Rev. Thomas Hooker

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Thomas E. Hooker, II

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Marefield, Tilton, Leicestershire, England
Death: Died in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut, USA
Place of Burial: Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Hooker and Susannah Hooker
Husband of Mary Hooker and Susan Harkes Hooker, Goodwin, Shepard
Father of Mary Newton; Joanna Hooker; John Hooker; Anne Hooker; Reverend Samuel Hooker and 4 others
Brother of Anne Alcock; Dorothy Chester; John Hooker; Elizabeth Hooker and William Hooker

Occupation: Reverend, 1st pastor of United Church of Christ from 1633-1647, founder of CT, Congregationalist minister, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Hooker
Managed by: Randy Stebbing
Last Updated:

About Rev. Thomas Hooker

Wikipedia Biographical Summary:

"...Thomas E. Hooker', II (July 5, 1586 – July 7, 1647) was a prominent Puritan religious and colonial leader remembered as one of the founders of the Colony of Connecticut.

Born at rural Marefield, Leicestershire, England, the son of a farm manager, Thomas Hooker won a good scholarship to study at the University of Cambridge, where in time he became the equivalent of a professor of theology. After Mr. Hooker's conversion to belief in the authenticity of Scripture and the saving grace of the Christ, his keenly reasoned reflections upon the meanings of Biblical passages and upon the life of a Christian helped his rise into the leadership of the Puritan movement in England. But this status as a leader in the Puritan movement would cause him to emigrate first to Holland and then to New England in 1633, on the ship Griffin, to escape the persecution of Archbishop William Laud for non-conformity. He was appointed the first pastor of the church at Newtown, Massachusetts (now Cambridge). He is attributed as being the first minister of the First Parish in Cambridge, a church that still exists in the present day. His home was on a plot of land which today is part of the yard at Harvard College. His departure from the Colony of the Massachussettes Bay (the nucleus of the present-day Commonwealth of Massachusetts) was one of the key events leading to the creation of the Colony of Connecticut (the nucleus of the present-day State of the same name).

In 1635, he was appointed by the General Court of Massachusetts to try to persuade his friend Roger Williams to give up his controversial views. Hooker and Williams took part in a public debate but Williams refused to change his opinions.

In 1636, Thomas Hooker led his congregation west to found the new English settlement at Hartford, Connecticut. One of the reasons he left Massachusetts was his failure to agree with John Winthrop about who should take part in civil government. Winthrop held that only admitted members of the Church should vote and hold office; Hooker maintained that any adult male who owned property should be able to vote and participate in civil government, regardless of church membership.

He and his party traveled on a trail that is now known as the Old Connecticut Path. After settling in Hartford, Hooker continued to be in contact with John Winthrop and Roger Williams. Hooker traveled to Boston often to help settle intercolonial disputes. He is also remembered for his role in creating the "Fundamental Orders of Connecticut". This document is one of the modern world's first written constitutions and an influence upon the current American Constitution, written nearly a century and a half later.

His great-granddaughter Sarah Pierpont married Rev. Jonathan Edwards. Some other direct descendants of his included William Howard Taft, William Gillette, Edward H. Gillette, George Catlin, Emma Willard, and J.P. Morgan..."

SOURCE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Hooker

Biographical Summary #2:

Rev. Thomas Hooker, son of Thomas Hooker, born in England, about 1586, he entered Emanuel College, Cambridge in 1604. He received the degree of B. A. in 1608, the degree of M. A. in 1611, and entering upon a divinity course, he was elected a Fellow of the College. He left the College before completing the first course and receiving the degree of B. D. There are many reasons for supposing that he went from the college direct to Chelmsford and remained there until being silenced, arrested and placed under bonds to appear before the Ecclesiastical Court; he fled to Holland. Came to New England on ship "Griffin" 1633.

The name of his first wife is unknown and nothing of the parentage of his second wife, whose name was Susanna.

His second wife survived him, and though nothing is positively known about her, there are many reasons for believing that in later years she became the wife of Elder William Goodwin and died at Farmington, Conn. He died at Hartford, Conn., July 7, 1647, age 61.

SOURCE: Unknown

Children:

By 1st wife:

  • Joanna, b. probably about 1615 to 1616.
  • Mary.

By 2nd wife:

  1. John, d. at Mazeworth, Bucks, Eng., 1684.
  2. Sarah, b. Little Baddow, England, 1628; d. Little Baddow, 1629.
  3. Sarah, No. 2, b. Little Baddow, England, 1629-30.
  4. Samuel, b. 1633.

