Is your surname Boucher?

Research the Boucher family

Records for Marin Boucher

970,811 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Marin Boucher

Also Known As: "Galéran"
Birthdate: (81)
Birthplace: Paroisse Saint-Langis, Mortagne, Perche, France
Death: Died in Château-Richer, Québec, Canada
Place of Burial: Château-Richer, Québec, Canada
Immediate Family:

Son of Unknown Boucher and Unknown
Husband of Julienne Baril and Perrine Mallet
Father of Marie Boucher; Nicole Boucher; Jean Boucher; Louise Boucher; Francois Boucher and 11 others
Brother of Jeanne Boucher

Occupation: Maçon, Mason, Fermier, Maçon (Builder), stonemason, macon, Maison, Macon, macon? (mason?), Mason/Farmer, stone mason, farmer
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Marin Boucher

Notes

Biography

Seven and a half centuries ago, the royal troops of France with Blanche de Gastille at their head, regent of the country until her son Louis IX attained his majority, captured the imposing fortress of the castle of Belleme and took possession of the county of Perche. The Due d'A-lencon, brother of Philippe VI, had obtained this territory earlier, but in 1525, the region was returned once and for all to the French crown.

A century passed: Then around 1633 there was great activity. Robert Giffard and Nod .Iiicliercau were recruiting for New France. They searched (he wooded hills around their small village, (from whence would come (lie celebrated strong-ntuslced, dappled gray work horse) and Iried to convince the men and their relatives lo follow them to Canada. Giffard imisl have been very persuasive since be succeeded in enlisting Hie following: the family ol Jean (,n\mi, mason; (he family of /acharic Cloulicr, carpenter; Henry I'inguct, Marin and Gas-II.IM! Hum her, and many oilier, \\lio bad verbal contracts of indenture .mil even some who made private agreements. The contracts ol Guyon and Cloutier, full of precise details, were signed before Roussel on 14 March 1634. Tlie two of them were comitted for 5 years to Giffard "up to the point of leaving in order to make, by the grace of God, the aforementioned colony trhe country of New France."

LE PERCHE

What is this country from whence came the greatest number of first families to be established in Canada in 1634? a brochure published in 1974 entitled Le Perche des Canadiens gives us precise information on the subject. The name Perche disappeared from the administrative divisions of France two centuries ago, but it still exists as a geographical region to the west of the Paris basin; between Normandy to the north, Maine to the west, the Vendomois to the south and the Beauce to the east.

This province is vividly contrasted from the neighboring regions by its terrain. Erosion carved the countryside into numerous valleys and its large forest is one of the water sources for western France. Numerous rivers and tributaries drain into the Seine and the Loire. The coast of lower Normandy is fed by sources deep in its wooded crests.

The introduction of Christianity into the Perche seems to date from the 5th century. After the difficult period of Norman invasions, the Perche was organized and developed with the help of its seigneurs. Monasteries were founded everywhere, but then the Hundred Years War weighed heavily on the countryside. Castles and villages were destroyed and but few Roman churches remained. After the conflict, the villagers left the forest and built a new town on the other side of the ruins which they designated the old bourg. Around the middle of the 15th century, the people of Perche started to farm again. With the advent of an iron and weaving industry, the villagers resumed a way of life long since forgotten. The country scarcely changed in the 17th century, except that agriculture and the crafts of artisans could not employ the expanding population. Increased knowledge of the New World, a taste for independence, and, perhaps for some of them, the idea of converting the native people, hastened their departure.

TOWARDS NEW FRANCE

Before enlisting his people, Robert Giffard, son of Guil-laume, sieur de la Tour and trumpeter at Autheuil, knew what waited for him in Canada. He had gone there for the first time in 1621, and lived there for 5 or 6 years. After his return to France, he took all the time he needed to fulfill his plan of implanting a certain number of families from Perche on Canadian soil. At the beginning of spring in 1634, Giffard and his future colonists were at the port of Dieppe. Four ships commanded by Duplessis-Boschard, and assisted by the Captains de Nesle, Bontemps, and de Lormel, awaited them before setting sail for New France. Among the passengers was Marin Boucher and his family, burning with impatience at the idea that in several weeks they would become acquainted with their new country. Benjamin Suite tells us that Marin, originally from Langy, had just sold a house to Jean Guyon, one that he owned in Montagne, which was next to that of Pierre Forget.

At the beginning of June, the first contingent from Perche arrived in Quebec and lost no time in choosing a site along the luxuriant banks of the majestic Saint-Law rence River. Boucher immediately opted for a lot on the Saint-Charles River, on land belonging to the Recollects.

Father Archange Godbout did patient research, urged on of course, by Madame Pierre Montagne, to find the origin of these families from Perche, from whom the majority of French Canadians are descended. In Our Ancestors of (he 17th Century, a colossal work which unfortunately remains unfinished, Father Godbout gives details on three generations of * Bouchers.

