Maud Matilda de Rumilly

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Maud Matilda de Rumilly

Also Known As: "Maud", "Maud Matilda De /Meschines/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Harrington, Northumberland, England
Death: Died in Harringworth, Hampshire, , England
Immediate Family:

Daughter of William FitzRanulf Meschin and Cecily de Rumilly, Lady Of Skipton
Wife of Hugh de Mortimer, Lord of Wigmore and Phillip de Belmeis
Mother of Hugh de Mortimer, II; Roger de Mortimer, Lord of Wigmore; Ralph de Mortimer; William de Mortimer; Philip de Belmeis and 2 others
Sister of Avice de Copeland de Rumilly, Lady of Harewood; Ranulf de Meschines and Johans de Saint Pierre

Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Maud Matilda de Rumilly

Matilda de Rumilly

  • m1: Philip de Belmeis
  • Issue:
  • Philip (d c 1159)
  • Ranulf (d c 1167)
  • Adelicia (d after 1190)
  • m2: Hugh de Mortimer
  • Issue:
  • Roger III de Mortimer (d. bef 19 Aug 1214)
  • Hugh III (d 1180)
  • Ralph (d bef. Hugh & William)
  • William (d childless)

From Medlands:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#MaudM2HughMortimer

MATILDA de Rumilly (-after 1189[88]). “Philippus de Belmeis” founded Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…”[89]. The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified. m firstly PHILIP de Belmeis of Tong, Shropshire, son of [90]WALTER de Belmeis & his wife --- (-1154 or before). m secondly HUGH de Mortimer, son of HUGH de Mortimer & his wife --- (-[Nov 1180/Nov 1181]).

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3.htm#PhilipBelmeisMMatildaRumilly

PHILIP de Belmeis of Tong, Shropshire (-after May 1145). "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[1169]. “Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…”[1170]. m as her first husband, MATILDA de Rumilly, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRanulf Meschin, of Skipton-in-Craven & his wife Cecily de Rumilly (-after 1189[1171]). "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[1172]. “Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…”[1173]. She married secondly ([1150]) Hugh [II] de Mortimer. The Complete Peerage explains the the documents which confirm her parentage and second marriage[1174]: including (1) pleadings in a suit concerning land at Kimbolton, Hampshire, and in a suit dated Jan 1282 in the Chester County Court, which both name Roger de Mortimer as son and heir of "Maud la Meschine"[1175]; (2) Roger Mortimer’s grant of rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis"[1176]; (3) the undated charter under which “Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire (quoted above)[1177]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that she was “Matildem Longespey, filiam Willielmi Longespey, ducis Normanniæ”[1178] but this is confused and cannot possibly be correct.

Philip & his wife had three children:

i) PHILIP de Belmeis (-[1154/59]). "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[1179]. "Philip son of Philip de Beumes" confirmed land to Lilleshall by charter dated to [1152/59], witnessed by "Radulf de Belmeys my brother…Richard de Belmeys…Robert de Belmeys, William his brother…"[1180]. Roger Mortimer granted rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis" by undated charter[1181]. "William de Belmeys son of Alan la Zouch" confirmed donations to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter which names "Adelhiza de Belmeys his mother, Philip de Belmeys senior, Philip junior and Ranulph brother of Philip junior"[1182].

ii) RANULPH de Belmeis (-[1166/67]). "Philippus de Belmeis…et Matilda uxor mea" donated "terram quæ fuit Selferi de Rochelai" to Buildwas abbey by charter dated to [1138/39], signed by "Philippi de Belmeis, Matildæ uxoris eius, Philippi filii eius, R. filii eius", and witnessed by "Robertus de Belmes…"[1183]. Roger Mortimer granted rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis" by undated charter[1184]. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Ranulfus de Beumeis" held three knights’ fees from "Roberti di Staffordia" in Staffordshire, of which two were held by "Johannes Bigod"[1185]. The 1166/67 Pipe Roll records the sheriff accounting for "Twanga terra Rand de Bealmes", indicating his recent death[1186]. "William de Belmeys son of Alan la Zouch" confirmed donations to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter which names "Adelhiza de Belmeys his mother, Philip de Belmeys senior, Philip junior and Ranulph brother of Philip junior"[1187].

iii) ADELICIA de Belmeis (-1190 or after). “Alanus la Zouche filius Galfridus vicecomitis” donated "ecclesiam de Essebi" to Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire, for the salvation of “uxoris meæ Aliciæ et puerorum nostrorum” and for the souls of "Philippi de Beumeis senioris et Philippi junioris et cæterorum filiorum eius", by undated charter[1188]. "William de Belmeys son of Alan la Zouch" confirmed donations to Lilleshall abbey by undated charter which names "Adelhiza de Belmeys his mother, Philip de Belmeys senior, Philip junior and Ranulph brother of Philip junior"[1189]. "Roger de Mortimer…Dame Adheliza de Belmes, William de Belmes her son, Philip de Belmes his brother…" witnessed the charter dated to [1185/90] under which “Alanus la Zouche filius Galfridus vicecomitis” donated "ecclesiam de Essebi" to Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire[1190]. m ALAN [I] la Zouche [ALAIN de Porhoët], son of GEOFFROY Vicomte de Porhoët & his wife Hawise --- (-1190).

