Raoul II de Toeni, seigneur de Tosny

Is your surname de Toeni?

Research the de Toeni family

Raoul II de Toeni, seigneur de Tosny's Geni Profile

Records for Raoul II de Toeni

96,361 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Raoul II de Toeni (de Tosny), seigneur de Tosny

French: Raoul II De Tosny, seigneur de Tosny
Also Known As: "Radulf", "Raoul II (Rodulf) (Ralph) de Toeni / Tosny / Toni", "de Todeniaco", "de Ternois", "Rodulf II /De Toeni/", "Seigneur de Toeni /Rodulph/", "Rudolph", "Ralph", "Rodulf"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Tosny, Haute-Normandie, France
Death: after 1023
Guerny, Eure, Normandy, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Raoul de Tosny, I, Seigneur de Tosny and NN wife of Raoul I de Toeni
Father of Roger I 'd'Espagne' de Tosny; Adele De Toeni; Position uncertain on tree Unknown father de Tosny and Robert De Tosny
Brother of Osbert de Toeni and Roger De Tosni

Occupation: Seigneur of Tosny, Hereditary Standard Bearer of Normandy, Named by Duke Richard II as one of guardians of the château de Tillières, Sieur, de Tosny, de Conches, Seigneur de Toeni, Sieur de Toeni
Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Raoul II de Toeni, seigneur de Tosny

Peter Stewart's work: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~bobwolfe/gentxt/Origin_and_early_generations_of_the_Tosny_family.pdf

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc489686673 Updated May 2018

RAOUL [II] de Tosny, son of RAOUL [I] [de Tosny] & his wife --- . "…Rodulphi filii Rodulphi de Todeniaco…" subscribed the undated charter under which "Richardus…Normannorum comes" confirmed property of Lisieux[1150]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Richard appointed “Nigellum Constantinensem atque Rodulfum Toennensem et Rogerium filium eiusdem” as custodians of “castrum Tegulense” (Tillières {Verneuil, Eure}), which he had built to protect against attack by Eudes [II] Comte de Blois (so dated to after 1004)[1151]. [The Chronico S Petri Vivi Senonensi records that, after his son "Rotgerius" was killed in Normandy, “Rodulfus...pater eius” left for Jerusalem “per limina apostolorum et per Apuliam”, where “princeps qui totam Apuliam tenebat” [maybe Melus, whose death is recorded in 1020, which is inconsistent with the chronology of the life of Raoul’s supposed son Roger, as shown below] whom the Greeks wished to expel (“quem Greci de principatu suo eicere volebant”) requested him to abandon his pilgrimage to fight with him “usque in hodiernum diem manserunt ibi Normanni”[1152]. How far this passage is factual is uncertain. It is possible that there is confusion with the expedition to Apulia led by Rainulf “Drengot” and his brothers (one of whom was named Rodolphe/Raoul): the Chronica Monasterii Casinensis records that "Giselbertus…qui et Buttericus…[cum] quatuor fratribus suis, Rainulfo, Asclittino, Osmundo, atque Rodulfo" arrived in Capua (after Gilbert was banished from Normandy) where they joined "Melus", dated to [1015/16] from the context[1153]. Rodulfus Glaber records that "a very brave Norman called Rodulf incurred the anger of Count Richard [Richard II Comte de Normandie]" and fled to Italy, where he met Pope Benedict VIII (Pope from 1012 to 1024), fought the Greeks, and visited Emperor Heinrich II[1154]. It appears more probable that Glaber is referring to Rodolphe, brother of Rainulf “Drengot”, rather than Raoul [II] de Tosny, although the question is not beyond doubt. There is little basis for dating the events, except a reference to Rodolfe being received "joyfully" by Count Richard in Normandy the year before the death of the Emperor (1024). Chalandon suggests that meeting with the emperor must have taken place in Germany after Rodolphe accompanied Melus there after his defeat in southern Italy, dated to 1017[1155].]

m ---. The name of Raoul's wife is not known.