In his report published in 1975, the Archivist of Quebec, 15 years after the death of Father Godbout, gives us another portion of the work by this esteemed genealogist, written under the title of Old Families of France in New France, with introduction and additional notes by Roland J. Auger, then Director of Genealogical Service at the National Archives of Quebec, Pages 139 and 140 are devoted in large part to Marin Boucher.

We read therein that Marin was a relative of Gaspard, but not his brother, as was often claimed. He had at least 2 sisters: Jeanne, who was married on 15 July 1629 at Saint-Jean to Thomas Hayot; and Antoinette, wife of Guillaume Lecourt.

TWO MARRIAGES IN FRANCE

Marin Boucher, born between 1587 and 1589, was married twice before leaving for Canada. On 7 February 1611, he married Juliane Baril, daughter of Jean, living at LaBarre, in the parish of Saint-Langis-lez-Mortagne (Orne). Juliane died on 15 December 1627 and was buried at Saint-Langis the next day. Around 1629, Marin took a second wife, Perrine Malet. The following children, except for Louise, were baptized at Saint-Langis: Nicole (1611), Jean (1613), Francois (1617), Thienette (1620), Charlotte (1622), and Marie (1625); as for Louise, she was baptized at Saint-Jean in 1615.

From the second marriage came: Louis-Mann (1630) and Jean-Galleran (1633). The family did not end there; 5 other childen baptized at Chateau-Richer or at Quebec were:

3.Fraiifoise (1636), married 14 years later to Jean Plante, the ancestor of the Plante families in Canada. 4.Pierre (1639), future pioneer of the Riviere-Ouelle 5.Madeleine (1641), the ancestress of the Houde (and Houle) families, by her marriage to Louis Houde in 1660. 6.Marie (1644), future wife of Charles Godin, ancestor of a large number of our current Godin families. 7.Guillaume (1647), married to Marguerite-Jeanne Thibault in 1671.

Perrine Malet, the second wife of Marin Boucher, was born between 1604 and 1606, and was the daughter of Pierre Malet and of Jacqueline Liger from Courgeout (Orne). When the Bouchers came to New France in 1634, they were accompanied by 3 children: Louis-Marin, 4 years old; Jean-Galleran, 1 year old; and Francois, 16 years old.

HEIR TO CHAMPLA1N

We know almost nothing about the first 4 years of Marin Boucher and his family in New France, except that the pioneer is mentioned in Champlain's will. According to the historian, E. Mitchell (a member of the Society of Canadian Writers, and the Historical Societies of Montreal and Boucherville), the founder of Quebec certainly knew Boucher before his death. She states that "the Commandant of Trois-Rivieres, Marc-Antoine Bras-de-fer de Chateaufort, assumed his duties as interim governor immediately after the funeral. He presided at the reading of Champlain's will—a will whose validity was to be contested in which a man called Marin was mentioned, and it concerns, we believe, Marin, relative of Gaspard: 'I give to Marin, mason, living near the house of the Recollet Fathers, the last suit that I had made from material which I got at the store," wrote Champlain.'

Marin Boucher must have greatly appreciated this legacy from Champlain, because we know how much our ancestors, who were for the most part very poor, attached importance to any clothing, be it also threadbare and worn out.

FARMER OF THE JESUITS

On 24 August 1638, Marin was called to give testimony on the circumstances of the voyage of Gaspard Bouchard "his relative" who also arrived in 1634. We know that Marin first worked a piece of land that the Recollects had abandoned in 1629, following the surrender of Quebec to the Kirke brothers. Later he took a farm, with his brother-in-law, Thomas Hayot (the ancestor of the Ayotte families), on land of the Jesuits at Beauport. On 11 June 1648, reports the Jesuit Journal, the two farmers separated. Hayot kept the farm and Boucher took a concession next to that of Olivier Le Tardif.

ON THE BEAUPRE COAST

Later Boucher and his family lived on the Beaupre coast. Marin then sold his former farm of 3 arpents in frontage on the Saint-Charles River "from the stream which separates the cleared field of the Reverend Fathers Recollets from the deserted property formerly of Jacques Caumont." Marin claimed to have received the land from the Company of New France, but the Recollects claimed this land as belonging to them, when they returned to Canada in 1670.

On 6 March 1656, Boucher signed a note for 176 livres for the Fabrique de Quebec, an old debt contracted from the Compagnie des Habitants. "Meanwhile our mason-farmer, wrote Father Godbout, advanced in age. Little by little, he gave up his concessions: He gave VA arpents in frontage to his son-in-law Louis Houde which was returned to Marin on 13 September 1655. He then gave 2 arpents to another son-in-law Jean Plante on 15 April 1656 which was receipted for on 7 February 1659; an increase of 8 perches on 8 July, and right of passage on 27 September 1668. He gave another 2 arpents to his son Jean Galleran, on 30 April 1656, and added an increase of 7Vz perches on 15 December 1662. He made a similar gift to his son Guillaume on 29 July 1670. At the time of the 1667 census, Marin Boucher had reached the age of 80. Therein he listed 8 head of cattle and 20 arpents under cultivation. He must have died shortly after 1670. In 1681 Perrine Malet, his widow, was listed in the census along with Antoine Voilon, a tailor, who seems to have been in her employ. She was buried at Quebec on August 1687."

