Rev. James Anderson

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James Anderson, Sr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Dowhill, Glasgow, Scotland
Death: Died in Donegal, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA
Place of Burial: Donegal Cemetery, Lancaster Co, PA
Immediate Family:

Son of George Anderson and Mary Anderson
Husband of Elizabeth Anderson; Suit Anderson; Janet Hill and Rebecca Crawford
Father of Susannah Woods; Maj. Patrick Anderson; Edward Anderson; Thomas Anderson; Elizabeth Anderson and 16 others
Brother of john Anderson

Occupation: Minister
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Rev. James Anderson

james anderson parents:

John anderson and Susannah hamilton

(some family histories state these are his parents, but George is a brother not his father...)

george anderson 1654-1754

Mary matthews 1658-1754

James Anderson

Birth 17 Nov 1678 in Glasgow, Lanarkshire, , Scotland

Death 16 Jul 1740 in Donegal, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States

wife: Suit Garland 1690-1736

children;

John Anderson 1710 – 1756 

Garland Anderson 1714 – 1790

Ann Anderson 1716 – 1810

Mary Anderson 1717 – 1818

Sylvester Anderson 1718 –

James Anderson 1721 – 1790
Robert Anderson 1722 –  

John Anderson 1723 – 1781

Susannah Anderson 1725 – 1781

William Anderson 1726 – 1826

John Doe Anderson 1727 – 
Anne Anderson 1728 – 
***Thomas Anderson 1731 – 1814
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Rev James Anderson 11/17/1678 to 7/16/1740

Wife: Rebecca Crawford--no children 12/5/1712

Wife: Suit Garland 1690 to 1736

Children of Suit Garland-anderson:

John Anderson (1724 to 1781)

only child listed

Reverend James Anderson

etdorwardadded this on 27 Sep 2009 

Reverend James Anderson

17 Nov 1678, Dowhill, Glasgow, Scotland

16 Jul 1740, Donegal, Lancaster PA

+ 5 Dec 1712, New Castle, New Castle, DE

Suit Garland 1694

24 Dec 1736, Donegal, Lancaster PA

History of the Presbytery of Philadelphia, p98

Mr. Anderson was born in Scotland, November 17, 1678, and was ordained by Irvine Presbytery, Nov 17, 1708, with a view to his settlement in Virginia. He arrived in the Rappahannock April 22, 1709, but the state of things not warranting his stay, he came northward, and was received by the Presbytery September 20th of that year. He settled at New Castle, Delaware. In 1717 he accepted a call to a congregation in New York, which at the time, was worshipping in City Hall. September 24, 1726, he received a call to Donegal, on the Susquehanna, and accepted it. He was installed the last Wednesday in August, 1727. In September, 1729, he began to give every fifth Sabbath to the people in Swatara, and joined the congregtion of Derry. In April, 1738, the Presbytery decided to ask the Synod to send a deputation to wait on the Virginia Government, and solicit its favor in behalf of Presbyterianism there. The Synod wrote to the Governor, and sent Mr. Anderson to bear the letter, providing supplies for his pulpit, and allowing for his expenses "in a manner suitable to his design." This mission was performed satisfactorily. He died July 16, 1740.

At the time of his death, he owned a farm of 305 acres well stocked and three slaves. He was a charter member of Donegal Presbytery October 11, 1732, and was Moderator of the Synod of Philadelphia May 23, 1739. February, 1713 he married Suit Garland, daughter of Sylvester Garland of the head of Apoquiminy, by whom eleven children. She died December 24, 1836 and he married Rebecca Crawford of Donegal, Pennsylvania.

Anderson Family

ANDERSON, Rev. James, was a native of Scotland, born November 17, 1678, was educated under Principal Stirling of Glasgow, and ordained by Irvine Presbytery, November 17, 1708, with a view to his settlement in Virginia. He sailed March 6,1709. and arrived in the Rappahanock on the 22d of April following, but the state of things there not warranting his stay, he came northward, and was received by the Presbytery September 20. He settled at New Castle. In 1714, out of regard to the desolate condition of the people in Kent county, he was directed to supply them monthly on a Sabbath, and also to spend a Sabbath at Cedar creek, in Sussex. He subsequently ministered in New York, but owing to some difficulties in the congregation there he desired a removal.

