Is your surname Cornia?

Research the Cornia family

Peter Cornia's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Peter Cornia

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Richelieu, Quebec, Canada
Death: Died in Woodruff, Rich County, Utah
Place of Burial: Woodruff, Rich, Utah
Immediate Family:

Son of Jean Baptiste Cournoyer and Francoise (Frances) Cournoyer
Husband of Margaret Ann Ward Welker and Ruth Clarissa Cornia
Father of Ruth Cornia (Cournoyer); Mary Cornia (Cournoyer); Exeriel Cornia (Cournoyer); Clarissa Amelia Cornia; Peter Carlos Cornia, Sr. and 10 others
Brother of Pierre Cornia

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Peter Cornia

This story was written by Peter Cornia's wife, Ruth C. Cornia. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized April 6, 1830, and Peter was born nine days later, April 15, 1830. His parents were of the Catholic faith. He somehow could not believe in it because he felt that the priest had not the power to forgive sins. At the age of fourteen years he left home. He went to find work in the lumber business, floating logs and cutting cord wood. He could not speak a word of English - a vocabulary of French was all that he had and he was so very young to go out among strangers. Many times have I heard him tell of when he was without a job, or was hungry, how he would always seek his Lord in prayer and his prayers were always answered. Though young, strong was the faith that he had.

Peter, in his wanderings, found a wonderful friend in John Telford. (Millie, a daughter of the Telfords, wrote in her diary that Peter Cornia came from Essex County, Ontario, Canada with her father and followed him wherever he went for a long time. Peter was a fine fellow and her folks all thought a great lot of him.)

When the Telford family left Canada in January 1838, Peter Cornia left with them. They sailed down the St. Lawrence River and settled on the Great Lakes in the midst of a great maple sugar orchard.

January 17th of this 1838, John Telford was baptized into the L.D.S. Church by Elder John Witt. Mrs. Telford already was a member, having been baptized on the third day of the same month.

After joining the Mormons, John Telford, his wife, and their five children moved again so they might join the main body of Saints. Because of the prejudice of the people against the Mormons, Mr. Telford did not try to sell his home or any of his property. He just locked up his house, which was newly built and furnished, and left everything as it stood.

They crossed the border into Detroit in a wagon with only the few things allowed by the United States Government, and later joined the Saints in Kirtland, Ohio. They were in all the mobbings and drivings out of the Saints in Ohio, Missouri and Illinois. They were in Independence at the time of the Haun's Mill Massacre, October 30th 1838. Many times were they destitute, ill and without food, and weary from wandering.

This was the time of the gold-rush in California. Peter Cornia was excited about it and eager - anxious to move westward, thinking that a fortune awaited his coming. He had heard that men found wealth in a day, so when the Telford's talked of starting for Utah, he was elated to be one of John Telford's teamsters. Immediately after all plans had been made, Peter took ill and was unable to leave his bed. It seems that Mr. Telford too, decided to wait until the springtime to begin so long and rough a journey.

Upon a farm belonging to a widow and her daughter, Peter found work, and the winter passed quickly. During this time the widow's daughter had fallen in love with their hired help. So much did the girl think of Peter Cornia that when Mr. Telford came for him in the spring, the mother offered him her farm and everything she owned if he would stay and marry her daughter. But the gold fields were calling and the widow's offer was not accepted. Gold was the greater incentive.

They crossed the plains with the Harry Walton Company, and John Telford was the captain of fifty. The Company arrived in Salt Lake City in September 1851. However, they did not settle in Salt Lake, but in Bountiful. For now, Peter made his home with John Duncan. His intentions were to stay and work until he had earned enough to take him to California State. But how often plans never, never mature, and how true that man's extremities are God's opportunities.

Peter, one day, was led into an argument. It started over an irrigating turn. After so much talking it ended in a fist-fight with Peter striking the first blow. He was arrested and fined one hundred dollars, which was every cent that he had saved for his fortune-finding.

Isn't it often "what appears to be our great misfortune, turns out to be our greatest blessing," a blessing that we cannot see today, but somewhere in the tomorrow.

When Peter Cornia left home, he promised his mother two things. One was that he would always say his prayers and the other, that he would never be profane. These promises were to him like a protecting arm.

The Captain Lot Smith Company was called into the service of the United States Government by President Abraham Lincoln on the 30th day of April 1862. It was made up of two Companies, A and B of First Cavalry, Utah Militia. They were under the command of Colonel Collins, and served with troops for the defense of the overland mail. There were in all 106 men, 23 officers, 72 privates and 11 teamsters.

