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Norman Kingsley Mailer

Hebrew: נורמן קינגסלי מיילר
Also Known As: "Nachum Malek Mailer"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Long Branch, Monmouth , New Jersey, United States
Death: November 10, 2007 (84)
Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York County, New York, United States
Place of Burial: Provincetown, Barnstable , Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Isaac Barnett Mailer and Feige/Fanny Mailer
Husband of Norris Church Mailer
Ex-husband of Private; Adele Morales; Lady Jeanne Louise Cram; Private and Private
Ex-partner of Vi Elander
Father of Private User; Private; Private; Private; Private and 4 others
Brother of Private

Occupation: Writer, Author
Managed by: Pam Karp
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Norman Mailer

Norman Kingsley Mailer (January 31, 1923 – November 10, 2007) was an American novelist, journalist, essayist, poet, playwright, screenwriter and film director.

Along with Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Hunter S. Thompson, John McPhee, and Tom Wolfe, Mailer is considered an innovator of creative nonfiction, a genre sometimes called New Journalism, which superimposes the essay onto the nonfiction novel. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize twice and the National Book Award once. In 1955, Mailer, together with John Wilcock, Ed Fancher and Dan Wolf, first published The Village Voice, which began as an arts and politics oriented weekly newspaper distributed in Greenwich Village. In 2005, he won the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters from the National Book Foundation.

Author. Considered one of America's outstanding writers of the 20th Century, his work often dealt with the social and political upheavals of his times. He won Pulitzer Prizes for "The Armies of the Night" (1969) and "The Executioner's Song" (1980). Born in Long Branch, New Jersey and raised in Brooklyn, New York City, New York, after graduating from Harvard University with an engineering science degree, he pursued his goal of writing. His first novel, "The Naked and the Dead" (1948), was inspired by his experiences in the South Pacific while serving in the United States Army during World War II, and its success made him an international celebrity. In the course of his controversial career Mailer produced such books as "The Deer Park", "An American Dream", "Marilyn" and "Tough Guys Don't Dance". He also occasionally acted in and directed films. In 1969 he unsuccessfully ran for Mayor of New York City. (bio by: C.S.) 


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Norman Kingsley Mailer was an American novelist, journalist, essayist, playwright, film-maker, actor, and political activist. His novel The Naked and the Dead was published in 1948 and brought him renown. His best-known work is widely considered to be The Executioner's Song (1979) winner of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Winner the Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction, Armies of the Night also won the National Book Award.

Along with Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Hunter S. Thompson, and Tom Wolfe, Mailer is considered an innovator of creative nonfiction, a genre sometimes called New Journalism, which uses the style and devices of literary fiction in fact-based journalism. Mailer was also known for his essays, the most famous and reprinted of which is "The White Negro." He was a cultural commentator and critic, expressing his views through his novels, journalism, essays and frequent media appearances. In 1955, Mailer and three others founded The Village Voice, an arts- and politics-oriented weekly newspaper distributed in Greenwich Village. In 1969 he ran an unsuccessful campaign for the mayor of New York.

While principally known as a novelist and journalist, Mailer was not afraid to bend genres and venture outside his comfort zone; he lived a life that seemed to embody an idea that echoes throughout his work: "There was that law of life, so cruel and so just, that one must grow or else pay more for remaining the same."

Mailer was born to a Jewish family in Long Branch, New Jersey on January 31, 1923. His father, Isaac Barnett Mailer, was an accountant born in South Africa, and his mother, Fanny (née Schneider), ran a housekeeping and nursing agency. Mailer's sister, Barbara, was born in 1927.

Raised in Brooklyn, New York, Mailer graduated from Boys' High School and entered Harvard University in 1939, when he was 16 years old. As an undergraduate, he was a member of the Signet Society. At Harvard, majored in engineering sciences, but took the majority of his electives as writing courses. He published his first story, "The Greatest Thing in the World," at the age of 18, winning Story magazine's college contest in 1941.

After graduating in 1943, Mailer marries his first wife Beatrice "Bea" Silverman in January 1944 just before being drafted into the U.S. Army. Hoping to gain a deferment from service, Mailer argued that he was writing an "important literary work" which pertained to the war. This deferral was denied, and Mailer was forced to enter the Army. After training at Fort Bragg, Mailer was stationed in the Philippines with the 112th Cavalry.

During his time in the Philippines, Mailer was first assigned to regimental headquarters as a typist, then assigned as a wire lineman. In the spring of 1945, after volunteering for a reconnaissance platoon, he completed more than two dozen patrols in contested territory, and engaged in a few firefights and skirmishes. After the Japanese surrender, he was sent to Japan as part of the army of occupation, was promoted to sergeant, and became a first cook.

When asked about his war experiences, he said that the army was "the worst experience of his life and the best." He drew on his experience as a reconnaissance rifleman for the central action of The Naked and the Dead, a long patrol behind enemy lines.

Mailer wrote 12 novels over a 59-year span. After completing courses in French language and culture at the University of Paris in 1947–48, he returned to the U.S. shortly after The Naked and the Dead was published in May 1948. A New York Times best seller for 62 weeks and the only one of Mailer's novels to reach the number one position. It was hailed by many as one of the best American wartime novels and named as one of the "one hundred best novels in English language" by the Modern Library. The book that made his reputation sold over a million copies in its first year, (three million by 1981) and has never gone out of print. It is still considered to be one of the finest depictions of Americans in combat during World War II, though many contemporary readers might find it a difficult read today.

Barbary Shore (1951) was "mauled" by the critics. It was a surreal parable of Cold War leftist politics set in a Brooklyn rooming-house. His 1955 novel The Deer Park drew on his experiences working as a screenwriter in Hollywood in 1949–50. It was initially rejected by seven publishers due to its purportedly sexual content before being published by Putnam's. It was not a critical success, but made the best-seller list, sold over 50,000 copies its first year, and is considered by some critics to be the best Hollywood novel since Nathanael West's The Day of the Locust.

Mailer wrote his fourth novel, An American Dream, as a serial in Esquire magazine over eight months (January to August 1964), publishing the first chapter two months after he wrote it. In March 1965, Dial Press published a revised version. His editor was E. L. Doctorow. The novel received mixed reviews, but was a best seller. Joan Didion praised it in a review in National Review (April 20, 1965) and John W. Aldridge did the same in Life (March 19, 1965), while Elizabeth Hardwick panned it in Partisan Review (spring 1965).

