Marie-Olivier Prevost (Manitouabeouich )

Québec, Nouvelle-France

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Marie Olivier Sylvestre Manitouabeouich Prevost (Manitouabeouich)

French: Ouchistauichkoue Manitouabeouich de la nation Abénaquise, dite Marie Olivier Sylvestre
Also Known As: "Manitouabeouich", "Marie Olivier Sylvestre Prevost", "Marie Olivier Manitouabeouich Sylvestre"
Birthdate: (50)
Birthplace: Huronie (aujourd'hui: Canada)
Death: Died in Québec, Nouvelle-France
Place of Burial: Notre-Dame-de-Québec, Québec, Nouvelle-France
Immediate Family:

Biological daughter of Roch Manitouabeouich and Outchibahabanouk Ouehou
Adopted daughter of Olivier LeTardif
Wife of Martin Prévost
Mother of Marie Madeleine 1 Prevost; Ursule Prévost; Louis Prevost; Marie-Madeleine Madeleine 2 Prévost; Antoine Prévost and 4 others
Sister of Ouasibiskounesout Manitouabeouich de la nation Abénaquise and Francois Manitouabe8ich

Occupation: Huron Tribe
Managed by: Jacques Dupont
Last Updated:

About Marie-Olivier Prevost (Manitouabeouich )

Sources

Notes

Suzanne et Marthe Prévost sont photographiées ici près du mémorial érigé sur les terres de Martin Prévost à Beauport, près de Québec.


Le mariage entre Martin Prévost et Marie Olivier Manitouabe8ich est le premier mariage enregistré au Canada entre un européen et une autochtone.


Son père adoptif fut l'interprète Olivier LeTardif


Marie reçut une dot de 500 francs de son parrain Pierre de Puyseaux. C'est lui qui en 1641 avait hébergé le Sieur de Maisonneuve, Jeanne Mance, ainsi que Madame de la Peltrie en attendant qu'ils remontent le Saint-Laurent pour fonder Montréal en 1642.


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Note about AKA: Manitouabe8ich: Le chiffre 8 inséré dans le nom peut étonner : il ne s’agit pas d’une faute de frappe. Pendant la première moitié du 17ème siècle, la lettre W n’existait pas encore dans l’alphabet français, donc on utilisait dans les manuscrits la lettre o surmontée d’un u. Mais il n’existe bien sûr pas de signe typographique, les imprimeurs utilisaient donc le 8. On peut se demander pourquoi, plus simplement, ils n'utilisèrent pas le o et le u pour former le 'ou' et obtenir le même résultat.


MARIE OLIVIER SYLVESTRE (MANITOUABEOUICH) (1624-1665)

By Suzanne Guimont Binette In the early history of Canada, it was not until Olivier Le Tardif became the personal representative and interpreter for Samuel de Champlain that we first hear the name Manitouabe8ich. (in those days, the "8" figure was pronounced as a "W"). This young Indian man, of the Algonquin nation (according to Jesuit Father Jérome Lallemand - see image 2), had been hired as Le Tardif's own scout and traveling companion. Manitouabe8ich had been converted to Christianity by the French missionaries, and as part of the baptismal ritual, had been given the Christian name of Roch, in honor of St.Roch, the patron saint. Olivier Le Tardif and Roch Manitouabe8ich traveled together for many years. It was the responsibility of Le Tardif to establish a network of fur trading posts for the "Company" that Champlain had based at Quebec (l'Habitation in the Basse ville (Lower town)).

Actually, the fur trading posts were the "middle link" between the trappers and the "Company". There were three types of trappers: a) the trappers that were "licensed" by the authorities of the Company b) the itinerant unlicensed trappers known as the "Coureurs des bois" c) the Indians who trapped and traded with the Company. All of these three types bartered their furs at the fur trading post of his choice, usually the post nearest his hunting area. The system worked well and was rather efficient. The trading posts gave the trappers a "depot" at which they could dispose of their furs and at the same time barter for traps, knives, and items of clothing such as hats, shirts, etc. The Indians almost always bartered for blankets, mirrors, the white man's hats, and for colored beads to adorn their native costumes and headdresses.