From the pages of the diary kept by Isaac Atkinson, we get this bit of a story:

"Pacific Springs Station, where the water divides at the south Pass. During the night there was sleet and rain and a high wind, tearing down every tent but one. The tent of Isaac Atkinson was the only one that remained.

"The gale was so fierce that nothing could be done to put the tents up again; they were forced to spend the rest of the night huddled under the canvass coverings, securing what protection they could from the storm, by holding to the tent with their hands."

"Peter Cornia's horse did not have a hair left on its mane or tail in the morning. One horse was found dead. That morning the wind ceased, the sun rose in all its splendor, giving promise of a beautiful day. 'Ike' and his comrades cheered the hearts of their comrades by inviting them into their one remaining tent and serving them with a fine hot breakfast. (This same Isaac Atkinson became a resident of Bountiful.)"

The following was: Pieced together by Zelda Davis Howard....After the death of my father, Peter Cornia, who died in Woodruff, June 29th 1887, my mother moved to Bountiful to take care of her stepmother, Cordelia Hotchkiss Carter, who lived to be almost ninety-six years. By living close to the temple, mother was able to do a great deal of temple work which gave her much joy. One day, not long after she came to Bountiful, she met William Streeper of Centerville, who was with father in the Lot Smith command.

"So you are the wife of Peter Cornia," he said. "He was one of the most unselfish men I have ever known." He then related how after one of their meals there was a large dough-god left. (The same was made of flour, water and a little salt, and baked in a large camp kettle.) No one thought it was worth taking along, but Peter, who put it into his saddle bag, He carried it for days.

There had been no food replenishment and their supply was getting low. When they were forced to eat wild berries and horse meat and with nothing else, Peter brought out the hard tack. It was so hard he had to break it with an ax. But everyone was ravenous for a piece. Cake had never tasted better. "I believe," said Mr. Streeper, "I would have gone behind some bushes and eaten my fill, then had there been any left, I would have passed it around."

The Lot Smith expedition was no pleasure trip because of the weather and rough roads, with deep snows, and high water to encounter making travel hazardous and laborious. The year 1862 is remembered as the season of the highest water ever experienced in the Rocky Mountains.

On August 14th the Company was mustered out of service. The war records state that as a company or individuals, their conduct was above reproach. There were always morning and evening prayers, and these men endeavored to live up to President Young's advice.

One night father was out on picket duty. When he returned to camp he saw upon the pillow by a sleeping comrade a large rattlesnake. The snake was coiled, already to strike. The men thought of shooting it, but that was risky work, so they pulled away their companion by his feet. It happened so quickly that the man, between sleep and waking, shouted, "What are you trying to do?" His temper climbed until they pointed, "Look at your bed fellow." Imagine his feelings if you can, when he saw what had been sharing his pillow.

Peter Cornia, son of John Baptiste Cornia, born 1789 and Frances St. Martins, born about 1791, was the eighth child of a family of fourteen, eleven boys and three girls.

Harriet Cornia Davis

__________________

Peter was in the Harry Walton/Garden Grove Company (1851)


Departure: 17 May 1851, Arrival: 24-25 September 1851

Company Information: About 21 families from Garden Grove plus other individuals and 60 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa (present day Council Bluffs). They left Garden Grove, Iowa on 17 May 1851.

_____________________________________

The following is from Ancestry.com:

Stories of Peter Cornia, Written by his family members

Peter Cournoyer, By Aunt Ruth Cornia about 80 years of age.

Your French Great Grandfather Peter Cournoyer Born April 14, 1830, at Sorel, Canada. His parents Father-John Baptist Cournoyer and Mother-Frances St. Martaine.

Peter left home when he was fifteen years old and came to the U.S.A. He couldn't speak any English but he joined a wagon train of Mormons and came to Utah with them.

He married Ruth Clarissa Carter May. 2, 1856 in Salt Lake City, Utah

When he came to the United States he gave his name and when they wrote it down it sounded like c-o-r-n-I-a and that is how he came to have the last name of Cornia instead of the French Cournoyer. Anyone who has Cornia in them are his descendants.

