Rev. Jabez B Culver, UEL

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Rev. Jabez B Culver, UEL

Also Known As: "Jabez Collver"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Groton, New London County, Connecticut, United States
Death: December 29, 1818 (87)
Simcoe, Norfolk Co. Ontario
Place of Burial: Windham Centre, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada
Immediate Family:

Son of John Colver, III and Freelove Crouch
Husband of Anna Collver
Father of Ebenezer Collver; Phoebe Thrasher; Anna Loder; Jabez Culver, Jr.; Freelove Shaw and 9 others
Brother of Joseph Collver; John Culver, IV and Jonas Culver
Half brother of William Crouch

Occupation: Presbyterian Minister, Pastor
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Rev. Jabez B Culver, UEL

http://www.mystic.com/dcd/collver/doc/CulverHist.html

Jabez Colver was born June 19, 1731 at Hunterdon County, New Jersey, He was married to Ann, who was born about 1740 and who died March 10, 1813. All their children were born in New Jersey. The family moved from Hunterdon County to Sussex County where Jabez owned considerable property. Colver Lake and Colver Gap in Sussex County are named for Jabez Colver. In the book The Loyalists of New Jersey in the Revolution it states that the Rev. Jabez Collver performed the marriage of a James Brittain and a Eleanor Butler in Knowlton, Sussex, New Jersey. James Brittain during the Revolutionary War was an officer of a Loyalist Battalion. "He (Jabez) was a Presbyterian Minister and Pastor of a church near Darkertown, New Jersey during the Revolutionary War, his sympathy was with the British. But due to his American influence and owning considerable real estate, he chose the bible rather than the sword and joined Washington's army as a Chaplain. Before and after the war he went to many areas and established new churches and would then move on once a regular one was installed."

When the new province of Upper Canada was organized, he traveled from New Jersey to Neward(Newark?) on horseback, to consult with Governor Simcoe as to terms of settlement in the new province. Canada was largely French and Catholic at this time, yet it was under British rule. Lt. Gov. Simcoe felt that if he were to encourage settlers, especially Protestant and Baptist ministers from the United States, he could change the make up of Canada to be more in tune with England. He brought in many of these missionaries under the condition, that he would over look the "Loyalty" issues (as the US had just thrown off English rule) if they would concern themselves with just religious issues and avoid the political ones. The missionaries agreed to this and it seemed to work pretty good. He was promised 600 acres, and 400 acres for each of his married children, and 200 for each unmarried child. They were the first pioneers to take a group of people into the Norfolk Canada.

In 1794 he went to Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada, and settled on lot 1-12, concession of Windham, and erected the first log house in the town- ship. Eight of his 13 children came with him. He stayed until his death in 1812. Today there is a memorial park to the Colvers where the house stood. It is built of native rock and the plaque reads:

COLLVER

This memorial built in 1941

serves to honor and perpetuate

the memories of:

Rev. Jabez Culver

Timothy Collver

Joseph Culver

and the families, pioneers of

Norfolk County in the closing

decade of the 18th Century

It was erected by their descendants, and by them presented to the Norfolk Historical Society. The triangle stone above the plaque for many years marked Rev. Jabez Culver's grave in old Windham cemetery. Much of the land around Simcoe, Ontario, Canada is still in the Culver name.

A son Nathan (b. 1764) died leaving a son Jabez B. Culver (b. 1789) who was adopted by the Rev. Jabez. This is a good place to pick up the trail as apparently the direct descendants of Jabez B. still live in Windham, Ontario Canada.

1763 to 1791, were very critical periods in US history. The revolutionary war started in Massachusetts in 1775 and ended at Yorktown Virginia in Oct 1781. It took another two years before an official peace treaty was signed. The colonies had formed into a loose federation with power at the state level and a weak central government. The Continental Congress convened in Philadelphia in Sept. 1787, with the signing of the Constitution. It wasn't until May 1790 before hold out states such as Rhode Island and North Carolina ratified it (under extreme pressure).

