Richard Church, of Hingham

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Richard Church

Also Known As: "Richard Church of the Plymouth Colony"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: England
Death: Died in Dedham, (Present Plymouth County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts)
Place of Burial: Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Richard Church of Hingham's father and Richard Church of Hingham's mother
Husband of Elizabeth Church
Father of Nathaniel Church I; Elizabeth Church, (died young); Elizabeth Hobart; Joseph Church; Richard Church, Jr. and 11 others

Occupation: Carpenter, Bonded Indenture
Managed by: John Patrick McCaffrey
Last Updated:

About Richard Church, of Hingham

Richard Church; b. 1608 at England, carpenter. He died 27 Dec 1668 in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts and his will was presented for probate 26 January 1669. His parents are unknown. He came over as a servant of 'Mr. (Richard) Webb' (Drake, Boston, 132) from "The Winthrop Fleet of 1630" No trace of Mr. "Welb" (Webb) has been found

He died in Dedham where he was on a visit "Sabbath day erly in the morning," and is buried in Hingham, Massachusetts at a spot now covered by the highway leading to the Old Steamboat Wharf and near the water.

family

Parents: unknown

Married: before 7 Mar 1636/37 at Dedham, MA to Elizabeth Warren (1616-9 Mar 1669/70), daughter of Richard Warren, "Mayflower" Passenger, and Elizabeth Walker.

their 15 children:

  1. Elizabeth Church; d. young.
  2. Joseph Church, b. circa 1638 at Plymouth, MA; m. Mary Tucker.
  3. Col. Benjamin Church, b. circa 1640 at Plymouth or Duxbury, MA; m. Alice Southworth.
  4. Elizabeth Church; b. circa 1636; m. Caleb Hobart 20 Jan 1657 at Hingham, MA; d. 3 Feb 1658/59.
  5. Nathaniel Church; b. circa 1642 at prob. Hingham, MA; m. Sarah Barstow, daughter of William Barstow and Ann, 1665 0r 1666; d. 1688/89. He resided in 1666 at Scituate, MA.
  6. Caleb Church; b. 1642 at Plymouth, MA; m. Joanna Sprague, daughter of William Sprague and Millicent Eames, 16 Dec 1667 at Hingham, MA; 1st wife; m. Deborah by 2 Jun 1680; 2nd wife; m. Rebecca 6 Nov 1691 at Watertown, MA; 3rd wife; d. 1722. He resided at Hingham, MA. He resided circa 1668 at Dedham, MA. He resided circa 1677 at Watertown, MA.
  7. Charles Church; b. circa 1644; d. 30 Oct 1659; killed by the overturning of his cart.
  8. Richard Church; d. at Plymouth, MA; young.
  9. Abigail Church; b. 22 Jun 1648 at Plymouth, MA; m. Samuel Thaxter, son of Thomas Thaxter and Elizabeth, 19 Dec 1666 at Hingham, MA; d. 25 Dec 1677 at age 29.
  10. Hannah Church; baptized 8 Aug 1647; m. Josiah Sturtevant.
  11. Mary Church; d. 30 Apr 1662 at Duxbury, MA.
  12. Sarah Church; b. circa 1652; m. James Burroughs 8 Dec 1674 at Hingham, MA.
  13. Lydia Church.
  14. Priscilla Church; b. 1645; m. Samuel Talbee; 1st husband; m. John Irish May 1708; 2nd husband. [SIC: in error - see "family comments"]
  15. Deborah Church; b. 1mo 27 1657; baptized 22 Mar 1656/57 at Hingham, MA; d. 17 Jan 1690.

family comments

From Errors and Omissions in Published Massachusetts Vital Records: Corrections and Additions

Little Compton Although it is now in Newport Co., RI, Little Compton was until 1747 in Bristol Co., MA James N. Arnold, Editor, Vital Record of Rhode Island 1636-1850, Volume 4, Little Compton, Part VI (Providence, RI: Narragansett Historical Publishing Co., 1893).

"P. 36 (Marriages): "IRISH ... John and Priscilla Church; m. by Benjamin Church, Justice, May —, 1708."

She was Priscilla (Southworth) Talbot, born 1645 and widow of Samuel Talbot of Bristol. See Robert S. Wakefield, "The Children and Purported Children of Richard and Elizabeth (Warren) Church" (The American Genealogist, 60 (1984):129-139) at pp. 138-139.

biography

from Randy Seaver's MyHeritage site

Richard Church's English origins and ancestry are unknown. The Great Migration Begins by Robert Charles Anderson (published Boston, by New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995) provides details about his life and family.

He migrated in 1630, and his first residence was in Weymouth. He removed to Plymouth in 1631, Eastham in 1649, Charlestown by 1653, and Hingham in 1654.

He was a carpenter [Plymouth Court Records 1:69]. On 16 February 1632/3 Richard Church hired William Baker to work for him for seven months as a sawyer [Plymouth CR 1:8]. On 23 July 1633 William Mendlove bound himself apprentice to Richard Church for seven years "in the trade of carpentry" [Plymouth CR 1:15].

Richard Church requested to be a freeman 19 October 1630 [MBCR 1:80], and was admitted Plymouth freeman 2 January 1632/3 [Plymouth CR 1:6]; he was in the "1633" and 7 March 1636/7 Plymouth lists of freemen [PCR 1:4, 53], and in Plymouth section of 1639 list [Plymouth CR 8:174].

He held offices on the Plymouth petit jury 7 June 1636, 5 October 1640, 1 March 1641/2, 1 November 1642 [PCR 1:42, 7:17, 28, 32]; and on the Plymouth grand jury 7 March 1636/7, 4 June 1639, 1 March 1641/2, 7 June 1642, 7 March 1642/3, 1 June 1647 [PCR 1:54, 126, 2:34, 41, 53, 116]; he was appointed arbitrator in a civil dispute 7 August 1638 [PCR 7:9].