This citation from Father Godbout, leaves us a little curious concerning the date of death of Marin Boucher, but his epitaph exists fine and clear, copied from the registry of Chateau-Richer dated 29 March 1671, as follows:

"In the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ 1671, on the 29th of March died Marin Boucher after having lived as a good Christian and received the Holy sacraments of eucharist, penance and the last rights of extreme unction, was buried in the cemetery of Chateau-Richer by Monsieur Morel accompanied by the Reverend Father Nouvelle and by me doing priestly functions for them on the coast of Beaupre."

(signed) F. Pillion, missionary priest

THE BOUCHERS ARE LEGION The descendants of Marin Boucher are extremely numerous in America. "His descendants would today form a complete regiment," exclaimed the historian Benjamin Suite 100 years ago, in speaking of Marin Boucher.

In our day the expression is not strong enough. It would be necessary to speak of an entire army.

According to Tanguay, the surname Boucher has given rise to no less than nineteen variations: Belleville, Cambray, De-Boucherville, De Grosbois, De la Bruyiere, De la Peri ire, De Montanville, De Montbrun, De Montizambert, De Nivevillc, Desnois, Desroches, Desrosiers, De Vercheres, Dubois, Simon, St. Amour, St. Martin and St. Pierre. After Tanguay's list, we may add the more modern variation of Bushey.

Marin's birthplace was Langy, Bishopric of Mortagne, France.

According to Bill DeMars, Marin and his brother, Gaspard, entered into a contract with Robert Giffard, surgeon, chemist, colonizer and founder of Beauport, QC, Quebec. Gaspard sold his farm in Mortagne, Perche, France on 1 Feb 1634, a year after he had purchased it, and in the spring of 1634, Gaspard and Marin and their families, set sail with four other families (maki persons total) to Quebec. The other families included Jean Guyon (a Master Carpenter), Noel Langlois (a Navigator and future pilot on the Saint Lawrence River) and a Zacharie Cloutier.

Tanguay said that Marin was the Founder of Riviere St-Charles, formerly Recollets.

Marin Boucher: Ancestor of François Bibaud

Born in the Village of Mortagne, Perche, France , Perche, he established himself in QC with his second wife, Perinne Malet, and their children in 1634. When he left France in 1633 he sold his house in Mortagne, Perche, France to Jean Guion, who also emigrated to New France . He arrived in QC on June 4, 1634 with a group from the Percheron region in France. Staying for a while with Champlain himself who was staying in the fort in QC The new colonists soon started working on the construction of a house for their seigneur, Robert Giffard and some other more modest houses for themselves. Marin Boucherville, QC had a leading role in the foundation of Beauport, QC He was a mason and therefore played a very important part in the construction of the town. After a while Marin settled with his family on the river St-Charles. The census taker in 1666 recorded his age as 77 years and his occupation mason and habitant. He also possessed other land on the island of Orleans.

This citation from Father Godbout, leaves us a little curious concerning the date of death of Marin Boucher, but his epitaph exists fine and clear, copied from the registry of Château-Richer, QC dated 29 March 1671, as follows:

"In the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ 1671, on the 29th of March died Marin Boucherville, QC after having lived as a good Christian and received the Holy sacraments of eucharist, penance and the last rights of extreme unction, was buried in the cemetery of Chateau- Richer by Monsieur Morel accompanied by the Reverend Father Nouvelle and by me doing priestly functions for them on the coast of Beaupré, QC '." (signed) F. Fillion, missionary priest. (The Albert Family Genealogy Web-Roots)




pp7734-5 born Langly , eviche de Mortagne etabli a la Riviere St Charles, sur les ci-devant terres des Recollets Arrived in Canada 8-9-1634




Les parents sont inconnus. Il est le frère de Jeanne Boucher m à Thomas Hayot (Ayotte) - autres sources qui donnent Jacques Boucher et Francoise Paigne comme parents sont une fiction.

Selon René Jetté parent de Gaspard Boucher m à Nicole Lemaire (degré de parenté inconnu)

serait decede d'apres Rene Jette le 25/3/1671 et inhume le 29/3/1671

On remarque chez Marin qu'il était marié deux fois et pour chacun des mariages naissaient 7 enfants. Les enfants du premier mariage en France mourraient en bas age, sauf François qui accompagnait ses parents au Canada.

Cependant, les enfants du deuxième mariage qui ont grandi au Québec atteignaient un age respectable. Il semble que la vie en Nouvelle France faisait du bien.


Les parents sont inconnus. Il est le frère de Jeanne Boucher m à Thomas Hayot (Ayotte) - autres sources qui donnent Jacques Boucher et Francoise Paigne comme parents sont une fiction.

Selon René Jetté parent de Gaspard Boucher m à Nicole Lemaire (degré de parenté inconnu)

serait decede d'apres Rene Jette le 25/3/1671 et inhume le 29/3/1671

On remarque chez Marin qu'il était marié deux fois et pour chacun des mariages naissaient 7 enfants. Les enfants du premier mariage en France mourraient en bas age, sauf François qui accompagnait ses parents au Canada.

