Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg mac Findemna, Rí na h'Éireann {Legendary}

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Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg Raidhdearg (mac Findemna), Rí na h'Éireann {Legendary}

Also Known As: "of the Red Circles", "Lugaid Riab nDerg", "Lugaid Redearg", "Lugaid Reoderc", "Lughaidh Raidhdearg", "Lughaidh Riebdarg", "Lughaaidh Redearglewy Otre", "Riebdearg", "Lughaidh Richbdarg", "Lughaid Sriabhn Dearg", "Red-Striped", "High King of Ireland", "Red Circles"
Birthdate: (26)
Birthplace: Ireland
Death: -8 (26)
Ireland (grief)
Place of Burial: Ireland
Immediate Family:

Son of Bres, Nár and Lothar Findemna mac Echdach and Clothra . ingen Echach
Husband of Derbforgaill, Princess of Denmark
Father of Criomhthann Niadh Nár mac Lughaidh, Rí na h'Éireann

Occupation: 98th High King of Ireland, 98th King of Ireland
Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg mac Findemna, Rí na h'Éireann {Legendary}

98th king of Ireland's

Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg
34 B.C.
Son of Breas-Nar-Lothar, son of Eochaidh Feidhleach (93). He entered into an alliance with the King of Denmark, whose daughter, Dearborguill, he obtained as his wife; he killed himself by falling on his sword. Other annalists claim he died of grief.
<nowiki>----------------------------------</nowiki>

Ftain: magoo.com: Irish Kings by Hugh Mc Cough.

He was known as:

Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg, Lugaidh Sriabhn Dearg, Lugaid Riab n-Derg, Lugaid Riab Derg, Lugaidh Riabh-n-derg (Lewy of the Red Circles)

A pedigree, probably prepared by Lugaidh's grandfather as a memorial to his three sons who had been slain, says that Lugaid was the son of Breas-Nar-Lothar, the three sons of Eochaidh Feidhleach #93. These three sons were known as the three Finns of Emain. They were slain in battle during the reign of their grandfather. Lugaidh married Dearborguilla (Dervorgill), daughter of the King of Denmark, and killed himself in 8 B. C. by falling on his sword. His son was Crimthan Nuadh-Nar #100. The Annals say he "died of grief"—probably because of the premature death of his wife.


98 High King of Ireland

Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg
34 B.C.
Son of Breas-Nar-Lothar, son of Eochaidh Feidhleach (93). He entered into an alliance with the King of Denmark, whose daughter, Dearborguill, he obtained as his wife; he killed himself by falling on his sword. Other annalists claim he died of grief.
 Source: The High Kings of Ireland
             www.familysearch.org

Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg, King of Ireland, d. ca. 009 BC, cause of death was grief.

Father: Fineamhuas

Lughaidh became king of Ireland ca. 34 BC after Ireland had been without a king for five years.

Children:

•Crimhthann Niadhnair, King of Ireland, m. Baine, Princess of Alba, ca. 008, d. 009 in Dun Crimhthainn, Edair, Ireland, cause of death was a massacre by the Aitheach Tuatha.

Spouse: Clothra

Married.

Source : Ancient Kings of Ireland

           

Lugaid Riab nDerg ("the red-striped"), son of the three findemna, triplet sons of Eochu Feidlech, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Conception

He was conceived of incest. The night before the three findemna, Bres, Nár and Lothar, made war for the High Kingship against their father in the Battle of Druimm Criaich, their sister Clothru, concerned that her brothers could die without heirs, seduced all three of them, and a son, Lugaid, was conceived.[1] His epithet came from two red stripes around his neck and waist, dividing him into three: above the neck he resembled Nár; from the neck to the waist he resembled Bres; and from the waist down he resembled Lothar.[2] Incest features further in Lugaid's story: he slept with Clothru himself, conceiving Crimthann Nia Náir.[3]

Rise to power

The Lebor Gabála Érenn says he came to power after a five year interregnum following the death of Conaire Mór (six years according to the Annals of the Four Masters).[4] His foster-father, the Ulster hero Cúchulainn, split the Lia Fáil, the coronation stone at Tara which roared when the rightful king stood or sat on it, with his sword when it failed to roar under Lugaid. It never roared again except under Conn of the Hundred Battles.[5]

Marriage

His wife was Derbforgaill, a daughter of the king of Lochlann (Scandinavia), who had fallen in love with Cúchulainn from afar and come to Ireland with a handmaiden in the form of a pair of swans, linked by a golden chain, to seek him out. Cúchulainn and Lugaid were at Loch Cuan (Strangford Lough) and saw them fly past. Cúchulainn, at Lugaid's urging, shot a slingstone which hit Derbforgaill, penetrating her womb, and the two women fell on the beach in human form. Cúchulainn saved Derbforgaill's life by sucking the stone from her side, and she declared her love for him, but because he had sucked her side he could not marry her - evidently he had violated some geis or taboo. Instead he gave her to Lugaid. They married, and she bore him children.