He volunteered for service in the Pequot War 7 June 1637 [PCR 1:60], and he is in the Plymouth section of the 1643 Plymouth Colony list of men able to bear arms.

Richard Church was assessed 1L 16s in the Plymouth tax list of 25 March 1633 and 1L 7s in the list of 27 March 1634 [PCR 1:11, 28]. He was granted 40 acres "at the head & on the south side of Eele River Swampe" 4 December 1637 [PCR 1:70]. On 3 June 1647 Richard Church exchanged this parcel with Manasseh Kempton, receiving in return "a parcel of land next adjoining unto the said Richard Church his lot" and also a small piece of meadow [PCR 12:144]. Granted one acre and a half of meadow "lying up the river, betwixt the two Mannamett Ponds" 7 August 1638 [PCR 1:92]. On 9 April 1649 "Richard Church senior" sold to Robert Bartlett "an house and land lying at the Eel River near Plymouth aforesaid with all the meadow land" [PCR 12:165].

On 19 July 1649, "Mr. Thomas Prence of Nawset" sold to "Richard Church...of Nawset...carpenter" and Anthony Snow of Marshfield, feltmaker, "a certain tract of upland and marsh meadow in the limits of Green's Harbor alias Marshfield" [PCR 12:176]. On 22 October 1650 "Richard Church sometimes of the town of Nawsett...carpenter" sold to John Dingley of Marshfield, smith, his half-share of this parcel of land [PCR 12:197].

On 24 January 1652 Thomas Joy of Boston, carpenter, and Joan his wife sold to "Richard Church of Charlestowne, carpenter", one half the corn mill at Hingham, with one half the land and other appurtenances thereto belonging [Suffolk LR 2:77].

On 2 July 1667, Plymouth court "do admit of Richard Church to come with the ancient servants for a share of land at Saconett" [PCR 4:159]. On 29 October 1668 Richard Church was one of four men permitted to seek out "a parcel of land...lying at Namassakett Pond" [PCR 5:5].

will

Richard Church's will was dated 25 December 1668, written in Dedham the day before his death, and proved 26 January 1668/9. It reads:  

"I Richard Church of Hingham, in the county of Suffolke in New England, thro the goodness and mercy of God, having my perfect understanding yet by Providence of God, at present, visited by sickness in body, and how soon my change may come, I now therefore order this my last will and testament as followeth. First I commit my soul unto Jesus Christ my Redeemer and my body to the dust from whence it came, and my mind and will is, that after the decease of my body, and the decent burial thereof, a true inventory of my estate in the portion of goods of this world, that the Lord hath lent mee, may bee made and all my just debts due out of the same bee paid.

 

"And my mind and will is that my beloved wife Elizabeth Church shall enjoy the remainder during her natural life and when it shall please God that shee leave this natural life, my mind and will is that what estate I shall leave to her, that shall not be nescessaraly expended for her maintenance, shall then be be equally divided amongst my children, only my son Joseph to have a double portion, that is twice so much as any one of the rest of my children, by reason of the lameness of his hand, whereby he is disenabled above the rest of my children, for the getting of a livlihood and that this last will will maybee well and truly performed as is above expressed.

 

"I doe nominate, appoint and ordaine my sonne Joseph to be sole executor to doe all things required of an executor, ccording to the lawes of this jurisdiction. In witness whereof I set my hand and seal, this 25th day of December 1668..." [Suffolk County Probate Records 6:21].

The inventory of "the estate of Richard Church of Hingham deceased" taken 1 January 1668 totalled 365 pounds 14s, of which 270 pounds was real estate: "the dwelling house with the barn, orchard & houselot containing six acres" 110 L, "half a tide mill L 100; "his share of the iron works at Taunton" L 50; and "2 acres of land lying by the mill L 10 [Suffolk PR 5:116].   SOURCES:

[1] Robert Charles Anderson, "The Great Migration Begins", 1995, p360-365.B

comments

Do not confuse with Richard Church, of Hartford & Hadley (spouse of Anne Church seen as Anne Marsh). He is the Richard Church of the Plymouth Colony who married Elizabeth Church. ( From Descendants of Richard Church "Note: there is some question whether [Richard Church of Hadley's parents] were Richard Church & Alice Vassell or if this was part of a fraudulent CHURCH genealogy perpetrated by Gustave Anjou.)

Seen on http://www.conovergenealogy.com/famous-p/p3.htm#i116 and othertt sites:Richard Church, of Hingham as son of  George Church & Margarit Church, "Christened: 3 Jun 1608, Shoreditch, Middlesex, England and Died: 27 Dec 1668, Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts. He came in the Winthrop Fleet to America (1633) and married Elizabeth Warren (1620-1669) in 1635."

