Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford

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Countess Maud de Vere (de Badlesmere), Countess of Oxford

Birthdate: (56)
Birthplace: Casle Badlesmere, Kent, England
Death: May 24, 1366 (52-60)
Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron of Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness of Badlesmere
Wife of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford and Robert Fitzpayn
Mother of Elizabeth de Vere; Sir John de Vere; Thomas de Vere, 8th Earl of Oxford; Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford; Robert de Vere and 2 others
Sister of Margery de Badlesmere, Baroness De Ros; Elizabeth de Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton; Baron Giles de Badlesmere; Ralph Badlesmere and Margaret de Badlesmere

Occupation: Countess of Oxford
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford

MARGARET/MAUD DID NOT MARRY WILLIAM DE ROS, JOHN TIBETOT OR RICHARD SERGEAUX. MAUD WHO MARRIED ROBERT FITZPAYN & JOHN DE VERE.

HER SISTER MARGERY MARRIED WILLIAM DE ROS, ALSO THOMAS ARUNDEL & JOHN AVENAL.

ANOTHER SISTER MARGARET WHO MARRIED JOHN TIBETOT/TIPTOFT.

Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford

(1310- 24 May 1366), was an English noblewoman, and the wife of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford. She, along with her three sisters, was a co-heiress of her only brother Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere who had no male issue.

Family

Maud was born at Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England in 1310, the second eldest daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare. She had three sisters, Margery, Elizabeth, and Margaret; all of whom eventually married and had issue.

She had one brother, Giles.

Her paternal grandparents were Guncelin de Badlesmere and Joan FitzBernard. Her maternal grandparents were Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly.

On 14 April 1322, when she was twelve years of age, Maud's father was hanged for treason by orders of King Edward II, following his rebellion and subsequent capture after the Battle of Boroughbridge. Her mother had been arrested the previous October for refusing Queen Isabella admittance to Leeds Castle where Lord Badlesmere held the post of castellan.[1] Maud's mother, Lady Badlesmere, remained imprisoned in the Tower of London until 3 November 1322.[2] Her brother Giles obtained a reversal of their father's attainder in 1328, and he succeeded to the barony as 2nd Baron Badlesmere. Maud, along with her three sisters, was Giles's co-heiress, as he had married but fathered no sons by his wife, Elizabeth Montagu.

Marriages and children

On an unknown date, Maud married her first husband Robert FitzPayn, but the marriage was childless. After his death, she married sometime before March 1335 her second husband, John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford. Upon her marriage, Maud assumed the title Countess of Oxford. John was a captain in King Edward III's army, and as such participated in the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers.

The marriage produced seven children:[3]

John de Vere (December 1335- before 23 June 1350), married Elizabeth de Courtney as her first husband.

Thomas de Vere, 8th Earl of Oxford (1336- 18 September 1371), married Maud de Ufford, by whom he had a son Robert de Vere, 9th Earl of Oxford

Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford (1338- 15 February 1400), married Alice FitzWalter, by whom he had three children, including Richard de Vere, 11th Earl of Oxford

Robert de Vere (died 1360)

Elizabeth de Vere (died 23 September 1375), married firstly in 1341 Sir Hugh de Courtney, by whom she had one son, Hugh de Courtney, Lord Courtney; she married secondly John de Mowbray, 3rd Lord Mowbray; she married thirdly on 18 January 1369 Sir William Costyn

Margaret de Vere (died 15 June 1398), married firstly Henry de Beaumont, 3rd Lord Beaumont (4 April 1340- 17 June 1369), the son of John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont and Eleanor of Lancaster, by whom she had issue; she married secondly Sir Nicholas de Lovain of Penhurst; she married thirdly after 1375 Sir John Devereux, by whom she had issue.

Maud de Vere

In May 1338, Maud's brother Giles died without leaving male issue. A considerable portion of the Badlesmere estates was inherited by Maud and her husband.

Maud died at the de Vere family mansion Hall Place in Earl's Colne, Essex on 24 May 1366 at the age of fifty-six years. She was buried in Colne Priory. Her husband had died in 1360.


Maud Badlesmere [b. 1310, widow of Robert Fitzpayne], second sister and coheir of Giles, lord Badlesmere (d. 1338) of Badlesmere in Kent married in 1336 John de Vere.