He was called September 24, 1726, to Donegal, on the Susquehanna, and accepted it. He was installed the last Wednesday in August, 1727. In September, 1729, he gave every fifth Sabbath to the people on Swatara, and joined the congregation of Derry, thus becoming the first settled pastor over that church, until the call of Rev. William Bertram, 1732. He died July 16, 1740. In the language of the Presbytery, "he was high in esteem for circumspection, diligence and faithfulness as a Christian minister."

  • *The Rev. Mr. Anderson married, February, 1712-13, Suit Garland, daughter of Sylvester Garland, of the Head of Apoqunimy. She died December 24, 1736. He then married Rachel Wilson, December 27, 1737. His son Garland Anderson, married Jane, daughter of Peter Chevalier, of Philadelphia, but died early. His daughter Elizabeth married Samuel Breeze, resided in New York, and was a woman of great excellence. A brother of the Rev. Mr. Anderson was John Anderson, of Perth Amboy, who in 1712 was made one of the council of the Province of New Jersey. He died in March, 1736, aged seventy-three, being then president of the council. **

A History of Lancaster County by H.M.J. Klein, 1926

James Anderson, who was the first regular pastor of Donegal Presbyterian church, made his home in Donegal from 1727 to his death, 1740. He was born in Scotland in 1678, and had been in the ministry in America since 1709. He was one of the founding members of Newcastle Presbytery in 1716, was later in a New York charge, and accepted call to Donegal in 1726. He was a man of broad mind, and was not long in Donegal before he saw that distorted matters of land-title needed straightening, and he gave them his careful inteligent attention. He himself purchased a tract of 305 acres in 1727 from Peter Allen, an Indian trader. It was not until 1737 that he straightened the titles of some of the land holdings of some of his congregation, "which then included nearly the whole population of Donegal township." He frequently rode to Philadelphia to plead the cause of the people with the Provincial Government in the differences over land-titles, and finally cleared the disputes to general satisfaction.

This accomplished, Rev. Anderson gave some thought to his own affairs. He had for ten years lived on a farm he had exchanged with William Wilkins for the Peter Allen tract he had bought. The Wilkins tract was along the river, and upon part of it the borough of Marietta de- veloped. But when Rev. James Anderson was able to think of his own affairs, in 1737, he only saw in his river-farm the possibility of establishing a ferry. He applied for a patent for a ferry, but was unable to get it for some time, owing to the objections of John Wright, who then had a ferry three miles further down the river. However, he secured the right eventually; and it was probably because of that ferry patent that his son held to the land, and also his grandson, James (3d), and great-grandson, James (4th), who founded the town of Waterford in 1804, which town was merged with another ultimately to form the borough of Marietta.


American Weekly Mercury,

Aug 17-24, 1727

ON the 2d Day of the 8th Month, October next, at New-Castle, will be exposed to sale by publick Vendue, two Plantations lying at the Head of Apoquinomie Creek, in the County of New-Castle, belonging to the Estate of Sylvester Garland deceas'd, and which formerly belong'd to Capt. Haily. containing betwixt the two Places near 700 Acres; there is an Orchard upon each Plantation, a House and Barn upon one of them, there is good conveniency for building either Fulling or Grist Mill; there is on the Land a landing Place from the Creek, to which a small sloop may be brought from Delaware Bay &c. there is a pretty deal of clear Land on it, the Land is good; and the Title indisputable. The two Places may be sold either joyntly and separatly: If any want to Enquire further into the Premisses they may be informed by James Anderson Minister, late of New-York, now at Donnigall, in the county of Chester, Pennsilvania, who has the Power of Disposing of said Plantations either publickly or privately, as he shall see Cause.