In 1980, The Executioner's Song, Mailer's novel of the life and death of murderer Gary Gilmore, won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Joan Didion reflected the views of many readers when she called the novel "an absolutely astonishing book" at the end of her front-page review in the New York Times Book Review.

Mailer spent a longer time writing Ancient Evenings, his novel of Egypt in the Twentieth Dynasty (about 1100 BC), than any of his other books. He worked on it for periods from 1972 until 1983. It was also a bestseller, although reviews were generally negative. Harold Bloom, in his review said the book "gives every sign of truncation," and "could be half again as long, but no reader will wish so," while Richard Poirier called it Mailer's "most audacious book."

Harlot's Ghost, Mailer's longest novel (1310 pages), appeared in 1991. It is an exploration of the untold dramas of the CIA from the end of World War II to 1965. He performed a huge amount of research for the novel, which is still on CIA reading lists. He ended the novel with the words "To be continued," and planned to write a sequel, titled Harlot's Grave, but other projects intervened and he never wrote it. Harlot's Ghost sold well.

His final novel, The Castle in the Forest, which focused on Hitler's childhood, reached number five on the Times best-seller list after publication in January 2007. It received reviews that were more positive than did any of his books since The Executioner's Song. Castle was intended to be the first volume of a trilogy, but Mailer died several months after it was completed. The Castle in the Forest received a laudatory 6,200-word front page review by Lee Siegel in the New York Times Book Review, as well as a Bad Sex in Fiction Award by the Literary Review magazine.

From the mid-1950s, Mailer became known for his counter-cultural essays. In 1955, he co-founded The Village Voice, for which he wrote a column from January to April 1956. Mailer's famous essay "The White Negro" (1957) develops a Hipster figure who stands in opposition of forces that seek debilitating conformity in American society. It is one of the most anthologized, and controversial, essays of the postwar period. Mailer republished it in 1959 in his miscellany Advertisements for Myself which he described as "The first work I wrote with a style I could call my own." The reviews were positive, and most commentators referred to it as his breakthrough work.

In 1960, Mailer wrote "Superman Comes to the Supermarket" for Esquire magazine, an account of the emergence of John F. Kennedy during the Democratic party convention. The essay was an important breakthrough for the New Journalism of the 1960s, but when the magazine's editors changed the title to "Superman Comes to the Supermart," Mailer was enraged, and would not write for Esquire for years.

Mailer took part in the October 1967 March on the Pentagon, but initially had no intention of writing a book about it. After conversations with his friend, Willie Morris, editor of Harper's magazine, he agreed to produce a long essay describing the March. In a concentrated effort, he produced a 90,000-word piece in two months, and it appeared in Harper's March issue. At that time, and to date, it is the longest nonfiction piece to be published by an American magazine. As one commentator states, "Mailer disarmed the literary world with Armies. The combination of detached, ironic self-presentation, deft portraiture of literary figures (especially Robert Lowell, Dwight Macdonald, and Paul Goodman), a reportorially flawless account of the March itself, and a passionate argument addressed to a divided nation, resulted in a sui generis narrative praised by even some of his most inveterate revilers." Alfred Kazin, writing in the New York Times Book Review, said, “Mailer’s intuition is that the times demand a new form. He has found it." He later expanded the article to a book, The Armies of the Night (1968), awarded a National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize.

His major new journalism, or creative nonfiction books, also include Miami and the Siege of Chicago (1968), an account of the 1968 political conventions; Of a Fire on the Moon (1971), a long report on the Apollo 11 mission to the moon; The Prisoner of Sex (1971), his response to Kate Millett’s critique of the patriarchal myths in the works of Mailer, Jean Genet, Henry Miller, and D.H. Lawrence; and The Fight (1975), an account of Muhammad Ali’s 1974 defeat in Zaire of George Foreman for the heavyweight boxing championship. Miami, Fire, and Prisoner were all finalists for the National Book Award. The hallmark of his five New Journalism works in his use of illeism, or referring to oneself in the third person, rather than the first. Mailer said he got the idea from reading The Education of Henry Adams (1918) when he was a Harvard freshman. Mailer also employs many of the most common techniques of fiction in his creative nonfiction.

In addition to his experimental fiction and nonfiction novels, Mailer produced a play version of The Deer Park, which had a four-month run and generally good reviews. In 2007, months before he died, he re-wrote the script, and asked his son Michael, a film producer, to film a staged production in Provincetown, but had to cancel because of his declining health. Mailer obsessed over The Deer Park more than any other work.

In the late 1960s, Mailer directed a number of improvisational avant-garde films: Wild 90 (1968), Beyond the Law (1968), and Maidstone (1970). The latter includes a spontaneous and brutal brawl between Norman T. Kingsley, played by Mailer, and Kingsley's half-brother, Raoul, played by Rip Torn. Mailer received a head injury when Torn struck him with a hammer, and Torn’s ear became infected when Mailer bit it. In 2012, The Criterion Collection released Mailer's experimental films in a box set: "Maidstone And Other Films By Norman Mailer." In 1987, he adapted and directed a film version of his novel Tough Guys Don't Dance, starring Ryan O'Neal and Isabella Rossellini, which has become a minor camp classic.

Mailer took on an acting role in the 1981 Milos Forman film version of E.L. Doctorow's novel Ragtime, playing Stanford White. In 1999, he played Harry Houdini in Matthew Barney's Cremaster 2, which was inspired by the events surrounding the life of Gary Gilmore.

In 1976, Mailer went to Italy for several weeks to collaborate with Italian spaghetti western filmmaker Sergio Leone on an adaptation of the Harry Grey novel, The Hoods. Although Leone would pursue other writers shortly thereafter, elements of Mailer's first two drafts of the commissioned screenplay would appear in the Italian filmmaker's final magnum opus, Once Upon A Time in America (1984) starring Robert DeNiro.

Shot in 1971, although not released until 1979, Mailer starred alongside writer/feminist Germaine Greer in D.A. Pennebaker's Town Bloody Hall.

In 1982, Mailer and Lawrence Schiller would collaborate on a television adaptation of The Executioner's Song, starring Tommy Lee Jones, Roseanna Arquette, and Eli Wallach. Airing on November 28th and 29th, The Executioner's Song received strong critical reviews and four Emmy nominations, including one for Mailer's screenplay. It won two: for sound production and for Jones as best actor.