He and grandmother lived in Bountiful, Utah for a while then the Church sent them to Kamas, Utah to help settle it. They had three children born there. John, Orson and Osro. Orson and Osro were twins. Osro died and is buried in Kamas. Then the Church sent them to southern Utah to colonize and grow cotton. After a few years they became ill with malaria and they were then sent to Woodruff, Utah. From the hottest part of the state to the coldest.

Grandfather was called by the Church to take a polygamist wife. He wanted nothing to do with this call but grandmother found a young women, did the courting and insisted he marry her. She said "You're not going to keep me from going to the Celestial Kingdom. You're going to do what you have been commanded to do."

Grandfather had not seen his mother for forty and when he was fifty five years he made a trip to Massachusetts as his mother had come to the United States. By then she was in her nineties and they had their picture taken together. She identified that he was who he said he was as he had a large scar on his wrist. Her name was Frances St. Martin.

A few years later he died at their homestead house in Eagle Springs at Woodruff. He is buried at Woodruff and grandmother moved to Bountiful after his death and she is buried there. He died of cancer at age 57. I (Aunt Ruth) think we must have many relatives named Cournoyer as Grandfather came from a large family of eight children. Grandfather always spoke very broken English.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

At Martin's Cove - Peter Cornia is listed as a of rescuers who came from Salt Lake to rescue the Willie and Martin Handcart commpanies. I have never found any information on his involvement in this rescue.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Life Story of Peter Cornia as dictated to Mattie( Martha) E. Cornia who wrote it down in longhand as told by Ruth Clarissa Carter Cornia. This is similiar to the one above, but is a bit different and gives us additional information in places.

Peter Cornia Born April 15, 1830, Sorrel, Canada.

The church was organized April 6 1831. Peter Comia was born April 15th 1830.

I will endeavor to write a few instances of his early life as near as I can remember. His parents were of the Catholic faith, but some way he could never get into that religion. He used to tell Ms mother "he knew the Priest had no power to forgive sins."

At the age of 14 he left home and went off to work in the lumber business, floating logs and cutting cordwood. He couldn't speak a word of English. I have heard him say when he was out of work or was hungry he would always seek [page] his God in prayer and his prayers were always answered. He also served on a steam boat as a fireman.

In 1850 he started to go to California, a teamster for John Telford. They came as far as Pisgah, stopped on account of sickness, lost their son George (Telford) and went back to St. Louis.

My Husband (Peter Cornia) was very sick. He was laying in a wagon, homeless and friendless, but some good chap came alone, loaded him in a wagon and took him back. It seemed like the Lord watched over him for Good for in the Spring, Bro. Telford again came after him to drive his team to Utah. They landed in Bountiful in the Fall of 1851. He went over to Provo to visit friends that crossed the plains with him. He was baptized there.

Peter Cornia, when but a young fellow, left home, and in his wanderings found a wonderful friend in John Telford. Millie, a daughter of the Telfords, says that Peter Cornia came from Essex County, Ontario, Canada with her father, and followed him wherever he went for a long time. He was a fine fellow and the folks all thought much of him.

Grandfather was one of the logging crew who worked for Millie's father in Canada. When they left there in January, 1938, grandfather left with the family, and remained with them until they came here in 1851. They sailed down the St. Lawrence River and settled on the Great Lakes in the midst of a great maple sugar orchard.

In the year 1838, on the 17th of January, John Telford was baptized into the L.D.S. Church by Elder John Witt. Mrs. Telford has already joined the church and had been baptized on the 3rd day of the same month.

After joining the Mormons, John Telford, his wife and their five children moved again that they might join the main body of Saints. Because of the prejudice of the people against the Mormons, Mr. Telford did not try to sell his home or any of his property. He just locked up his house, which was newly built and furnished, and left everything as it stood. They crossed the border into Detroit in a wagon with only the few things allowed by the United States Government, and later joined the Saints in Kirtland.

The Telfords were in all the mobbings and drivings out of the Saints in Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois. At one time during the persecution of the Saints, and while he and all his family, except Robert, were down in bed with chills and fever, the mob came and ordered them out of their house. Because one of the mob (not so heartless as the others) objected to such outrageous treatment, and pleaded in their behalf, they were permitted to remain in their home until the next day. When morning came they were still to ill to get up, and when the mob returned they threatened to burn them with the house unless they would denounce Joseph Smith as an imposter. This they refused to do, and the mob then planned to kill them, but the fellow who had interceded for them the day before, defied the mob and in a profane language asked them if not one of their number had a mother? Then during the blasphemous mutterings of the mob, he carried the family out of the house and laid them on a quilt, and while their home burned he hitched the team to the wagon, loaded them in and walked between them and the enraged mob for a mile, to prevent them being killed. Their house was burned to the ground, and everything they owned, even the stacks of stacked wheat that were in the yard (left there after the harvest).