Anderson was a Freemason, the Master of a Masonic lodge, and a Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge of London and Westminster. He was commissioned in September of 1721 by the Grand Lodge to write a history of the Free-Masons, and it was published in 1723 as The Constitutions of the Free-Masons. Anderson's name does not appear on the title page, but his authorship is declared in an appendix. The Constitutions was edited and reprinted by Benjamin Franklin in Philadelphia in 1734, becoming the first Masonic book printed in America. An electronic edition of that work is online here. A second London edition, much expanded, appeared in 1738. The work was translated into many languages, including Dutch (1736), German (1741), and French (1745). His other published works include Royal Genealogies (1732), A Defence of Masonry (1738?), News from Elysium (1739), and A Genealogical History of the House of Yvery (1742).

Core Articles Freemasonry · Grand Lodge · Masonic Lodge · Masonic Lodge Officers · Prince Hall Freemasonry · Regular Masonic jurisdictions History History of Freemasonry · Liberté chérie · Masonic manuscripts [show]Masonic Bodies Masonic Masonic bodies · York Rite · Order of Mark Master Masons · Knights Templar · Scottish Rite · Knight Kadosh · The Shrine · Tall Cedars of Lebanon · The Grotto · Societas Rosicruciana · Grand College of Rites · Swedish Rite · Order of St. Thomas of Acon · Royal Order of Scotland Masonic Women's Groups Women and Freemasonry · Order of the Amaranth · Order of the Eastern Star · Co-Freemasonry Masonic Youth Organizations DeMolay · A.J.E.F. · Job's Daughters · International Order of the Rainbow for Girls [show]Views of Masonry Anti-Masonry · Anti-Masonic Party · Anti-Freemason Exhibition · Christianity and Freemasonry · Catholicism and Freemasonry · Suppression of Freemasonry · Masonic conspiracy theories · Taxil hoax [show]Notable People and Places James Anderson · Albert Mackey · Albert Pike · Prince Hall · John the Evangelist · John the Baptist · William Schaw · Elizabeth Aldworth · List of Freemasons · Lodge Mother Kilwinning · Freemasons' Hall, London · House of the Temple · Solomon's Temple · The Library and Museum of Freemasonry Great Architect of the Universe · Square and Compasses · Pigpen cipher · Eye of Providence · Hiram Abiff · Sprig of Acacia · Masonic Landmarks · Pike's Morals and Dogma· Propaganda Due · Freemasonry and the Latter Day Saint movement · Dermott's Ahiman Rezon

Freemasonary Initiation

A candidate for Freemasonry must petition a lodge in his community, obtaining an introduction by asking an existing member, who then becomes the candidate's proposer. In some jurisdictions, it is required that the petitioner ask three times, however this is becoming less prevalent. In other jurisdictions, more open advertising is utilised to inform potential candidates where to go for more information. Regardless of how a potential candidate receives his introduction to a Lodge, he must be freely elected by secret ballot in open Lodge. Members approving his candidacy will vote with "white balls" in the voting box. Adverse votes by "black balls" will exclude a candidate. The number of adverse votes necessary to reject a candidate, which varies from juisdiction to jurisdiction, is set out in the governing Constitution of the presiding Grand Lodge. Generally, to be a regular Freemason, a candidate must: Be a man who comes of his own free will. Believe in a Supreme Being. (The form of which is left to open interpretation by the candidate) Be at least the minimum age (from 18–25 years old depending on the jurisdiction). Be of good morals, and of good reputation. Be of sound mind and body (Lodges had in the past denied membership to a man because of a physical disability, however, now, if a potential candidate says a disability will not cause problems, it will not be held against him). Be free-born (or "born free", i.e. not born a slave or bondsman). As with the previous, this is entirely an historical holdover, and can be interpreted in the same manner as it is in the context of being entitled to write a will. Some jurisdictions have removed this requirement. Have character references, as well as one or two references from current Masons, depending on jurisdiction. Deviation from one or more of these requirements is generally the barometer of Masonic regularity or irregularity. However, an accepted deviation in some regular jurisdictions is to allow a Lewis (the son of a Mason), to be initiated earlier than the normal minimum age for that jurisdiction, although no earlier than the age of 18. Some Grand Lodges in the United States have an additional residence requirement, candidates being expected to have lived within the jurisdiction for certain period of time, typically six months.