Cependant, les enfants du deuxième mariage qui ont grandi au Québec atteignaient un age respectable. Il semble que la vie en Nouvelle France faisait du bien.




Maçon

Les parents sont inconnus. Il est le frère de Jeanne Boucher m à Thomas Hayot (Ayotte) - autres sources qui donnent Jacques Boucher et Francoise Paigne comme parents sont une fiction.

Selon René Jetté parent de Gaspard Boucher m à Nicole Lemaire (degré de parenté inconnu)

serait decede d'apres Rene Jette le 25/3/1671 et inhume le 29/3/1671

On remarque chez Marin qu'il était marié deux fois et pour chacun des mariages naissaient 7 enfants. Les enfants du premier mariage en France mourraient en bas age, sauf François qui accompagnait ses parents au Canada.

Cependant, les enfants du deuxième mariage qui ont grandi au Québec atteignaient un age respectable. Il semble que la vie en Nouvelle France faisait du bien.




De St-Jean de Mortagne, Perche, France Établi à la Rivière St-Charles, sur les ci-devant, terres des Récollets. S'installe à la côte de Beaupré sur le testament de Champlain. Ancêtre de François Bibaud.




Marin was a stone mason. Resided St. Langid? les Mortagne.He married 2nd (1629) in France, to Perrine MALET. Withhis new wife he came to New France about 1634.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


(source Our French Canadian Ancestors): Marin was arelative but not a brother of Gaspard BOUCHER.

Marin married a second wife, Perrine MALET around 1629.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


another source lists his birth: 1589 at Soligny de Trappe, Mortagne, France

                      -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  --  -  -  -  -  -

(Tanguay Dictionnaire v1 p71) / Dictionnaire Genealogie des Familles Canadiennes

Marin BOUCHER ... establi a la Riviere St-Charles, sur les ci-devant terresdes Recollets.

    -    -    -    -    -    -   -   -

Tanguay Dictionnaire v1 p71 : Wedding year 1625 (no day or month or location).




Les colons qu’a fournis la Perche à la Nouvelle-France furent, règle générale, parmi les plus entreprenants. Marin Boucher fut de ceux-là.

Originaire de la belle ville de Mortagne au Perche, il vint s’établir au Canada en 1634 avec sa seconde femme, Périnne Malet, et ses enfants. Avant son départ en 1633, il avait vendu sa maison de Mortagne à Jean Guion qui lui aussi devait émigrer en Nouvelle-France.

Votre ancêtre arriva au Québec le 4 juin 1634 avec tout un contingent de Percherons. Pendant quelques temps ce fut Champlain lui-même qui les logea dans le fort de Québec. Mais bientôt les nouveaux colons se mirent à l’œuvre, construisant d’abord une maison pour leur seigneur, Robert Giffard, et d’autres plus modestes pour eux-mêmes. Les défrichements furent poussés avec vigueur et le sol bientôt ensemencé.

Marin Boucher a joué un rôle particulier dans la fondation de Beauport. Il était en effet maçon de son métier et c’est à lui que fut confiée par conséquent une partie importante des travaux de construction.

Après quelques temps, Marin Boucher s’établit avec sa famille à rivière Saint-Charles. Plus tard, sur la fin de sa vie, Marin Boucher revint à Beauport et en 1666 les recenseurs le disent âgé de 77 ans, maçon et habitant. Nous savons par ailleurs qu’il possédait une autre terre située dans l’Île d’Orléans.

De son vivant Marin Boucher partagea une bonne partie de ses biens entre ses nombreux enfants. Il mourut entouré de sa famille après avoir vécu en bon chrétien, comme dit l’acte de sépulture, dont nous vous donnons transcription fidèle.

« L’an de nost. Seigneur Jésus-Christ mil six cent soixante et onze le 29 de mars mourut Marin Boucher après avoir vécu en bon chrétien et receu les Sts. Sacraments de pénitence eucharistie et viatique et l’extrême onction et fust enterré dans le cimetière du chasteau Richer M. Morel accompagné du révérend père Nouvelle de moy faisant pour lors les fonctions curiales dans le coste de beaupré.

F. Fillion, prest. Missionnaire. »

Marin Boucher est l’ancêtre de la plupart des familles Boucher, et en particulier de celle du comté de Kamouraska.

Généalogie de Rémi Bachand. Compilée par l’Institut Généalogique Drouin, Montréal, février 1948.




Il venait de St-Jean -de- Mortagne Perche




Of St Langis-Les Mortagne, Perche France. Married 2-7-1611 St Langis


Marin settled in Canada in 1634 with his second wife, Perinne Malet, and their two children. This first wife, Julienne Baril whom he married in 1611, had died in 1627. They had 7 children not all of whom travel to Quebec with them. They arrived in Canada with a contingent of other settlers from Perche. Samuel de Champlain met them and provided their first shelter at the fort of Quebec. Soon the settlers were off to build a house for their seigneur, Robert Giffard and then more modest ones for themselves. Marin, a stone mason by trade, was given key tasks in the construction projects in this early Beauport. The settlers then cleared land and sowed their first crops. Marin was mentioned in de Champlain's will, in 1635 bequeathing him "the suit of clothes which i had made from the cloth I bought at the store." Shortly Marin settled his family at Riviere-Saint-Charles. Five more children were born in Quebec. By the 1666 census, he was age 77 and a mason and farmer in Beauport again. he also owned land on Ile d'Orleans.