Raoul [II] & his wife had one child:

1. ROGER [I] de Tosny ([990]-killed in battle [before 17 Jun] [1040]). His parentage is confirmed by Guillaume of Jumièges who records that Richard II Duke of Normandy appointed “Nigellum Constantinensem atque Rodulfum Toennensem et Rogerium filium eiusdem” as custodians of “castrum Tegulense” (Tillières {Verneuil, Eure}), which the duke had built to protect against attack by Eudes [II] Comte de Blois (so dated to after 1004)[1156]. Roger [I] de Tosny spent time in Spain, returned to Normandy, and was killed in rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy. The precise chronology of these events is uncertain given the contradictions in the different primary sources as we shall see. Two sources record Roger in Spain in [1017/20]. Firstly, the Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes (written before [1034]) records that "Normanni, duce Rotgerio" (presumably identifiable as Roger [I], although he never bore the ducal or even comital title), who had been fighting Saracens in Spain, asked "comitissa Barzelonensi Ermensende…vidua" for the hand of her (unnamed) daughter[1157]. This episode is dated to [1017/20], when Ermesinde was acting for her son Berenguer Ramon I “el Curvo” Comte de Barcelona during his minority. In addition, the other events recorded by Adémar in the same paragraph, all relate to 1016/18. Secondly, the early 12th century Chronicon S Petri Vivi Senonensis records, in a section headed 1015 but whose coverage extends into later years, that "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" left Normandy with an army for Spain (“de Normannia perrexit cum exercitu in Hispaniam”) where he captured “civitates et castella...Tarraconam [Tarragona] et Gerundam [Girona]”, married “sororem Raymundi Berengerii Stephaniam”[1158]. The Chronicon S Petri Vivi Senonensis records that "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" lived in Spain “cum uxore et exercitu suo per 15 annos” before returning “ad patrem suum in Normanniam” (having left “20 viris et uxore et omnibus quæ possidebant” in Spain) to make peace “cum duce Richardo”[1159]. “Duce Richardo” was either Duke Richard II or Duke Richard III, but assuming that the Chronicon’s report is accurate (which is not without doubt) Roger [I]’s return from Spain to Normandy must be dated to before Aug 1027, when Duke Richard III died. Roger’s presence in Normandy after this date is confirmed by two charters dated during the early 1030s: firstly, "…Rogerii filii Radulfi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1160], and secondly “...Rogerii Todelensis...” witnessed the charter dated [20 Jul 1031/Jul 1032] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille[1161]. After this time, the situation becomes confused, but indications are that Roger returned to Spain: Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” (who was “totius Normanniæ signifer“) travelled “in Hispaniam” when Duke Robert II went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem (so dated to [1035]), that he returned after the accession of Duke Guillaume II but rebelled because of the new duke’s ignoble birth, destroyed property in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis”, and that the latter eventually sent his son to attack Roger who was killed with “duobus filiis suis Helberto et Elinantio”[1162]. Orderic Vitalis also names “...Rogerius de Hispania...” among those who rebelled against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy after his accession in 1035[1163]. In another passage, Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Grentemaisnilio...cum Rogerio de Toenio” fought “Rogerium de Bellomonte”, during the course of which “Rogerius cum filiis suis Elberto et Elinancio“ were killed and “Rodbertus” mortally wounded (adding that the latter later died “XIV Kal Jul”)[1164]. Guillaume of Jumièges’s account is partly corroborated by a second extract from the Chronicon S Petri Vivi Senonensis which records that, after returning to Normandy, Roger attacked a neighbour but was killed (“iste Rotgerius contra quemdam vicinum faciens bellum, interfectus est”), although the chronology of the Chronicon is suspect as this passage follows the report that Roger returned to Normandy to make peace “cum duce Richardo”[1165]. The Chronicon report is also confused by Roger’s father’s supposed