Nicholas de Moels of Watlington & Cadbury

Is your surname de Moels?

Research the de Moels family

Nicholas de Moels of Watlington & Cadbury's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Nicholas de Moels

Also Known As: "'miles strenuissimus et circumspectus.'"
Birthdate: (69)
Birthplace: Cadbury Manor, Cadbury, Somserset, England
Death: Died in Cadbury, Somerset, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Roger de Molis and Roesia de Molis
Husband of Hawise de Newmarch, Heiress of Cadbury and Hawise de Newmarche, Heiress of Cadbury
Father of Agnes de Moels; Maud De Lorti; James De Moels and Sir Roger Moels, of Cadbury & Maperton
Brother of John de Mules; NN de Mules and Iseult de Mules

Occupation: High Sheriff of Devon and Yorkshire, Constalbe of Winchester, Haverford West, Cilgerran, Tenby, Rochester, Canterbury and Corfe Castles, Governor of the Channel islands, Keeper of Oxford Castle
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Nicholas de Moels of Watlington & Cadbury

Nicholas de Moels c 1195-1264/72

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_de_Moels

Arms of Nichol de Moels, from the Glover Roll: "d'argent od deux barres de gules ovec trois moeles de gules en le chief" (Argent, two bars gules in chief three torteaux)

Nicholas de Moels was a medieval Norman administrator in Somerset.

Life

He was born about 1195. He married, as her second husband, Hawise de Newmarch, younger daughter & co-heiress of James de Newmarch feudal baron of North Cadbury, Somerset, in about 1224.[1][2] In 1230 he was granted the royal demesne manors of Kingskerswell and Diptford in Devon.[3]

De Moels served as High Sheriff of Hampshire (1228–1232), High Sheriff of Devon (1234), and High Sheriff of Yorkshire (1239–1242) ; and Constable of Winchester Castle, Pembroke Castle, Haverfordwest Castle, Cilgerran Castle, Tenby Castle, Rochester Castle (1247), Canterbury Castle (1247) and Corfe Castle. He was also governor of the Channel Islands.[4]

In 1244 he won a victory over French forces at Navarre, returned to fight in the Welsh wars and was made governor of the castles of Caernarvon and Cardigan. In 1246 he was then made Constable of Dover Castle, High Sheriff of Kent in 1247 and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports in 1258. [4]

He died sometime after 1264 but sometime before 1272.[5]

Children by Hawise de Newmarch

Agnes de Moels was born about 1230 at Cadbury. She became the second wife of William de Braose, Lord of Bramber and Gower;[6]

Roger de Moels was born about 1233/1237. He was appointed Marshal of the Army. Roger was also a governor of the castle of Lampsdervour in Ceredigion. He died in 1294;[6] His second son by his wife Alice de Preux (1236–1272) was John de Moels, 1st Baron Moels (d. 1310).

James de Moels was born about 1254 either at Cadbury or at Chidecot, Lew, Exbourne, Devonshire, England;[6] He predeceased his father.

Maud de Moels was born about 1258 at Chidecot. She married Richard de Lorti,[6] heir to the barony of Stoke Trister, Somerset.

Sources

Sanders, I.J. English Baronies, A Study of their Origin & Descent 1086-1327, Oxford, 1960, p. 68, "North Cadbury"

Notes

1 Sanders (1960), op.cit.

2 "Nicholas de Moels". The Peerage.com. Retrieved 2009-08-19.

3 Henry Summerson, 'Moels , Sir Nicholas de (d. 1268/9)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, September 2004. Online here (subscription required). Retrieved 2010-06-23.

4 a b Kingsford 1894.

5 "Sir Nicholas de Moels". DeLoria – Hurst Family Tree. Retrieved 2009-08-19.

6 a b c d "Nicholas de MOELS / Hawise de NEWMARCHE". Genealogy. Retrieved 2009-08-19.

References

Kingsford, Charles Lethbridge (1894). "Moels, Nicholas de". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 38. London: Smith, Elder & Co.


Nicholas de Moels, Seneschal of Gascony, led the English force that had a signal victory over King Theobald I "the Troubadour" of Navarre in 1244.

Nicholas appears to have been from an early age in the court of King John. He was granted the manor of Watlington "for his sustenance in the king's service" in 1217. He was made Sheriff of Hampshire, and governor of the castle of Winchester, and he continued in this office for four years after 1220.

After 1220 Nicholas possessed in right of Hawise, his wife, the lordships of Cadebury, Saperton, and other manors in Somerset and the neighboring counties, thus becoming one of the greater landowners before September 1231. He also had the islands of Guernsey, Jersey, Serke, and Aureny (Alderney) committed to his care after 1220.

He was appointed a second time as Sheriff of Hampshire.

He was sent to Poitou on an embassy from the King in April 1223. He served in the King's expedition into Wales circa July 1223. He served at the siege of Bedford in 1224.