Seven and a half centuries ago, the royal troops of France with Blanche de Gastille at their head, regent of the country until her son Louis IX attained his majority, captured the imposing fortress of the castle of Belleme and took possession of the county of Perche. The Due d'A-lencon, brother of Philippe VI, had obtained this territory earlier, but in 1525, the region was returned once and for all to the French crown.

A century passed: Then around 1633 there was great activity. Robert Giffard and Nod .Iiicliercau were recruiting for New France. They searched (he wooded hills around their small village, (from whence would come (lie celebrated strong-ntuslced, dappled gray work horse) and Iried to convince the men and their relatives lo follow them to Canada. Giffard imisl have been very persuasive since be succeeded in enlisting Hie following: the family ol Jean (,n\mi, mason; (he family of /acharic Cloulicr, carpenter; Henry I'inguct, Marin and Gas-II.IM! Hum her, and many oilier, \\lio bad verbal contracts of indenture .mil even some who made private agreements. The contracts ol Guyon and Cloutier, full of precise details, were signed before Roussel on 14 March 1634. Tlie two of them were comitted for 5 years to Giffard "up to the point of leaving in order to make, by the grace of God, the aforementioned colony trhe country of New France."

LE PERCHE

What is this country from whence came the greatest number of first families to be established in Canada in 1634? a brochure published in 1974 entitled Le Perche des Canadiens gives us precise information on the subject. The name Perche disappeared from the administrative divisions of France two centuries ago, but it still exists as a geographical region to the west of the Paris basin; between Normandy to the north, Maine to the west, the Vendomois to the south and the Beauce to the east.

This province is vividly contrasted from the neighboring regions by its terrain. Erosion carved the countryside into numerous valleys and its large forest is one of the water sources for western France. Numerous rivers and tributaries drain into the Seine and the Loire. The coast of lower Normandy is fed by sources deep in its wooded crests.

The introduction of Christianity into the Perche seems to date from the 5th century. After the difficult period of Norman invasions, the Perche was organized and developed with the help of its seigneurs. Monasteries were founded everywhere, but then the Hundred Years War weighed heavily on the countryside. Castles and villages were destroyed and but few Roman churches remained. After the conflict, the villagers left the forest and built a new town on the other side of the ruins which they designated the old bourg. Around the middle of the 15th century, the people of Perche started to farm again. With the advent of an iron and weaving industry, the villagers resumed a way of life long since forgotten. The country scarcely changed in the 17th century, except that agriculture and the crafts of artisans could not employ the expanding population. Increased knowledge of the New World, a taste for independence, and, perhaps for some of them, the idea of converting the native people, hastened their departure.

TOWARDS NEW FRANCE

Before enlisting his people, Robert Giffard, son of Guil-laume, sieur de la Tour and trumpeter at Autheuil, knew what waited for him in Canada. He had gone there for the first time in 1621, and lived there for 5 or 6 years. After his return to France, he took all the time he needed to fulfill his plan of implanting a certain number of families from Perche on Canadian soil. At the beginning of spring in 1634, Giffard and his future colonists were at the port of Dieppe. Four ships commanded by Duplessis-Boschard, and assisted by the Captains de Nesle, Bontemps, and de Lormel, awaited them before setting sail for New France. Among the passengers was Marin Boucher and his family, burning with impatience at the idea that in several weeks they would become acquainted with their new country. Benjamin Suite tells us that Marin, originally from Langy, had just sold a house to Jean Guyon, one that he owned in Montagne, which was next to that of Pierre Forget.

At the beginning of June, the first contingent from Perche arrived in Quebec and lost no time in choosing a site along the luxuriant banks of the majestic Saint-Law rence River. Boucher immediately opted for a lot on the Saint-Charles River, on land belonging to the Recollects.

Father Archange Godbout did patient research, urged on of course, by Madame Pierre Montagne, to find the origin of these families from Perche, from whom the majority of French Canadians are descended. In Our Ancestors of (he 17th Century, a colossal work which unfortunately remains unfinished, Father Godbout gives details on three generations of * Bouchers.

In his report published in 1975, the Archivist of Quebec, 15 years after the death of Father Godbout, gives us another portion of the work by this esteemed genealogist, written under the title of Old Families of France in New France, with introduction and additional notes by Roland J. Auger, then Director of Genealogical Service at the National Archives of Quebec, Pages 139 and 140 are devoted in large part to Marin Boucher.

We read therein that Marin was a relative of Gaspard, but not his brother, as was often claimed. He had at least 2 sisters: Jeanne, who was married on 15 July 1629 at Saint-Jean to Thomas Hayot; and Antoinette, wife of Guillaume Lecourt.