This is not supported by Anderson's "The Great Migration Project" or Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume 18, Part One: Richard Warren Author: Wakefield, Robert S., compiler Publication: [Plymouth MA:] The General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1999.  Both have Richard Church of Hingham's origins as unknown.


sources

from Savage

RICHARD, Plymouth 1633, had, prob. come to Mass. in the fleet with Winthrop for he req. adm. as freem. 19 Oct. 1630, yet did not after take the o. but rem. from Weymouth to P. and was rec. as freem. of that Col. 4 Oct. 1632. He m. Elizabeth d. of Richard Warren, wh. prob. came with her mo. in the Ann 1623; was engag. as a carpenter in build. the earliest ch. edif. at Plymouth, serv. in the Pequot war, sold his est. at P. in 1649, and was at Charlestown 1653, and for final resid. sat down at Hingham. Giv. evid. at Sandwich, 25 Aug. 1664, he call. hims. 56 yrs. old, and he made his will at H. 25 Dec. 1668, and d. at Dedham a few days after. It provides for wid. Elizabeth and equal portions to all the ch. without nam. them, exc. that Joseph, on acco. of his lame hd. should have a double one. To name those ch. older, is not easy, perhaps not all of them with confidence. Beside Joseph, we kn. Benjamin, the gr. soldier, b. 1639; Elizabeth wh. m. 20 Jan. 1658, Caleb Hobart; Richard, wh. d. young; Caleb; Nathaniel; Hannah, bapt. 8 Aug. 1647; Abigail, wh. m. 19 Dec. 1666, Samuel Thaxter, and d. 25 Dec. 1677; Charles, k. by casual. 30 Oct. 1659; Deborah, b. 27 Jan. 1677, wh. m. John Irish, junr. says Winsor, as his sec. w. (tho. ano. author, wh. gives the date of his m. May 1708, calls her Priscilla); and perhaps Mary, wh. d. at Duxbury, 30 Apr. 1662. 

From Anderson's Great Migration Project

Richard Church, in Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633. (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995).

  • ORIGIN: Unknown
  • MIGRATION: 1630
  • FIRST RESIDENCE: Weymouth
  • REMOVES: Plymouth 1631, Eastham 1649, Charlestown by 1653, Hingham 1654
  • BIRTH: About 1608 (deposed 25 August 1664 aged about 56 [PCR 4:85; MD 4:152]).
  • DEATH: Dedham 26 December 1668 [DeVR 11], probably on a visit to his son Caleb. In his will, written the day before his death, he calls himself of Hingham, but the witnesses are all of Dedham

Notes

from http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~legends/church.html

Richard's marriage in to the Warren family may suggest something about his social standing even though he came as a bonded indenture. Richard Warren was one out of ten (of 41) signers of the Mayflower Compact who were distinguished by the title "Mister.", Myles Standish being called "Captain." Elizabeth, Richard Church's mother-in-law, was usually styled "Mistress," a title not at all common then.

Richard Church was a carpenter, and apparently a very good one, for the Plymouth authorities employed him immediately in making a gun a carriage for the defenses on Fort Hill and, with John Tomson, in building the first church in the colony -- although he had to sue to get paid. He probably learned his trade recently as a young apprentice in England, for he was just 22 years old when he arrived in Plymouth.


Richard Church of Plymouth came in 1630. Removed from Weymouth to Plymouth where he was made freeman, 1632. He married Elizabeth Warren daughter of Richard Warren of the "Mayflower". He lived at Eel River in Plymoutn. He was taxed at Duxbury in 1637. In 1649 sold his estate at Plymouth, was at Eastham, 1649: Chalestown, 1653 at Hingham 1657. At Sandwich 1664. He gave evidence in which he called himsel fifity six years old. He served as sergeant in the Pequot War. His will is dated Hingham, Dec. 25, 1668. His will provides for his widow, Elizabeth and gives equal portions unto all his children, except Joseph, who on account of his lame hand, should have a double portion. (The genealogical exchange by Natalie Fernald).

Richard died in Dedham where he was on a visit "Sabbath day erly in the morning," and is buried in Hingham, Massachusetts at a spot now covered by the highway leading to the Old Steamboat Wharf and near the water. He left a modest estate, but since he probably granted inheritances to each of his eleven children as they reached majority or were married, it is likely that his estate was much greater than indices show it was at his death. His will is concise:

I Richard Church of Hingham, having perfect understanding, yet visited by sickness of body, order this my last will. Debts pay'd then my will is that my wife, Elizabeth Church, shall enjoy the remainder during her life. And when it shall please God that she shall leave this life my will is that what Estate I shall leave her that shall not be necessarily Expended for her maintenance shall then be equally divided amongst my children, only my sonn Joseph to have a dubble portion, that is twice as much as any of the rest of my children, by reason of the lameness of his hand, whereby he is disinabled above the rest of my children for the getting of a livelihood. I ordain my sonn Joseph to be my Executor. 25 Dec 1668 Richard X Church

The witnesses were Joshus Fisher, John Farebank, Sr., and John Farebank, Jr. The will was presented for probate 26 January 1669. The fact that Richard signed by a mark may not necessarily indicate lack of education, so much as weakness of body. The will is dated three days before his death.


Richard Church, the immigrant settler and progenitor of the Churches of the region named, was born in 1608. He came to New England in 1630 in the fleet with Governor Winthrop.

He removed from Weymouth to Plymouth, where he was made a freeman from bonded indenture in 1632, and where he married, in 1636, Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Warren, of the 'Mayflower,' 1620.

He was a carpenter by trade, and helped to build the first meetlinghouse and the first gun carriage in Plymouth. He served in the Pequot war.


From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbpretz/PS03/PS03_208.HTM

Died in Dedham 26 December 1668, probably on a visit to his son Caleb. In his will, written the day before his death, he calls himself of Hingham, but the witnesses are all of Dedham.

Married by 7 March 1636/7 (and probably by 14 March 1635/6), Elizabeth Warren, daughter of RICHARD WARREN. She died in Hingham 9 March 1669/70.