Son Of

John Anderson, III and Susannah Anderson (Hamilton)

Husband Of 

Janet Hill; Rebecca Crawford and Suit Garland

Father Of 

Ann Anderson; Elizabeth Doe Anderson; Garland Anderson; James Anderson, Jr.; John A Anderson, Sr.; John Anderson; John Anderson; John Garland Anderson; Mary Anderson; Robert Anderson; Susannah Taylor (Anderson); Sylvester Anderson; Thomas Anderson and William Anderson « less

Brother Of 

Alexander Anderson; Barbara Anderson; Christian Anderson; George Anderson; Isobell Anderson; Janet Anderson; John Anderson, Jr.; Margaret Anderson; Ninian Anderson; Susanna Anderson and William Anderson « less

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Living 

false

Birth Date

11/17/1678

Death Date

7/16/1740

First Name

James

Last Name

Anderson

Suffix

Sr.

Display Name

Rev. James Anderson

Birth Location

Glasgow, Dowhill, Scotland

Death Location

Donegal,Lancaster,Pennsylvania,USA

Burial Date

7/16/1740


James Anderson (1678-1740), one of the early pastors of the Donegal Presbyterian Church in Lancaster County, PA. This church is now quite a historical landmark of early Pennsylvania and a stream of visitors visit at its shrine. James Anderson's body and that of his wife, Suit Garland, lie buried in the Donegal cemetery and their graves are marked by a horizontal red sandstone monument.


I transferred this to History file for you.

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1693 in Isle of Skye, Scotland Death: AFT. 1741 in Chester County, Pennsylvania Residence: 1707 To Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Medical Information: Red Hair.

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James Anderson came over in 1707. A Welsh farmer by the name of Thomas Jerman was searching among the newcomers for a farmhand.

It happened that he and Anderson struck a bargain,according to the custom of the poor coming to America at that time and enter into the service of someone who advanced the "passage money" and bind himself to work for such person until the debt of indebtness was discharged.

Mr. Jermain was said to be in comfortable circumstances ,and had what seems to have been of more importance to the young Scotsman,a daughter. For Anderson succeeded in winning her heart in return. A difficulty arose,however,he had gained her consent to become his wife but her father by no means would sanction the marriage.

They overcame this obstacle by by eloping, Miss Elizabeth Jermain became the wife of James Anderson. Little is known of subsequent events. There was a reconcilation,however,in 1713,six years after Anderson arrival in America,Jermain advanced a part of the money with which James brought a farm. It comprised 343 acres ,being in a section of country,considered unbroken wilderness. It was two and a half miles form Phoenixsville,and now in middle of a thickly settled and wealthy country. Paid approx. 600.00 ,with his father-in-law advancing him the money.

He built a one room log house,with one window,and one door on the north side of Pickering Creek. It was not a pretentious one for it was built of logs,and where they lived a happy life,while he tllled the soil,and because prosperous. Although his home was humble one,it was not the poorest,since we are told that some of the early settlers in this vicitiny lived in caves. The light was admitted between the holes in the wall. These were closed up when necessary. The bare ground was the floor. The fireplaces extended across the whole side of one wall,and into them were thrown large logs which frequently burned for several days.

"James oldest child was the first child" of" European parents born in this vicinty". In church creed the Andersons were originally Episcoplians,and into this sect James Anderson probably belonged.

James was the first actual resident of what was then known as" PickeringTract ",and was first settler in "Schuykill Township". When he first moved in, his nearest neighbor was three miles away.

His descendants,by the eldest son in each generation,continueto live and on this land.

