Richard Gildersleeve I, "The Immigrant"

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Richard Gildersleeve, I

Birthdate: (80)
Birthplace: Little Wallingford, Suffolk, England
Death: 1681 (80)
Hempstead, Long Island, NY, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Robert Gildersleeve and Barbara Gildersleeve
Husband of Isabella Gildersleeve

Occupation: Puritan - Emigrated 1635 to New Engalnd, surveyor
Managed by: Leland Bond-Upson
Last Updated:

About Richard Gildersleeve I, "The Immigrant"

Gildersleeve Pioneers, by Willard Harvey Gildersleeve, 1941: The Gyldensleve-Gildersleeve Family is one of the oldest English families on record - almost seven hundred years from Roger Gyldensleve, in 1273 land-holder in Norfolk, whose name was derived from "sleeves braided with gold." Richard Gildersleeve, Puritan, born in 1601 in Suffolk, England, came to New England in 1635, and was a pioneer in the settlements of Connecticut, Dutch New York and Long Island, as was his son, Richard II. The grandson, Richard III of Northport, founded the older line of Gildersleeve families that has spread all over America, while his brother Thomas was founder of the more numerous younger line and very prominent in St. George's Church of Hempstead. The greater portion of the book is made up of records of these first four Gildersleeve pioneers, who from 1635 to 1740 helped to settle a virgin wilderness in New England and New York, and firmly lay the foundations of our country. This was done in constant battle against the oppression of royal governors of the exploited colonial province of New York. The records show how these pioneers were forced to meet persecution and oppression such as no other colonists faced.

It is astounding how much of the records of the colony are devoted to the affairs of the Long Island town of Hempstead, under constant persecution by its governors, and their predatory followers, the Indian puppets and greedy land speculators. Documentary evidence shows how solid were the foundations of self-government the early colonists laid, so educating the people that later at the proper time the Bill of Rights was adopted in making up the Constitution of the United States. The thoughts expressed in the Declaration of Independence were the principles of the early settlers of Long Island towns. Almost fifty citations from Oyster Bay town records testify to the active career of "Mr." Gildersleeve.

The most striking fact brought out in this series of sketches of pioneer life is that the struggle for American independence really started in the first years of settlement of the English colonies. Research work in the libraries and halls of records must follow the careers of the early settlers if one is to get at the fundamentals of American government, and avoid mistaken judgments as to the nature of the inherited beliefs of those that formulated the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States.

Genealogical Guide to the Early Settlers of America, Henry Whittemore, 1967: Richard Gildersleeve, of Stamford, one of the first settlers in 1641; representative 1643; had been 5 years before at Wethersfield, removed about 1646 to Hempstead, L.I., where he was 1663; had commission for administering justice.

References - Champion Gen., 62.

Richard is said to have been born at Aldeburgh Parish, on the North Sea Coast of England, in County Suffolk. He was at Wethersfield, Connecticut by 1636, and was a founder of Stamford in 1641. About 1644 he joined the group that settled Hempstead, Long Island. In 1652 he moved to Middlesburg (later Newtown), Long Island, and was Magistrate. He returned to Hempstead where he was magistrate in 1658. He was on the Hempstead 1683 tax list. No attempt has been made to compile a complete record of him because of the uncertainty as to the marriage of a daughter to Jeremy Wood.

Above is from the Ancestry of Thomas Jefferson Wood.


From http://jliptrap.us/gen/gildersleeve.htm:

Richard Gildersleeve (c1601-1681) is said to have been born in Hempstead, Hertfordshire. [Directory of the Ancestral Heads of New England Families, Frank R Holmes, 1923] He married first a wife whose name we do not know (see below), mother of his children. He married secondly the Widow Smith, mother of John Nan Smith. He is supposed to have been born in Aldeburgh, Suffolk, England, but I have not seen proof. Both he and his wife claimed to be 76 years of age in a deposition in Hempstead 22 July 1677. He moved to Watertown, Mass, in 1635, Wethersfield, CT, in Sept 1636, Quinnipiac (New Haven CT) in 1639, Stamford, CT, in Oct 1640, and Hempstead LI in 1643.