Deaths of Derbforgaill and Lugaid

One day in deep winter, the men of Ulster made pillars of snow, and the women competed to see who could urinate the deepest into the pillar and prove herself the most desirable to men. Derbforgaill's urine reached the ground, and the other women, out of jealousy, attacked and mutilated her, gouging out her eyes and cutting off her nose, ears, and hair. Lugaid noticed that the snow on the roof of her house had not melted, and realised she was close to death. He and Cúchulainn rushed to the house, but Derbforgaill died shortly after they arrived, and Lugaid died of grief. Cúchulainn avenged them by demolishing the house the women were inside, killing 150 of them.[6]

Lugaid's reign

He had ruled for twenty, twenty-five or twenty-six years. The Lebor Gabála synchronises his reign with that of the Roman emperor Claudius (AD 41-54). The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éireann dates his reign to 33-13 BC,[7] that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 33-9 BC.

References

  1. ^ Joseph O'Neill (ed. & trans), "Cath Boinde", Ériu 2, 1905, pp. 173-185; Edward Gwynn (ed. & trans.), The Metrical Dindshenchas, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1906, Vol 4, Druimm Criaich Poem 13: Druimm Criach, pp. 43-57; Vernam Hull, (ed. & trans.), "Aided Meidbe: The Violent Death of Medb", Speculum v.13 issue 1, Jan 1938, pp. 52-61
  2. ^ Whitley Stokes (ed. & trans.), "Cóir Anmann", Irische Texte series 3 vol. 2, 1897, p. 22
  3. ^ R. A. Stewart Macalister (ed. & trans.), Lebor Gabála Érenn: The Book of the Taking of Ireland Part V, Irish Texts Society, 1956, p. 301-303
  4. ^ Annals of the Four Masters M5165-5191
  5. ^ Lebor Gabála Érenn §57
  6. ^ Carl Marstrander (ed. & trans.), "The Deaths of Lugaid and Derbforgaill", Ériu 5, 1911, pp. 201-218
  7. ^ Geoffrey Keating, Foras Feasa ar Éireann 1.37

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lugaid_Riab_nDerg


Lugaidh Sriabh Dearg King of Ireland

Birth: bef 54 BC

Death :008 BC, suicide by sword

Father: Bres-Nar Lothar King of Ireland (<130bc-)

Mother: Clotherne

Misc. Notes

was the 98th Monarch ; he entered into an alliance with the King of Denmark, whose daughter, Dearborguill, he obtained as his wife ; he killed himself by falling on his sword. in the eighth year Before CHRIST.

Irish Pedigrees by John O'Hart, part I, ch. IV

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9.

Spouses

1Clotherne

Father

Eochaidh Feidhlioch King of Ireland (-130bc)

Mother

Clothfionn Uchtleathan

Children

Crimthann (017bc-009)


Title: King of Ireland


From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps11/ps11_018.htm

was the 98th Monarch ; he entered into an alliance with the King of Denmark, whose daughter, Dearborguill, he obtained as his wife ; he killed himself by falling on his sword. in the eighth year Before CHRIST.

Irish Pedigrees by John O'Hart, part I, ch. IV

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9.


Lugaid Riab nDerg ("the red-striped") or Réoderg ("Red Sky"), son of the three findemna, triplet sons of Eochu Feidlech, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Contents [hide]

1 Conception

2 Rise to power

3 Marriage

4 Deaths of Derbforgaill and Lugaid

5 Alternatives

6 Further analysis

7 Lugaid's reign

8 References

[edit]Conception

He was conceived of incest. The night before the three findemna, Bres, Nár and Lothar, made war for the High Kingship against their father in the Battle of Druimm Criaich, their sister Clothru, concerned that her brothers could die without heirs, seduced all three of them, and a son, Lugaid, was conceived.[1] His epithet came from two red stripes around his neck and waist, dividing him into three: above the neck he resembled Nár; from the neck to the waist he resembled Bres; and from the waist down he resembled Lothar.[2] Incest features further in Lugaid's story: he slept with Clothru himself, conceiving Crimthann Nia Náir.[3]