Destitute, ill, and without food, they made their weary way from their stricken community. (This may have been in Missouri, as Mr. Telford had a home in that state, and was in Independence at the time of the Haun's Mill Massacre on October 30th, 1838.)

And this was the time of the gold-rush in California. Grandfather was anxious to move westward, thinking, hoping that he would become rich. He had heard that men found fortunes in a day, and when the Telfords talked of starting for Utah, he was happy to be one of John Telford's teamsters. Immediately after that, he took ill, and was unable to go on. It seems that John Telford, too, decided to wait until the Springtime to begin so long and rough a journey.

Grandfather found work on a farm belonging to a widow and her daughter and the winter passed. But during this short time, the widow's daughter had fallen in love with young Peter Cornia. When Telford came for grandfather in the spring, the widow offered him her farm and everything she owned if he would stay and marry her daughter. But the gold fields were calling, and Peter was anxious to go.

Mr. Telford had his wagons built especially for the trip, and according to his own specifications. Two extra large wagons for their provisions, seeds for planting, bolts of cloth, and fine linen was part of the equipment. He also built a small house-wagon for his family to ride in, which had an especially built and upholstered seat.

They crossed the plains with the Harry Walton Company, and John Telford was a captain of fifty. The company arrived in Salt Lake City, in September 1851, and settled in Bountiful. Here grandfather made his home with John Duncan. His intentions were to stay here and work until he had earned enough to take him to California's gold fields.

But how often plans never, never mature? Grandfather was led into an argument one day. (We think it started over an irrigating turn.) Anyhow, he was arrested and fined one hundred dollars, which was practically all the money that he had. Oft' times, what appears to be our great misfortune, turns out to be our greatest blessing.

When Grandfather left home, he promised his mother two things. One that he would always say his prayers, and the other, that he would never profane. This promise was to him like a protecting arm.

The Captain Lot Smith Company was called into the service of the United States Government by President Abraham Lincoln on the 30th day of April, 1862. It was made up of the two companies, A and B of First Calvary, Utah Militia. They were under the command of Colonel Collins, and served with Troops for the defense of the Overland Mail. There were in all 106 men, 23 officers, 72 privates, and 11 teamsters.

From the pages of the diary kept by Isaac Atkinson, we get this bit of a story:

"Pacific Springs Station, where the water divides at the South Pass! During the night there was sleet and rain and a high wind, tearing down every tent, but one. The tent of Isaac Atkinson was the only one that remained.

The gale was so fierce that nothing could be done to put the tents up again; they were forced to spend the rest of the night huddled under the canvas coverings, securing what protection they could from the storm, by holding to the tent with their hands.

Peter Cornia's horse did no have a hair left on its mane or tail in the morning. One horse was found dead. That morning the wind ceased, the sun rose in all its splendor, giving promise of a beautiful day. "Ike", and his comrades cheered the hearts of their companions by inviting them into their one remaining tent and serving them with a fine hot breakfast."

The dates and facts in this sketch, were taken from the Telford History, and pieced together by Zelda Davis Howard.

PETER CORNIA

Peter Cornia was born April 15, 1830 at Sorel Canada -- This story-bit was written by his wife, Ruth C. Cornia:

The church was organized April 6, 1830, and Peter was born nine days later, April 15, 1830. His parents were of the Catholic faith. He somehow cold not believe in it because he felt that the priest had not the power to forgive sins.

At the age of fourteen years he left home. He went to find work in the lumber business, floating lobs and cutting cordwood. He could not speak a word of English, - a vocabulary of French was all that he had and he was so very young to go out among strangers. Many times have I heard him tell of when he was without a job, or was hungry, how he would always seek his Lord in prayer and his prayers were always answered. Though young, strong was the faith he had.

Peter, in his wanderings, found a wonderful friend in John Telford. ( Millie, a daughter of the Telfords, wrote in her diary that Peter Cornia came from Essex County, Ontario, Canada, with her father and followed im where ever he went for a long time." Peter was a fine fellow and her folks all thought a great lot of him.

When the Telford family left Canada in January 1838, Peter Cornia left with them. They sailed down the St. Lawrence River and settled on the Great Lakes in the midst of a great maple sugar orchard.