In 1987, Mailer would appear in Jean-Luc Godard's experimental film version, shot in Switzerland, of Shakespeare's King Lear. Originally, Mailer was to play the lead "Don Learo" in Godard's unscripted film alongside his daughter, Kate Mailer. The film also featured a variable list of Hollywood stars like Woody Allen and Peter Sellers. However, tensions surfaced between Mailer and Godard early in the production when the french auteur insisted that Mailer play a character who had a carnal relationship with his own daughter. He left Switzerland after just one day of shooting with the filmmaker behind Breathless (1960).

In 2001, he adapted the screenplay for the movie: Master Spy: The Robert Hanssen Story.

In 2005, Mailer served as a technical consultant on the Ron Howard boxing movie, Cinderella Man, about legendary boxer Jim Braddock.

Mailer's approach to biography came from his interest in the ego of the artist as an "exemplary type." Lennon explains that Mailer would use "himself as a species of divining rod to explore the psychic depths" of disparate personalities, like Pablo Picasso, Muhammad Ali, Gary Gilmore, Lee Harvey Oswald, and Marilyn Monroe. "Ego," states Lennon, "can be seen as the beginning of a major phase in his writing career: Mailer as biographer."

What began as an assignment from Lawrence Schiller to write a short preface to a collection of photographs, Mailer's 1973 biography of Monroe (usually designated Marilyn: A Biography) was not approached like a traditional biography. Mailer read the available biographies, watched her films, and looked at photographs of Monroe; for the rest of it, Mailer stated, "I speculated."[60] Since Mailer did not have the time to thoroughly research them, this speculation extended into the facts surrounding her death and led to the biography's controversy. The book's final chapter theorizes that Monroe was murdered by rogue agents of the FBI and CIA who resented her supposed affair with Robert F. Kennedy. In his own autobiography, Monroe's former husband Arthur Miller wrote scathingly of Mailer: "[Monroe] was himself in drag, acting out his own Hollywood fantasies of fame and sex unlimited and power."

The book was enormously successful: it sold more copies than any of Mailer's works except The Naked and the Dead, and it Mailer's most widely-reviewed book. It was the inspiration for the Emmy-nominated TV movie Marilyn: The Untold Story which aired in 1980. Two later works co-written by Mailer presented imagined words and thoughts in Monroe's voice: the 1980 book Of Women and Their Elegance and the 1986 play Strawhead, which was produced off Broadway starring his daughter Kate Mailer.

Mailer held the rare position that the Cold War was not a positive ideal for America. It allowed the State to become strong and invested in the daily lives of the people. He critiqued conservative politics as they, specifically Barry Goldwater, supported the Cold War which called for an increase in government spending and oversight. This, Mailer argued, stood in opposition with conservative principles like lower taxes, and smaller government. He believed that conservatives were pro-Cold War because that was politically relevant to them and would therefore help them win.

In October 1967, he was arrested for his involvement in an Anti-Vietnam War demonstration at the Pentagon sponsored by the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam. In 1968, he signed the “Writers and Editors War Tax Protest” pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War.

At the December 15, 1971, taping of The Dick Cavett Show, with Janet Flanner and Gore Vidal, Mailer, annoyed with a less-than-stellar review by Vidal of Prisoner of Sex, apparently headbutted Vidal and traded insults with him backstage. As the show began taping, a visibly belligerent Mailer, who admitted he had been drinking, goaded Vidal and Cavett into trading insults with him on air and continually referred to his "greater intellect". He openly taunted and mocked Vidal (who responded in kind), finally earning the ire of Flanner, who announced during the discussion that she was "becoming very, very bored", telling Mailer "You act as if you're the only people here." As Cavett made jokes comparing Mailer's intellect to his ego, Mailer stated "Why don't you look at your question sheet and ask your question?", to which Cavett responded "Why don't you fold it five ways and put it where the moon don't shine?" A long laugh ensued, after which Mailer asked Cavett if he had come up with that line and Cavett replied "I have to tell you a quote from Tolstoy?". The headbutting and later on-air altercation was described by Mailer himself in his essay "Of a Small and Modest Malignancy, Wicked and Bristling with Dots."

In 2003, in a speech to the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, just before the Iraq War, Mailer said: "Fascism is more of a natural state than democracy. To assume blithely that we can export democracy into any country we choose can serve paradoxically to encourage more fascism at home and abroad. Democracy is a state of grace that is attained only by those countries who have a host of individuals not only ready to enjoy freedom but to undergo the heavy labor of maintaining it."

In 1969, at the suggestion of Gloria Steinem, his friend the political essayist Noel Parmentel and others, he ran unsuccessfully in the Democratic Party primary for Mayor of New York City, allied with columnist Jimmy Breslin (who ran for City Council President), proposing the creation of a 51st state through New York City secession. Although Mailer took stands on a wide range of issues, from opposing "compulsory fluoridation of the water supply" to advocating the release of Black Panther Party leader Huey Newton, decentralization was the overriding issue of the campaign. Mailer "foresaw the city, its independence secured, splintering into townships and neighborhoods, with their own school systems, police departments, housing programs, and governing philosophies." Their slogan was "throw the rascals in". Mailer was endorsed by libertarian economist Murray Rothbard, who "believed that 'smashing the urban government apparatus and fragmenting it into a myriad of constituent fragments' offered the only answer to the ills plaguing American cities," and called Mailer's campaign “the most refreshing libertarian political campaign in decades.” He came in fourth in a field of five. Looking back on the campaign, journalist and historian Theodore White called it "one of the most serious campaigns run in the United States in the last five years. . . . [H]is campaign was considered and thoughtful, the beginning of an attempt to apply ideas to a political situation."

In "The White Negro" Mailer argues that African Americans are psychopaths because they live in a society that hates them, (meaning white society) which in turn causes them to hate themselves. Mailer goes on to argue that because of this innate psychopathy, African Americans are left to explore the least virtuous areas of civilized life. Mailer’s analysis culminates in his expression that if African Americans were to achieve equality it would have violent, and chaotic effects on white society.

In 1956, while abroad in Paris, Mailer met James Baldwin the famous African American author. Mailer became even more fascinated with African Americans after meeting Baldwin, and this friendship inspired Mailer to write “The White Negro”. To Mailer, Baldwin was a natural point of intrigue as Baldwin was both gay and an African American author, similar to Mailer’s stature. Their relationship was never a close friendship nor contemptuous, but one of mutual intrigue and sense of competition existed between the two writers. Mailer often commented on Baldwin’s work, and Baldwin did the same to Mailer.