TWO MARRIAGES IN FRANCE

Marin Boucher, born between 1587 and 1589, was married twice before leaving for Canada. On 7 February 1611, he married Juliane Baril, daughter of Jean, living at LaBarre, in the parish of Saint-Langis-lez-Mortagne (Orne). Juliane died on 15 December 1627 and was buried at Saint-Langis the next day. Around 1629, Marin took a second wife, Perrine Malet. The following children, except for Louise, were baptized at Saint-Langis: Nicole (1611), Jean (1613), Francois (1617), Thienette (1620), Charlotte (1622), and Marie (1625); as for Louise, she was baptized at Saint-Jean in 1615.

From the second marriage came: Louis-Mann (1630) and Jean-Galleran (1633). The family did not end there; 5 other childen baptized at Chateau-Richer or at Quebec were:

3.Fraiifoise (1636), married 14 years later to Jean Plante, the ancestor of the Plante families in Canada. 4.Pierre (1639), future pioneer of the Riviere-Ouelle 5.Madeleine (1641), the ancestress of the Houde (and Houle) families, by her marriage to Louis Houde in 1660. 6.Marie (1644), future wife of Charles Godin, ancestor of a large number of our current Godin families. 7.Guillaume (1647), married to Marguerite-Jeanne Thibault in 1671.

Perrine Malet, the second wife of Marin Boucher, was born between 1604 and 1606, and was the daughter of Pierre Malet and of Jacqueline Liger from Courgeout (Orne). When the Bouchers came to New France in 1634, they were accompanied by 3 children: Louis-Marin, 4 years old; Jean-Galleran, 1 year old; and Francois, 16 years old.

HEIR TO CHAMPLA1N

We know almost nothing about the first 4 years of Marin Boucher and his family in New France, except that the pioneer is mentioned in Champlain's will. According to the historian, E. Mitchell (a member of the Society of Canadian Writers, and the Historical Societies of Montreal and Boucherville), the founder of Quebec certainly knew Boucher before his death. She states that "the Commandant of Trois-Rivieres, Marc-Antoine Bras-de-fer de Chateaufort, assumed his duties as interim governor immediately after the funeral. He presided at the reading of Champlain's will—a will whose validity was to be contested in which a man called Marin was mentioned, and it concerns, we believe, Marin, relative of Gaspard: 'I give to Marin, mason, living near the house of the Recollet Fathers, the last suit that I had made from material which I got at the store," wrote Champlain.'

Marin Boucher must have greatly appreciated this legacy from Champlain, because we know how much our ancestors, who were for the most part very poor, attached importance to any clothing, be it also threadbare and worn out.

FARMER OF THE JESUITS

On 24 August 1638, Marin was called to give testimony on the circumstances of the voyage of Gaspard Bouchard "his relative" who also arrived in 1634. We know that Marin first worked a piece of land that the Recollects had abandoned in 1629, following the surrender of Quebec to the Kirke brothers. Later he took a farm, with his brother-in-law, Thomas Hayot (the ancestor of the Ayotte families), on land of the Jesuits at Beauport. On 11 June 1648, reports the Jesuit Journal, the two farmers separated. Hayot kept the farm and Boucher took a concession next to that of Olivier Le Tardif.

ON THE BEAUPRE COAST

Later Boucher and his family lived on the Beaupre coast. Marin then sold his former farm of 3 arpents in frontage on the Saint-Charles River "from the stream which separates the cleared field of the Reverend Fathers Recollets from the deserted property formerly of Jacques Caumont." Marin claimed to have received the land from the Company of New France, but the Recollects claimed this land as belonging to them, when they returned to Canada in 1670.

On 6 March 1656, Boucher signed a note for 176 livres for the Fabrique de Quebec, an old debt contracted from the Compagnie des Habitants. "Meanwhile our mason-farmer, wrote Father Godbout, advanced in age. Little by little, he gave up his concessions: He gave VA arpents in frontage to his son-in-law Louis Houde which was returned to Marin on 13 September 1655. He then gave 2 arpents to another son-in-law Jean Plante on 15 April 1656 which was receipted for on 7 February 1659; an increase of 8 perches on 8 July, and right of passage on 27 September 1668. He gave another 2 arpents to his son Jean Galleran, on 30 April 1656, and added an increase of 7Vz perches on 15 December 1662. He made a similar gift to his son Guillaume on 29 July 1670. At the time of the 1667 census, Marin Boucher had reached the age of 80. Therein he listed 8 head of cattle and 20 arpents under cultivation. He must have died shortly after 1670. In 1681 Perrine Malet, his widow, was listed in the census along with Antoine Voilon, a tailor, who seems to have been in her employ. She was buried at Quebec on August 1687."

This citation from Father Godbout, leaves us a little curious concerning the date of death of Marin Boucher, but his epitaph exists fine and clear, copied from the registry of Chateau-Richer dated 29 March 1671, as follows:

"In the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ 1671, on the 29th of March died Marin Boucher after having lived as a good Christian and received the Holy sacraments of eucharist, penance and the last rights of extreme unction, was buried in the cemetery of Chateau-Richer by Monsieur Morel accompanied by the Reverend Father Nouvelle and by me doing priestly functions for them on the coast of Beaupre."

