Master Commandant Richard Somers Jr. USN

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Master Commandant Richard Somers, Jr.

Birthdate: (25)
Birthplace: Somers Point, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States
Death: Died in Tripoli, Barbary Coast
Cause of death: Killed in Action
Place of Burial: Tripoli, Tarabulus, Libya
Immediate Family:

Son of Richard Somers and Sophia Somers
Brother of Constant somers; Sophia Higbee (Somers); Sarah somers; John Somers and Jane Somers

Managed by: Eldon Clark (C)
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Master Commandant Richard Somers Jr. USN

Find a Grave

Birth: Sep. 15, 1778 Somers Point Atlantic County New Jersey, USA

Death: Sep. 4, 1804

United States Naval Officer. He entered the United States Navy in 1798 as a Midshipman aboard the frigate "USS United States". Promoted to Lieutenant in 1799, and Second Lieutenant in 1800, in 1801 he transferred to the frigate "USS Boston", serving in the first campaign against the Tripoli pirates through 1802. In 1803 he became commander of the schooner "USS Nautilus". In this capacity he served on blockade duty. In August 1804 Somers commanded Gun Boat Division One in battles against the pirates around Tripoli. On August 28 he volunteered to commanded the "USS Intrepid" to destroy the pirate flotilla in the harbor. On September 4, 1804, while carrying out his mission, the "Intrepid" exploded killing Somers and 12 other men aboard. (bio by: Dan Silva)


Burial: Green Square Tripoli Tarabulus, Libya


Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]


Maintained by: Find A Grave Originally Created by: Dan Silva Record added: Jul 13, 2011 Find A Grave Memorial# 73309051


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Somers

Richard Somers (1778 or 1779–4 September 1804) was an officer of the United States Navy, killed during a daring assault on Tripoli.


Life


Born at Great Egg Harbor, New Jersey, he attended school in Philadelphia with future naval heroes Stephen Decatur and Charles Stewart. He was appointed midshipman on 25 April 1797 and served in the West Indies during the Quasi-War with France on the frigate United States with Decatur and Stewart, a ship commanded by Captain John Barry. Promoted to lieutenant on 21 May 1799, Somers was detached from United States on 13 June 1801 and ordered to Boston on 30 July 1801. He served in the latter frigate in the Mediterranean. After Boston returned to Washington, DC, Somers was furloughed on 11 November 1802 to await orders.


On 5 May 1803, Somers was ordered to Baltimore, Maryland, to man, fit out, and command USS Nautilus, and when that schooner was ready for sea, to sail her to the Mediterranean. Nautilus got underway on 30 June, reached Gibraltar on 27 July, and sailed four days later to Spain. He then returned to Gibraltar to meet Commodore Edward Preble, in Constitution, who was bringing a new squadron for action against the Barbary pirates. Nautilus sailed with Preble on 6 October to Tangier where the display of American naval strength induced the Europeans of Morocco to renew the treaty of 1786. Thereafter, Tripoli became the focus of Preble's attention.


Somers' service as commanding officer of Nautilus during operations against Tripoli won him promotion to Master Commandant on 18 May 1804. In the summer, he commanded a division of gunboats during five attacks on Tripoli, during the First Barbary War.


On 4 September 1804, Somers assumed command of fire ship Intrepid which had been fitted out as a "floating volcano" to be sailed into Tripoli harbor and blown up in the midst of the corsair fleet close under the walls of the city. That night, she got underway into the harbor, but she exploded prematurely, killing Somers and his entire crew of volunteers.


Somers is buried in Tripoli, Libya. In 2004, the New Jersey state assembly passed two resolutions calling for the return of his remains. It is hoped that with the fall of Moammar Gadhafi's regime in Libya in August 2011 that the effort to repatriate the remains will finally be successful.


Since 1804, six ships of the US Navy have successively been named the USS Somers in his honor.


The town of Somers, New York, located in Westchester County is named in his honor. Somers Point, N.J., is named after Richard's great-grandfather. Every year there is a Richard Somers Day celebration in Somers Point, which is co-sponsored by LibertyandProsperity.org and the Somers Point Historical Society. The event is Sunday 12 September in 2010.


He went on to became a famous Navy Commandant; he died in 1804 at the Battle of Tripoli during the First Barbary War. [3]


http://somerspointhistory.org/tour/birth.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Somers

Richard Somers (15 September 1778 –4 September 1804) was an officer of the United States Navy, killed during a daring assault on Tripoli during the First Barbary War. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Barbary_War#Battles


Life


Born at Great Egg Harbor, New Jersey, he attended school in Philadelphia with future naval heroes Stephen Decatur and Charles Stewart. He was appointed midshipman on 25 April 1797 and served in the West Indies during the Quasi-War with France on the frigate United States with Decatur and Stewart, a ship commanded by Captain John Barry. Promoted to lieutenant on 21 May 1799, Somers was detached from United States on 13 June 1801 and ordered to Boston on 30 July 1801. He served in the latter frigate in the Mediterranean. After Boston returned to Washington, DC, Somers was furloughed on 11 November 1802 to await orders.


On 5 May 1803, Somers was ordered to Baltimore, Maryland, to man, fit out, and command USS Nautilus, and when that schooner was ready for sea, to sail her to the Mediterranean. Nautilus got underway on 30 June, reached Gibraltar on 27 July, and sailed four days later to Spain. He then returned to Gibraltar to meet Commodore Edward Preble, in Constitution, who was bringing a new squadron for action against the Barbary pirates. Nautilus sailed with Preble on 6 October to Tangier where the display of American naval strength induced the Europeans of Morocco to renew the treaty of 1786. Thereafter, Tripoli became the focus of Preble's attention.


Somers' service as commanding officer of Nautilus during operations against Tripoli won him promotion to Master Commandant on 18 May 1804. In the summer, he commanded a division of gunboats during five attacks on Tripoli, during the First Barbary War.


On 4 September 1804, Somers assumed command of fire ship Intrepid which had been fitted out as a "floating volcano" to be sailed into Tripoli harbor and blown up in the midst of the corsair fleet close under the walls of the city. That night, she got underway into the harbor, but she exploded prematurely, killing Somers and his entire crew of volunteers.


Somers is buried in Tripoli, Libya. In 2004, the New Jersey state assembly passed two resolutions calling for the return of his remains. It is hoped that with the fall of Moammar Gadhafi's regime in Libya in August 2011 that the effort to repatriate the remains will finally be successful.


Since 1804, six ships of the US Navy have successively been named the USS Somers in his honor.

The Tripoli Monument, the oldest military monument in the U.S., honors the heroes of the First Barbary War, including Master Commandant Richard Somers. Others honored are: Lieutenant James Caldwell, James Decatur (brother of Stephen Decatur), Henry Wadsworth, Joseph Israel and John Dorsey. Originally known as the Naval Monument, it was carved of Carrara marble in Italy in 1806 and brought to the U.S. as ballast on board the USS Constitution ("Old Ironsides"). From its original location in the Washington Navy Yard, it was moved to the west terrace of the national Capitol and finally, in 1860, to the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.


The town of Somers, New York, located in Westchester County is named in his honor. Somers Point, N.J., is named after Richard's great-grandfather. Every year there is a Richard Somers Day celebration in Somers Point, which is co-sponsored by LibertyandProsperity.org and the Somers Point Historical Society. The event is Sunday 12 September in 2010.

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Master Commandant Richard Somers Jr. USN's Timeline

1778
September 15, 1778
Somers Point, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States
1804
September 4, 1804
Age 25
Tripoli, Barbary Coast
????
Tripoli, Tarabulus, Libya