Mailer was married six times and had nine children. He fathered eight children by his various wives and informally adopted his sixth wife's son from another marriage.

Mailer's first marriage was in 1944, to Beatrice Silverman, whom he divorced in 1952. They had one child, Susan.

Mailer married his second wife, Adele Morales, in 1954. She was a painter, well known in New York City. They had two daughters, Danielle and Elizabeth. Mailer stabbed her twice with a penknife during a party, puncturing her pericardium which needed emergency surgery. His wife would not press charges and he later pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of assault for a suspended sentence. Morales recovered and in 1997 published a memoir of their marriage entitled The Last Party, which recounted her husband stabbing her at a party and the aftermath. This incident has been a focal point for feminist critics of Mailer, who point to themes of sexual violence in his work.

His third wife, whom he married in 1962, and divorced in 1963, was the British heiress and journalist Lady Jeanne Campbell (1929–2007). She was the only daughter of Ian Campbell, 11th Duke of Argyll, a Scottish aristocrat and clan chief with a notorious private life, and a granddaughter of the press baron Lord Beaverbrook. The couple had a daughter, Kate Mailer, who is an actress.

His fourth marriage, in 1963, was to Beverly Bentley, a former model turned actress. She is the mother of his producer son Michael Mailer and his actor son Stephen Mailer. They divorced in 1980.

His fifth wife was Carol Stevens, a jazz singer whom he married on November 7, 1980, and divorced in Haiti on November 8, 1980, thereby legitimating their daughter Maggie, born in 1971.

His sixth and last wife, whom he married in 1980, was Norris Church Mailer (née Barbara Davis, 1949–2010), an art teacher. They had one son together, John Buffalo Mailer, a writer and actor. Mailer raised and informally adopted Matthew Norris, Church's son by her first husband, Larry Norris. Living in Brooklyn, New York and Provincetown, Massachusetts with Mailer, Church worked as a model, wrote and painted.

Over the course of his life, Mailer was connected with several women other than his wives, including Carole Mallory, who wrote a "tell all" biography, Loving Mailer, after his death

According to his obituary in The Independent, his "relentless machismo seemed out of place in a man who was actually quite small – though perhaps that was where the aggression originated."

Alan Dershowitz, in his book, Taking the Stand, recounts when Claus von Bülow had a dinner party after he was found not guilty at his trial. Dershowitz countered that he would not attend if it was a "victory party", and von Bulow assured him that it was only a dinner for "several interesting friends." Norman Mailer attended the dinner where, among other things, Dershowitz explained why the evidence pointed to von Bülow's innocence. As Dershowitz recounted, Mailer grabbed his wife, Norris Church Mailer's, arm and said: "Let's get out of here. I think this guy is innocent. I thought we were going to be having dinner with a man who actually tried to kill his wife. This is boring."

Mailer died of acute renal failure on November 10, 2007, a month after undergoing lung surgery at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, New York.

In 2008, Carole Mallory, a former mistress, sold seven boxes of documents and photographs to Harvard University, Norman Mailer's alma mater. They contain extracts of her letters, books and journals.

Norman Mailer is buried in Provincetown Cemetery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.

About Norman Mailer (עברית)

נורמן קינגסלי מיילר

' (באנגלית: Norman Kingsley Mailer;‏ 31 בינואר 1923 - 10 בנובמבר 2007), היה סופר, מחזאי, עיתונאי ויוצר קולנוע אמריקאי-יהודי. ידוע כמחדש ז'אנר הנובלה התיעודית.

חייו מיילר נולד בלונג בראנץ' בניו ג'רזי. אביו, איזק ברנט מיילר, יליד ליטא שהיגר לארצות הברית מדרום אפריקה, היה מנהל חשבונות, אמו פאני לבית שניידר ניהלה סוכנות למטפלות. אביה שהיה בעל מכולת שימש כעין רב של הקהילה המקומית.

נורמן גדל בברוקלין, ובשנת 1939 החל ללמוד באוניברסיטת הרווארד. במהלך לימודיו החל מתעניין בכתיבה, ופרסם את סיפורו הראשון כשהוא בן 18.

עם הצטרפותה של ארצות הברית למלחמת העולם השנייה בשנת 1941 התגייס מיילר לצבא האמריקאי, ושירת כלוחם בחזית האוקיינוס השקט, בפיליפינים וביפן.

לאחר שחרורו מן הצבא, החל ללמוד באוניברסיטת הסורבון בפריז, עם מלגה מהצבא, ובשנת 1948 פרסם את ספרו הראשון "הערומים והמתים" המתבסס על ניסיונו כחייל. זהו רומן מלחמה ריאליסטי, המתאר בצורה חזקה ואלימה קבוצת חיילים אמריקנים הנלחמת לכיבושו של אי המוחזק בידי היפנים. ספר זה נחשב לאחד הספרים החשובים בסוגו, ולמייצג נאמן של הספרות שנכתבה על ידי דור הצעירים שלחם במלחמת העולם השנייה.

בשנים שלאחר מכן עבד מיילר כתסריטאי בהוליווד. חלק ניכר מעבודתו הספרותית לא התקבל על ידי המוציאים לאור. באמצע שנות החמישים התפרסם מיילר כמסאי המבקר את התרבות האמריקנית בת זמנו. ספרו "פרסומת לעצמי" (1959) המבוסס על קטעי יומן ורשימות, בוחן את האלימות, ההיסטריה, הפשע והבלבול בחברה האמריקנית, והיה בעל השפעה על דור הכותבים הצעירים בשנות השישים.

ב-1987 ביים את הסרט הקולנועי "גברים קשוחים אינם רוקדים" על פי תסריט של רוברט טאון. ב-2002 כתב מיילר את התסריט לסרט "מרגל ראשי: הסיפור של רוברט הנסן", אשר מבוסס על חיו של רוברט הנסן.

נמנה עם מייסדי המגזין "Village Voice".

