March. Alberto Azzo II, conte di Luni

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Alberto Azzo II d'Este, conte di Luni

Italian: Alberto Azzo II d'Este, Albertazzo II
Also Known As: "Count Azzo II of /Este/", "II Margave of Este Azo", "Albertazzo II"
Birthdate:
Death: 1097 (97-105)
Vangadizza Abbey, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Veneto, Italy
Immediate Family:

Son of March. Alberto Azzo I, conte di Luni and Adela Obertenghi
Husband of Cunegonde of Altdorf and Gersende Du Maine
Partner of Matilde Pallavicini
Father of Welf IV, duke of Bavaria; Guelph IV d'Este Herzog von Bayern; Fulco d'Este, I; Hughues d'Este, comte du Maine and Adelasia
Brother of Adelasia

Occupation: Margrave de Milão e Liguria, Conde de Gavello, Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice e Montagnana, Marquis, d'Este, Sieur, de Rovigo, Comte, de Lunigiana, du Maine, Margrave, de Padoue, Markgraf, senior w Este i Ferrarze
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About March. Alberto Azzo II, conte di Luni

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Azzo_II,_Margrave_of_Milan Alberto Azzo II (997 or July 10, 1009, Modena – August 20, 1097, Modena), Margrave of Milan, and Liguria, Count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice, and Montagnana, aka, Albertezzo II, was a powerful nobleman in the Holy Roman Empire. He is considered the founder of Casa d'Este (House of Este), having been head of the first family to be master of Este, a town of Padua.

Alberto Azzo II was the only son of Albert Azzo I, Margrave of Milan. He inherited his father's offices around 1020, and continually increased his properties in northern Italy. In 1069–1070, he tried to acquire Maine for his son Hugh, because his wife, Garsende, was a co-heiress of the previous counts of Maine. Hugh was declared count, but he could not prevail against Robert, the Duke of Normandy, who had been betrothed to the last heiress. In the Investiture Controversy between Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Pope Gregory VII, Azzo attempted to mediate, but later he joined the side of the pope. Around 1073 he made a castle at Este his residence, from which the HOUSE OF ESTE, the dynasty to which he belonged, took its name. Before his building project, Este was little more than a village.

His son Welf (from his first marriage) moved first to Carinthia and then to Bavaria, giving rise to one of the most important families in European history, the Guelphs. Another son, Fulk I of Milan, (from his second marriage), made the first documented use of the title "Marquis d'Este."

Azzo II married Kunigunde (also called Chuniza), the daughter of Welf II, Count of Altdorf, in 1036. They had one known child:

   Welf (died November 6, 1101, Paphos) Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death who was the first member of the Welf branch of the House of Este.

His second marriage was to Garsende, daughter of Herbert I, Count of Maine, around 1050. They had the following known sons:

   Fulco I, Margrave of Milan (died 1128), ancestor of the Italian branch of the House of Este
   Hugh V, Count of Maine (died 1131), had no issue.

Some sources say he also married Vitalia Orseolo, daughter of Peter Orseolo. They had a daughter: Itta.

He had an extra-marital affair with Matilda, sister of William, Bishop of Padua[citation needed], with whom he had a daughter named Adelasia who married Guglielmo Adelardi.

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberto_Azzo_II._d%E2%80%99Este

Alberto Azzo II. d’Este

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Kunigunda Azzo.jpg

Alberto Azzo II. d’Este (* 996; † 1097) aus der italienischen Familie Este ist der Stammvater der jüngeren Welfen. Er war der Sohn Azzos I. und gründete 1056 die Stadt Este, nach der er und dann auch seine Nachkommen ihren Namen führten.

Alberto Azzo II. heiratete um 1035 in erster Ehe Gräfin Kunigunde von Altdorf, Schwester des Herzogs Welf III. († 31. März vor 1055), in zweiter Ehe Garsende von Maine, Tochter des Grafen Herbert I.