He was in the group of puritans led by Rev. Richard Denton, but later became a Presbyterian. He moved to Newtown, LI, in 1652, where he was among the purchasers of land from the Indians in 1656. He was appointed Magistrate by Peter Stuyvesant, a position he again held in Hempstead in 1658. Shortly after its formation, Heemstede (Hempstead) fell under the gaze of the leaders of the Connecticut colony, who had long hoped to incorporate Long Island. In 1662, Connecticut sent representatives to ask the English towns on Long Island to change their allegiance to the Connecticut colony, but Richard Gildersleeve refused, and remained loyal to the colony to which he had sworn an oath. He protested the exploitations of Colonial Governors, both Dutch and English. He signed the Hempstead Petition of 1669, demanding "No taxation without representation!" He died in Hempstead, Queens County, New York.

  • 1. Richard Gildersleeve (c1626-21 May 1691) married 1654 Dorcas Williams
  • 2. Anna Gildersleeve (c1629-bef.1671) m.c1646 John "Nan" Smith (see below)
  • 3. Elizabeth "Betsy" Gildersleeve (c1628-aft.20 Feb 1663/4) m.c1645 Jeremiah Wood (1620-1686) OR m.1647 William Lawrence of Flushing. The identity of her husband is disputed,
  • 4. Samuel Gildersleeve (1631- after 1665)

Richard Gildersleeve has been widely reported to have married Joanna Appleton (1601-aft.1677) in 1620. She is alleged to have been the daughter of Thomas Appleton (1539-16 May 1603) who married in 1572 Mary Isaacke (1552-11 Jun 1613). This line extends back to William D'Aubigney (1175-1220) Crusader, named in the Magna Carta, and further back to Charlemagne. Unfortunately, Thomas Appleton did not have a daughter named Joanna. He and Mary had 9 children between 1572 and 1588. Those who survived were listed in his will. There was no Joanna. Connecticut Genealogy, Vol 3, p. 1023, published 1911-2, established this myth. It was garbled from a Latin rendition of the 1635 purchase by a Richard Gildersleeve and John Borcham, of the Appleton Manor in Groton and Combs, County Suffolk, England, from Samuel Appleton and wife Judith; Thomas Gostlyn and wife Jane or Joanna, and Stephen Keable and wife Mariam.

- Colonial Families of Long Island, New York, and Connecticut, Herbert F Seversmith, 1948, v.3, p.1158

I have also seen Gildersleeve's wife listed as Experience. But I have seen no evidence for this claim.

A Richard Gildersleeve of Aldeburgh, widower, married 18 Apr 1618 Barbara Patrick, a widow. This is not likely to be the Richard who moved to Massachusetts in 1635, since he was approximately 17 years old in 1618. This is more likely the purchaser of the Appleton Manor in 1635, perhaps the father or an uncle of the Richard of Massachusetts. Richard of Groton died in 1653, his wife was Mary. Another Richard Gildersleeve lived in Little Wallingford with his wife Joanna.

The Ancestry of Rev. Nathan Grier Parke and his wife Ann Elizabeth Gildersleeve, N Grier Parke III, 1959.


Richard Gildersleeve II was born in 1601 in , Suffolk, England. He died in 1681 in Hempstead, Long Island, Queens, Nassau County, New York. He was buried in 1681. Gildersleeve Pioneers, by Willard Harvey Gildersleeve, 1941:

The Gyldensleve-Gildersleeve Family is one of the oldest English families on record - almost seven hundred years from Roger Gyldensleve, in 1273 land-holder in Norfolk, whose name was derived from "sleeves braided with gold." Richard Gildersleeve, Puritan, born in 1601 in Suffolk, England, came to New England in 1635, and was a pioneer in the settlements of Connecticut, Dutch New York and Long Island, as was his son, Richard 2d. The grandson, Richard 3d of Northport, founded the older line of Gildersleeve families that has spread all over America, while his brother Thomas was founder of the more numerous younger line and very prominent in St. George's Church of Hempstead. The greater portion of the book is made up of records of these first four Gildersleeve pioneers, who from 1635 to 1740 helped to settle a virgin wilderness in New England and New York, and firmly lay the foundations of our country. This was done in constant battle against the oppression of royal governors of the exploited colonial province of New York. The records show how these pioneers were forced to meet persecution and oppression such as no other colonists faced.