January 17th of this 1838, John Telford was baptized into the L.D.S. church by Elder John Witt. Mrs. Telford already was a member, having been baptized on the third day of the same month. After joining the Mormons, John Telford, his wife, and their five children moved again so they might join the main body of Saints. Because of the prejudice of the people against the Mormons, Mr. Telford did not try to sell his home or any of his property. He just locked up his house, which was newly built and finished, and left everything as it stood.

The crossed the border into Detroit in a wagon with only the few things allowed by the United States Government, and later joined the Saints in Kirtland, Ohio. They were in all the mobbings and drivings out of the Saints in Ohio, Missouri and Illinois. They were in Independence at the time of the Haun's Mill Massacre, October 30th, 1838. Many times were they destitute, ill and without food, and weary from wandering.

This was the time of the gold-rush in California. Peter Cornia was excited about it and eager -- anxious to move westward, thinking that a fortune awaited his coming. He had heard that men found wealth in a day, so when the Telford's talked of starting for Utah, he was elated to be one of John Telford's teamsters. Immediately after all plans had been made, Peter took ill, and was unable to leave his bed. It seems that Mr. Telford, too decided to wait until the Springtime to begin so long and rough a journey.

Upon a farm belonging to a widow and her daughter, Peter found work, and the winter passed quickly. During this time the widow's daughter had fallen in love with their hired help. So much did the girl think of Peter Cornia that when Mr. Telford came for him in the Spring, the mother offered him her farm and everything she owned if he would stay and marry her daughter. but the gold fields were calling and the widow's offer was not accepted. Gold was the greater incentive.

They crossed the plains with the Harry Walton Company, and John Telford was the captain of fifty. The company arrived in Salt Lake City, in September 1851. However they did not settle in Salt Lake, but in Bountiful. From now Peter made his home with John Duncan. His intentions were to stay and work until he had earned enough to take him to California State. But how often plans never, never mature, and how true that man's extremities are God's opportunities.

Peter, one day, was led into an argument. It started over an irrigating turn. After so much talking it ended in a fist fight with Peter striking the first blow. He was arrested and fined one hundred dollars which was every cent that he had saved for his fortune finding.

Isn't it often, what appears to be our great misfortune, turns out to be our greatest blessing', a blessing that we cannot see today, but somewhere in the tomorrow.

When Peter Cornia left home, he promised his mother two "things." One was that he would always say his prayers, and the other, that he would never profane. These promises were to him like a protecting arm.

The Captain Lot Smith Company was called into the service of the United States Government by President Abraham Lincoln on the 30th day of April 1862. It was made up of two companies, A and B of First Calvary, Utah Militia. They were under the command of Colonel Collins, and served with Troops for the defense of the overland mail. There were in all 105 men, 23 officers, 72 privates and 11 teamsters.

From the pages of the diary kept by Isaac Atkinson, we get this bit of a story --

"Pacific Springs Station, where the water divides at the south Pass. During the night there was sleet and rain and a high wind, tearing down every tent but one. The tent of Isaac Atkinson was the only one that remained.

The gale was so fierce that nothing could be done to put the tents up again; they were forced to spend the rest of the night huddled under the canvas coverings, securing what protection they could from the storm, by holding to the tent with their hands.

Peter Cornia's horse did not have a hair left on its mane or tail in the morning. One horse was found dead. That morning the wind ceased, the sun rose in all its splendor, giving promise of a beautiful day. "Ike", and his comrades cheered the hearts of their comrades by inviting them into their one remaining tent and serving them with a fine hot breakfast. -- (This same Isaac Atkinson became a President of Bountiful.)

(Pieced together by Melda Davis Howard. There are several of these biographies of Peter Cornia that are very similar, but they do differ in places and give us additional insights into his life.)

After the death of my father, Peter Cornia, who died in Woodruff, June 29th, 1887, my mother moved to Bountiful to take care of her step-mother, Cordelia Hotchkiss Carter, who lived to be almost ninety-six ears. By living close to the temple mother was able to do a great deal of temple work which gave her much joy.

One day, not long after she came to Bountiful, she met William Streeper of Centerville, who was with father in the Lot Smith command.

"So you are the wife of Peter Cornia," he said. "He was one of the most unselfish men I have ever known." He then related how after one of their meals there was a large dough-god left. (The same was made of flour, water and a little salt, and baked in a large camp kettle.) No one thought it was worth taking along, but Peter, who put it into his saddle bag. He carried it for days.