[edit]Rise to power

The Lebor Gabála Érenn says he came to power after a five year interregnum following the death of Conaire Mór (six years according to the Annals of the Four Masters).[4] His foster-father, the Ulster hero Cúchulainn, split the Lia Fáil (coronation stone at Tara which roared when the rightful king stood or sat on it) with his sword when it failed to roar under Lugaid. It never roared again except under Conn of the Hundred Battles.[5]

[edit]Marriage

His wife was Derbforgaill, a daughter of the king of Lochlann (Scandinavia), who had fallen in love with Cúchulainn from afar and come to Ireland with a handmaiden in the form of a pair of swans, linked by a golden chain, to seek him out. Cúchulainn and Lugaid were at Loch Cuan (Strangford Lough) and saw them fly past. Cúchulainn, at Lugaid's urging, shot a slingstone which hit Derbforgaill, penetrating her womb, and the two women fell on the beach in human form. Cúchulainn saved Derbforgaill's life by sucking the stone from her side, and she declared her love for him, but because he had sucked her side he could not marry her - evidently he had violated some geis or taboo. Instead he gave her to Lugaid. They married, and she bore him children.

[edit]Deaths of Derbforgaill and Lugaid

One day in deep winter, the men of Ulster made pillars of snow, and the women competed to see who could urinate the deepest into the pillar and prove herself the most desirable to men. Derbforgaill's urine reached the ground, and the other women, out of jealousy, attacked and mutilated her, gouging out her eyes and cutting off her nose, ears, and hair. Lugaid noticed that the snow on the roof of her house had not melted, and realised she was close to death. He and Cúchulainn rushed to the house, but Derbforgaill died shortly after they arrived, and Lugaid died of grief. Cúchulainn avenged them by demolishing the house the women were inside, killing 150 of them.[6]

[edit]Alternatives

For Lugaid Réoderg, an alternative tradition exists that he met his death at the hands of the Trí Rúadchinn Laigen, the "Three Reds of the Laigin" also involved in the death of Conaire Mór.[7] Lucius Gwynn suggested that what may have happened is an earlier King of Tara known as Lugaid Réoderg may have become confused with a separate and minor character from the Ulster Cycle associated with Cúchulainn.[8] T. F. O'Rahilly, on the other hand, believed the epithet Riab nDerg to simply be a corruption of the earlier Réoderg, meaning something like "of the red sky",[9] and does not believe them to be distinct legendary figures (see below).

[edit]Further analysis

The view advanced by O'Rahilly was that Lugaid Riab nDerg is yet another emanation of the heroic mytho-dynastic figure Lugaid, closely associated with the prehistoric Érainn,[10] a population of late Iron Age Ireland who provide Irish legend with its earliest known Kings of Tara. One of their most notable representatives in that office is Lugaid's immediate predecessor, Conaire Mór.

Specifically, O'Rahilly believed Lugaid Riab nDerg to be the double of Lugaid mac Con Roí, whose alternative epithet was mac Trí Con "son of Three Hounds", and who himself is to some extent identical with Lugaid Mac Con.[11] The last, usually known simply as Mac Con "Hound's Son", is an Érainn king matching Conaire Mór in importance in Irish legend. Another is Cú Roí mac Dáire, or simply Dáire,[12] father of Lugaid mac Con Roí. A 'fourth' Lugaid and 'ancestor' of Mac Con was Lugaid Loígde.

[edit]Lugaid's reign

He had ruled for twenty, twenty-five or twenty-six years. The Lebor Gabála synchronises his reign with that of the Roman emperor Claudius (AD 41-54). The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éireann dates his reign to 33-13 BC,[13] that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 33-9 BC.


Ahnentafel, Generation No. 2

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2. LUGHAIDH SRIABH-NDEARG 98TH KING OF (L) IRELAND was born in 27 AD, and died in 63 AD. He was the son of 4. BREAS NAR BRES NAR-LOTHAR (NOTES) (L) LOTHAN and 5. CLOTHRU (NOTES) OR (L) CLOATHRA.

Source:  Roots Web - Ancestry.com (31.5.2010)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For other people of the same name, see Lugaid (disambiguation).