The couple had had four sons and one daughter:

1. Margaret or Maud.

2. Thomas (1337-1371), the 8th Earl of Oxford, Aubrey, who became 10th EO in 1393, and

3. John predeceased his father.

4. Robert, who predeceased his father.

By EO7's marriage, the title of Lord Badlesmere was added to the honorific employed by all later Earls of Oxford. His son Thomas succeeded him.

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John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In 1336 he married Maud, who was the second of the four daughters and coheir of Giles, Lord Badlesmere, of Badlesmere in Kent.

Maud de Vere died in 1366. The couple had four sons and two daughters. The eldest son, John, married the daughter of Hugh Courtenay, Earl of Devon, but died before his father, in 1350. Also another son, Robert, died in his father's lifetime. The oldest remaining son was then Thomas, born around 1336–7, who succeeded his father in 1360. Thomas's son Robert succeeded at his father's death, but with Robert's forfeiture in 1392, the earldom was given to Robert's uncle Aubrey – the seventh earl's fourth son. The eldest daughter, Margaret, married three times, while of the second, Matilda, little is known.

Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere (18 October 1314 – May 1338) was an English nobleman, the son and heir of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere by Margaret de Clare of Inchinquin and Youghal.

In 1328, he obtained a reversal of his father's attainder and inherited his barony. However, he died young in 1338, and the barony of Badlesmere became abeyant. His coheirs were his four sisters:

Margery de Badlesmere, married William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros, then Thomas de Arundel

Maud de Badlesmere, married John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford

Elizabeth de Badlesmere, married Sir Edmund Mortimer, then William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton

Margaret de Badlesmere, married John Tiptoft, 2nd Baron Tibetot

[edit]


Maud de Badlesmere1

F, #11709, b. circa 1310, d. 1366

Last Edited=14 May 2006

    Maud de Badlesmere was born circa 1310.1 She was the daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare.1 She married John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford, son of Sir Alphonsus de Vere and Jane Foliot, circa 1336. She died in 1366.1
    Her married name became de Vere.

Children of Maud de Badlesmere and John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford

Elizabeth de Vere+ d. 23 Sep 1375

John de Vere

Margaret de Vere+ d. 15 Jun 13982

John de Vere b. c 1335, d. c 1350

Thomas de Vere, 8th Earl of Oxford+ b. c 1336, d. 18 Sep 1371

Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford+ b. c 1338, d. 15 Feb 1417

Citations

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 373. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 61.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maud_de_Badlesmere,_Countess_of_Oxford

Maud was born at Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England in 1310, the second eldest daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare. She had three sisters, Margery, Elizabeth, and Margaret; all of whom eventually married and had issue. She had one brother, Giles.

Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford (1310 – 24 May 1366) was an English noblewoman, and the wife of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford. She, along with her three sisters, was a co-heiress of her only brother Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere who had no male issue.

At the age of 11 she was imprisoned in the Tower of London along with her mother, Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere and her four siblings, after the former refused Queen consort Isabella admittance to Leeds Castle and ordered an assault upon her when she attempted entry.


DE BADELESMERE, Maud

   m. FITZPAYN, Sir Robert
       May 02 1316
       Married at Feast of Saint James [follo]
       d. BEF Dec 10 1322

ROBERT FITZPAYN, son and heir apparent, by 1st wife. He married (contract dated at London, 2 May 1316, to marry at the Feast of St. James [25 July] following, Maud, sister and (afterwards) coheir of Sir Giles DE BADELESMERE, of Badlesmere and Chilham, Kent, Castle Combe, Wilts, &c. [LORD BADELFSMERE], and 2nd daughter of Sir Bartholomew DE BADELESMERE, of the same [LORD BADELESMERE], by Margaret, aunt and coheir of Thomas DE CLARE, and elder daughter of Sir Thomas DE CLARE, Lord of Inchiquin and Youghal. In March 13I9/20 he was about to go over seas with Edmund of Woodstock. He died s.p. and v.p. before 10 December 1322, and was buried in the Church of the Grey Friars at York (d). His widow, who held the manors of Poole Keynes and Worth in dower, married, before 27 March 1336, John (DE VEER), EARL OF OXFORD, who was born 12 March 1311/2, and died in France, 23 or 24 January 1359/60. She died 24 May 1366, hora vesperarum. [Complete Peerage V:454-5, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(d) He was probably killed in the Scottish wars, perhaps in the rout at Byland Abbey, 14 Oct 1322. Father: Robert 1st Baron FITZPAYN , of Llanvair, Sir b: ABT 1254 in Llanvair Discoed, Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales Mother: Isabel (Isabella) de CLIFFORD b: ABT 1254 in Frampton-on-Severn, Gloucestershire, England