It is unclear at this writing, as to why the Rev. Jabez moved his family to Canada, apparently a lot of people who were sympathetic to the British (Tories) took Gov. Simcoe up on his offer. So it could be he was under local pressure to leave or he just wanted the chance to do continue missionary work. Other possible explanations are: an outbreak of Yellow Fever in Philadelphia caused a panic and sanitary conditions in the older cities were getting pretty bad. Another interesting note, the US and Britain were close to war at that time, in fact President Washington ordered troops into the Ohio ( Then called the Northwest Territory) area to crush Indian resistance and to force a withdrawal of British troops from various forts like Fort Detroit.

At the end of the Revolutionary the Tories that left the former Colonies were given land in Canada, equal to the amount they lost. If Jabez had been a Tory, wouldn't he have headed to Canada in the early 1780's and not wait until 1793? He was considered by other Canadians to be a "Late Loyalist" which was a name given to people who migrated to Canada after the offer of free lands were given.

In the "The Long Point Settlers" there is an entry: "recorded 15 Jun. 1798 - From a principle hath ever been strongly attached to the British Crown and Government; suffered such persecution and loss in the time of the late American War; In order to favor an idea or intention entertained by the loyalists of Sussex County in the Province of New Jersey in or about the month of Jan 1776 to erect the royal standard in the said County of Sussex, subscribed his name in writing too an enrollment under John Petit, who was nominated as an officer of a battalion to be raised for that purpose; hopes that the said John Petit had a legal authority to take such enrollment; proofs adduced, not sufficient to entitle the petitioner to be entered on the U.E. list. But the council is perfectly satisfied that the petitioner has been firmly attached to his majesty and the constitution of Great Britain, and the quantity of the land given to him in a larger proportion than has been extended to others of his condition is proof of their sentiments in his favor.

The U.E. mentioned above was the United Empire Loyalists and he was denied membership as there was too little proof. But they closed by saying that they felt he was "enough" of a loyalist to receive preferential treatment in land grants. He was also slow to take an oath of allegiance to the Crown, which was preventing him from receiving a license to be a pastor. During the war of 1812, some of his nephews and grand children were brought up on conspiracy and treason charges. So was he a Tory, or merely opportunistic?

There is also accounts from various sources that document that both American and British forces used the "Collver House" at Turkey Point in Long Point settlement as a headquarters for their armies. John Collver is listed as a petitioner for compensation for war damages caused by both armies. In some of the letters a British officer writes about the bad behavior and looting by both American and British troops.


Jabez COLLVER Rev.

Birth: 1731 in Groton, New London, Connecticut,BNA

Christening: 19 Jun 1731 Groton, New London, Connecticut, BNA

Death: 29 Dec 1818 in Old Windham, Norfolk, Ontario, Canada

Prebyterian minister 1760, grew up with Rogerenes, 30 years at Beemer Meeting employed by Connecticut Missionary Society to travelthroughout newly created states and establish churches

BIOGRAPHY: House of Wantage, Newton, New Jersey, organized churches at Turkey Point, Windham and Oakland.First ordained minister in Norfolk County, home lot1 conc, XII Windham, O.C.seen 1790 Knowlton twp Sussex Co. N. J. 1820 C. Niagara twp, Niagara, N.Y. maybe 1840 also.

Chaplain in Washingtons army. asked Lieut. Governor Simcoe for terms to settle in Canada, given 600 acres plus 400 per married and 200 unmarried child in Townsend, O.C. 4 of his sons married four daughters of cousin Timothy Collver.

ADDR:

_NAME: George Shaw

ADR1: 162 Bay St.

BIOGRAPHY

Colver and Ann Smith. Jabez and Ann resided near where I reside in Chemung

County, New York for a brief period before removing to Canada. I have

researched several of the early families in this area and thought you might

enjoy some of this information as some of you may not have realized they

lived here and some of Jabez and Ann's children died here.

BIOGRAPHY: Jabez Colver (sometimes Culver and Collver) was baptised 19 June 1731

Groton, New London County, Connecticut son of John Colver and Freelove Lamb.