Richard, carpenter, Boston, October 19, 1630. Removed to Weymouth, then to Plymouth before 1632. Volunteer( B. in Regiment 11, 243) for the Pequot War before 1637 and became a sergeant. He lived at Eel river and Plymouth until about 1649, when he appears soon after at Eastham and then of Charlestown in 1853. When he bought one half of corn mill at Hingham Jan. 24, 1653, and removed thither. Town officer. He deposed Nov. 15, 1656, ae. about 47 years. He died at Dedham, (home of his son Caleb), Dec. 26,1668. Gave lands in Hingham, share in Iron Works at Taunton, etc. to wife Elizabeth; son Joseph a double portion, on account of the lameness of his hand. "Pioneers of Massachusetts" by Charles H. Pope, 1965

RICHARD CHURCH was a man of moderate height, not over five feet six or eight inches probably, well-knit, strong and active, with broad forehead, strong nose, firm but rather delicate mouth and a countenance which derived its expression from an intelligent and conscientious mind. He could not be forefather to so many men of strong religious feeling were he not himself religious. Richard was twenty-two the year he landed in the new world, 1630, a carpenter and a good one, as the Plymouth fathers employed him immediately in making a gun carriage for the defences on Fort Hill and in designing and building the first church in the colony. (He had to sue the Pilgrim Fathers to get his pay) He was also a cabinet maker and considered a good workman. He must have learned his trade in England as an apprentice. January 24, 1653, he bought a half-interest in a "corne mill at Hingham", setting an example which was to be followed by his sons.

ABSTRACTS FROM THE EARLIEST WILLS ON RECORD AND ON THE FILES IN THE COUNTY OF SUFFOLK, MASS. (prepared by William B. Trask)

I, RICHARD CHURCH, of Hingham, having perfect understanding, yet visited by sicknes of body, order this my last will. Debts payd, then my will is, that my wife Elizabrth Church, shall enjoy the Remainder during her life. And when it shall please God that Shee shall leave this life my will is, that what Estate I shall leave to her that shall not bee necessarily Expended for her maintenance shall then bee Equally divided amongst my children, only my sonn Joseph to have a dubble Portion, that is twice soe much as any of the rest of my children, by reason of the lamenes of his hand, whereby hee is disinabled above the rest of my children for the getting of a livelihood. I ordaine my sonn Joseph to bee my sole Executor. 25 Dec., 1668 Richard (X) Church In the presence of us, John Farebanck, senr., John Farebanck, junr. 26 Jan. 1668 Josuah Fisher and John Farebanck, senior, deposed. IINVENTORY of the estate, apprized by John Thaxter, and Matthew Cushin. Jan. 1, 1668. Amt. LB.365.14 Mentions--dwelling house with the barne, orchard and house LB.110. Lott, containing six Acres, LB.110; halfe a tide mill, LB.110; his share of the iron worke at Taunton, LB.50; 2 Acres of Land Lying by the mill, LB.10. Joseph Church deposed.


From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbpretz/PS03/PS03_208.HTM

Notes for Richard Church

"Richard Church, the immigrant settler and progenitor of the Churches of the region named, was born in 1608. He came to New England in 1630 in the fleet with Governor Winthrop. He removed from Weymouth to Plymouth, where he was made a freeman in 1632, and where he married, in 1636, Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Warren, of the 'Mayflower,' 1620. He lived at a number of different points, died in 1668 in Dedham, and was buried at HIngham. He was a carpenter by trade, and helped to build the first meetlinghouse and the first gun carriage in Plymouth. He served in the Pequot war. Locating at Eastham in 1653, he was then at Charlestown and in 1657 was at HIngham. He was the father of thirteen children, among them Col. Benjamin Church, who settled in Little Compton, R.I." 572

"Richard Church was born in England in 1608, and came to America with Governor Winthrop in 1630. He was made a freeman Oct. 19, 1630, but did not take the oath. He removed from Weymouth to Plymouth, and there on Oct. 4, 1632, was made a freeman. He was a carpenter by trade, and with John Thompson erected the first meeting-house, and built the first gun carriage in Plymouth, in 1637. In 1649 he sold his estate there and went to Eastham, whence in 1653 he moved to Charlestown,a nd four years later was located at HIngham. In 1664 he was at Sandwich. He was often a member of the grand inquest and frequently made referee. As a soldier in the Pequot war he held the rank of sergeant. His will, dated Dec. 25, 1668, provided for his widow, and gives equal portions to all his children except his son Joseph, who had a lame hand, and to him his father gave a double portion. In 1636 Richard Church married Elizabeth Warren, daughter of Richard Warren, the latter one of the passengers of the 'Mayflower.' " 572

Details to be entered from "Little Compton Families", pg. 166.

He was "the first of that surname in America. Mr. Church probably arrived at Boston in the fleet with Winthrop, and requested admission as freeman of Massachusetts Colony, 19 October, 1630, but removed to Plymouth, and was there received as freeman, 2 January, 1632-3. He served in the Pequot war, in which he doubtless earned the title of Sergeant, by which he was subsequently known. In 1647 he enchanged his lands at Eel River, Plymouth, given him by Mrs. Warren, and removed to Hingham. He made a deposition at Sandwich, 25 August, 1664, in which he gave his age as 'about 56 yeares.' He died at Dedham, 27 December, 1668, and was buried at Hingham. His will, dated two days earlier, provided for wife Elizabeth and all of his children, though naming but son Joseph, who was to receive a double portion in consideration of his lame hand."1037

"He is buried in Hingham at a spot which is covered now by the highway leading to the Old Steamboat Wharf, and near the water." Details and text of will to be entered.949