מיילר זכה פעמיים בפרס פוליצר. בפעם הראשונה על ספרו "צבאות הלילה" (1968), ובפעם השנייה על ספרו "שירת התליין" (1979). ספר זה, שהוא מפסגת יצירתו של מיילר, מתאר את הוצאתו להורג של הרוצח גארי גילמור. כן זכה מיילר במדליית אמרסון ת'ורו על מפעל חיים (1989), ושימש כנשיא הסניף האמריקאי של ארגון הסופרים PEN.

מיילר היה גם ביוגרף מוכשר, וכתב את הביוגרפיה (עם הרבה אלמנטים דמיוניים) של מרילין מונרו, פבלו פיקאסו ולי הארווי אוסוואלד. רצח קנדי העסיק אותו אף בספר "רוחו של הארלוט" משנת 1991 העוסק באיש CIA המעורב באירועי תקופתו - המלחמה הקרה, הפלישה למפרץ החזירים ורצח קנדי.

נטייתו של מיילר אל הפוליטיקה הובילה אותו לכתיבת ספרים כ"מדוע אנו בווייטנאם" (1967). בשנת 1969 התמודד על משרת ראש עיריית ניו יורק בתור "שמאלני שמרן" שצידד בהקמת מדינה נפרדת של העיר ניו יורק ונכשל. למרות היותו יהודי, מיילר לא היה אוהד ישראל, לא ביקר בה מעולם, והביע לא פעם תמיכה בפלסטינים.

מיילר הופיע כשחקן במספר סרטים, ביניהם סרטי אוונגרד של במאים "מחתרתיים" בשנות השישים. כן ביים מספר סרטים מסוג זה. כן ביים את הסרט "בחורים קשוחים אינם רוקדים", על פי ספרו. ספריו "העירומים והמתים", "חלום אמריקני" ו "שירת התליין" הוסרטו אף הם.

מיילר היה נשוי שש פעמים ואב לתשעה ילדים (לרבות בן חורג אחד), בהם הבמאי סטיבן מיילר, השחקנית קייט מיילר והעיתונאי (עורך המגזין "היי טיימס") ג'ון בפאלו מיילר. נפטר עקב אי-ספיקת כליות חריפה בבית החולים מאונט סיני במנהטן.

מספריו שתורגמו לעברית העירומים והמתים, מאנגלית חיים גליקשטיין, הוצאת מערכות. עובד לסרט קולנוע בשנת 1958. הבשורה על פי הבן, מאנגלית אמיר צוקרמן, הוצאת ידיעות אחרונות. שירת התליין, מאנגלית עמשי לוין, הוצאת זמורה ביתן. גן הצבאים, מאנגלית - עמשי לוין, זמורה ביתן, 1990. קישורים חיצוניים ויקישיתוף מדיה וקבצים בנושא נורמן מיילר בוויקישיתוף רות אלמוג, נועז יותר, צעקני יותר , באתר הארץ, 19 בנובמבר 2007 ‫מרב יודילוביץ', פרס מפעל חיים לנורמן מיילר , באתר ynet, 21 בספטמבר 2005‬ ‫מרב יודילוביץ' וסוכנויות הידיעות, הסופר נורמן מיילר הלך לעולמו , באתר ynet, 10 בנובמבר 2007‬ ריצ'רד פייל, מת הסופר נורמן מיילר , באתר הארץ, 10 בנובמבר 2007 ‫משה ריינפלד, מת הסופר האמריקני נורמן מיילר , באתר News1 מחלקה ראשונה‏, 10 בנובמבר 2007‬ הדס בשן, נורמן מיילר מת , נענע 10 ג'נט מסלין, בנו של השטן , באתר הארץ, 23 בינואר 2007 הזכיר לך שאתה חי , באתר ynet https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%A0%D7%95%D7%A8%D7%9E%D7%9F_%D7%9E...

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Norman Kingsley Mailer (January 31, 1923 – November 10, 2007) was an American novelist, journalist, essayist, poet, playwright, screenwriter and film director.

Along with Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Hunter S. Thompson, John McPhee, and Tom Wolfe, Mailer is considered an innovator of creative nonfiction, a genre sometimes called New Journalism, which superimposes the essay onto the nonfiction novel. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize twice and the National Book Award once. In 1955, Mailer, together with John Wilcock, Ed Fancher and Dan Wolf, first published The Village Voice, which began as an arts and politics oriented weekly newspaper distributed in Greenwich Village. In 2005, he won the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters from the National Book Foundation.

Author. Considered one of America's outstanding writers of the 20th Century, his work often dealt with the social and political upheavals of his times. He won Pulitzer Prizes for "The Armies of the Night" (1969) and "The Executioner's Song" (1980). Born in Long Branch, New Jersey and raised in Brooklyn, New York City, New York, after graduating from Harvard University with an engineering science degree, he pursued his goal of writing. His first novel, "The Naked and the Dead" (1948), was inspired by his experiences in the South Pacific while serving in the United States Army during World War II, and its success made him an international celebrity. In the course of his controversial career Mailer produced such books as "The Deer Park", "An American Dream", "Marilyn" and "Tough Guys Don't Dance". He also occasionally acted in and directed films. In 1969 he unsuccessfully ran for Mayor of New York City. (bio by: C.S.) 


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Norman Kingsley Mailer was an American novelist, journalist, essayist, playwright, film-maker, actor, and political activist. His novel The Naked and the Dead was published in 1948 and brought him renown. His best-known work is widely considered to be The Executioner's Song (1979) winner of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Winner the Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction, Armies of the Night also won the National Book Award.

Along with Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Hunter S. Thompson, and Tom Wolfe, Mailer is considered an innovator of creative nonfiction, a genre sometimes called New Journalism, which uses the style and devices of literary fiction in fact-based journalism. Mailer was also known for his essays, the most famous and reprinted of which is "The White Negro." He was a cultural commentator and critic, expressing his views through his novels, journalism, essays and frequent media appearances. In 1955, Mailer and three others founded The Village Voice, an arts- and politics-oriented weekly newspaper distributed in Greenwich Village. In 1969 he ran an unsuccessful campaign for the mayor of New York.

While principally known as a novelist and journalist, Mailer was not afraid to bend genres and venture outside his comfort zone; he lived a life that seemed to embody an idea that echoes throughout his work: "There was that law of life, so cruel and so just, that one must grow or else pay more for remaining the same."

Mailer was born to a Jewish family in Long Branch, New Jersey on January 31, 1923. His father, Isaac Barnett Mailer, was an accountant born in South Africa, and his mother, Fanny (née Schneider), ran a housekeeping and nursing agency. Mailer's sister, Barbara, was born in 1927.