Jabez m. Ann Smith b. 18 June 1740. Jabez was a Presbyterian minister and

was aminister at the Beemer Meeting Church in Sussex County, New Jersey.

Jabez is related to have been employed by the Connecticut Missionary Society

to travel in newly settled areas and establish churches. It is also related

that during the Revolutionary War, his sympathy was with the British, but

chose the Bible rather than the sword, and joined Washington's Army as a

Chaplain. Jabez was assigned lot 54 of 101 acres and lot 56 of 150 acres in

1788. Both lots crossedSeeley Creek on what is now Maple Avenue east of

Fitzsimmons Cemetery. Jabez and John Culver (sometimes Colver and Collver)

were assigned lot 124 of 300 acres on 29 Oct 1788 on the hills west of the

Seeley Creek Valley which they assigned to David Cooley. Jabez enumerated in

the 1790 census with two males overage sixteen, two males under age

sixteen, and one female in the household.

BIOGRAPHY: A historical tablet attached to the old Brick Church in Wysox, Bradford

County, Pennsylvania reads:

BIOGRAPHY: This October 3, 1791, as Congregational

By the Rev. Jabez Culver, a Connecticut

Church was organized

Missionary.

This was the first church of White people

In Pennsylvania north of Wilkes-Barre and

Mother of the Towanda Presbyterian Church.

The building of this,the "Old Brick Church"

was begun in 1828. The church became

Presbyterian in 1830.

This tablet was erected by the George Clymer Chapter,

Daughters of the American Revolution.

The Eugenia MacFarlane Balch Fund.

BIOGRAPHY: They removed in 1794 to Canada where Jabez was granted 600 acres, 400 acres

for each of his married children, and 200 acres for each unmarried child.

They settled on Lot 1-12, Concession of Windham, and erected the first log

house in the township. Eight of their thirteen children are related to have

removed with them, at least two of them having died in the Seeley Creek

Valley. Anna d. 10 Mar 1813 and Jabez d. 19 Dec 1818 Windham, Norfolk

County, Ontario, Canada. Four of their sons married daughters of cousin

Timothy Colver.

BIOGRAPHY: 1. Ebenezer Colver b. c. 1756.

2. Phebe Colver b. 29 May 1757 Schooley's Mountain, Morris County, New

Jersey.

3. Anna Colver b. 15


Birth: 1731 in Groton, New London, Connecticut,BNA

Christening: 19 Jun 1731 Groton, New London, Connecticut, BNA

Death: 29 Dec 1818 in Old Windham, Norfolk, Ontario, Canada

Prebyterian minister 1760, grew up with Rogerenes, 30 years at Beemer Meeting employed by Connecticut Missionary Society to travelthroughout newly created states and establish churches

BIOGRAPHY: House of Wantage, Newton, New Jersey, organized churches at Turkey Point, Windham and Oakland.First ordained minister in Norfolk County, home lot1 conc, XII Windham, O.C.seen 1790 Knowlton twp Sussex Co. N. J. 1820 C. Niagara twp, Niagara, N.Y. maybe 1840 also.

Chaplain in Washingtons army. asked Lieut. Governor Simcoe for terms to settle in Canada, given 600 acres plus 400 per married and 200 unmarried child in Townsend, O.C. 4 of his sons married four daughters of cousin Timothy Collver.

BIOGRAPHY: Jabez Colver (sometimes Culver and Collver) was baptised 19 June 1731

Groton, New London County, Connecticut son of John Colver and Freelove Lamb.

Jabez m. Ann Smith b. 18 June 1740. Jabez was a Presbyterian minister and

was aminister at the Beemer Meeting Church in Sussex County, New Jersey.