Marriage 1 Unknown First WIFE b: ABT 1290

  • Married: in 1st wife

Children

1. Has No Children Robert FITZPAYN , Master of Llanvair, Sir b: ABT 1303 in Marshwood, Beaminster, Dorset, England

Marriage 2 Ela de BRIENE b: ABT 1295 in Walwyn's Castle, Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, Wales

  • Married: 29 JUN 1319 in 2nd husband 2nd wife 1

Children

1. Has Children Isabel "3rd Baroness" FITZPAYN b: BEF 1324 in Llanvair Discoed, Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales

Sources:

1. Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: V:451-3 // Regarding the marriages of Sir John de Grey, The Complete Peerage states "he m. 1stly (it is said), Anne, da. of Sir William de Ferrers....", and "he m. 2ndly, Maud, who is said to have been da. of Sir Ralph Basset...", the operative words here in both cases being "it is said". Douglas Richardson's findings indicate that both marriages were taken from the 1619 Visitation of Leicester, which he found on the subject of de Grey to be quite inaccurate. He noted that the manor of Debden (in Essex) was originally a Bohun property, and that this was passed to Sir John de Grey and his wife Maud. Using papal registers and dispensations, arms quarterings, etc., he has conclusively proven that Maud (note the terminology used by CP) was indeed John's wife, but she was not a Basset, but rather a Verdun, daughter of Sir John de Verdun by his second wife, Eleanor de Bohun. He could find absolutely no evidence that Sir John de Grey ever married an Anne de Ferrers. For a complete discussion by Mr. Richardson, see his initial 15 Jan 2002 posting on soc.genealogy.medieval, entitled "Eleanor de Verdun and her daughter, Maud, wife of John de Grey of Wilton", (search words: Eleanor Verdun), and follow the thread of his subsequent informative and detailed postings. At about the same time of Mr. Richardson's discovery, John Ravilious, also a frequent poster on SGM, brought forth conclusive evidence that Sir John de Grey had an older daughter, Maud, whom he has identified from said evidence as the wife of Sir John de Moels (previously known as simply Maud). The newly-identified Maud de Grey, based on chronology, would likely be the daughter of John de Grey's first wife, who is currently unidentified, but almost certainly, as mentioned above, not Anne de Ferrers.

Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Maud de Badlesmere Countess of Oxford Spouse(s) Robert FitzPayn John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford Issue John de Vere Thomas de Vere, 8th Earl of Oxford Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford Robert de Vere Elizabeth de Vere Margaret de Vere Maud de Vere Noble family Badlesmere Father Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere Mother Margaret de Clare Born 1310 Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England Died May 1366 Hall Place, Earl's Colne, Essex, England Buried Colne Priory

Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford (1310 – May 1366) was an English noblewoman, and the wife of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford. She, along with her three sisters, was a co-heiress of her only brother Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere, who had no male issue.

At the age of 11 she was imprisoned in the Tower of London along with her mother, Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere and her four siblings, after the former refused Queen consort Isabella admittance to Leeds Castle and ordered an assault upon her when she attempted entry.

Maud was born at Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England in 1310, the second eldest daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare. She had three sisters, Margery, Elizabeth, and Margaret; all of whom eventually married and had issue. She had one brother, Giles.

Her paternal grandparents were Guncelin de Badlesmere and Joan FitzBernard, and her maternal grandparents were Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly.