Sowohl Kunigunde als auch Garsende waren als letzte ihrer Familie Erbtöchter. Kunigunde erhielt nach dem Tod ihres Bruders den umfangreichen Besitz der Welfen in Oberschwaben, Garsende brachte die Anwartschaft auf Maine mit in die Ehe, die Alberto Azzo dazu brachte, hier einzugreifen, nachdem die Familie seiner Frau 1062 in männlicher Linie ausgestorben war, mehrfach in weiblicher Linie vererbt wurde, um sich 1070, nachdem er durch einem Aufstand ins Land gerufen worden war, zum Grafen von Maine zu machen. Er konnte seinen Anspruch einige Jahre durchsetzen, verlor aber die Grafschaft 1072 wieder an den Herzog der Normandie.

Er hatte aus den beiden Ehen drei Söhne, die die verschiedenen Linien der Familie begründeten:

   * Welf IV. (Guelfo; * 1030/40–1101), Herzog von Bayern 1070, der älteste Sohn, stammte aus der ersten Ehe. Er ist der Stammvater der älteren deutschen Welfenlinie (Welf-Esten), die bis ins heutige britische Königshaus reicht.
   * Hugo V. († um 1131), aus der zweiten Ehe stammend, Graf von Maine (1069–1072), Titulargraf (1072–1090), Graf (1090–1093), Titulargraf (1093–1131), starb ohne Nachkommen.
   * Die jüngere italienische Linie (Fulc-Este oder nur Este) begann mit Fulco I. d’Este († um 1128/35), dem dritten Sohn. Seine Nachkommen führten seit 1171 den Titel eines Markgrafen von Este.

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Albert Azzo II (d. c. 1097), Margrave of Milan and Liguria, Count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice, and Montagnana, was a powerful nobleman in the Holy Roman Empire.

Albert Azzo II was the only son of Albert Azzo I, Margrave of Milan. He inherited his father's offices around 1020, and continuously increased his properties in northern Italy. In 1069–1070, he tried to acquire Maine for his son Hugh, because his wife, Garsende, was a co-heiress of the previous counts of Maine. Hugh was declared count, but could not prevail against Robert the duke of Normandy, who had been betrothed to the last heiress. In the Investiture Controversy between Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Pope Gregory VII, Azzo attempted to mediate, but later he joined the side of the Pope. Around 1073 he made a castle at Este his residence, from which the House of Este, the dynasty to which he belongs, takes its name.

Family

Azzo II married Cuniza (also called Chuniza and Cunigunde), daughter of Welf II, Count of Altdorf, by 1036. They had one known child:

Welf (died 6 November 1101, Paphos) Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. First member of the Welf branch of the House of Este.

His second marriage was to Garsende, daughter of Herbert I, Count of Maine, around 1050. They had the following known sons:

Fulco I, Margrave of Milan (died 1128)

Hugh V, Count of Maine (died 1131)

Thirdly, he married Matilda, sister of William, Bishop of Padua, with whom he had no known children.

He married Vitalia Orseolo, daughter of Peter Orseolo. They had daughter Itta.


Albert Azzo II (d. c. 1097), Margrave of Milan and Liguria, Count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice, and Montagnana, was a powerful nobleman in the Holy Roman Empire.

Albert Azzo II was the only son of Albert Azzo I, Margrave of Milan. He inherited his father's offices around 1020, and continuously increased his properties in northern Italy. In 1069–1070, he tried to acquire Maine for his son Hugh, because his wife, Garsende, was a co-heiress of the previous counts of Maine. Hugh was declared count, but could not prevail against Robert the duke of Normandy, who had been betrothed to the last heiress. In the Investiture Controversy between Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Pope Gregory VII, Azzo attempted to mediate, but later he joined the side of the Pope. Around 1073 he made a castle at Este his residence, from which the House of Este, the dynasty to which he belongs, takes its name.

Family

Azzo II married Cuniza (also called Chuniza and Cunigunde), daughter of Welf II, Count of Altdorf, by 1036. They had one known child:

Welf (died 6 November 1101, Paphos) Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. First member of the Welf branch of the House of Este.

His second marriage was to Garsende, daughter of Herbert I, Count of Maine, around 1050. They had the following known sons:

Fulco I, Margrave of Milan (died 1128)

Hugh V, Count of Maine (died 1131)

Thirdly, he married Matilda, sister of William, Bishop of Padua, with whom he had no known children.