Jabez is related to have been employed by the Connecticut Missionary Society

to travel in newly settled areas and establish churches. It is also related

that during the Revolutionary War, his sympathy was with the British, but

chose the Bible rather than the sword, and joined Washington's Army as a

Chaplain. Jabez was assigned lot 54 of 101 acres and lot 56 of 150 acres in

1788. Both lots crossedSeeley Creek on what is now Maple Avenue east of

Fitzsimmons Cemetery. Jabez and John Culver (sometimes Colver and Collver)

were assigned lot 124 of 300 acres on 29 Oct 1788 on the hills west of the

Seeley Creek Valley which they assigned to David Cooley. Jabez enumerated in

the 1790 census with two males overage sixteen, two males under age

sixteen, and one female in the household.

BIOGRAPHY: They removed in 1794 to Canada where Jabez was granted 600 acres, 400 acres

for each of his married children, and 200 acres for each unmarried child.

They settled on Lot 1-12, Concession of Windham, and erected the first log

house in the township. Eight of their thirteen children are related to have

removed with them, at least two of them having died in the Seeley Creek

Valley. Anna d. 10 Mar 1813 and Jabez d. 19 Dec 1818 Windham, Norfolk

County, Ontario, Canada. Four of their sons married daughters of cousin

Timothy Colver.

Emigration: Emigration: 1794 To Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada 1

Occupation: 1750 Presbyterian Minister and pastor of a church in Darkertown, New Jersey. 1

Residence: Bet. 1731 - 1794 Hunterdor County, New Jersey, and Sussex County, New Jersey

Jabez owned a considerable amount of property in Sussex County, New

Jersey. Culvers Lake and Culver Gap in Sussex Co. are named for Jabez.

Culvers Lake is along U.S. highway 206, near the Appalacian Trail. The

closest town is Tuttl e's Corner, in Northern New Jersey. During the

Revolutionary War, his sympath y was with the British, but due to his

American influence and owning consider able real estate he chose the Bible

rather than the sword, and joined Washing ton's Army as a Chaplain.

When the new province of Upper Canada was organized, he traveled

from New Jersey to Newark on horseback, to consult with Governor Simcoe

as to terms of settlement in the new province. He was promised a gran t of

600 acres for himself, and 400 acres for each of his married children,

and 200 acres for each unmarried child.

In 1974, he went to Norfolk County, O ntario, Canada, and settled in

Lot 1-12, Concession of Windham, and erected t he first log house in the

township. Eight of his thirteen children came with him.

Today there is a memorial park where the house stood, to the

Culver's. It is built out of native rock and the plaque reads:

Collver - Culver

This me morial built in 1941

Serves to honor and perpetuate

the memories of:

Rev. Jabez Culver

Timothy Collver

Joseph Culver

And their families, pioneers of

No rfolk County in the closing

decade of the 18th Century;

It was erected by the ir decendants, and by them presented to the Norfolk

Historical Society. The t riangle stone above the plaque for many years

marked Rev. Jabez Culver's grave in Old Windham Cemetary. Much of the

land around Simcoe, Ontario, Canada is still in the Culver name.



Inscription: COLLVER

TO MARK THE GRAVES OF

THE REV. JABEZ COLLVER AND HIS WIFE U.E. LOYALISTS FROM NEW JERSEY WHO WITH THEIR CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN SETTLED HERE IN 1793, THE ANCESTORS OF MANY IN NORFOLK. THAT YEAR MR. COLLVER ORGANIZED A PRESBYTERIAN CONGREGATION AND MINISTERED TO IT THROUGHOUT THE COUNTY TILL HIS DEATH

HE DIED DEC. 29TH 1818 AGED 88 YEARS ERECTED 1912

view all 30

Rev. Jabez B Culver, UEL's Timeline

1731
July 19, 1731
Groton, New London County, Connecticut, United States
1756
March 5, 1756
Wantage, Sussex County, New Jersey, New Jersey, United States
1757
May 29, 1757
Province of New Jersey
1759
September 15, 1759
Schooleys Mountain, Washington Township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States
1760
1760
Province of New Jersey
1760
Age 28
Cambridge Presbyterian Order
1762
July 18, 1762
Province of New Jersey
1764
1764
New Jersey, United States
1766
February 27, 1766
Sussex, New Jersey, NJ