant le premier en Canada à l'agriculture."


Louis Hébert

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Louis Hébert (c. 1575 – January 1627) is widely considered to be the first Canadian apothecary as well as the first European to farm in Canada. He was born around 1575 at 129 de la rue Saint-Honoré in Paris to Nicolas Hébert and Jacqueline Pajot. He married Marie Rollet in July 1602 in Paris.

In 1606, he accompanied Jean de Biencourt de Poutrincourt et de Saint-Just, his cousin in law, to Acadia, a new colony (without any woman, wife neither child before almost 30 years) founded by Pierre Dugua Des Monts in 1604, accompanied by Samuel Champlain. He lived at Port-Royal (now Annapolis, in southern Nova Scotia) from 1606 to 1607 and from 1611 to 1613 when Port-Royal was destroyed by the English deputy governor of Virginia Samuel Argall.

In 1617, with his wife, Marie Rollet, and their three children, Guillaume (3 years old), Guillaumette (9 years old), and Anne (14 years old), he left Paris for ever to live in Quebec City. He died there 10 years later because of an injury that occurred when he fell on a patch of ice. Statues of Louis Hébert, Marie Rollet, and their children are prominent in Parc Montmorency overlooking the St. Lawrence River in Quebec City.

Descendants

At the beginning of 1800, Louis Hébert and Marie Rollet had 4592 descendents married in Quebec, according to the PRDH (Historical Demography Research Program) of the Université de Montréal, making the couple the tenth most important one in French-Canadian ancestry at that time. Given the migratory routes of French-Canadians, their descendents thus live mainly in Canada (especially Quebec and Manitoba), but also in communities in New England, upstate New York, and the midwest (especially Michigan, Missouri, Illinois, Minnesota).

Louis Hébert and Marie Rollet had only one son, Guillaume, who married Hélène Desportes. They in turn had a daughter, Francoise Hébert (who married Charles Fournier, thus ending the surname Hébert with her line), and a single son, Joseph Hébert, who in turn had a single son, Joseph Hébert, who died as a small child thus ending the surname Hébert with his line. However, some descendants of Louis Hébert and Marie Rollet may also share the name Hébert through marriage of female descendants with other men named Hébert since there were several other male Hébert immigrants to New France or Acadia with posterity.


Louis and his wife Marie, with their three children are the first (non-native) family to settle in what is now Canada. They arrived in Quebec in 1617.

There is a statue honoring Louis Hebert in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. It stands in a park across the street from the City Hall.


  1. Immigration: 15 Jul 1617 Quebec, Co. Quebec 1

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db...



Apothicaire
Premier officier de justice en Nouvelle France Procureur du Roi en 1621

Arrivé le 15 Juillet 1617 au Canada



He became the first settler of New France and the first pharmacist in New France.

In 1607 he left with the last group that had lingered stubbornly in Port Royal, hard until the last moment to search for mines that have saved the company. Jonas Champlain sailed on September 3, 1607 in Canso. He treats both white and Indian.

He arrived in 1617 in Quebec City. It is a grocer, chemist and pioneer in 1617. He was appointed prosecutor by Samuel de Champlain in 1620.

He is buried in the cemetery of Recollets Convent St-Charles, Quebec in 1627

He died after a bad fall on the ice.

http://www.nosorigines.org/GenealogieQuebec.aspx?genealogy=Louis_He...



In 1604, he was the apothecary/doctor on Samuel de Champlain's expedition from France to Acadia [Nova Scotia].


https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=95474560 y Paternal 10th Great Grandfather... Louis Gaston Hebert was born in 1575 at 129 Rue Honore,Paris,France;the son of Nicholas and Jacqueline Hebert (Pajot). His family was quite affluent,with ties to the Royal Court of Catherine de'Medici;where his father was the official druggist and spice merchant to the Queen.In this capacity,Louis would have had access to the royal palace;and would have been respected as a gentleman of the court. Louis was well educated and adventurous,so when he had a chance to travel to the New World with his cousin,Jean de Biencourt de Poutrincourt,he decided to go. On June 13,1602 he had married Marie Rollet in Paris and would be separated for a short time while going on this voyage, He set sail in 1606 on the "Jonas" and arrived in New France. After less than a year,Louis Hebert and the crew were headed back to Paris. New France was unlike the beautiful city of Paris;wilderness,Indians and harsh weather were difficult. Louis and Marie now had three children;Anne,Guillaume and Marie-Guillimette and the family was quite content yet Louis always recalled the rugged beauty of the new country he had seen. Several years later an old friend approached Louis.Samuel Champlain was looking for volunteers to settle Quebec, After accepting Champlain's offer,Louis,Marie and their three children were sailing to "New France" to live-the year was 1617. The Hebert family encountered many obstacles but they overcame them with their hard work and determination. Louis learned a great deal about new herbal remedies which he treated the people with. Sadly, Louis had a terrible fall on the ice and it cost him his life after only seven years in his new country. Marie would spend thirty years there,raising her family and teaching the native children how to read and write and instructing them in the Christian faith.