HUGH [II] de Mortimer, son of RALPH [I] de Mortimer & his [second/third wife Mabel ---/---] (-Cleobury [26 Feb] [1180/81], bur Wigmore). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Radulpho de Mortuomari…filium suum Hugonem”[254]. Ralph is named as the father of Hugh in other sources which are quoted below. Debate surrounding Hugh [II] de Mortimer has focussed on whether there was one individual named Hugh Mortimer or two, father and son, during the 12th century. The difficulty is that Hugh [II]´s career would have been unusually long if there had been only one person named Hugh. Eyton proceeds on the assumption that there was only one Hugh [II] de Mortimer, who was the father of Roger de Mortimer (who died in 1214)[255]. He bases this on the manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey, which is quoted throughout this section of the present document, although he does suggest that the document is unreliable[256]. More recently, Paul Remfry has also suggested that there was only one Hugh [II] de Mortimer[257]. All the sources which are quoted below suggest a continuous career of one individual, there being no hint about a succession from father to son during the period in question. The Complete Peerage, on the other hand, suggests that it "would seem a chronological impossibility" if there had been only one Hugh de Mortimer, considering that Ralph [I] de Mortimer was already married to his second wife in 1088 and that his supposed grandson Roger de Mortimer died in 1214[258]. It is true that, if we assume that Hugh [II] was born in the last years of the 11th century, he must have been in his late eighties or early nineties if he died in [1180/81]. However, this assumes that (1) Ralph [I]´s second wife was the mother of Hugh [II], and (2) that Ralph [II] died at the beginning of the 12th century. Neither of these assumptions would be correct if Hugh [II] was born from an otherwise unrecorded third marriage of Ralph [I], and if Ralph [I] survived some years after his last appearance in the sources in 1104. Both of these possibilities are discussed further above. Another apparent indication that there must have been two persons named Hugh de Mortimer is the dating of Hugh´s known marriage. This marriage with Matilda, widow of Philip de Belmeis, could not have taken place much before 1150 (her first husband was living in 1145). At that time, Hugh [II] would have been in his fifties if he had been born at the turn of the century. The chronology is thus difficult, but certainly not an "impossibility". Two other facts point to Hugh [II] having a long career. Firstly, William of Newburgh refers to Hugh as "nobilem annis jam plurimis" in 1155[259]. Secondly, the Anglo-Norman history of the foundation of Wigmore abbey records that "Hugh de Mortimer" died "at a good old age".

Hugh´s first documented appearance in the sources dates to before 1130: "…Hugone de Mortuomari…" witnessed the charter under which "Giroldus abbas S. Luciani Bellovacensis" confirmed the foundation of the abbey by "Stephano comiti Albæmarlensi"[260]. Although the document is undated, its wording suggests that Etienne Comte d´Aumâle was still alive at the time, therefore dating it to before 1130. Hugues Archbishop of Rouen confirmed donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by charter dated 1137, including property "apud Wellas" {Veules, commune de Saint-Valéry} in "feudo Hugonis de Mortuo mari" and property "apud Sanctum Victorem" donated by "Radulfi de Mortuo mari et filii eius Hugonis", the property described in an earlier part of the same document as "de feudo Hugonis de Mortuo mari"[261]. "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations made "tam a patre meo Radulfo, quam ab avo meo Rogerio" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux, and other past donations including all donations of property in England "antequam duxissem uxorem", by undated charter issued "in communi expeditione Domini Normannie", witnessed by "Hugonem et Vuillelmum filios meos…Ricardum de Altifago…Renaldum de Vassumvilla…Brianim de Jai et Heliam patrem eius…Vuillelmum fratrem meum…"[262]. In 1144, he initiated the reconquest of the Marches conquered by the Welsh after the death of King Henry I, capturing Rhys ap Howel in 1145, killing Meredith ap Madog in 1146, and blinding the former in 1148[263]. The Annales Cambriæ record that "Hugo de Mortuo Mari" captured "Resum filium Hoeli" in 1145, killed "Maredut filium Madauc filium Ithuert" in 1146, and blinded "Resum filium Hoeli" in prison in 1148[264]. William of Newburgh records that "Hugonem de Mortuomari virum fortem et nobilem annis jam plurimis" ("annis jam plurimis" indicating that the passage refers to Hugh [I]) refused to surrender "castro de Brigia" to King Henry II, dated to 1155[265]. Robert de Torigny records that "Hugo de Mortuo Mari, vir arrogantissimus et de se præsumens" fortified "castella sua" against the king, who captured and destroyed "Bruge, Wigemore, Cleoberei", in 1155, but adding in a later passage in the same year that "Non Jul…Hugo de Mortuo Mari" made peace with the king and "castellis Bruge et Wigemore" were returned[266]. The Complete Peerage says that Hugh [II] "seems to have died in the period [1148/50]"[267]. However, the passage from William of Newburgh, quoted above, indicates that Hugh [II] survived into the reign of King Henry II. “H. de Mortuomari” donated property to Kington St Michael, for the soul of “Rogeri fratris mei”, by undated charter[268]. "Hugo de Mortuo Mari" founded Wigmore abbey by charter witnessed by "the Lord Hugh de Lacy, the Lord Robert Corbet, the Lord Robert Rowles…" (undated, but the names of the witnesses suggest dating to the 1170s), the charter quoted in a charter of King Henry VIII dated 1509[269]. The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Hugo de Mortuo Mari" with 5 knights and 13 knights and one half in his own service[270]. "H. de Mortuomari" donated the church of Vatterville to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by charter dated to after 1179, witnessed by "Hugone filio meo, Rogero filio meo…Willelmo fratre meo, Willelmo nepote meo…Reginaldo de Vassunvilla…"[271]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that Hugh died “26 Feb 1185”[272]. The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1185 of “Hugo de Mortuo Mari, fundator abbathiæ de Wiggemore” and his burial “ad ostium capituli Wigorniæ”[273]. An Anglo-Norman history of the foundation of Wigmore abbey records that "Hugh de Mortimer" died "at Cleobury at a good old age and full of good works" ("en bone veleste et pleine de bones eovres"), was buried at Wigmore, and succeeded by his son Roger who "was held in the king´s keeping for the death of one named Cadwallan"[274].