Raised in Brooklyn, New York, Mailer graduated from Boys' High School and entered Harvard University in 1939, when he was 16 years old. As an undergraduate, he was a member of the Signet Society. At Harvard, majored in engineering sciences, but took the majority of his electives as writing courses. He published his first story, "The Greatest Thing in the World," at the age of 18, winning Story magazine's college contest in 1941.

After graduating in 1943, Mailer marries his first wife Beatrice "Bea" Silverman in January 1944 just before being drafted into the U.S. Army. Hoping to gain a deferment from service, Mailer argued that he was writing an "important literary work" which pertained to the war. This deferral was denied, and Mailer was forced to enter the Army. After training at Fort Bragg, Mailer was stationed in the Philippines with the 112th Cavalry.

During his time in the Philippines, Mailer was first assigned to regimental headquarters as a typist, then assigned as a wire lineman. In the spring of 1945, after volunteering for a reconnaissance platoon, he completed more than two dozen patrols in contested territory, and engaged in a few firefights and skirmishes. After the Japanese surrender, he was sent to Japan as part of the army of occupation, was promoted to sergeant, and became a first cook.

When asked about his war experiences, he said that the army was "the worst experience of his life and the best." He drew on his experience as a reconnaissance rifleman for the central action of The Naked and the Dead, a long patrol behind enemy lines.

Mailer wrote 12 novels over a 59-year span. After completing courses in French language and culture at the University of Paris in 1947–48, he returned to the U.S. shortly after The Naked and the Dead was published in May 1948. A New York Times best seller for 62 weeks and the only one of Mailer's novels to reach the number one position. It was hailed by many as one of the best American wartime novels and named as one of the "one hundred best novels in English language" by the Modern Library. The book that made his reputation sold over a million copies in its first year, (three million by 1981) and has never gone out of print. It is still considered to be one of the finest depictions of Americans in combat during World War II, though many contemporary readers might find it a difficult read today.

Barbary Shore (1951) was "mauled" by the critics. It was a surreal parable of Cold War leftist politics set in a Brooklyn rooming-house. His 1955 novel The Deer Park drew on his experiences working as a screenwriter in Hollywood in 1949–50. It was initially rejected by seven publishers due to its purportedly sexual content before being published by Putnam's. It was not a critical success, but made the best-seller list, sold over 50,000 copies its first year, and is considered by some critics to be the best Hollywood novel since Nathanael West's The Day of the Locust.

Mailer wrote his fourth novel, An American Dream, as a serial in Esquire magazine over eight months (January to August 1964), publishing the first chapter two months after he wrote it. In March 1965, Dial Press published a revised version. His editor was E. L. Doctorow. The novel received mixed reviews, but was a best seller. Joan Didion praised it in a review in National Review (April 20, 1965) and John W. Aldridge did the same in Life (March 19, 1965), while Elizabeth Hardwick panned it in Partisan Review (spring 1965).

In 1980, The Executioner's Song, Mailer's novel of the life and death of murderer Gary Gilmore, won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Joan Didion reflected the views of many readers when she called the novel "an absolutely astonishing book" at the end of her front-page review in the New York Times Book Review.

Mailer spent a longer time writing Ancient Evenings, his novel of Egypt in the Twentieth Dynasty (about 1100 BC), than any of his other books. He worked on it for periods from 1972 until 1983. It was also a bestseller, although reviews were generally negative. Harold Bloom, in his review said the book "gives every sign of truncation," and "could be half again as long, but no reader will wish so," while Richard Poirier called it Mailer's "most audacious book."

Harlot's Ghost, Mailer's longest novel (1310 pages), appeared in 1991. It is an exploration of the untold dramas of the CIA from the end of World War II to 1965. He performed a huge amount of research for the novel, which is still on CIA reading lists. He ended the novel with the words "To be continued," and planned to write a sequel, titled Harlot's Grave, but other projects intervened and he never wrote it. Harlot's Ghost sold well.

His final novel, The Castle in the Forest, which focused on Hitler's childhood, reached number five on the Times best-seller list after publication in January 2007. It received reviews that were more positive than did any of his books since The Executioner's Song. Castle was intended to be the first volume of a trilogy, but Mailer died several months after it was completed. The Castle in the Forest received a laudatory 6,200-word front page review by Lee Siegel in the New York Times Book Review, as well as a Bad Sex in Fiction Award by the Literary Review magazine.

From the mid-1950s, Mailer became known for his counter-cultural essays. In 1955, he co-founded The Village Voice, for which he wrote a column from January to April 1956. Mailer's famous essay "The White Negro" (1957) develops a Hipster figure who stands in opposition of forces that seek debilitating conformity in American society. It is one of the most anthologized, and controversial, essays of the postwar period. Mailer republished it in 1959 in his miscellany Advertisements for Myself which he described as "The first work I wrote with a style I could call my own." The reviews were positive, and most commentators referred to it as his breakthrough work.

In 1960, Mailer wrote "Superman Comes to the Supermarket" for Esquire magazine, an account of the emergence of John F. Kennedy during the Democratic party convention. The essay was an important breakthrough for the New Journalism of the 1960s, but when the magazine's editors changed the title to "Superman Comes to the Supermart," Mailer was enraged, and would not write for Esquire for years.

Mailer took part in the October 1967 March on the Pentagon, but initially had no intention of writing a book about it. After conversations with his friend, Willie Morris, editor of Harper's magazine, he agreed to produce a long essay describing the March. In a concentrated effort, he produced a 90,000-word piece in two months, and it appeared in Harper's March issue. At that time, and to date, it is the longest nonfiction piece to be published by an American magazine. As one commentator states, "Mailer disarmed the literary world with Armies. The combination of detached, ironic self-presentation, deft portraiture of literary figures (especially Robert Lowell, Dwight Macdonald, and Paul Goodman), a reportorially flawless account of the March itself, and a passionate argument addressed to a divided nation, resulted in a sui generis narrative praised by even some of his most inveterate revilers." Alfred Kazin, writing in the New York Times Book Review, said, “Mailer’s intuition is that the times demand a new form. He has found it." He later expanded the article to a book, The Armies of the Night (1968), awarded a National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize.