Richard Church shared mowing land with Mrs. Warren 14 March 1635/6. 318

He was "bur. HIngham where he resided for some years. . . Richard Church first appeared in New England records on 19 Oct. 1630 when he desired to be made a freeman of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was apparently living in Wessagusset (later called Weymouth) at that time. He had moved to Plymouth by 6 Feb. 1631 as stated in William Bradford's letter of that date. On 25 Aug. 1664 Richard Church deposed he was aged about 56 years. The will of Richard Church of Hingham, dated 25 Dec. 1668, sworn 26 Jan. 1668, names wife Elizabeth Church; 'my children', but he only names son Joseph. The 1 June 1669 Court granted land at the Taunton River to Benjamin Church for all the right of his father Richard Church deceased. On 29 Sept. 1688 Benjamin Church deeded a house lot to brother-in-law James Burroughs and his wife Sarah." 970, 950

"Richard Church was in the 1633 list of Freemen of Plymouth Colony. On 9 April 1649 Richard Church sold his land in Plymouth to Robert Bartlett, with wife Elizabeth giving her consent. On 13 July 1649 Thomas Prence sold land in Marchfield to Richard Church of Nawset (later called Eastham) and Anthony Snow of Marshfield. On 24 Jan. 1652 Richard Church of Charlestown, carpenter, purchased half of a corn mill in Hingham from Thomas Joy of Boston and his wife Joan. " 950

"b. 1608, arrived 1630, admitted a freeman, Oct. 4, 1632, (see p. 66) . . . He was a sergeant in the Pequod war." 333

"The thirty eight men who requested freemanship in October 1630 [at General Court of Massachusetts Bay], but were not on the May 1631 list, deserve a closer look. . . Of those who never became freemen, we might look at . . .Richard Church, who may have moved at this time to Plymouth." 1065

"The following tables comprise the two earliest tax lists of the Colony of New Plymouth that can be found. the first, taken 2 Jan., 1632-3, has never appeared in print; the second, being for the year 1633-4, was printed in the first volume of Hazard's valuable collection of State Papers. . . 1) Richard Church 01: 16: 00 . . 2) Rich. Church 01: 07: 00" 323

Of these thirty eight men, Richard Church was one of "eighteen delaysed only briefly attaining freeman status, being made free at various dates down to 1634, and also appearing in other town and colony records in the early and middle 1630s." 1066

" August 1643. The names of all the males that are able to beare armes from XVI yeares old to 60 yeares wthin the seuerall Touneships. Plymouth. . . Richard Church " 332

"Richard Church. This person, a carpenter, was at an early date in Duxbury. We find him at Eel river and Plymouth until about 1649, when he appears soon after at Eastham; and then of Charlestown in 1653, when he bought land in Hingham of Thomas Joye of Boston, [Suffolk Deeds] whither he removed, and, it is believed, continued during the remainder of his life. His death occurred at Dedham, Dec. 27th, 1668, though he was buried at Hingham, where his will is dated. - Hist. Bridgewater." 333

"The following list, containing, in part, the names of those in the colony who were taxed by order of the Court, March, 1633, will show the comparative wealth of some of them. Richard Church £1 7s [listed 7th]" 333

"Richard Church first appeared in New England records on 19 Oct. 1630 when he desired to be made a freeman of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was apparently living in Wesaqusset (later called Weymouth) at that time. He had moved to Plymouth by 6 Feb. 1631 as stated in William Bradford's letter of that date. Richard Church was in the 1633 list of Freemen of Plymouth Colony. On 9 April 1649 Richard Church sold his land in Plymouth to Robert Bartlett, with wife Elizabeth giving her consent. On 13 July 1649 Thomas Prence sold land in Marshfield to Richard Church of Nawset (later called Eastham) and Anthony Snow of Marshfield. On 24 Jan. 1652 Richard Church of Charlestown, carpenter, purchased half of a corn mill in Hingham from Thomas Joy of Boston and his wife Joan. On 25 Aug. 1664 Richard Church deposed he was aged about 56 years. The will of Richard Church of Hingham, dated 25 Dec. 1668, sworn 26 Jan. 1668, names wife Elizabeth Church; 'my children' but he only names son Joseph. The 1 June 1669 Court granted land at the Taunton River to Benjamin Church for all the right of his father Richard Church deceased. On 29 Sept. 1688 Benjamin Church deeded a house lot to brother-in-law James Burroughs and his wife Sarah." 969

"Richard Church came to New England about 1630. He may have come over with Winthrop's fleet, but was in Plymouth as a freeman Oct. 4, 1632. he seems to have paid is ow way over, and was free to do as he chose. He was a carpenter and builder, and, together with John Thomson, built the first church in the Colony, but he had to sue the Pilgrim Fathers for his pay. At various times he resided at Plymouth, Duxbury, Eastham and Charlestown, 1653, and last at Hingham, 1668, residing there for the rest of his life. He is mentioned in an interesting deposition take at Sandwich Aug. 25, 1664. 'Richard Church aged about 56 years this Deponant saith that hee being att worke about the mill the 19th of August hearng of a Cry that the man was killed; hasted prsently and healped to remove the earth from Thomas ffisk whoe being much bruised therrby was gott to bedd and in four Dayes and a halfe Dyed; and furthr saith not.' Richard Church died in Dedham, where he was on a visit, his death taking place 'Sabbath day erly in the morning.' Eleven of his children reached maturity. . . His will is recorded in Suffolk Co, at Boston, Vol. 6, p. 26, Inventory Vol. V, p. 116." 249