He was again sent to Poitou on an embassy from the King in January 1223/24.

He was sent to Cologne as an ambassador to treat of a proposed marriage between King Henry III and a daughter of Leopold VI, Duke of Austria, in January 1224/25.

Nicholas was granted the land of Little Berkhampstead in July 1226.

He was on the King's service in 1227 at Gascony, France. He was charged with negotiations as to the truce with France in March 1228.

Nicholas was a plenipotentiary, as miles noster familias, to treat of peace with Louis IX of France in April 1229.

Nicholas was pardoned the 8 marks yearly due from him for debts of his father-in-law, James de Newmarch in September 1231.

Nicholas was at the Coronation of Queen Eleanor, and along with Richard Siward, he carried the two royal sceptres.

Nicholas held the office of Sheriff of Yorkshire before 1240.

He was deputed with Ralph FitzNicholas, ambassador to France, for the purpose of denouncing war against the king of that realm in 1241.

He was appointed seneschal of Gascony circa 1242 in France.

Following the action in Navarre, Nicholas participated in the Welsh wars in 1245. He was constituted governor of the castles of Caermarthen and Cardigan circa 1246.

Nicholas was appointed constable of Dover Castle and warden of the Cinque Ports after 1246 in Kent. He was made Sheriff of Kent, and governor of the castles of Rochester and Canterbury in March 1247.

Nicholas was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through his daughter Maud and through his son Roger, each of whom was independently our ancestor,


De Moels served as High Sheriff of Hampshire (1228–1232), High Sheriff of Devon (1234), and High Sheriff of Yorkshire (1239–1242) ; and Constable of Winchester Castle, Pembroke Castle, Haverfordwest Castle, Cilgerran Castle, Tenby Castle, Rochester Castle (1247), Canterbury Castle (1247) and Corffe Castle. He was also governor of the Channel Islands.[4]

In 1244 he won a victory over French forces at Navarre, returned to fight in the Welsh wars and was made governor of the castles of Caernarvon and Cardigan. In 1246 he was then made Constable of Dover Castle, High Sheriff of Kent in 1247 and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports in 1258. [4]

He died sometime after 1264 but sometime before 1272.[5]

-------------------------------

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingskerswell

"The first written record of Kingskerswell is in the Domesday Book where it is called Carsewelle. Before the Norman Conquest it was held by Edward the Confessor as part of the royal demesne; afterwards it continued in royal ownership under William the Conqueror and his descendants (in contrast to the nearby village of Abbotskerswell).[9] The first part of the village's name represents this royal ownership. The Saxon word carse probably means watercress, a plant that still grows freely in the local streams; and the last part of the name most likely refers to the wells and springs in the vicinity, though an alternative theory proposes that it derives from the Latin villa, indicating a Roman origin.[9]

After being granted to several lords, but always escheating to the king due to the lack of any heirs,[9] the manor was given to Nicholas de Moels in 1230.[10] In 1268 his son, Roger de Molis, was granted the right to hold a weekly market on Tuesdays and an annual fair on 1 September.[11] The manor remained in the de Molis family until some time between 1349 and 1362 when it passed to the Courtenays for a short time until 1369 when it again escheated to the king...."

Notes

9.  Walker, Hilda H. (1972), "Presidential Address 1972—The History of Kingskerswell, a Medieval Market Town", Devon Archaeological Society, 30: 195–215

10. Henry Summerson, 'Moels , Sir Nicholas de (d. 1268/9)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004. Online here (subscription required). Retrieved 23 June 2010. 11. Letters, Samantha. "Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England & Wales to 1516: Devon". Centre for Metropolitan History. Retrieved 4 July 2010.


Nicholas de Moels was usually recorded in Latin records as de MOLIS, as were ancestors and succeeding land holders of estates in Devon held by Roger de Molis by Domesday, subtenant of Baldwin de Meulles/Molis, alia Baldwin le Viscount, Fitzgibert, de Brionne, de Exiter and Baldwin the Sheriff. Estates in Domesday were Exbourne, High Hampton, Leuw Trenchard.

The most celebrated lineage descended from Roger were the MULES. Other surnames which evolved from Molis in the immediate area of MULES estates between 1269 and into 1500s include Mulles, Mullis and Mullies in Cornwall County in Tintagel, Altarnun, Michaelstow and neighboring parishes.

view all 11

Nicholas de Moels of Watlington & Cadbury's Timeline

1195
1195
Cadbury, Somserset, England
1225
1225
Age 30
Cadbury, Somersetshire, England, United Kingdom
1226
1226
Age 31
Cadbury, Somersetshire, England
1232
1232
Age 37
Cadbury, Somerset, England
1254
1254
Age 59
Kingskerswell, Devon, England
1264
1264
Age 69
Cadbury, Somerset, England
1994
September 16, 1994
Age 69
1995
May 5, 1995
Age 69