(signed) F. Pillion, missionary priest

THE BOUCHERS ARE LEGION The descendants of Marin Boucher are extremely numerous in America. "His descendants would today form a complete regiment," exclaimed the historian Benjamin Suite 100 years ago, in speaking of Marin Boucher.

In our day the expression is not strong enough. It would be necessary to speak of an entire army.

According to Tanguay, the surname Boucher has given rise to no less than nineteen variations: Belleville, Cambray, De-Boucherville, De Grosbois, De la Bruyiere, De la Peri ire, De Montanville, De Montbrun, De Montizambert, De Nivevillc, Desnois, Desroches, Desrosiers, De Vercheres, Dubois, Simon, St. Amour, St. Martin and St. Pierre. After Tanguay's list, we may add the more modern variation of Bushey.

Marin's birthplace was Langy, Bishopric of Mortagne, France.

According to Bill DeMars, Marin and his brother, Gaspard, entered into a contract with Robert Giffard, surgeon, chemist, colonizer and founder of Beauport, QC, Quebec. Gaspard sold his farm in Mortagne, Perche, France on 1 Feb 1634, a year after he had purchased it, and in the spring of 1634, Gaspard and Marin and their families, set sail with four other families (maki persons total) to Quebec. The other families included Jean Guyon (a Master Carpenter), Noel Langlois (a Navigator and future pilot on the Saint Lawrence River) and a Zacharie Cloutier.

Tanguay said that Marin was the Founder of Riviere St-Charles, formerly Recollets.

Marin Boucher: Ancestor of François Bibaud

Born in the Village of Mortagne, Perche, France , Perche, he established himself in QC with his second wife, Perinne Malet, and their children in 1634. When he left France in 1633 he sold his house in Mortagne, Perche, France to Jean Guion, who also emigrated to New France . He arrived in QC on June 4, 1634 with a group from the Percheron region in France. Staying for a while with Champlain himself who was staying in the fort in QC The new colonists soon started working on the construction of a house for their seigneur, Robert Giffard and some other more modest houses for themselves. Marin Boucherville, QC had a leading role in the foundation of Beauport, QC He was a mason and therefore played a very important part in the construction of the town. After a while Marin settled with his family on the river St-Charles. The census taker in 1666 recorded his age as 77 years and his occupation mason and habitant. He also possessed other land on the island of Orleans.

This citation from Father Godbout, leaves us a little curious concerning the date of death of Marin Boucher, but his epitaph exists fine and clear, copied from the registry of Château-Richer, QC dated 29 March 1671, as follows:

"In the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ 1671, on the 29th of March died Marin Boucherville, QC after having lived as a good Christian and received the Holy sacraments of eucharist, penance and the last rights of extreme unction, was buried in the cemetery of Chateau- Richer by Monsieur Morel accompanied by the Reverend Father Nouvelle and by me doing priestly functions for them on the coast of Beaupré, QC '." (signed) F. Fillion, missionary priest. (The Albert Family Genealogy Web-Roots)

pp7734-5 born Langly , eviche de Mortagne etabli a la Riviere St Charles, sur les ci-devant terres des Recollets Arrived in Canada 8-9-1634

According to https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Boucher-64 : Biography

Marin BOUCHER (~1587 - 1671)[1][2][3][4][5][6] [Carpin #25][22][34]

Nov. 4, 2014: This is a draft that needs cleaning up. Any text not backed by solid references will be deleted.

Marin Boucher, born about 1587. On February 7, 1611, he married in first marriage Julienne Baril, daughter of Jean Baril et Raouline Creste. Born in Saint-Langis in Perche, Julienne died on December 15, 1627 and was buried at Saint-Langis the next day. Around 1629, Marin married in second marriage Perrine Mallet, born between 1604 and 1606, daughter of Pierre Mallet and Jacqueline Ligier, from Courgeoût[35] in Perche.

The first purposeful settlement program to Canada began in 1634, spearheaded by physician Robert Giffard, who had been granted the Beauport seigneurie along the Saint-Charles River downriver from Québec on condition that he bring in settlers to develop the colony. Giffard collaborated closely with the two Juchereau brothers Noël and Jean to recruit settlers from Perche, the tiny ancient province bounded by Normandie province to the North, Maine province to the West, Beauce province to the East and Orléanais province to the South. The Giffard-Juchereau-sponsored Percheron emigration movement was remarkably successful in attracting families and individuals from locations all over Perche but especially from locations centered (in decreasing order of importance) on Tourouvre, Mortagne, Saint-Côsme de Vair and Igé.[36][37][38]

The initial 30 or so Percheron settlers to go to Canada in 1634 included Marin Boucher accompanied by his second wife, Perrine Mallet, and three children from both marriages.[21][37][39][22][23] We know that Marin first worked a piece of land that the Recollets had abandoned in 1629 following the surrender of Québec to the Kirke brothers. Later, he took a farm from his brother-in-law, Thomas Hayot on the Jesuits estate at Beauport. On June 11, 1648, reports Le journal des Jésuites, the two farmers separated. Hayot kept the farm and Boucher took a concession next to that of Olivier Tardif.[40]

After working the land on three different sites, including Beauport, Marin Boucher and Perrine Mallet finally settled their family in 1650 at Château-Richer, opposite l’Île d’Orléans, downriver from Québec, between Beauport and Ste-Anne-de-Beaupré. It seems that the Boucher-Mallet home became the local religious gathering-place, before a church was built in the area. Both Marin and Perrine were buried at Château-Richer.