journey to Apulia after Roger died, which as discussed above appears to contradict other sources and whose chronology is in any case suspect. The presence of Roger [I] in Normandy in the late 1030s is noted in two charters: "…Rodgerii filii Rodulfi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[1166], and "…Rodgerii filii Rodulfi…Rogerii de Conchis" subscribed the charter dated to [1040] under which "Vuillelmus Ricardi magni ducis Normannorum filius" donated property to the abbey of Jumièges[1167]. The question of the dual identity of “Roger de Tosny”, reflected in the references to “Rodgerii filii Rodulfi" and "Rogerii de Conchis" in the latter document, is discussed below under Roger [II] de Tosny. Roger [I]’s death is dated to [before 17 Jun] because firstly Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentesmaisnil” died in the same battle as “Rogerius [de Toenia]“[1168], and secondly the necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "17 Jun" of "Robertus de Grentemesnil"[1169]. The date must be considered approximate because Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Grentemaisnilio” was mortally wounded in the battle during which “Rogerius cum filiis suis Elberto et Elinancio“ were killed and that Robert died “XIV Kal Jul” (it is not known how many dies after the battle)[1170]. m ([1017/20]) [--- de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BORELL I Comte de Barcelona & his wife Ermesinde de Carcassonne]. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes (written before [1034]) records that "Normanni, duce Rotgerio" (presumably identifiable as Roger [I], although he never bore the ducal or even comital title), who had been fighting Saracens in Spain, asked "comitissa Barzelonensi Ermensende…vidua" for the hand of her (unnamed) daughter[1171]. This episode is dated to [1017/20], when Ermesinde was acting for her son Berenguer Ramon I “el Curvo” Comte de Barcelona during his minority. In addition, the other events recorded by Adémar in the same paragraph, all relate to 1016/18. Europäische Stammtafeln names her “Adelaida (Papia)”[1172]. No primary source has been identified which confirms that either of these names is correct. The early 12th century Chronicon S Petri Vivi Senonensi records, in a section headed 1015 but whose coverage extends into later years, that "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" left Normandy with an army for Spain (“de Normannia perrexit cum exercitu in Hispaniam”) where he married “sororem Raymundi Berengerii [Ramon Berenger [I] “el Viejo” Comte de Barcelona] Stephaniam” and lived there “cum uxore et exercitu suo per 15 annos” before returning “ad patrem suum in Normanniam” (having left “20 viris et uxore et omnibus quæ possidebant” in Spain) to make peace “cum duce Richardo”[1173]. The early 12th century Chronicon S Petri Vivi Senonensi records that “sororem Raymundi Berengerii Stephaniam” married as her second husband “rex Hispaniæ Garsias”[1174]. Based on this source, Jaime de Salazar Acha suggests that the widow of Roger [I] de Tosny was Estefanía who married García V King of Navarre[1175]. There are several reasons why this suggestion is unlikely to be correct. Firstly, Roger [I]’s marriage is dated to [1017/20] according to Adémar de Chabannes as noted above. If that date is correct, it is unlikely that his widow would have given birth to nine children by a second marriage, whose births are estimated between 1039 and 1054 (see the document NAVARRE KINGS). Secondly, Estefanía is named with her husband King García in a charter dated 1040, her marriage probably being dated to a couple of years earlier, whereas Roger [I] is recorded in Normandy around the same time as noted above. Thirdly, there are intrinsic problems associated with the Chronicon S. Petri Vivi Senonensis: the chronology of the whole passage, of which the reference to Roger’s marriage forms part, is flawed as explained earlier, and in addition Roger’s wife could not have been the sister of Ramon Berenguer [I] Comte de Barcelona (whose birth is dated to 1023, see the document CATALONIA) if his marriage is correctly dated to [1017/20]. Roger [I] & his wife had [three] children (it does not appear chronologically possible that, in addition, Berthe (who married Guy [I] Seigneur de Laval in [1010/15]) and her [two] brothers (see below) were also children of Roger [I]):