Lugaid Riab nDerg ("the red-striped") or Réoderg ("Red Sky"), son of the three findemna, triplet sons of Eochu Feidlech, and their sister Clothru was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

Conception

He was conceived of incest. The night before the three findemna, Bres, Nár and Lothar, made war for the High Kingship against their father in the Battle of Druimm Criaich, their sister Clothru, concerned that her brothers could die without heirs, seduced all three of them, and a son, Lugaid, was conceived.[1] His epithet came from two red stripes around his neck and waist, dividing him into three: above the neck he resembled Nár; from the neck to the waist he resembled Bres; and from the waist down he resembled Lothar.[2] Incest features further in Lugaid's story: he slept with Clothru himself, conceiving Crimthann Nia Náir.[3] Rise to power

The Lebor Gabála Érenn says he came to power after a five-year interregnum following the death of Conaire Mór (six years according to the Annals of the Four Masters).[4] His foster-father, the Ulster hero Cúchulainn, split the Lia Fáil (coronation stone at Tara which roared when the rightful king stood or sat on it) with his sword when it failed to roar under Lugaid. It never roared again except under Conn of the Hundred Battles.[5] Marriage

His wife was Derbforgaill, a daughter of the king of Lochlann (Scandinavia), who had fallen in love with Cúchulainn from afar and come to Ireland with a handmaiden in the form of a pair of swans, linked by a golden chain, to seek him out. Cúchulainn and Lugaid were at Loch Cuan (Strangford Lough) and saw them fly past. Cúchulainn, at Lugaid's urging, shot a slingstone which hit Derbforgaill, penetrating her womb, and the two women fell on the beach in human form. Cúchulainn saved Derbforgaill's life by sucking the stone from her side, and she declared her love for him, but because he had sucked her side he could not marry her – evidently he had violated some geis or taboo. Instead he gave her to Lugaid. They married, and she bore him children. Deaths of Derbforgaill and Lugaid

One day in deep winter, the men of Ulster made pillars of snow, and the women competed to see who could urinate the deepest into the pillar and prove herself the most desirable to men. Derbforgaill's urine reached the ground, and the other women, out of jealousy, attacked and mutilated her, gouging out her eyes and cutting off her nose, ears, and hair. Lugaid noticed that the snow on the roof of her house had not melted, and realised she was close to death. He and Cúchulainn rushed to the house, but Derbforgaill died shortly after they arrived, and Lugaid died of grief. Cúchulainn avenged them by demolishing the house the women were inside, killing 150 of them.[6] Alternatives

For Lugaid Réoderg, an alternative tradition exists that he met his death at the hands of the Trí Rúadchinn Laigen, the "Three Reds of the Laigin" also involved in the death of Conaire Mór.[7] Lucius Gwynn suggested that what may have happened is an earlier King of Tara known as Lugaid Réoderg may have become confused with a separate and minor character from the Ulster Cycle associated with Cúchulainn.[8] T. F. O'Rahilly, on the other hand, believed the epithet Riab nDerg to simply be a corruption of the earlier Réoderg, meaning something like "of the red sky",[9] and does not believe them to be distinct legendary figures (see below). Further analysis

The view advanced by O'Rahilly was that Lugaid Riab nDerg is yet another emanation of the heroic mytho-dynastic figure Lugaid, closely associated with the prehistoric Érainn,[10] a population of late Iron Age Ireland who provide Irish legend with its earliest known Kings of Tara. One of their most notable representatives in that office is Lugaid's immediate predecessor, Conaire Mór.

Specifically, O'Rahilly believed Lugaid Riab nDerg to be the double of Lugaid mac Con Roí, whose alternative epithet was mac Trí Con "son of Three Hounds", and who himself is to some extent identical with Lugaid Mac Con.[11] The last, usually known simply as Mac Con "Hound's Son", is an Érainn king matching Conaire Mór in importance in Irish legend. Another is Cú Roí mac Dáire, or simply Dáire,[12] father of Lugaid mac Con Roí. A 'fourth' Lugaid and 'ancestor' of Mac Con was Lugaid Loígde. Lugaid's reign

He had ruled for twenty, twenty-five or twenty-six years. The Lebor Gabála synchronises his reign with that of the Roman emperor Claudius (AD 41–54). The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éireann dates his reign to 33–13 BC,[13] that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 33–9 BC. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In Irish mythology the three Findemna or Finn Eamna (variously interpreted as "fair triplets" or "three fair ones of Emain Macha") were three sons of the High King of Ireland, Eochaid Feidlech. Their names were Bres, Nár and Lothar.