James was the first to introduce garlic into Schuykill Township,following Swedish custom of sowing for early pasture for cows,he sowed it on his farm in 1730. From his place it scattered over the adjoining farms. James was Supervisor of Highways in 1728.

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"Family History. Containing a Brief Accounty of the Families of Anderson, Davies, Wersler," by J. A. Lloyd, Dixon, IL, 1880.

James Anderson was born in 1693 in Scotland. In 1707 he sailed to America. He was poor. His passage money may have been given him by Thomas Jerman, a wealthy farmer and Quaker preacher. He was in the service of Mr. Jerman and lived with the family in Chester County, PA. He eloped with Jerman's daughter, Elizabeth, as Mr. Jerman would not allow the marriage. 6 years after arriving in America, James bought a farm of 340 acres with money advanced to him by Mr. Jerman. Their home was on the south side of Pickering Creek. It was a one room log home with one door and one window. He "tilled the soil and became prosperous." They were the first residents of Pickering Tract and the first settlers in Schuylkill Township. "In church creed the Andersons were originally Episcopalians, and to this sect James Anderson probably belonged." He was the first to introduce Garlic to Schuylkill Township. he was supervisor of highways in 1728. "An old number of a newspaper published in PA says: 'The opsterity of James Anderson will remain with us, though many have emigrated westward.'"

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James E. Anderson, born 1690 in Scotland, emigrated to America in 1709 and by 1710 had settled in Schuylkill twp, Chester County PA. He married Elizabeth Jerman/Jarman, daughter of Quaker preacher Thomas Jerman and his wife Elizabeth. They had children Patrick 1719, Elizabeth, James, William, Thomas, George, Margaret and Edward. Patrick was a captain in the Pennsylvania Musketry during the Revolution and remained in Charles Town, Chester County PA all his life. Patrick had a son James born 1752 or 1762 who also served in the Revolution, as a Lieutenant in the Fourth Continental Dragoons. James married twice, had 15 children, and settled in Washington County PA where he died in 1833. NOTE: I am descended from a different James Anderson, born 1763 in Chester County PA, who also served in the Revolution and who was PROBABLY a grandson of James E. Anderson by one of James E.'s other sons. Sources: Revolutionary War Pension Files; Officers of the Continental Army of the Revolution; DAR Patriot Index; Graves of Revolutionary War Patriots; Notes of Family History by Isaac E. Sutton; History of Chester County PA 1881; Phoenixville PA 1910 Historical Souvenir Book; Chester County PA Abstract of Wills.

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James and his wife are probably buried in the graveyard of old St. Peter's Church in the Great Valley, of which he was vestryman. According to family tradition he is said to have imported clover and garlic (!) into this country - a blessing and a curse!

Harry Emerson Wildes, the historian, in his book VALLEY FORGE, recounts the romance of James Anderson with the miller's daughter:

"Valley Forge itself began with an elopement. The story following traditional romantic patterns, richly merits novelistic treatment, for a poor indentured servant, bought by a crusty miller, won the daughter of the rich, conservative Welsh Quaker family, ran off with her to break hitherto untilled farm land, built a home in the wilderness, achieved success, and gained eventual forgiveness.

"In 1713(*), the year following Holstein's arrival at Swedesford, Thomas Jerman, Quaker preacher who was nicknamed 'The Thrifty Miller', went into Philadelphia to buy a sleigh. There he found a ship just arrived from England, bringing, among other passengers, a red-headed, twenty-year old(*) Scotch boy. The man to whom this James Anderson was indentured, desired to sell the lad's services, and Jerman, attracted by his bright personality, bought the boy for little more than the five pounds' transportation cost. The thrifty miller took James Anderson upcountry to his Great Valley Mill, the first inland grist mill to be licensed after Penn gave up his mill monopoly.

"Quick-witted and pleasant-spoken, laughing Jim Anderson worked faithfully and hard, though the serious Welsh Quakers thought him frivolous. Elizabeth, the elder daughter of the Jermans, was captivated by his charm. A few months after his arrival, the two were deep in love. Jerman was disappointed; he had intended Elizabeth for Enoch Walker, son of the pioneer of Rehobeth, hoping that thus "Rehobeth" and the Great Valley Mill might be united into one great property.