Family links:

Spouse:
 Marie Rollet Hebert (1577 - 1649)*
Children:
 Anne Hébert Jonquest (1602 - 1619)*
 Guillemette Hébert Couillard (1608 - 1684)*
 Guillaume Hébert (1614 - 1639)*
  • Calculated relationship

Burial: Notre Dame De Quebec Basilica-Cathedral Quebec Capitale-Nationale Region Quebec, Canada

Created by: Keeper of the Stars Record added: Aug 16, 2012 Find A Grave Memorial# 95474560

http://www.acadian-cajun.com/hebfrcan.htm French-Canadian HEBERTs

Louis HEBERT

The first HEBERT to come to the new world was Louis HEBERT in 1604. Louis was born about 1575 in the vicinity of Paris. He worked as an apothecary, as did his father. Louis was the son of Nicolas HEBERT and Jacqueline PAJOT. Nicolas was married to Jacqueline about 1564 in Paris. Nicolas worked as an apothecary at St-Germain-des Pres in Paris. Nicolas died around 1600, and Jacqueline passed away between 27 June 1579 and 15 July 1580 in Paris. Jacqueline's father was Simon PAJOT. he was "maitre chandelier de suif, bourgeois de Paris, paroisse St-Gervais. His inventory is dated before 9 Nov 1553 in Paris. Jacqueline's mother was Jeanne GUERINEAU. Her testament is dated after 3 OCT 1572 in Paris. Louis married Marie a bit before July 1662 in Paris. Marie ROLET (or ROLLET) was from Paris and had a brother named Claude. After Louis' death, Marie married Guillaume HUBOU in 1629.

Louis first came to help explore the land to be settled. He was the apothecary of Acadia (at Port Royal) in 1696-1697 and 1611-1613. After spending some time exploring the New World, he moved there (arriving at Quebec on 15 July 1617) with his wife, Marie ROLLET, and three children (Guillaume, Guillemette, and Anne). Although there are descendants who can trace their ancestry back to Louis, none of them get their SURNAME from him. Louis passed away on 23 Jan 1627. His only son, Guillaume, married (b. 1634) Helene DESPORTES. Their union produced only one son, who left no surviving son. Of Louis & Marie's daughters ... Guillemette (b. 1608) married Guillaume COUILLARD in 1621, and Anne married Etienne JONQUEST in 1618. More information the family of Louis HEBERT can be found in Rene Jette's Dictionary ... the source of much of the above information. Jette also lists where he obtained the information, so you can find more if you're willing to do some research.


http://www.nosorigines.qc.ca/GenealogieQuebec.aspx?genealogie=Louis..... Il devint le premier colon de la Nouvelle-France et premier pharmacien de la Nouvelle-France.

Il arrive le 4 juillet 1617 à Québec. Il est épicier, apothicaire et défricheur en 1617. Il est nommé procureur du Roi par Samuel de Champlain en 1620. Il est inhumé au cimetière des Récollets, couvent St-Charles, Québec en 1627 Il meurt à la suite d'une mauvaise chute sur la glace. REF CONTAINS COPY OF BIRTH RECORD

SEE ALSO: https://www.wikitree.com/photo.php/3/36/Hebert-1556.jpg



HÉBERT, LOUIS was an apothecary, first officer of justice in New France, first Canadian settler to support himself from the soil, and considered the first permanent settler in Nouvelle France.

His father was Nicolas Hébert, an apothecary to Catherine de Medici, Queen of France. Louis was born in the Mortier d’Or, a house near the Louvre. 

In 1617, with his wife, Marie Rollet, and their three children, Guillaume (3 years old), Guillaumette (9 years old), and Anne (14 years old), he left Paris forever to live in Quebec City. He died there 10 years later because of an injury that occurred when he fell on a patch of ice.

Statues of Louis Hébert, Marie Rollet, and their children are prominent in Parc Montmorency overlooking the St. Lawrence River in Quebec City.

view all 21

Louis Hébert's Timeline

1575
October 14, 1575
Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois, Paris, Isle de France, France
1601
June 7, 1601
Paris, Île de France, France, Paris, Ile-de-France, France
1601
Paris, Seine, Île-de-France, France
1604
1604
6ieme arrondissement, Paris, Paris, Île-de-France, France

Some say closer to 1590. no proof of anything yet.

1604
Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Paris, Isle de France, France
1605
1605
Paris, Île-de-France, France
1606
1606
- 1607
Age 30
Pharmacist and Grocer in Acadia (Port Royal)
1611
1611
- 1613
Age 35
Pharmacist and Grocer in Acadia (Port Royal)