m ([1150]) as her second husband, MATILDA de Rumilly, widow of PHILIP de Belmeis, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRanulf Meschin, of Skipton-in-Craven & his wife Cecily de Rumilly (-after 1189[275]). The Complete Peerage explains the the documents which confirm her parentage and second marriage[276]: including (1) pleadings in a suit concerning land at Kimbolton, Hampshire, and in a suit dated Jan 1282 in the Chester County Court, which both name Roger de Mortimer as son and heir of "Maud la Meschine"[277]; (2) Roger Mortimer´s grant of rents in Bisley given to him by "his brothers Philip and Ranulph de Belmeis"[278]; (3) “Philippus de Belmeis” founding Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire by undated charter, witnessed by “Philippus filius Philippi de Belmis…domina Matilda filia Willielmi Meschin uxor prædicti Philippi de Belmis…”[279]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that she was “Matildem Longespey, filiam Willielmi Longespey, ducis Normanniæ”[280] but this is confused and cannot possibly be correct. The undated charter, under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed various donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux and other past donations including all donations of property in England "antequam duxissem uxorem"[281], indicates that Hugh married only once.

Hugh [II] & his wife had four children:

1. HUGH [III] de Mortimer (-killed Warwick [1180]). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Hugonem, Radulphum et Willielmum” as the other sons of Hugh[282]. "Hugonem et Vuillelmum filios meos…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo Radulfo…ab avo meo Rogerio"[283]. "H. de Mortuomari" donated the church of Vatterville to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by charter dated to after 1179, witnessed by "Hugone filio meo, Rogero filio meo…Willelmo fratre meo, Willelmo nepote meo…Reginaldo de Vassunvilla…"[284]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Hugonem”, son of Hugh, was killed in a tournament “apud Wygorniam”[285]. m FELICIA de Saint-Saëns, daughter of ---. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Hugonem”, son of Hugh, married “dominam Feliciam de sancto Sydonio”[286].

2. RALPH . A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Hugonem, Radulphum et Willielmum” as the other sons of Hugh[287]. Ralph presumably died before his brothers Hugh and William as he did not witness the document under which their father confirmed donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux.

3. WILLIAM . A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Hugonem, Radulphum et Willielmum” as the other sons of Hugh, adding that William was captured as “miles in bello partibus transmarinis”, died childless and was buried there[288]. "Hugonem et Vuillelmum filios meos…Ricardum de Altifago…Renaldum de Vassumvilla…Brianum de Jai et Heliam patrem eius…Vuillelmum fratrem meum…" witnessed the undated charter under which "Hugo de Mortuo mari" confirmed the donations to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "patre meo Radulfo…ab avo meo Rogerio"[289].

4. ROGER [III] de Mortimer (-24 Jun 1215 or before 19 Aug 1214, bur Wigmore). "H. de Mortuomari" donated the church of Vatterville to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by charter dated to after 1179, witnessed by "Hugone filio meo, Rogero filio meo…Willelmo fratre meo, Willelmo nepote meo…Reginaldo de Vassunvilla…"[290]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “filium suum Rogerum [ex Matilda filia Willielmi Longespeye]” succeeded on the death of his father Hugh[291]. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Maud Matilda de Rumilly's Timeline

1116
1116
Harrington, Northumberland, England
1130
1130
Age 14
Shropshire, England, United Kingdom
1132
1132
Age 16
Shropshire, England, United Kingdom
1145
1145
Age 29
Wigmore, Herefordshire, , England
1150
1150
Age 34
Harringworth, Northamptonshire, England
1158
1158
Age 42
Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
1190
1190
Age 74
Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
1190
Age 74
Harringworth, Hampshire, , England