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THE ANDERSON CLAN In the book entitled THE SCOTTISH CLANS AND THEIR TARTANS, we find the family Anderson, Sons of Andrew, Clan Aindreas, called by these names among the Highlanders, until this day. The old Celtic form of the name is Andermas, and up to the present time the Annual Andermas Fair is still held in Scotland, generally known as the Clan Ross. In the Ancient Genealogical history, however, they were known by the name Clan Anrias and the history of this Clan commences with a charter for lands of Gairloch given by Willis, Earl of Ross, Lord of Skye, to Paul MacTyre in the year 1366, being witnessed by Alexander, Bishop of Ross, Hergone, brother of Earl William, and Henry the Seneschal and others. Robertson mentions, however, that in the Earl of Haddington's Collections, he found an entry made in the year 1220, during the reign of Alexander II of a "charter to Ferquhard," who was son of Gille Anrias from whom the Clan originally took its name; the same hailing from Apple Cross. For services rendered to Alexander II, Ferquhard, or otherwise known as Fearchar, was knighted by the king, and in 1234 was created Earl of Ross. He founded at that time the Abbey of Fearn in Ross-shire. His son, Earl William was one of the Scottish nobles who, under Alexander II, bound themselves to make no peace with England in which the Prince and Chiefs of Wales were not included.

The Clan had adopted by this time their music, badge and tartan. The Clan pipe march was "The Earl of Ross's March"; the badge, the Juniper, and the tartan, red field transversed by three broad dark blue stripes, two narrow green stripes, three broad green stripes and two sets of narrow blue stripes, the center stripe being slightly heavier than the other two. Again the three broad green stripes and the two narrow green stripes. The fighting force of this original Clan in 1745 was 500 men. About the year 1732, the family divided into several clans having their own castles and estates, four of which adopted the motto "Stand Sure," and for a crest a seeded Scotchfir tree on mount. (Page 1)

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ANDERSON FAMILY JAMES ANDERSON The first Anderson in this country, James, is said to have emigrated in 1707 from the Isle of the Skye, Scotland. This island is separated from the mainland by a strait narrow enough to be crossed by a ferry, and contains some of the highest mountains and most picturesque scenery in Scotland. According to a Scotchman I know who comes from the island, there are many Andersons still living there, and all the men are over six feet tall.

Tradition has it that James was seventeen years of age when he ran away from home to come to this country with his brothers, George and William, but against his father's will. It is said that he fled from his home with nothing but his clothing - even without his coat. According to the custom of that day, the captain of the ship was recompensed for the passage of any who could not pay, by a settler of this country, who thereupon became entitled to the services of the immigrant for five years, during which time he was provided with his keep, and at the end of that period given fifty acres of land.

James was bound out to service to Thomas Jermain (or Jerman), a Quaker preacher who operated a mill in Great Valley, not far from Paoli station, on the Pennsylvania Railroad. Jermain obtained one of the first licenses to operate a mill in the province. All mills had originally been operated by the Proprietor, and there arose protests by settlers against monopoly and the "excessive" charges made for grinding their grain, and Penn thereupon granted several private licenses.

Jermain arrived in Philadelphia in March 1699, and there practiced his trade as a glover. He came from a farm on the River Towys in Wales. In 1701 he bought 300 acres in the Paoli Valley for thirty-six pounds. Thomas Jermain had an attractive daughter named Elizabeth, and she and James Anderson fell in love. The father had other plans for her, however, and wanted her to marry Enoch Walker, whose father, Lewis, owned a pretentious home nearby, called "Rehobeth," which he built in 1695. (We are descended also from Enoch Walker through another line - see (Page 2 )

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Dr. James Anderson's wife.) An old mill still operates on the site of the original, and belonged to Richard Haughton, son of the former rector of the Church of the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr, where Dick and I used to sing in the choir when we were boys. Mr. Haughton died recently. The mill has been in operation 240 years and now produces the "Great Valley Mill Products," - flour and cereals noted for their high quality. The high bank on which the mill stands has been made into one of the most beautiful rock gardens in the country, and flower lovers come from great distances to see it.

