Nicholas Carper

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Nicholas Carper

Also Known As: "Kerber", "Korper"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Sharpsburg, Washington County, Maryland, United States
Death: February 12, 1813 (63-64)
Fincastle, Botetourt County, Virginia, United States
Place of Burial: Fincastle, Botetourt County, Virginia, United States of America
Immediate Family:

Son of Nicholas Jacob Carper, Sr and Anna Margaretha Barbara Carper
Husband of Elizabeth Shrider Carper
Father of Jacob Robert Carper; Elizabeth Harvey; Henry Carper; Benjamin Carper; Mary Polly McFerren and 3 others
Brother of Lt. Friederich Carper; Philip Adam Carper, I; John "Jacob" Carper; Margaret Carper and Elizabeth Carper

Managed by: Jim Wile
Last Updated:

About Nicholas Carper

A Patriot of the American Revolution for VIRGINIA (Soldier). DAR Ancestor # A019560



Nicholas CARPER3

was born about 1749 in Western Maryland. He was the son of Jacob CARPER, the immigrant. He was the third generation in America and the second Nicholas. There is some controversy as to the surname of his wife. We know, from many sources, including his will, that her first name was Elizabeth. Until recently it has been believed that she was a HARVEY. The HARVEYS were an old-line Virginia family who lived in the same locale as the CARPERS. It has now been presented that her name was Elizabeth SHRIDER, d/o Henry SHRIDER. This has been deduced from various documents recorded in Botetourt County, Virginia. However the SMITH-RIFFE Collection of New River Genealogy and local History at Salt Lake City Morman Library in Utah lists her as Elizabeth HARVEY, d/o John and Mary (Jones) HARVEY. I shall proceed with the idea that she was indeed a HARVEY until it is proven otherwise. Nicholas is first mentioned in Botetourt County records on 14 May 1779, when he served as a juryman. That may not sound like much, but in 1779 America was only a fledgling country, still fighting for its independence. Having been under the rule and influence of the British crown, as well as generations of petty German princes, the American colonials were honored to serve as jurymen. In fact this honor was awarded only to the most ardent and devoted supporters of the new nation. [Alas, jury duty today is often seen as more of a burden than an honor.] Nicholas (now, officially Nicholas CARPER), served as Magistrate of Botetourt County, as Overseer of Roads, and he held numerous other important offices. From 1802-1803 he served as a Representative from Botetourt County in the Virginia House of Delegates. He was also a surveyor, which required a lot of technical knowledge, as well as a high degree of literacy. He operated a Grist Mill over Mooney's Mill Creek and he owned a few slaves. He paid land taxes in Botetourt County from 1783, the year of the earliest tax list until his death in 1813. In 1785 he owned a 70 acre grant on the Catawba River, and 150 acres on the James River. In 1792 he held a grant on land on the headwaters of Back CreeMThese grants can be 32  THE CARPERS OF ROANE COUNTY found on record at the state Capitol in Richmond.) His maximum holdings, up to 1800 were 1,335 acres, plus several lots in the town of Fincastle, Virginia. [He passed his love of the land on to his descendants as we shall see in the following chapters. I remember, as a child, being instructed by my grandfather, Okey CARPER, "Land, is the best investment, banks fail, stocks drop and money loses its value - but the land is always there."] When Nicholas and Elizabeth and their four children left Maryland and moved to Virginia in 1778, this country was at war. We celebrate Independence Day on July 4th and we remember the year as 1776, but the Revolutionary War did not end then - it had really only begun. The war didn't end until the surrender of CORNWALLIS on 19 Oct 1781, and the official peace came two years after that. Botetourt County, Virginia was on the western front. Many of the Indians of the frontier were naturally hostile to the settlers. Parties of Englishmen and English sympathizers, traveled among the Indians, offering them gifts and friendship, and urging them to go on the warpath. The result was a long series of deadly encounters. No where in the Continental Army was there so much suffering as on the frontier. And the civilian population was never really safe. These raids continued long after the battles had ended in the East, while the politicians decided where the western frontier should end. Nicholas first served, as many revolutionary soldiers did, as a civilian. Remember, we had no trained army. He guarded the jail in Fincastle and furnished salt to guards on military service. On 31 Oct 1782 he was recruited as a member of the 42nd district of Botetourt County, under Captain ROBINSON to serve either three years, or until the end of the war. This service as a Revolutionary War soldier, entitles his female descendants to membership in the DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) and his male descendants to membership in the SAR (Sons of the American Revolution). Nicholas CARPER is listed in the DAR Patriot Index on page 115, and was accepted by the DAR in 1964. In February of 1981, my mother, Mabel (Carper) BROWN, and myself, became members, bringing the file up-to-date and ensuring membership to those who can prove descent from the Nicholas CARPER who came to Roane County, West Virginia in 1858. (He was a grandson of the Nicholas who served in the Revolution.) Nicholas was a charter member of the Sinking Springs Presbyterian Church, and served as an Elder. This church was located in Fincastle, Virginia where there is a memorial sign honoring church members who were Revolutionary War Heroes. Nicholas' name is included on this memorial. 
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Nicholas Carper's Timeline

1749
1749
Sharpsburg, Washington County, Maryland, United States
1774
1774
Maryland, United States
1775
October 11, 1775
Maryland, United States
1776
January 18, 1776
Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland
1778
March 1778
Maryland
1781
1781
Maryland, United States
1783
1783
Botetourt, Virginia
1786
1786
1795
1795
Botetourt County, Virginia, United States