There had been no food replenishment and their supply was getting low. when they were forced to eat wild berries and horse meat and with nothing else. Peter brought out the hard tack. It was so hard he had to break it with an ax. But everyone was ravenous for a piece. Cake had never tasted better. I believe", said Mr. Streeper, "I would have gone behind some bushes and eaten my fill, then had there been any left, I would have passed it around."

The Lot Smith expedition was no pleasure trip because of the weather and rough roads, with deep snows and high water to encounter making travel hazardous and laborious. The year 1862 is remembered as the season of the highest water ever experienced in the rocky Mountains.

On August 14th the company was mustered out of service. The war records state that as a company of individuals, their conduct was above reproach. There were always morning and evening prayers, and these men endeavored to live up to President Young's advice.

One night father was out on picket duty. When he returned to camp he saw upon the pillow by a sleeping comrade a large rattlesnake. The snake was coiled, already to strike. The men thought of shooting it, but that was risky work, so they pulled away their companion by his feet. It happened so quickly that the man, between sleep and waking, shouted, "What are you trying to do?" His temper climbed until the pointed, "Look at your bed fellow." Imagine his feelings, if you can, when he saw what had been sharing his pillow.

Peter Cornia, son of John Baptiste Cornia, born 1789, and Francis St. Martins, born about 1791, was the eighth child of a family of fourteen, eleven boys and three girls.

Harriet Cornia Davis

In 1868 in the Autumn, we were called to go to Dixie, the east point of Nevada. While living there I gained experiences I shall never, never forget. The way of Indians and scorching hot weather. We were grateful for plenty to eat and sufficient clothing, but we suffered for the want of water to drink. Because of the over amount of mineral there in Dixie, it was impossible to dig wells, but we could grow everything except Irish potatoes. The climate was too hot for them to grow without water, and when irrigated with it, the vines looked as if they had been scalded.

Our gardens were choice with the loveliest corn, cucumbers, melons, squash, and all of the kinds of fruit given to such climate. There were also abundant crops of wheat, sugar cane, cotton and yet the sun was hot enough to melt resin. In this sunshine we lived until Brigham Young and his company came and released us, which was in the fall of the year after the harvesting. In 1870 we were told that we might choose any spot in Utah in which to make our home.

At this time doctors were not available and they were needed as much as they are today. I bought a book on obstetrics, read and studied its pages thoroughly, and prayed for an understanding of the same. After gaining the information I needed, and people knew of my new interest, they came for me at all hours of the day and night form near and far. If it was winter and cold, my husband heated a flat rock to put at my feet. This was always kept on the stove in readiness.

Although I did not keep count of the babies that I helped to bring into the world, I know they numbered more than a thousand. Then there were the countless cases of pneumonia, measles, typhoid and scarlet-fever.

Sometimes they came for me from ten and twelve miles away. When I was bewildered, uncertain in what to do for the one I had been called to help, I prayed -- God always came to me with knowledge and strength, all that I needed.

Mother came to Bountiful in 1890 to take care of Grandmother Carter and to work in the Temple. She did the work for more than 8,000. Had the endowments for the men done in the Logan, Manti, and St. George Temples. The endowments for the women, and the sealings and adoptions, were done in the Salt Lake Temple.

When my sister, Zoe Cornia Rampton, age 37 passed away on May 14th, 1913, leaving seven children (1 boy, 17 years old and six girls, the youngest 14 and months), mother , at the age of 77 years, took care of the family -- nine in all -- four and one-half years. John Hampton, Zoe's husband, then married again so mother came to live with us. In 1918 when the flu' was so bad, three of Zoe's girls passed away within two weeks. Carol, age 18, was the first to go and within that two weeks, Zoe, age 8 and Mila, age 11 followed.

Mother died in Bountiful, May 20, 1920 and was buried in the Bountiful cemetery on May 25th.

Harriet Cornia Davis

------------------------------------------------------------------------

A REAL ROMANCE

This touch of romance I am piecing together bit by bit, just as the girl in it put together her patch-work quilts. Some Romances never end. They live as long as the two lives -- and on.

Peter Cornia -- young, dark blue-eyed and handsome, (I would say) and of French-Canadian birth, left his Catholic home. The "spirit of the west" was in his blood. Adventure beckoned him -- the gold fields were ripe. California was calling!