As a team, Le Tardif and Manitouabewich oftentimes penetrated deep into the vast expanse of the Canadian wilderness to make contact with some of the outlaying Indian settlements of the "back country", and along the way they met and did business with some of the nomadic Indians. They encouraged these nomadic Indians to use the facilities of the various trading posts that had been set up for the operation of fur trade. After eight years as clerk locally and in the field, Le Tardif was promoted by Champlain and became the head clerk (equivalent to Secretary-Treasurer) of the fur trading company. It was then that Le Tardif settled down to a more normal way of life, conducting the "inner affairs" of the Company at the main office at Quebec (Basse-ville). Roch Manitouabewich also settled down to a more domestic way of life, but in his own environment of the Huron settlement at Sillery near Quebec. The bond off friendship, trust, and loyalty between these two men was very strong, and, although each lived in his own "milieu", they never lost contact one from the other.

It was when Roch Manitouabewich and his wife had a daughter and had her baptized that Le Tardif became "Godfather" for the baby girl, and in accordance with the custom of the times, Le Tardif gave the girl his own name of Olivier. In addition, the missionary performing the baptism gave the girl the name Marie, in honor of the Virgin Mary, and he also gave her the name Sylvestre, meaning "one who comes from the forest" or "one who lives in the forest". When Marie Olivier Sylvestre was ten years old, Olivier LeTardif, in his generous way and because of his respect for his friend and servant, Roch Manitouabewich, adopted the young Indian girl as his very own daughter (she never carried the family name of Le Tardif). This enabled her to be educated and reared in the same manner as a well-to-do French girl. First he placed her as a "live-in border" and student with the Ursuline Nuns at Quebec, and later he boarded her with a French family where she was privately tutored.

It was in the atmosphere of this respected family of Guillaume Hubou and his wife Marie Rollet (when she married Guillaume Hubou, she was the widow of Louis Hebert) that Marie Olivier Sylvestre met and married Martin Prevost, friend of the Hubou family and a very personal friend of Olivier Le Tardif. This marriage was to be the first marriage on record between an Indian girl and a French colonist. The marriage took place on the third of January 1644 at Quebec. Recorded as witnesses to the ceremony was Olivier LeTardif and Quillaume Couillard (father-in-law of Le Tardif). [2]

Abenaki Native American Indian maiden the daughter of a Abenaki fur trader and scout, Roch Manitouabewich and Outchibabanoukoueou of the Abanaki's. Marie was given to the care of Oliver Le Tardif in gratitude and great respect for a bountiful hunting season. Le Tardif inturn , provided a home , education to have been instructed in the french manner, by the Ursuline Nuns. She was the first of her people to marry a Frenchman, Martin Provost. They married Nov. 3, 1644. She lived until 41 years old and died in Quebec City, 6 months after the death of her adoptive father Olivier Le Tardif. She is buried in Quebec City Catholic Cemetery.


Marie Olivier (Manitouabeouich) Sylvestre

The following is a historical biography by Suzanne Guimond Binette of Martin’s first wife and mother of Louis, the first direct line Prévost/Provost ancestor to be born in what is now Canada:

Marie-Olivier Sylvestre (Manitouabewich) (1620-1665)

In the early history of Canada, it was not until Olivier LeTardif became the personal representative and interpreter for Samuel de Champlain that we first hear the name Manitouabewich.This young Indian, of the Huron Nation, had been hired as LeTardif's own scout and traveling companion. Manitouabewich had been converted to Christianity by the French missionaries, and as part of the baptismal ritual, had been given the Christian name of Roch, in honor of St.Roch, the patron saint. Olivier LeTardif and Roch Manitouabewich traveled together for many years. It was the responsibility of LeTardif to establish a network of fur trading posts for the "Company" that Champlain had based at Quebec (l'Habitation at Basseville). Actually, the fur trading posts were the "middle link" between the trappers and the "Company".

There were three types of trappers: a) the trappers that were "licensed" by the authorities of the Company b) the itinerant unlicensed trappers known as the "Coureurs des bois" c) the Indians who trapped and traded with the Company

All of these three types bartered their furs at the fur trading post of his choice, usually the post nearest his hunting area. The system worked well and was rather efficient. The trading posts gave the trappers a "depot" at which they could dispose of their furs and at the same time barter for traps, knives, and items of clothing such as hats, shirts, etc. The Indians almost always bartered for blankets, mirrors, the white man's hats, and for colored beads to adorn their native costumes and headdresses. As a team, LeTardif and Manitouabewich oftentimes penetrated deep into the vast expanse of the Canadian wilderness to make contact with some of the outlaying Indian settlements of the "back country", and along the way they met and did business with some of the nomadic Indians. They encouraged these nomadic Indians to use the facilities of the various trading posts that had been set up for the operation of fur trade.