His major new journalism, or creative nonfiction books, also include Miami and the Siege of Chicago (1968), an account of the 1968 political conventions; Of a Fire on the Moon (1971), a long report on the Apollo 11 mission to the moon; The Prisoner of Sex (1971), his response to Kate Millett’s critique of the patriarchal myths in the works of Mailer, Jean Genet, Henry Miller, and D.H. Lawrence; and The Fight (1975), an account of Muhammad Ali’s 1974 defeat in Zaire of George Foreman for the heavyweight boxing championship. Miami, Fire, and Prisoner were all finalists for the National Book Award. The hallmark of his five New Journalism works in his use of illeism, or referring to oneself in the third person, rather than the first. Mailer said he got the idea from reading The Education of Henry Adams (1918) when he was a Harvard freshman. Mailer also employs many of the most common techniques of fiction in his creative nonfiction.

In addition to his experimental fiction and nonfiction novels, Mailer produced a play version of The Deer Park, which had a four-month run and generally good reviews. In 2007, months before he died, he re-wrote the script, and asked his son Michael, a film producer, to film a staged production in Provincetown, but had to cancel because of his declining health. Mailer obsessed over The Deer Park more than any other work.

In the late 1960s, Mailer directed a number of improvisational avant-garde films: Wild 90 (1968), Beyond the Law (1968), and Maidstone (1970). The latter includes a spontaneous and brutal brawl between Norman T. Kingsley, played by Mailer, and Kingsley's half-brother, Raoul, played by Rip Torn. Mailer received a head injury when Torn struck him with a hammer, and Torn’s ear became infected when Mailer bit it. In 2012, The Criterion Collection released Mailer's experimental films in a box set: "Maidstone And Other Films By Norman Mailer." In 1987, he adapted and directed a film version of his novel Tough Guys Don't Dance, starring Ryan O'Neal and Isabella Rossellini, which has become a minor camp classic.

Mailer took on an acting role in the 1981 Milos Forman film version of E.L. Doctorow's novel Ragtime, playing Stanford White. In 1999, he played Harry Houdini in Matthew Barney's Cremaster 2, which was inspired by the events surrounding the life of Gary Gilmore.

In 1976, Mailer went to Italy for several weeks to collaborate with Italian spaghetti western filmmaker Sergio Leone on an adaptation of the Harry Grey novel, The Hoods. Although Leone would pursue other writers shortly thereafter, elements of Mailer's first two drafts of the commissioned screenplay would appear in the Italian filmmaker's final magnum opus, Once Upon A Time in America (1984) starring Robert DeNiro.

Shot in 1971, although not released until 1979, Mailer starred alongside writer/feminist Germaine Greer in D.A. Pennebaker's Town Bloody Hall.

In 1982, Mailer and Lawrence Schiller would collaborate on a television adaptation of The Executioner's Song, starring Tommy Lee Jones, Roseanna Arquette, and Eli Wallach. Airing on November 28th and 29th, The Executioner's Song received strong critical reviews and four Emmy nominations, including one for Mailer's screenplay. It won two: for sound production and for Jones as best actor.

In 1987, Mailer would appear in Jean-Luc Godard's experimental film version, shot in Switzerland, of Shakespeare's King Lear. Originally, Mailer was to play the lead "Don Learo" in Godard's unscripted film alongside his daughter, Kate Mailer. The film also featured a variable list of Hollywood stars like Woody Allen and Peter Sellers. However, tensions surfaced between Mailer and Godard early in the production when the french auteur insisted that Mailer play a character who had a carnal relationship with his own daughter. He left Switzerland after just one day of shooting with the filmmaker behind Breathless (1960).

In 2001, he adapted the screenplay for the movie: Master Spy: The Robert Hanssen Story.

In 2005, Mailer served as a technical consultant on the Ron Howard boxing movie, Cinderella Man, about legendary boxer Jim Braddock.

Mailer's approach to biography came from his interest in the ego of the artist as an "exemplary type." Lennon explains that Mailer would use "himself as a species of divining rod to explore the psychic depths" of disparate personalities, like Pablo Picasso, Muhammad Ali, Gary Gilmore, Lee Harvey Oswald, and Marilyn Monroe. "Ego," states Lennon, "can be seen as the beginning of a major phase in his writing career: Mailer as biographer."

What began as an assignment from Lawrence Schiller to write a short preface to a collection of photographs, Mailer's 1973 biography of Monroe (usually designated Marilyn: A Biography) was not approached like a traditional biography. Mailer read the available biographies, watched her films, and looked at photographs of Monroe; for the rest of it, Mailer stated, "I speculated."[60] Since Mailer did not have the time to thoroughly research them, this speculation extended into the facts surrounding her death and led to the biography's controversy. The book's final chapter theorizes that Monroe was murdered by rogue agents of the FBI and CIA who resented her supposed affair with Robert F. Kennedy. In his own autobiography, Monroe's former husband Arthur Miller wrote scathingly of Mailer: "[Monroe] was himself in drag, acting out his own Hollywood fantasies of fame and sex unlimited and power."

The book was enormously successful: it sold more copies than any of Mailer's works except The Naked and the Dead, and it Mailer's most widely-reviewed book. It was the inspiration for the Emmy-nominated TV movie Marilyn: The Untold Story which aired in 1980. Two later works co-written by Mailer presented imagined words and thoughts in Monroe's voice: the 1980 book Of Women and Their Elegance and the 1986 play Strawhead, which was produced off Broadway starring his daughter Kate Mailer.

Mailer held the rare position that the Cold War was not a positive ideal for America. It allowed the State to become strong and invested in the daily lives of the people. He critiqued conservative politics as they, specifically Barry Goldwater, supported the Cold War which called for an increase in government spending and oversight. This, Mailer argued, stood in opposition with conservative principles like lower taxes, and smaller government. He believed that conservatives were pro-Cold War because that was politically relevant to them and would therefore help them win.

In October 1967, he was arrested for his involvement in an Anti-Vietnam War demonstration at the Pentagon sponsored by the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam. In 1968, he signed the “Writers and Editors War Tax Protest” pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War.