"The earliest published list of the children of Richard and Elizabeth (Warren) Church appears to be by Nahum Mitchell, who names eight children (History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater in Plymouth County, Mass. [Boston 1840; rpt. Baltimore 1970], p. 383). Bu 1967 this list had grown to fifteen children in Benjamin Franklin Wilbour's Little Compton Families ([Little Compton RI 1967], hereafter Wilbour, pp. 166-167). This article will document what is known about their children and establish which are proven and which are questionable. Unless otherwise stated, all town are in Massachusetts. Richard Church first appeared in New England records on 19 Oct. 1630 when he desired to be made a freeman of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. His name is listed with John Taylor, Richard Silvester and Robert Abell, all of whom were early settlers at Wessagusset (later Weymouth). 'It cannot be doubted that he was then living there . . . It is probable that he came before 1630 to Wessagusset, wher he first appears' (George Walter Chamberlain, History of Weymouth, Mass. [Boston 1923, p. 159). Church had arrived in Plymouth by 6 Feb. 1631, where he was 'one of Mr. Webb's man,' as stated in William Bradford's letter of that date (MD 9:1-3). On 2 Jan. 1632/3 Church was admitted as a freeman in Plymouth Colony (Nathaniel B. Shurtleff and David Pulsifer, eds., Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England [Boston 1855-1861; rpt. New York 1968], hereafter PCR, 1:6). The 14 March 1635/6 court record 'that Mrs. Warren, Rich. Church, Tho. Little & Robt. Bartlett mow where they did last year' (PCR 1:41) probably indicates that Richard Church was already married to Elizabeth Warren, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth (____) Warren. (Richard Warren was one of the Mayflower passengers, and his wife and five daughters, including Elizabeth, came on the Anne in 1623.) Thomas Litle and Robert Bartlett were married to other daughters of the widow Warren and her three sons-in-law were sharing the same meadow. Church had certainly married Elizabeth Warren by 7 March 1636/7 when Widow Elizabeth Warren mentions the formerly given by her unto her sons-in-law Richard Church, Robert Bartlett and Thomas Little, 'in marriage with their wives, her daughters' (PCR 1:54)." 977

"Richard Church was first called Sergeant Church on 7 March 1647/8 (PCR 2:121), the beginning of a family tradition of military service, On 9 April 1649 he sold his land in Plymouth to [his wife's brother-in-law] Robert Bartlett, with wife Elizabeth given her consent (PCR 12:165-66). Richard Church was 'of Nawset' (later Eastham) three months later (13 July 1649) when he and Anthony Snow purchased land in Marshfield from Thomas Prence (PCR 12:176). He was still there on 22 Oct. 1650 when he sold the same land to John Dingly (PCR 12:197). Apparently Church was still living in Plymouth Colony 4 June 1652 when he joined Robert Bartlett, Thomas Clarke, Nathaniel Warren and Joseph Warren in a suit about building a bridge over the Eel Ricer (PCR 7:59)." 977

"On 24 Jan. 1653 Richard Church of Charlestown, carpenter, purchased half a corn mill in Hingham (Suffolk Deeds 2:77, 83-84). This is about the time he moved to Hingham, where he lived out his life. The was a selectman there in 1665 (George Lincoln, History of the town of hingham, Mass. [Cambridge, 1893; rpt. Somersworth NH 1982], hereafter Lincoln, 2:125). On 25 Aug. 1664 Richard Church deposed that he was aged about 56 years (PCR 4:85; MD 4:152); so he was probably born about 1608, in England. Church died in Dedham 26 Dec. 1668, apparently while he was visiting his son Caleb (Don Gleason Hill, ed., The Record of Births, Marriages and Deaths, and Intentions of Marriage, in the Town of Dedham [Dedham 19=886], thereafter Dedham VR, p. 11)." 977

"The will of Richard Church of Hingham, dated 25 Dec. 1668 and sworn 26 Jan. 1668[/9], names wife Elizabeth Church, and provides that his estate 'bee equally divided amongst my children, only my sonn Jospeh to have a dubble Portion, that is twice soe much as any of the rest of my children, by reason the the lamnes [lameness] of his hand . . . ' (MD 5:118-19; Suffolk Co. PR 4:21). His inventory, dated 1 Jan. 1668[/9], mentions dwelling house with the barn, orchard and house; lot containing six acres; half a tide mill; his share of the iron works at Taunton; two acres of land by the mill (MD 5:119-20; Suffolk Co. PR 4:21" 977

"Because the will of Richard Church mentioned only one child, Joseph, and his widow left no probate, the proof of their children becomes difficult. There are very few vital records or church records to identify them. An exception is the Little Compton VR; however, these records wer entered long after the fact, and name only five children (James N. Arnold, Vital Record of Rhode Island 1636-1850 [Providence 1893, 4:Little Compton:101, hereafter LCVR): Joseph b. 1638 Benjamin b. 1639 Caleb b. 1642 Prescilla b. 1645 Sarah m. James Burroughs of Boston." 977

"Richard Church was born about 1608 [Mayflower Descendant, IV: 152.] and died at Adeham, Mass., 27 December, 1668 (O.S.), and was buried at Hingham, where he had resided for some years. The dedham records give the date of his death as 26 December, but the Hingham records {I:17], Hobart's Diary and Cushing's Manuscript all give it as 27, and as that day was Sunday, Hobart's entry under date of 27 December is conclusive. It reads 'Richard Church dyed at Dedham Sab: day erly In the morning.' His wife Elizabeth, the daughter of Richard Warren of the Mayflower, survived him and died at Hingham 9 March, 1669/70. [Town Records, I: 20] The will is recorded in the Suffolk County Probate Records at Boston, Volume VI, page 21, and the inventory in Volume V, page 116. The original documents are not in the files. [text of will and inventory to be entered.] 1064

"The Deposition of Richard Church aged about 56 yeares this Deponant saith that hee being att worke about the mill the 19th of august hearing of a Cry that the man was killed; hasted p'sently and healped to remove the earth from Thomas ffish whoe being much bruised therby was gott to bedd and in four Dayes and an halfe Dyed; and further saith not; 'This deposition of Richard Church, the husband of Elizabeth Warren (Richard) was made at Sandwich on 25 August. 1664, and is recorded in the Plymouth Colony Court Orders, Volume IV, page 92.' " 1067