They conspired to overthrow their father. The day before meeting him in battle they were visited by their sister, Clothru, who tried in vain to dissuade them from this course of action. They were childless, so for fear that they might die without an heir Clothru took all three of them to bed, conceiving Lugaid Riab nDerg, son of the three Findemna. Lugaid later became High King of Ireland, so that Clothru's incest preserved the line of succession to the high kingship. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Eochu or Eochaid Feidlech ("the enduring"),[1] son of Finn, son of Rogen Ruad, son of Essamain Emna, son of Blathnachta, son of Labraid Lorc, son of Enna Aignech was, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, a High King of Ireland. He is best known as the father of the legendary queen Medb of Connacht.

According to the 12th century Lebor Gabála Érenn, he took power when he defeated the previous High King, Fachtna Fáthach, in the Battle of Leitir Rúaid.[2] The Middle Irish saga Cath Leitrech Ruibhe tells the story of this battle. While Fachtna Fáthach was away from Tara on a visit to Ulster, Eochu, then king of Connacht, raised an army, had the provincial kings killed and took hostages from Tara. When news reached Fachtna at Emain Macha, he raised an army of Ulstermen and gave battle at Leitir Rúaid in the Corann (modern County Sligo),[3] but was defeated and beheaded by Eochu. Eochaid Sálbuide, the king of Ulster, was also killed. Fergus mac Róich covered the Ulster army's retreat, and Eochu marched to Tara.[4]

Various Middle Irish tales give him a large family. His wife was Cloithfinn,[5] and they had six daughters, Derbriu, Eile, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, and four sons, a set of triplets known as the three findemna, and Conall Anglondach. Derbriu was the lover of Aengus of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Her mother-in-law, Garbdalb, turned six men into pigs for the crime of eating nuts from her grove, and Derbriu protected them for a year until they were killed by Medb.[6] When Conchobar mac Nessa became king of Ulster, Eochu gave four of his daughters, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, to him in marriage in compensation for the death of his supposed father, Fachtna Fáthach. Eithne bore him a son, Furbaide, who was born by posthumous caesarian section after Medb drowned her. Clothru, according to one tradition, bore him his eldest son Cormac Cond Longas, although other traditions make him the son of Conchobar by his own mother, Ness. Medb bore Conchobar a son called Amalgad, but later left him, and Eochu set her up as queen of Connacht. Some time after that, Eochu held an assembly at Tara, which both Conchobar and Medb attended. The morning after the assembly, Conchobar followed Medb down to the river Boyne where she had gone to bathe, and raped her. Eochu made war against Conchobar on the Boyne, but was defeated.[3]

The three findemna tried to overthrow their father in the Battle of Druimm Criaich. The night before the battle, their sister Clothru, afraid that they would die without an heir, seduced all three of them, and the future High King Lugaid Riab nDerg, was conceived. The next day they were killed, and their father, seeing their severed heads, swore that no son should directly succeed his father to the High Kingship of Ireland.[7]

He ruled for twelve years, and died of natural causes at Tara, succeeded by his brother Eochu Airem. The Lebor Gabála synchronises his reign with the dictatorship of Julius Caesar (48–44 BC).[2] The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éireann dates his reign to 94–82 BC,[8] that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 143–131 BC.[9] -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Clothru was, according to medieval Irish legend, the daughter of Eochu Feidlech, a High King of Ireland. When her triplet brothers, the findemna, were fighting with their father Eochu Feidlech for the high kingship, she was concerned that her brothers might die without heirs. She is said to have seduced the three of them, and conceived Lugaid Riab nDerg.[1] The next day, according to legend, her brothers were indeed killed, and when Lugaid was born, he was their heir. His epithet came from two red stripes around his neck and waist, dividing him into three: above the neck he resembled Nár; from the neck to the waist he resembled Bres; and from the waist down he resembled Lothar.[2] Lugaid later also became a High King of Ireland, so that her incest preserved the line of succession. Incest features further in Clothru's story: she is said to have then slept with Lugaid herself, conceiving Crimthann Nia Náir,[3] who later also became a High King of Ireland. She was thus both Crimthann's mother and his grandmother.

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Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg mac Findemna, Rí na h'Éireann {Legendary}'s Timeline

-39
-39
Ireland
-34
-34
Ireland
-8
-8
Age 25
Ireland
8
8
Age 26
Ireland
????
98th, King of Scotland, King of Ireland
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98th, King of Scotland, King of Ireland
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98th, King of Scotland, King of Ireland
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