a) [ELBERT (-killed in battle [before 17 Jun] [1040]). Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” rebelled against Duke Guillaume II and destroyed property, in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis” whose son eventually killed Roger [I] along with “duobus filiis suis Helberto et Elinantio”[1176]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Grentemaisnilio...cum Rogerio de Toenio” fought “Rogerium de Bellomonte”, during the course of which “Rogerius cum filiis suis Elberto et Elinancio“ were killed and “Rodbertus” mortally wounded[1177]. Assuming that these sources are accurate, there is no indication of the identity of the mother of Elbert and Elinand. Their names are unusual, and not encountered either in the Tosny or Barcelona families, which may suggest that they were illegitimate.]

b) [ELINAND (-killed in battle [before 17 Jun] [1040]). Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” rebelled against Duke Guillaume II and destroyed property, in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis” whose son eventually killed Roger [I] along with “duobus filiis suis Helberto et Elinantio”[1178]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Grentemaisnilio...cum Rogerio de Toenio” fought “Rogerium de Bellomonte”, during the course of which “Rogerius cum filiis suis Elberto et Elinancio“ were killed and “Rodbertus” mortally wounded[1179]. Assuming that these sources are accurate, there is no indication of the identity of the mother of Elbert and Elinand. Their names are unusual, and not encountered either in the Tosny or Barcelona families, which may suggest that they were illegitimate.]

c) [VUASO . “...Vuaso filius Rogerii Tothennensis...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][1180]. The name “Vuaso” (or similar) is not found in either the Tosny or Barcelona families, which may suggest that he was illegitimate.]


Sources

[1150] Le Prévost ‘Pouillés du diocèse de Lisieux’ (1842-43), p. 9, footnote 5.

[1151] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber V, X, p. 253.

[1152] Clarii, Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensi 1015, MGH SS XXVI, p. 31.

[1153] Chronica Monasterii Casinensis II.37, MGH SS VII, p. 652.

[1154] Rodulfus Glaber III.3, pp. 97-101.

[1155] Chalandon (1907), Tome I, p. 57.

[1156] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber V, X, p. 253.

[1157] Adémar de Chabannes, III, 55, p. 178.

[1158] Clarii, Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensi 1015, MGH SS XXVI, pp. 30-1.

[1159] Clarii, Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensi 1015, MGH SS XXVI, pp. 30-1.

[1160] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 9, p. 10.

[1161] Saint-Wandrille, Appendice, 13, p. 52.

[1162] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, III, p. 268.

[1163] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. I, Liber I, p. 180.

[1164] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, II, pp. 40-1.

[1165] Clarii, Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensi 1015, MGH SS XXVI, pp. 30-1.

[1166] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 16, p. 17.

[1167] Jumièges, Tome I, XX, p. 63.

[1168] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, IV, p. 269.

[1169] RHGF XXIII, Ex Uticensis monasterii necrologio, p. 487.

[1170] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, II, pp. 40-1.

[1171] Adémar de Chabannes, III, 55, p. 178.

[1172] ES II 69.

[1173] Clarii, Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensi 1015, MGH SS XXVI, pp. 30-1.

[1174] Clarii, Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensi 1015, MGH SS XXVI, pp. 30-1.

[1175] Salazar Acha ‘Estefanía de Pamplona’ (2007), pp. 853-64.

[1176] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, III, p. 268.

[1177] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, II, pp. 40-1.

[1178] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Duchesne, 1619), Liber VII, III, p. 268.

[1179] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, II, pp. 40-1.

[1180] Saint-Wandrille, Appendice, 17, p. 59.


(the above is from Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands Database)

--------------------

Ralph de Toeni, Hereditary Standard-Bearer of Normandy, fought at Senlac. Was Governor, under William the Conqueror, of Stafford. Held 131 lordships in Staffordshire and other counties.

SOURCE: Copes of Wiltshire by J. C. Biddle-Cope 1881, in collection of PA Historical Society

--------------------

Seigneur de Tosni et Conches Roger de Tosny joined with his father in the custody of the castle of Tillières in 1013/14.

James Bulkeley, La Hougue Bie de Hambie: a tradition of Jersey. Volume 2. London: Gilbert & Rivington, Whitaker & Company, 1837. (Google Books)

Notes to Vol. 1 pp. 195-202 "p. 75 (55.) The constable Gislebert Crispin' Based on Roman de Rou, which is interspersed throughout... summary:

  • Count Eudes of Chartres married Maud, the sister of Duke Richard II, and received in dowry the seigneuries of Dreux and other domains. When Maud died with no children, Richard tried to retake the city Dreux and castle of Tillières back from Eudes by force.
  • He "confided his defences" to Néel de Saint-Sauveur, to Ralph, and to this son Roger de Toesny and de Couches
  • Eudes of Chartres allied himself to Valeran de Meulan, Hugh Count of Maine, and a reinforcement of French troops
  • Néel commanded the center, defending the main road into the castle; Ralph the right wing, and Roger the left.
  • Three divisions of Eudes' troops: (1) the troops of Chartres and Blois led by Eudes, (2) those of France and Maine by Count Hugh of Maine, and (3) those of Meulan by Valeran.
  • Néel's column was attacked, but with the aid of Roger's and Ralphs' forces, the Normans routed the Counts of Chartres and Meulan, causing the Count of Maine to flee. When his horse died, he disguised himself as a peasant and was able to escape capture.