" In the Chamberlain Collection at the Boston Public Library is an ancient letter which will be of great interest to a large proportion of those who can trace their descent from Pilgrim ancestry. This letter, dated 6 February, 1631 (16 February, 1632, new style), is in the well-known handwriting of Governor William Bradford, and on the fourth page was addressed by him as follows: 'To or Worpll good freinds mr Winthrp Gover of the Massachusetts & the rest of the Counssell ther.' It was signed by Governor Bradford, also by Capt. Myles Standish, Thomas Prence (afterwards Governor of Plymouth Colony), Doctor Samuel Fuller and John Alden. As Thomas Prence had married Patience, the daughter of Elder William Brewster, and the letter contains references to Edward Winslow (afterwards Governor of Plymouth Colony), and to Richard Church, who married Elizabeth, the daughter of Richard Warren, this document, which is reproduced in half-tone as the frontispiece of this issue, will be of especial interest to the thousands of descendants of the Bradford, Standish, Brewster, Fuller, Alden, Winslow and Warren families. . . . 'We have now at length returned an Answer to your letter dated the .26. of July . . . our meaning, & former practiss, was & hath been, only of shuch as come to dwell & inhabite, whether as servants, or free men; and not of soujournours wch come but for a seasone, with a purpose to returne, yet if any abuse should grow hereby; we shall agree to any good order for the preventing or redressing of ye same; provided the way be left open for pore men to releve ther wants, And for mutuall help to both plantations. We have therfore given warning in open courte to all our people; not to receive any as servants, or other dwellers with them, but to acquainte us first therwith that we may inquire of their certificates or dismisions; but we have sett no penealtie upon it as yett, because we hope ther shall no noe need if ther be we have libertie to punish shuch things at our discretions; if that will not serve; when we understand what penealtie you apointe in the case, we shall doe ye like, or yt which shall be equivelente unto it. . . . Richard Church came likewise ass a soujournour to worke for ye present; though he is still hear residente longer then he purposed; And what he will doe, neither, we no I thinke him selfe knowes; but if he resolve here to setle we shall require of him to procure a dismision; but he did afirme to us at ye first, that he was one of mr webbs men, & freed to goe for England or whither he would, ye wch we ye rather beleved because he came to us frome wessagasscusett upon ye falling out wth his parttner; for other intimated, we know none [thoug[h] we have inquired) but they had a dismission either to come hither, or goe for England . . . ' 1068

"CHURCH Richard, b. 1608, arrived at Boston, 1630; freeman, 1632; and from 1633 to 1649 inc. a resident of Ply. Mass. Subsequently he was for a short time at Eastham, removing thence to Charlestown. Jan. 24, 1653, he purchased of Thomas Joy 'one halfe or moytie of his Corne mill standeing vpon ye Ryuer caled ye towne Coue in hingham It is with ye damme head & Streame thereunto belongeing and halfe ye lott of Lande Lying there unto contayneing fower or six acres wch was formerly ye lands of Abraham Martyn,' etc. (S.R. Vol. I. pp. 82, 83). Richard, without doubt, was a resident of Hing. during the remainder of his life. He m. ab. 1636 Elizabeth, dau. of Richard and Elizabeth (Jouatt) Warren, who, in 1620, came to Plymouth in the 'Mayflower.' She d. in Hing. 4 March, 1670. He d. at Dedham, 27 Dec. 1668, 'though he was buried in Hing., and his will was made here.' "Carpenter.' Selectman in 1665. Resided on the spot now owned and occupied by heirs of the late Col. Charles Lane, on North St." 1050

"Richard Church, 'a sojourner' removed from 'Wessagasscusett' to Plymouth before 6 Feb. 1631-32. He desired to be made a freeman of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, 19 Oct. 1630. His name is given with John Taylor, Ricahrd Silvester, and Robert Abell, all of whom were early settlers at Wessagussett. It cannot be doubted that he was then living there. Gov. William Bradford wrote a letter from Plymouth, 6 Feb. 1631-32, to Gov. John Winthrop, in which he said among other things: 'Richard Church came likewise as a souourne to work for ye present; though he is still here residente longer than he purposed. And what he will doe, neither we nor I thinke himselfe knowes; but if he resolve here to setle we shall require of him to procure a dismission; but he did affirme to us at ye first that he was one of Mr. [____] Webb's men and freed to goe for England or whither he would, ye wch we ye rather beleved because he came to us from Wessagasscusett upon ye falling out with his partner.' (The Mayflower Descendant, 9:3.) This letter implies that Richard Church was neither a member of those who came in Winthrop's fleet in 1630, nor of the Pilgrims who came to Plymouth in the Mayflower or the Fortune in 1621. He was 'one of Webb's men.' He evidently settled in Plymouth, as he was taxed there £1 16s. on 2 Jan. 1632-33, and again £1 7s. on 2 Jan. 1633-34. He was among the Plymouth men able to bear arms in Aug. 1643. (Register, 4:253, 254, 256.) He was made a freeman of Plymouth Colony, 4 Oct. 1632. It has been stated that he came in Winthrop's fleet in 1630, but that appears to be pure supposition. In view of the fact that he was one of Mr. Webb's men ad a sojourner, according to Bradford, it is probable that he came before 1630 to Wessagusset, where he first appears. According to his deposition made at Sandwich 25 Aug. 1664, he was 'aged about 56 yeares.' (The Mayflower Descendant, 4:152.) Hence he was born near 1608 and died at Dedham, 27 Dec. 1668. He resided in Plymouth, Eastham and Charlestown, and from 1653 to 1668 at Hingham. He married, about 1636, Elizabeth Warren, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth Warren. She died at Hingham, 9 Mar. 1669-70. (For their twelve Children see Lincoln's Genealogies of Hingham, 2:125, and The Mayflower Descendant, 5: 118.) 1069