According to Tanguay, the surname Boucher has given rise to no less than nineteen variations (variation du nom): Belleville, Cambray, De Boucherville, De Grosbois, De la Bruyiere, De la Perriere, De Montarville, De Montbrun, De Montisambert, De Niveville, Desnois, Desroches, Desrosiers, De Vercheres, Dubois, Simon, St. Amour, St. Martin and St. Pierre. [41][42] Some of the early root ancestors' surname variations have of course been anglicized to names such as Bushey.

(Content for the rest of the Biography section is taken largely from recent profile merge, which is in part lifted from Wikipedia's "Marin Boucher" article (which should be cited properly), requires further integration into one seamless Biography section.)

Marin Boucher (1587 or 1589–1671), was a pioneer of early New France and one of the most prolific ancestors of French Canada, being the ancestor of most of the Bouchers of North America, particularly in the province of Quebec, Northern New Brunswick, Ontario and Western Canada. Estimates of the number of families in Canada and the United States descended from Marin Boucher run as high as 350,000 (?!), although most of them do not bear the name Boucher today because Marin's line produced more daughters than sons.[43] According to Duchesne 2006, Tableau 11, for Quebec in the year 2005 and La Mémoire du Québec:

Last Name People with that Last Name Rank Descendants in 1729 Boucher 25,800 20 Marin, 1454; Madeleine, 202 Tremblay 81,500 1 Pierre, 333 Larouche 11,000 100 Marin Boucher was born in Mortagne in France's ancient Perche province about 1587 and died on 25 March 1671 in Château-Richer on the fleuve St-Laurent's north shore east of Québec.

He married twice: (1) to Julienne Baril ( - 1627) in 1611 and (2) to Perrine Mallet (1604-1687) before 1630. Marin and Julienne had seven children, one of whom traveled to Canada; Marin and Perrine had seven more children, five of whom were born in Canada.

The Bouchers were stonemasons and carpenters, skills which were valuable in the early colony. Marin Boucher was deeded certain Champlain's clothes in his will when he died. He was also a witness in a dispute with a fellow Percheron, Thomas Giroust, over stolen property in which his relation Gaspard Boucher was the plaintiff.[44]

Two early settlers of Acadia are believed to be descended from Marin Boucher of New France, including a Jacques Boucher who shows up in a 1700 census of Port Royale (in present-day Nova Scotia), and Pierre Boucher who went to Grand Pré and married Anne Hebert on or around 1714. According to the Boucher family website and referring to current footnote 37, there are three main Boucher lines (Marin + François + Jean-Galleran; Gaspard + Pierre, sieur de Grosbois; and Jean born on or around 1650 in St-Etienne du Bourg de Chaix located in France's ancient Poitou province)[45] and eight minor Boucher lines.

Enfants / Children

Union avec / with Julienne Baril:

- 1. Nicole Boucher (1611 - ) - 2. Jean Boucher (1613 - 1617) - 3. Louise Boucher (1615 - ) + 4. François Boucher (1617 - 1678) - 5. Étiennette Boucher (1620 - ) - 6. Charlotte Boucher (1622 - ) - 7. Marie Boucher (1625 - ) Union avec / with Perrine Mallet:

- 8. Louis-Marin Boucher dit Boisbuisson (1630 - 1700) + 9. Jean-Galleran Boucher (1633 - 1714) + 10. Françoise Boucher (1636 - 1711) + 11. Pierre Boucher dit Pitoche (1639 - 1707) + 12. Madeleine Boucher (1641 - 1709) + 13. Marie Boucher (1644 - 1730) + 14. Guillaume Boucher (1647 - 1729) Bibliographie / Bibliography

view all 46

Marin Boucher's Timeline

1589
April 15, 1589
Mortagne, Perche, France
1589
Mortagne, Perche, France
1610
1610
Age 20
Échillais, Saintonge, France
1611
November 8, 1611
Age 22
Mortagne, Perche, France
1611
Age 21
au lieu de La Barre paroisse de Saint Langis
1613
March 15, 1613
Age 23
Mortagne, Perche, France
1615
August 15, 1615
Age 26
Mortagne, Perche, France
1617
November 21, 1617
Age 28
Mortagne, Perche, France

History tells us he crossed the ocean in 1634 with his father Marin Boucher and that he was then 17, that sets his d of b as 1617

1619
1619
Age 29
Perche, France