When the five-year service was up in 1712, James Anderson and Elizabeth Jermain eloped and went to live on Pickering Creek in what is now Charlestown Township, Chester County, beyond Valley Forge. According to tradition they lived in a cave or dugout, and made moccasins for the Indians. Later, they built a one-room log cabin. Soon there was a reconciliation with the father, and he helped James purchase 340 acres in 1713. This was located along the Pickering Creek near Phoenixville, and included the site of the cave.

When I was a boy, I visited the old Anderson homestead on which Cousin Jim Anderson was then living. He was my mother's second cousin, his father being Joseph Everett Anderson, brother of Dr. James, my great-grandfather. Cousin Jim took me over the fence into the adjoining Pennypacker farm, that field being originally part of the Anderson farm, and showed me a surveyor's mark on a tree which had been made by his nephew, who was a surveyor, and which located the site of the cave. Cousin Jim said that his father told him that a mound was still there in his youth.

Our first Anderson immigrant, James, was said to have been over six feet tall, with red hair and light blue-gray eyes. *** Governor Samuel W. Pennypacker says in his memoirs that James could neither read nor write. James's grandson, Isaac, wrote a history of that general locality, and says of his grandparents' day: "The Indians were fellow inhabitants, and on very friendly terms. An Indian woman has been known to suckle and nurse a white infant while its mother went to visit her relatives three miles off. One of said

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infants was the child of James Anderson. Such was the confidence of the first settlers in the aborigines." James and his wife are probably buried in the graveyard of old St. Peter's Church in the Great Valley, of which he was vestryman. According to family tradition he is said to have imported clover and garlic (!) into this country - a blessing and a curse!

Harry Emerson Wildes, the historian, in his book VALLEY FORGE, recounts the romance of James Anderson with the miller's daughter: "Valley Forge itself began with an elopement. The story following traditional romantic patterns, richly merits novelistic treatment, for a poor indentured servant, bought by a crusty miller, won the daughter of the rich, conservative Welsh Quaker family, ran off with her to break hitherto untilled farm land, built a home in the wilderness, achieved success, and gained eventual forgiveness.

"In 1713(*), the year following Holstein's arrival at Swedesford, Thomas Jerman, Quaker preacher who was nicknamed 'The Thrifty Miller', went into Philadelphia to buy a sleigh. There he found a ship just arrived from England, bringing, among other passengers, a red-headed, twenty-year old(*) Scotch boy. The man to whom this James Anderson was indentured, desired to sell the lad's services, and Jerman, attracted by his bright personality, bought the boy for little more than the five pounds' transportation cost. The thrifty miller took James Anderson upcountry to his Great Valley Mill, the first inland grist mill to be licensed after Penn gave up his mill monopoly.

"Quick-witted and pleasant-spoken, laughing Jim Anderson worked faithfully and hard, though the serious Welsh Quakers thought him frivolous. Elizabeth, the elder daughter of the Jermans, was captivated by his charm. A few months after his arrival, the two were deep in love. Jerman was disappointed; he had intended Elizabeth for Enoch Walker, son of the pioneer of Rehobeth, hoping that thus "Rehobeth" and the Great Valley Mill might be united into one great property. (Page 4 )

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Anderson and Elizabeth found no encouragement. As soon as Jim's service had expired, they fled in the moonlight down the trail that led toward Holstein's Swedes' ford, past Walker's farm, and over the fields that now comprise the Valley Forge Park reservation. Once safely through the narrow pass beyond the present site of Valley Forge, they took up three hundred acres of unbroken hilly land.