On 14 April 1322, when she was twelve years of age, Maud's father was hanged, drawn and quartered by orders of King Edward II, following his participation in the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion and his subsequent capture after the Battle of Boroughbridge. Maud, her siblings,[1] and her mother had been arrested the previous October after the latter had ordered an assault upon Queen consort Isabella after refusing her admittance to Leeds Castle where Baron Badlesmere held the post of governor.[2] Maud's mother, Baroness Badlesmere, remained imprisoned in the Tower of London until 3 November 1322,[3] although it is not known when Maud and her siblings were released. Her brother Giles obtained a reversal of their father's attainder in 1328, and he succeeded to the barony as 2nd Baron Badlesmere. Maud, along with her three sisters, was Giles's co-heiress, as he had married but fathered no children by his wife, Elizabeth Montagu.

Marriages and issue

In June 1316, Maud, aged six, married her first husband, Robert FitzPayn, son of Robert FitzPayn. Welsh historian R. R. Davies relates in his book, Lords and lordship in the British Isles in the late Middle Ages how her father, Lord Badlesmere, when drawing up the marriage contract, sought to provide for Maud's future by ensuring that she would have independent means. He granted her land worth 200 marks per year, and her future father-in-law was constrained to endow her with three manors and their revenues.[4] The marriage did not produce children; and on an unknown date sometime before March 1335 Maud married secondly, John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford. Upon her marriage, Maud assumed the title Countess of Oxford. John was a captain in King Edward III's army, and as such participated in the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers.

The marriage produced seven children:[5]

John de Vere (December 1335- before 23 June 1350), married Elizabeth de Courtney as her first husband. Thomas de Vere, 8th Earl of Oxford (1336- 18 September 1371), married Maud de Ufford, by whom he had a son Robert de Vere, 9th Earl of Oxford Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford (1338- 15 February 1400), married Alice FitzWalter, by whom he had three children, including Richard de Vere, 11th Earl of Oxford Robert de Vere (died 1360) Elizabeth de Vere (died 23 September 1375), married firstly in 1341, Sir Hugh de Courtney, by whom she had one son, Hugh de Courtney, Lord Courtney; she married secondly John de Mowbray, 3rd Lord Mowbray; she married thirdly on 18 January 1369 Sir William Costyn Margaret de Vere (died 15 June 1398), married firstly Henry de Beaumont, 3rd Baron Beaumont (4 April 1340- 17 June 1369), the son of John de Beaumont, 2nd Baron Beaumont and Eleanor of Lancaster, by whom she had issue; she married secondly Sir Nicholas de Loveyne; she married thirdly after 1375 Sir John Devereux, by whom she had issue. Maud de Vere

In June 1338, Maud's brother Giles died without leaving any legitimate issue. A considerable portion of the Badlesmere estates was inherited by Maud and her husband.

Maud died at the de Vere family mansion Hall Place in Earls Colne, Essex in May 1366 at the age of fifty-six years. Evidence given at the various inquisitions post mortem held after her death differ as to whether she died on the 19th, 23rd or 24th day of the month.[6] This source gives details of her numerous properties which were to be found in Essex and six other counties.

Maud was buried in Colne Priory. Her husband had died in 1360. Ancestry Ancestors of Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford

Ireland, William Henry (1829). England's Topographer: or A New and Complete History of the County of Kent. London:G. Virtue, Ivy Lane, Paternoster Row. p.647. Google Books, retrieved 8-11-10 Costain 1958, pp. 193-95. Lundy 2004, "Margaret de Clare" cites (Cokayne 2000, p. 372) R. R. Davies, Brendan Smith (2009). Lords and lordship in the British Isles in the late Middle Ages. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p.154. Google Books. Retrieved 29-01-11 Cawley, Charles, England: Earls Created 1138-1143: Earls of Oxford 1142-1526 (Vere), Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[self-published source][better source needed]

Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, 1st series, Vol. 12, No. 81.

References Cokayne, G.E. (2000), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, I (new; reprint in 6 volumes ed.), Gloucester, UK: Alan Sutton Publishing, p. 372

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Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford's Timeline

1310
1310
Kent, England
1321
1321
Age 11
Cheddon Fitzpaine, Somerset, England, United Kingdom
1326
1326
Age 16
Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
1335
December 1335
Age 25
Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
1336
1336
Age 26
Barony Badlesmere, Kent, England
1340
1340
Age 30
Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
1342
1342
Age 32
Abt. 1342
1344
1344
Age 34
Oxford, Oxfordshire, England