Strange it is how often we reach for something we think is the desire of our hearts. We fail to get it and disappointment almost engulfs us; but when the morrow comes we are glad that the "price" was high -- just beyond our reach.

It was an argument, and then a fist-fight; and when young Cornia stood up andbrushed the dirt from his clothing, jammed his hand into his one precious pocket, his money was gone -- every cent of it, all that he had earned and saved for getting into the gold fields.

Imagine the picture he made standing there! "But successes that are easy are cheap." Peter must have know this fore he was ready to work again; this time he would get there. Determination fired him to earn more of that, that which is so hard to get sometimes. He was a poor boy today, but tomorrow, he'd show them what gold was like.

It's lots of fun building skyscrapers out of thoughts, isn't it? And then one day --

Peter Cornia met Ruth Clarrissa Carter, brown-haired and fair. She was smiling and dainty and young. How often I've heard her say of this meeting, "It was love at first sight." She knew it -- and he knew it -- and the "shining yellow" of the California streams and hills was forgotten. Cupid was at work!

I wonder why this French fellow, before asking Ruth Carter if he might call on her, asked her father if he had any objections to his taking his daughter out. This I know made the boy appear different from the others -- and it made Daniel Carter like and respect him the more. There was no mother in the Carter home. She died when her girls were little, and her boy was a baby.

And they loved to dance in those days. Dancing was life for them. they did it well, and it kept them young. When Daniel Carter's daughters wanted to sleep late after dancing late, he would say, "If you will dance, you must pay for the music," and they understood.

Peter Cornia was a step-dancer and a graceful one, too. When the floor was being cleared between dances, everyone knew what it was for, and they always clapped him back. And no one enjoyed the "going back" more than he did.

Perhaps this boy and girl wouldn't have married at nineteen, had there not been an excursion to the Endowment House. they did their planning quickly, and were married there by Heber C. Kimball.

Love has followed them here, there, everywhere -- through trouble, trails, summer heat, and frigid weather. Where love lives, there is happiness: hardships and poverty have no effect.

She gave him children -- sons and daughters; and these always welcome, added to the joy of their humble abode. He thought no one quite so capable as his Ruth. She worked quickly and there was nothing she couldn't do -- really no task that she wouldn't tackle. He was proud of her, thoughtful and considerate.

Many times (after he left her) she was proposed to in marriage, but her answer was always, "No." Her love belonged to him -- all of it. No other could take his place.

The times I have listened to her talking to him -- to his picture on the wall -- are beautiful moments for me to keep. They hold the true, deep definition of love. I can never forget!

Just a while before her "going home" to him she sat and gazed up at his portrait admiringly. She asked him, (and you'd have thought he was right there) what he was doing, and if he would like to see her? And she couldn't help telling him how lonely she was without him, but she smiled bravely -- it was her way.

The Soldier-boys were returning. The Armistice (Nov. 11, 1918) had made their coming home possible. Everyone was thrilled. The training camps were nursing them out -- back to their homes. It was evening -- the hour between the dark and the globe-light. Her fire burned brightly, as we sat before it -- she and I -- she was knitting, and she could knit as well in the twilight as by the light of day. But now, her needles and her hands stopped for a moment. Looking up at me she said, "He'll soon be coming back to you -- everyone has someone coming, but me. Mine can't come," and tears trickled down her cheeks.

Tenderly I closed my hand over hers. "The one who is coming to me is coming to you, too, Grandma," I said, "for he like you." And I can see it now -- that picture she made there in the firelight -- and it has been almost fifteen long years ago.

"Is this of theirs love and romance," I ask? "Yes, it's the type that lives forever"!

By Zelda Davis Howard

view all 20

Peter Cornia's Timeline

1829
April 4, 1829
Richelieu, Quebec, Canada
1857
October 13, 1857
Age 28
Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
1859
August 16, 1859
Age 30
Bountiful, Utah, USA
1861
August 20, 1861
Age 32
Bountiful, UT, USA
1863
September 18, 1863
Age 34
Bountiful, UT, USA
1865
July 9, 1865
Age 36
Kamas, UT, USA
July 9, 1865
Age 36
Kamas, UT, USA
1867
July 21, 1867
Age 38
Kamas, Summit County, Utah
1869
July 8, 1869
Age 40
West Point, Clark, Nevada, USA
1871
April 18, 1871
Age 42
Woodruff, UT, USA