"Only the Indians lived nearby, but these, charmed by the friendliness of the young Scot and his bride, befriended the elopers. 'Sky', their young Lenni Lenape neighbor, married them by Indian rites, and showed them how to make a hut. It was a log house with one room, one door, and a window, and it was in a dangerous position, for each night the wolves prowled in the neighborhood. Even later, when Anderson had bought sheep, the snow about the tight-walled sheepfold was trampled nightly by packs of hungry wolves. For long months, Jim Anderson slept with a loaded gun by his bedside to protect his flocks against unusual attack. "'Sky' gave fluent counsel on how to care for crops, but Anderson preferred to follow better and more modern methods. When "Sky" showed how the Indians cleared ground by kindling fires to kill the tree roots, Anderson urged that the roots be grubbed out before seed was sown. The cost of repairing one plow broken on a stump, he said, was greater than the added cost of complete clearing. By so caring for the land, however, the fields would be immediately as fit for cultivation as they would be after twenty years of inefficient Indian practices. "Sky's" advice that children should be thrown into the creek daily before dawn to make them hardy was likewise disregarded, though Elizabeth left the young Andersons in Indian care whenever she rode back to see her people. "The families were friendly again, for after Elizabeth's elopement, the thrifty miller had married her younger sister, Mary, to the favored Enoch Walker. When the harvests were gathered, therefore, and the grain flailed, Elizabeth rode back into the Great Valley to take the wheat to be ground. (Page 6)

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RECORD OF ORIGINAL ANDERSON PROPERTY On October 8, 1701, William Penn patented to Griffith Jones and fifteen others a tract of land in Charlestown Township, Chester County, containing 5358 acres, (Patent Book A-2-208, Philadelphia). Of this land Griffith Jones became legally seized of 340 acres. (Partition dated December 10, 1705 - Book F-6-5.) By the deed dated February 6, 1709 he conveyed the said 340 acres to Alexander Ross, who, with his wife, Catherine, by Deed, June 2, 1713, conveyed it to James Anderson. By his deed dated December 11, 1740, James Anderson of Charlestown, Chester County, yeoman, conveyed it to his eldest son, Patrick Anderson, who then assumed an existing mortgage on the property, (Deed Book F-317, Chester County). On May 6, 1774 Patrick Anderson of the Township of Charlestown, Chester County, yeoman, for 637 pounds conveyed to John Custer of the Township of Perkiomen and Skippack, Philadelphia County, fuller, and Mathias Pennypacker of the same place, yeoman, all that tract with the saw mill thereon in Charlestown, by lands of Edward Lane and William Moore, Esq., on Pickering Creek. Patrick Anderson's other land, containing fifty-one acres was part of the above 340 acres by deed recorded in Deed Book N-2-534 - Chester County.

The first house of James Anderson was upon the Eastern margin of the original tract. It was a log house or hovel with a door and one window and underpinned with stone. Next he excavated a cellar against this building. Some years later his son, Patrick Anderson, built a stone house of superior structure and finish adjoining the cabin. It contained a room and kitchen with two rooms over, and above this a loft. It had no finished ceiling. The front was of dressed stone. Patrick's son, Isaac, tore down the log cabin and built an addition to the stone portion. Isaac's son, Joseph E., removed the stone structure built by Patrick and rebuilt an addition to correspond with his father's building.

                 (From Isaac W. Pennypacker)

The information about the collateral descendants of JAMES ANDERSON, first of the line to come to this country is incomplete; same is true of descendants (Page 7)

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Rev. James Anderson's Timeline

1678
November 17, 1678
Glasgow, Scotland
1712
1712
Age 33
PA, USA
1714
November 21, 1714
Age 36
New Castle, New Castle, Delaware, USA
November 21, 1714
Age 36
New Castle, New Castle, Delaware, USA
1716
July 24, 1716
Age 37
New Castle, New Castle, Delaware, USA
1717
1717
Age 38
New York, New York, New York, USA
1718
February 17, 1718
Age 39
New York, New York Co, NY
1718
Age 39
New York, New York, New York, USA