SOURCE: The descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Hartford, Connecticut, 1586-1908; Edward Hooker. Downloaded 2010 from books.google.com.

References:

  1. Edward Hooker; edited by Margaret Huntington Hooker, The Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Hartford, Connecticut, 1586-1908., Page 3-12.
  2. Della S. Bishop, Smith Hooker Genealogy (Ithaca, N.Y. : [Stuart & Son], 1936), Page 272-273.
  3. "Families of Early Hartford, Connecticut", Lucius Barnes Barbour, Genealogical Publishing Co.., Inc. Baltimore, 1977. pp 310-313.
  4. "Richard Edwards and his wife Catherine Pond May, Their Ancestors' Lives and Descendants", Rev. Maurice Dwight Edwards, D.D., 1931. pp 31-35.
  5. "Founders of Early American Families", Founders and Patriots of America, Cleveland, Ohio 1985. p 161.
  6. "Pedigrees of Descendants of the Colonial Clergy", The Society of the Descendants of the Colonial Clergy, 1976. p 646.
  7. "History of the National Society of Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America" 1913. p 70.
  8. Internet source: www.geocities.com/Heartland/Pointe/8663/thomashooker.html

Burial:

SOURCE: "findagrave," database, findagrave (findagrave.com : accessed 22 Sep 2009), memorial for Thomas Hooker; Find A Grave Memorial# 497.


Emigrated from England via Downs, Holland, to Boston, Massachusetts Colony, aboard the "Griffin," 1633. Pastored Puritan congregation called Braintree Company. Later moved to and participated in founding of Hartford, Connecticut.

Hooker came to this country in 1633 aboard the Griffin with Richard Risley: in my time, I am connected to Mark Risley via my son-in-law; Mark is undoubtedly a descendant of Richard Risley.... Connections are interesting.


Colonist. He was a Puritan minister, and the chief founder of the city of Hartford, Connecticut. He was one of the drafters (in 1639) of the Fundamental Orders, by which Connecticut was governed for a long time.

Rev. Thomas Hooker married in Amersham, Buckinghamshire, 3 April 1621, Susannah Garbrand. They came to Massachusetts Bay in 1633 in the "Griffin." They first settled in Cambridge MA & moved to Hartford CT in 1636. They had 8 known children: Joanna Shepard, Mary Newton, Anne, Sarah, Sarah Wilson, John, Samuel, & a son who died young.

Thomas Hooker was born into a Puritan family in Leicestershire County, England. He was educated at Cambridge and quickly developed into a highly talented preacher. He acquired a position in Chelmsford, a town noted for its taverns and boisterous citizens, but Hooker's preaching was credited for bringing order. Hooker eventually ran into trouble with religious authorities over theological matters and was forced to flee to Holland. In 1633, Hooker and several dozen of his followers sailed to Massachusetts. Again Hooker ran into trouble for his religious views. John Cotton, one of Massachusetts' leading clergymen, held the position that only church members who owned property could have the vote. Hooker advanced a more democratic view, favoring the vote for all men, regardless of any religious or property qualification.

Hooker lost favor in the Bay Colony and relocated to Connecticut in 1636, where he was instrumental in the development of Hartford. Hooker continued to voice democratic principles and aided in the adoption of the Fundamental Orders in 1638, sometimes regarded as the first written constitution. The franchise was given to adult males who had been accepted by a majority vote of their individual townships; this was democratic by the standards of the 17th century.

Hartford.com’s Hooker Day Parade honors Hartford’s founder, Thomas Hooker. This annual parade is a family-oriented extravaganza with giant puppets, costumes, candy, Mardi-Gras beads, marching bands and brass bands. This boisterous, fun-filled procession celebrates the city and the creativity of its people. The parade steps off at 1 on the dot, and it is a pretty short parade. The parade steps off on Asylum at High Street, moves east on Asylum, south on Ann Uccello, east on Pearl, north on Trumbull, West on Church, South on Ann Uccello and makes a final turn moving west onto Asylum, ending in a dance party in front of Black-eyed Sally’s. Awards will be presented to the Best Group, Best Individual, and a Master or Madame Hooker will be crowned. .

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Rev. Thomas Hooker's Timeline

1586
July 5, 1586
England
July 7, 1586
Marefield, Tilton Parish, Leicestershire, England
July 7, 1586
Marefield, Leicestershire, England
1618
1618
Age 31
Amersham, Buckinghamshire, England, (present United Kingdom)
1622
1622
Age 35
Amersham, Buckinghamshire, England
1625
1625
Age 38
Amersham, Buckinghamshire, England
1626
January 5, 1626
Age 39
Great Badow, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
1628
1628
Age 41