The castle of Tillières, as a gateway to Chartres and France, became "of couble consquence to [Duke] Robert," and he gave command of it to Gilbert Crispin, Lord of Bec-Crispin. Later, King Henry of France, along with a group of disaffected Norman barons, "advanced a powerful army on Dreux" to persuade Duke William to raze the fortress. Crispin, indignant, "increased the garrison of the castle" but "could not overcome the brave resistance of the beseiged, or the virtuous obstinacy of the faithful Gilbert Crispin," who had pledged to turn it over only to the Duke, which he died, and Duke William in turn delivered it to King Henry, who "enveloped it in flames." The castle was later ceded by Henry to William after the Battle of Veraville, who named Gilbert's second son, also named Gilbert, as constable in remembrance of his father's loyalty. This younger Gilbert followed Duke William to the Conquest.

--------------------

RALPH (or RODULF) DE TOENI II, son and heir, was born probably before 970, for in 1013 or 1014 the Duke of Normandy, having founded the castle of Tilliéres, gave the custody of it to Ralph de Toeni and his son Roger, together with Neel, Vicomte of the Cotentin. Ralph was seigneur of Tosni and Conches. About 1015 he went to Apulia; and in the winter of 1015-16 he was at the siege of Salerno (a). The name and parentage of his wife are unknown, but it is possible that she belonged to a collateral branch of the ducal house; for according to Orderic, Ralph's son Roger descended from an alleged uncle of Rolf, the founder of Normandy (b). The date of Ralph's death is not known. [Complete Peerage XII/1:754-5, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(a) "Chron. Mon. Casinensis" (in one MS, only) in Mon. Germ. Hist., vol ix (vol vii Scriptorum), p. 652, note (a); F. Chalondon, La Domination normande en Italie, vol i, pp. 49, 52; cf. Douglas, op. cit. p. 30, note 127. He may be the "quidam Normannorum audacissimus, nomine Rodulfuls," who (according to Rodulf Glaber), having displeased Duke Richard, went to Rome to lay his cause before the Pope and was induced by him to got to Benevento to fight the Greeks; and after victorious campaigns returned to Normandy (Rec. des Hist. de France, vol x, pp. 25-26). According to the Sens Chron., Count Rodulf, whose son Roger fought in Spain (see p. 756, note "b" below), set out from Normandy for Jerusalem, but when he reached Apulia was asked by the local princeps to abandon his pilgrimage and stop to fight the Greeks, which he did ("Chron. S. Petri Vivi Senonensis," in Idem, p. 223). These writers may refer to Ralph de Toeni, but the identity cannot be proved.

   (b) . . . de Stirpe Malahulcii, qui Rollonis patruus fuerat (Will. de Jumieges, p. 157--interpoations by Orderic). An alternative reading is "de stirpe mala Hulcii" (Rec. des Hist. de France, vol xi, p. 38); whence he is called "Hulce" by the Vicomte du Motey, Origines de la Normandie, p. 55, note 4 and p. 173. Nothing is known of Rolf's alleged uncle under either name. If he really existed, the alleged descent might be through the unknown wife of the elder Ralph.

--------------------

Ralph/Rodulf de Toeni; feudal Lord also of Conches; custodian with his son of Castle of Tillieres from 1013 to 1014; took part in Norman expedition to Southern Italy c1015. [Burke's Peerage]

view all 24

Raoul II de Toeni, seigneur de Tosny's Timeline

955
955
Tosny, Haute-Normandie, France
985
985
Age 30
Tosny, Eure, Normandy, France
1004
1004
Age 49
Normandy,France
1009
1009
Age 54
1023
1023
Age 68
Guerny, Eure, Normandy, France
1959
November 7, 1959
Age 68
November 25, 1959
Age 68
1961
March 24, 1961
Age 68
ARIZO
1992
May 14, 1992
Age 68