After eight years in the field, LeTardif was promoted by Champlain and became the head clerk (equivalent to Secretary-Treasurer) of the fur trading company. It was then that Le Tardif settled down to a more normal way of life, conducting the "inner affairs" of the Company at the main office at Quebec (Basse-ville). Roch Manitouabewich also settled down to a more domestic way of life, but in his own environment of the Huron settlement at Sillery near Quebec. The bond off friendship, trust, and loyalty between these two men was very strong, and, although each lived in his own "milieu", they never lost contact one from the other. It was when Roch Manitouabewich and his wife had a daughter and had her baptized that LeTardif became "Godfather" for the baby girl, and in accordance with the custom of the times, LeTardif gave the girl his own name of Olivier. In addition, the missionary performing the baptism gave the girl the name Marie, in honor of the Virgin Mary, and he also gave her the name Sylvestre, meaning "one who comes from the forest" or "one who lives in the forest". When Marie Olivier Sylvestre was ten years old, Olivier LeTardif, in his generous way and because of his respect for his friend and servant, Roch Manitouabewich, adopted the young Indian girl as his very own daughter (she never carried the family name of LeTardif). This enabled her to be educated and reared in the same manner as a well-to-do French girl. First he placed her as a "live-in border" and student with the Ursuline Nuns at Quebec, and later he boarded her with a French family where she was privately tutored.

It was in the atmosphere of this respected family of Guillaume Hubou and his wife Marie Rollet (when she married Guillaume Hubou, she was the widow of Louis Hebert) that Marie Olivier Sylvestre met and married Martin Prévost, friend of the Hubou family and a very personal friend of Olivier LeTardif. This marriage was to be the first marriage on record between an Indian girl and a French colonist. The marriage took place on the third of January 1644 at Quebec. Recorded as witnesses to the ceremony was Olivier LeTardif and Quillaume Couillard (father-in-law of LeTardif).

Marie Olivier dit Sylvestre was bom about 1620 in St. Andre de Kamouraska, P. Q.. She died on 10 Sep 1665 in Quebec City, P. Q.. She was also known as Marie Manitouabe8ich. This marriage is reportedly the first Franco marriage to a Native Indian woman. Source: from a passage in a chapter of a book entitled "Portraits of Pioneer Families", Vol 1, by Robert Prevost, Editions Libre Expression, Montreal, 1993. Here it is in part.Translated by Phil Proust Dec 1996.***** "Our sons will marry with your daughters and we will become one people;" thus said Samuel de Champlain to the native Indians in 1633. "You always say something to cheer us replied a feathered chief , "If this comes to be we will be very happy". But the first such marriage did not occur for 11 years, until November 3, 1644, when our ancestor, MARTIN PREVOST, married MARIE MANITOUABE81CH, an indian. The number 8 in her name is not a printing error. In the first half of the 17th century, printers generally used "8" as a "w"; the letter "w" had not yet been borrowed from the Germanic languages. *Note: for more information about her marriage to Martin Prevost see the notes in Martin Prevost's file. Parents: Roch MANITOUABE81CH and (Squaw) OUTCHIBAHABANOUKOUEHOU. She was married to Martin PREVOST on 4 Jan 1644 in Quebec City, P. Q.. Children were: Children were: Marie Madeleine1, Ursule, Louis, Marie-Madeleine2, Antoine, Jean-Pascal, Jean-Baptiste, Marie Therese

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Marie-Olivier Prevost (Manitouabeouich )'s Timeline

1615
September 10, 1615
Huronie (aujourd'hui: Canada)
1647
December 21, 1647
Age 32
Québec City, Québec, Canada
1648
February 5, 1648
Age 32
Québec City, Communauté-Urbaine-de-Québec, Québec, Canada
1649
December 13, 1649
Age 34
Québec, Québec, Canada
1651
1651
Age 35
Québec, Canada
1655
January 7, 1655
Age 39
Québec, Québec, Canada
1657
October 15, 1657
Age 42
Québec, Québec, Canada
1660
January 31, 1660
Age 44
Québec, Québec, Canada
1662
May 16, 1662
Age 46
Beauport, Québec, Canada