He married Vitalia Orseolo, daughter of Peter Orseolo. They had daughter Itta.


Albert Azzo II (c.1027 – c.1097), Margrave of Milan and Liguria, Count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice, and Montagnana, was a powerful nobleman in the Holy Roman Empire.

Albert Azzo II was the only son of Albert Azzo I, Margrave of Milan. He inherited his father's offices around 1020, and continuously increased his properties in northern Italy. In 1069–1070, he tried to acquire Maine for his son Hugh, because his wife, Garsende, was the heiress of the previous counts of Maine. Hugh was declared count, but could not prevail against the dukes of Normandy. In the Investiture Controversy between Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Pope Gregory VII, Azzo attempted to mediate, but later he joined the side of the Pope. Around 1073 he made a castle at Este his residence, from which the House of Este, the dynasty to which he belongs, takes its name.

Azzo II married Cuniza (also called Chuniza and Cunigunde), daughter of Welf II, Count of Altdorf, around 1035. They had one known child:

Welf (died 6 November 1101, Paphos) Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. First member of the Welf branch of the House of Este.

His second marriage was to Garsende, daughter of Herbert I, Count of Maine, around 1050. They had the following known sons:

Fulco I, Margrave of Milan (died 1128)

Hugh V, Count of Maine (died 1131)

Thirdly, he married Matilda, sister of William, Bishop of Padua, with whom he had no known children.

He married Vitalia Orseolo, daughter of Peter Orseolo. They had daughter Itta.


Albert Azzo II (c. 997–c. 1097), Margrave of Milan and Liguria, Count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monfelice, and Montagrana, was a powerful nobleman in the Holy Roman Empire.

Albert Azzo II was the only son of Albert Azzo I, Margrave of Milan. He inherited his father's offices around 1020, and continuously increased his properties in northern Italy. In 1069–1070, he tried to acquire Maine for his son Hugh, because his wife, Garsende, was the heiress of the previous counts of Maine. Hugh was declared count, but could not prevail against the dukes of Normandy. In the Investiture Controversy between Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Pope Gregory VII, Azzo attempted to mediate, but later he joined the side of the Pope. Around 1073 he made a castle at Este his residence, from which the House of Este, the dynasty to which he belongs, takes its name.

[edit] Family

Azzo II married Cuniza, daughter of Welf II, Count of Altdorf, around 1035. They had one known child:

   * Welf (died 1101)

His second marriage was to Garsende, daughter of Herbert I, Count of Maine, around 1050. They had the following known sons:

   * Fulco I, Margrave of Milan (died 1128)
   * Hugh V, Count of Maine (died 1131)

Thirdly, he married Matilda, sister of William, Bishop of Padua, with whom he had no known children.

[edit] References

   * Sir Andrew Halliday Annals of the House of Hannover, v.1, London, 1826. at Google Books

www.wikipedia.com


Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan

Albert Azzo II (c. 997–c. 1097), Margrave of Milan and Liguria, Count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice, and Montagnana, was a powerful nobleman in the Holy Roman Empire.

Albert Azzo II was the only son of Albert Azzo I, Margrave of Milan. He inherited his father's offices around 1020, and continuously increased his properties in northern Italy. In 1069–1070, he tried to acquire Maine for his son Hugh, because his wife, Garsende, was the heiress of the previous counts of Maine. Hugh was declared count, but could not prevail against the dukes of Normandy. In the Investiture Controversy between Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Pope Gregory VII, Azzo attempted to mediate, but later he joined the side of the Pope. Around 1073 he made a castle at Este his residence, from which the House of Este, the dynasty to which he belongs, takes its name.

Azzo II married Cuniza (also called Chuniza and Cunigunde), daughter of Welf II, Count of Altdorf, around 1035. They had one known child:

Welf (died 6 November 1101, Paphos) Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. First member of the Welf branch of the House of Este.

His second marriage was to Garsende, daughter of Herbert I, Count of Maine, around 1050. They had the following known sons:

Fulco I, Margrave of Milan (died 1128)

Hugh V, Count of Maine (died 1131)

Thirdly, he married Matilda, sister of William, Bishop of Padua, with whom he had no known children.

He married Vitalia Orseolo, daughter of Peter Orseolo. They had daughter Itta.