"Another deed i find given Oct. 22, 1650, from Richard Church, of land lying in Marshfield on teh south side of South River to John Dingley."280

"The Governor and Assistants of Plymouth to the Governor and Assistants of Massachusetts To our Wors[hipfu]ll good freinds mr Winthrop Gouer[nour] of the Massachusetts and the rest of the Counssell ther . . . Richard Church came likewise ass a soujournour to worke for the present; tough he is still hear residente longer than he purpossed; And what he will doe, neither we nor I thinke him self knowes, but if he resolue here to setle we shall require of him to procure a dismision; but he did affirme to vs at the first, that he was one of mr. webbs men, and freed to goe for England or whither he would, the which we the rather beleued because he came to vs frome wessagasscusett upon the faling out with his parttner; for others intimated, we know none, )thoug we haue inquired) but they had a dismission either to come hither, or goe for England. . . . Plim:feb. 6, 1631[/32] William Bradford Gouer[nour] Myles Standish Tho: Prence Samuell Fuller John Alden" 1070

"Richard Church, carpenter, b. England c1608; d. Dedham, Massl, 2 Dec. 1668, probably on a visit to his son Caleb. His death is noted in the Journal of Rev. Hobart: 'December 2, 1668 Richard Church dyed.' In his will written the day before his death, he calls himself of Hingham, but the witnesses are all of Dedham. He m. by 7 Mar 1636/37 Elizabeth Warren, b. England; d. Hingham, Mass., 9 Mar 1669/70, d/o Richard Warren, Mayflower passenger. Her death is noted in the Journal Rev. Hobart: 'March 9, 1670 widdow Church dyed.' Elizabeth came to America 1623 on the Anne with her mother and four sisters." 125

"There is much information on Richard Church, who first appeared in New England records on 19 Oct 1630 when he desired to be made a freeman of Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was 'one of Mr. Webb's men,' as stated in Bradford's letter dated 6 Feb 1631. On that date he arrived in Plymouth, and he was admitted as a freeman of Plymouth Colony 4 Oct 1632. He was among the Plymouth men able to bear arms in Aug 1643. According to a deposition made at Sandwich 25 Aug 1664, he was 'aged about 56 yeares.' 'The Deposition of Richard Church aged about 56 yeares this Deponent saith that hee being att worke about the mill the 19th day of august hearing of a Cry that the man was killed; hasted presently and healped to remove the earth from Thomas ffish who eing much bruised thereby was gott to bedd and in four dayes and a halfe Dyed; and further saith not. Made at Sandwich 25 Aug. 1664 and recorded in Plymouth Colony Court Orders, Vol. IV, p. 92. (Mayflower Descendant IV-152).' " 125

"Richard Church was first called Sergeant Church on 7 Mar 1647/8, the beginning of a family tradition of military service. He resided in Plymouth, Eastham and Charlestown, and from 1653 to 1668 at Hingham." 125

"I, Richard Church, of Hingham, hauing perfect understanding, yet visited by sickness of body, order this my last will. Debts payd, then my will is, tht my wife, Elizabeth Church, shall enjoy the Remainder during her life. And when it shall please God that shee shall leaue this life my will is, that what Estate I shall leaue to her that shall not bee necessarily Expended for her maintenance shall then bee Equally diuided amongst my children, only my sonn Joseph to have a dubble Portion, that is twice soe much as any of the rest of my children, by reason of the lamnes of his hand, whereby hee is disinabled above the rest of my children for the getting of a liuelihood. I ordaine my sonn Joseph to bee my sole Executor. 25 Dec. 1668. Richard X Church In the presence of vs, Josuah Fisher, John Farebanck, senr., John Farebanck, junr." 125


http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/m/e/i/M-S-Meinhart/GENE9-0026.html
Born about 1608 (deposed 27 Apr 1657 aged 48 years or thereabouts; deposed 25 Aug 1664 aged about 56 years). Came to Plymouth Colony in 1630 as servant to Francis Webb & first settled in Weymouth. Moved to Plymouth in 1631, Eastham in 1649, Charlestown by 1652, and finally Hingham in 1654. Died in Dedham 26 December 1668, probably on a visit to his son Caleb. In his will, written the day before his death, he calls himself of Hingham, but the witnesses are all of Dedham.

Married by 7 March 1636/7 (and probably by 14 March 1635/6), Elizabeth Warren, daughter of RICHARD WARREN. She died in Hingham 9 March 1669/70. Their ten children: Elizabeth Hobart, Joseph, Benjamin, Nathaniel, Charles, Caleb, Abigail Thaxter, Sarah Burroughs, Mary, & Deborah.

"He died in Dedham where he was on a visit, his demise taking place "Sabbath day erly in the morning," and is buried in Hingham at a spot which is covered now by the highway leading to the Old Steamboat Wharf, and near the water. (Letter of Mrs. Henrietta Church Dunham.)" Source: Anderson's Winthrop Fleet.

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Richard Church, of Hingham's Timeline

1608
1608
England
1635
1635
Age 27
Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts
1636
1636
Age 28
Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts
1637
1637
Age 29
Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts
1638
1638
Age 30
Plymouth, Mass
1639
1639
Age 31
Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts
1640
September 20, 1640
Age 32
Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
1642
1642
Age 34