At the December 15, 1971, taping of The Dick Cavett Show, with Janet Flanner and Gore Vidal, Mailer, annoyed with a less-than-stellar review by Vidal of Prisoner of Sex, apparently headbutted Vidal and traded insults with him backstage. As the show began taping, a visibly belligerent Mailer, who admitted he had been drinking, goaded Vidal and Cavett into trading insults with him on air and continually referred to his "greater intellect". He openly taunted and mocked Vidal (who responded in kind), finally earning the ire of Flanner, who announced during the discussion that she was "becoming very, very bored", telling Mailer "You act as if you're the only people here." As Cavett made jokes comparing Mailer's intellect to his ego, Mailer stated "Why don't you look at your question sheet and ask your question?", to which Cavett responded "Why don't you fold it five ways and put it where the moon don't shine?" A long laugh ensued, after which Mailer asked Cavett if he had come up with that line and Cavett replied "I have to tell you a quote from Tolstoy?". The headbutting and later on-air altercation was described by Mailer himself in his essay "Of a Small and Modest Malignancy, Wicked and Bristling with Dots."

In 2003, in a speech to the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, just before the Iraq War, Mailer said: "Fascism is more of a natural state than democracy. To assume blithely that we can export democracy into any country we choose can serve paradoxically to encourage more fascism at home and abroad. Democracy is a state of grace that is attained only by those countries who have a host of individuals not only ready to enjoy freedom but to undergo the heavy labor of maintaining it."

In 1969, at the suggestion of Gloria Steinem, his friend the political essayist Noel Parmentel and others, he ran unsuccessfully in the Democratic Party primary for Mayor of New York City, allied with columnist Jimmy Breslin (who ran for City Council President), proposing the creation of a 51st state through New York City secession. Although Mailer took stands on a wide range of issues, from opposing "compulsory fluoridation of the water supply" to advocating the release of Black Panther Party leader Huey Newton, decentralization was the overriding issue of the campaign. Mailer "foresaw the city, its independence secured, splintering into townships and neighborhoods, with their own school systems, police departments, housing programs, and governing philosophies." Their slogan was "throw the rascals in". Mailer was endorsed by libertarian economist Murray Rothbard, who "believed that 'smashing the urban government apparatus and fragmenting it into a myriad of constituent fragments' offered the only answer to the ills plaguing American cities," and called Mailer's campaign “the most refreshing libertarian political campaign in decades.” He came in fourth in a field of five. Looking back on the campaign, journalist and historian Theodore White called it "one of the most serious campaigns run in the United States in the last five years. . . . [H]is campaign was considered and thoughtful, the beginning of an attempt to apply ideas to a political situation."

In "The White Negro" Mailer argues that African Americans are psychopaths because they live in a society that hates them, (meaning white society) which in turn causes them to hate themselves. Mailer goes on to argue that because of this innate psychopathy, African Americans are left to explore the least virtuous areas of civilized life. Mailer’s analysis culminates in his expression that if African Americans were to achieve equality it would have violent, and chaotic effects on white society.

In 1956, while abroad in Paris, Mailer met James Baldwin the famous African American author. Mailer became even more fascinated with African Americans after meeting Baldwin, and this friendship inspired Mailer to write “The White Negro”. To Mailer, Baldwin was a natural point of intrigue as Baldwin was both gay and an African American author, similar to Mailer’s stature. Their relationship was never a close friendship nor contemptuous, but one of mutual intrigue and sense of competition existed between the two writers. Mailer often commented on Baldwin’s work, and Baldwin did the same to Mailer.

Mailer was married six times and had nine children. He fathered eight children by his various wives and informally adopted his sixth wife's son from another marriage.

Mailer's first marriage was in 1944, to Beatrice Silverman, whom he divorced in 1952. They had one child, Susan.

Mailer married his second wife, Adele Morales, in 1954. She was a painter, well known in New York City. They had two daughters, Danielle and Elizabeth. Mailer stabbed her twice with a penknife during a party, puncturing her pericardium which needed emergency surgery. His wife would not press charges and he later pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of assault for a suspended sentence. Morales recovered and in 1997 published a memoir of their marriage entitled The Last Party, which recounted her husband stabbing her at a party and the aftermath. This incident has been a focal point for feminist critics of Mailer, who point to themes of sexual violence in his work.

His third wife, whom he married in 1962, and divorced in 1963, was the British heiress and journalist Lady Jeanne Campbell (1929–2007). She was the only daughter of Ian Campbell, 11th Duke of Argyll, a Scottish aristocrat and clan chief with a notorious private life, and a granddaughter of the press baron Lord Beaverbrook. The couple had a daughter, Kate Mailer, who is an actress.

His fourth marriage, in 1963, was to Beverly Bentley, a former model turned actress. She is the mother of his producer son Michael Mailer and his actor son Stephen Mailer. They divorced in 1980.

His fifth wife was Carol Stevens, a jazz singer whom he married on November 7, 1980, and divorced in Haiti on November 8, 1980, thereby legitimating their daughter Maggie, born in 1971.

His sixth and last wife, whom he married in 1980, was Norris Church Mailer (née Barbara Davis, 1949–2010), an art teacher. They had one son together, John Buffalo Mailer, a writer and actor. Mailer raised and informally adopted Matthew Norris, Church's son by her first husband, Larry Norris. Living in Brooklyn, New York and Provincetown, Massachusetts with Mailer, Church worked as a model, wrote and painted.

Over the course of his life, Mailer was connected with several women other than his wives, including Carole Mallory, who wrote a "tell all" biography, Loving Mailer, after his death

According to his obituary in The Independent, his "relentless machismo seemed out of place in a man who was actually quite small – though perhaps that was where the aggression originated."

Alan Dershowitz, in his book, Taking the Stand, recounts when Claus von Bülow had a dinner party after he was found not guilty at his trial. Dershowitz countered that he would not attend if it was a "victory party", and von Bulow assured him that it was only a dinner for "several interesting friends." Norman Mailer attended the dinner where, among other things, Dershowitz explained why the evidence pointed to von Bülow's innocence. As Dershowitz recounted, Mailer grabbed his wife, Norris Church Mailer's, arm and said: "Let's get out of here. I think this guy is innocent. I thought we were going to be having dinner with a man who actually tried to kill his wife. This is boring."

Mailer died of acute renal failure on November 10, 2007, a month after undergoing lung surgery at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, New York.

In 2008, Carole Mallory, a former mistress, sold seven boxes of documents and photographs to Harvard University, Norman Mailer's alma mater. They contain extracts of her letters, books and journals.

Norman Mailer is buried in Provincetown Cemetery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.

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Norman Mailer's Timeline

1923
January 31, 1923
Long Branch, Monmouth , New Jersey, United States