Alberto Azzo II Modena, July 10, 1009 - Modena, August 20, 1097, Margrave of Milan , and Liguria, Count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice, and Montagnana, aka, Albertezzo II, was a powerful nobleman in the Holy Roman Empire. He is considered the founder of Casa d'Este, having been the first family to be master of Este, a town of Padua.

Alberto Azzo II was the only son of Albert Azzo I, Margrave of Milan. He inherited his father's offices around 1020, and continuously increased his properties in northern Italy. In 1069–1070, he tried to acquire Maine for his son Hugh, because his wife, Garsende, was a co-heiress of the previous counts of Maine. Hugh was declared count, but he could not prevail against Robert the duke of Normandy, who had been betrothed to the last heiress. In the Investiture Controversy between Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Pope Gregory VII, Azzo attempted to mediate, but later he joined the side of the Pope. Around 1073 he made a castle at Este his residence, from which the House of Este, the dynasty to which he belongs, takes its name. Before his building project, Este was little more than a village.

His son Welf IV d'Este moved to Germany, first to Carinthia and then to Bavaria, giving rise to one of the most important families in European history, the Guelphs. This in turn ultimately led to the ascension to the English throne in 1714 with George I of England. Another son Fulk I of Milan was the first for whom there is a documented of "Marquis d'Este."

Family

Azzo II married Cuniza (also called Chuniza and Cunigunde), daughter of Welf II, Count of Altdorf, by 1036. They had one known child:

Welf (died 6 November 1101, Paphos) Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. First member of the Welf branch of the House of Este.

His second marriage was to Garsende, daughter of Herbert I, Count of Maine, around 1050. They had the following known sons:

Fulco I, Margrave of Milan (died 1128)

Hugh V, Count of Maine (died 1131)

Thirdly, he married Matilda, sister of William, Bishop of Padua, with whom he had no known children.

He married Vitalia Orseolo, daughter of Peter Orseolo. They had daughter Itta.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Azzo_II,_Margrave_of_Milan

Alberto Azzo II (997 or July 10, 1009, Modena – August 20, 1097, Modena), Margrave of Milan, and Liguria, Count of Gavello and Padua, Rovigo, Lunigiana, Monselice, and Montagnana, aka, Albertezzo II, was a powerful nobleman in the Holy Roman Empire. He is considered the founder of Casa d'Este, having been the first family to be master of Este, a town of Padua.


Alberto Azzo II was the only son of Albert Azzo I, Margrave of Milan. He inherited his father's offices around 1020, and continuously increased his properties in northern Italy. In 1069–1070, he tried to acquire Maine for his son Hugh, because his wife, Garsende, was a co-heiress of the previous counts of Maine. Hugh was declared count, but he could not prevail against Robert the duke of Normandy, who had been betrothed to the last heiress. In the Investiture Controversy between Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Pope Gregory VII, Azzo attempted to mediate, but later he joined the side of the Pope. Around 1073 he made a castle at Este his residence, from which the House of Este, the dynasty to which he belongs, takes its name. Before his building project, Este was little more than a village.


His son Welf IV d'Este (from his first marriage) moved to Germany, first to Carinthia and then to Bavaria, giving rise to one of the most important families in European history, the Guelphs. This in turn ultimately led to the ascension to the English throne in 1714 with George I of England. Another son Fulk I of Milan (from his second marriage), who was the first person documented to use the title of "Marquis d'Este."


Family


Azzo II married Kunigunde (also called Chuniza), the daughter of Welf II, Count of Altdorf, in 1036. They had one known child:

Welf (died November 6, 1101, Paphos) Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. First member of the Welf branch of the House of Este.

His second marriage was to Garsende, daughter of Herbert I, Count of Maine, around 1050. They had the following known sons:

Fulco I, Margrave of Milan (died 1128), ancestor of the House of Este
Hugh V, Count of Maine (died 1131), had no issue

Some sources say he also married Vitalia Orseolo, daughter of Peter Orseolo. They had daughter Itta.


He had an extra-marital affaire with Matilda, sister of William, Bishop of Padua, with whom he had a daughter named Adelasia, who married Guglielmo Adelardi.

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