It is astounding how much of the records of the colony are devoted to the affairs of the Long Island town of Hempstead, under constant persecution by its governors, and their predatory followers, the Indian puppets and greedy land speculators. Documentary evidence shows how solid were the foundations of self-government the early colonists laid, so educating the people that later at the proper time the Bill of Rights was adopted in making up the Constitution of the United States. The thoughts expressed in the Declaration of Independence were the principles of the early settlers of Long Island towns. Almost fifty citations from Oyster Bay town records testify to the active career of "Mr." Gildersleeve.

The most striking fact brought out in this series of sketches of pioneer life is that the struggle for American independence really started in the first years of settlement of the English colonies. Research work in the libraries and halls of records must follow the careers of the early settlers if one is to get at the fundamentals of American government, and avoid mistaken judgments as to the nature of the inherited beliefs of those that formulated the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States.

Genealogical Guide to the Early Settlers of America, Henry Whittemore, 1967: Richard Gildersleeve, of Stamford, one of the first settlers in 1641; representative 1643; had been 5 years before at Wethersfield, removed about 1646 to Hempstead, L.I., where he was 1663; had commission for administering justice.

References - Champion Gen., 62.

Richard is said to have been born at Aldeburgh Parish, on the North Sea Coast of England, in County Suffolk. He was at Wethersfield, Connecticut by 1636, and was a founder of Stamford in 1641. About 1644 he joined the group that settled Hempstead, Long Island. In 1652 he moved to Middlesburg (later Newtown), Long Island, and was Magistrate. He returned to Hempstead where he was magistrate in 1658. He was on the Hempstead 1683 tax list. No attempt has been made to compile a complete record of him because of the uncertainty as to the marriage of a daughter to Jeremy Wood.

Above is from the Ancestry of Thomas Jefferson Wood. Jo Anna Appleton and Richard Gildersleeve II had the following children:

+1808 i. Elizabeth "Betsy" Gildersleeve.

+1809 ii. Richard Gildersleeve III.

+1810 iii. Anna Gildersleeve.

1811 iv. Samuel Gildersleeve was born in 1631 in Suffolk, England.

Richard was an emigrant to Watertown, Mass., c.1634 during the Puritan exodus from England. He was a pioneer settler, surveyor, Colonial Commissioner, Constable, and Attorney never fully pleased with the rigidity of the Puritan Church or with local government in the seven colonies he helped to found. He was recorded in Wethersfield Connecticut on 10 Sept. 1636; signer of a New Haven Colony Covenant in 1639, a founder of Stamford in 1641, original proprietor of Hempstead in 1644 and New Town, Queens in 1652 and Freeport, NY. Richard signed the Hempstead Petition in 1669 which led the Duke of York in 1683 to Grant the "Charter of Liberties and Privileges" (known as the Dongen Charter, which mentioned for the first time "The People" in a legislative Declaration of the Ruling Powers of Government.

Richard served as a magistrate for Hempstead. He was commissioned by Peter Stuyresant, which he held until 1664 when the British captured NJ. As Magistrate Richard became a chief persecutor of Quakers.

Gildersleeves of Gildersleeve, Conn By Willard Harvey Gildersleeve

AMERICAN ANCESTRY OF PHILIP GILDERSLEEVE,

1757-1822.

Richard Gildersleeve, born in 1601 in County Suffolk, England, came to America in the Puritan Emigration of 1630-1640. Pausing at Watertown, Mass., he joined the small band of Puritan settlers who set out through the wilderness to settle the new colony of Connecticut. He made a home for himself in 1636, at Wethersfield, on the west side of High street, facing the Common near the river. He was one of the earliest proprietors of Naubuc Farms in Glastonbury when it was first surveyed. Discontented with conditions here, he journeyed down to the new colony just planted at New Haven where he was enrolled among the first proprietors of New Haven Colony in 1639. In 1641, he moved from Wethersfield to Staimford, Conn., where he was deputy to the General Court at New Haven. In 1644, he moved over with the first settlers of Hempstead, Long Island, N. Y., where he soon became one of the most influential and largest land proprietors. He was a "schepen," or Dutch magistrate under Governor Stuyveseant, 1644-1664. The first persecution of the Quakers by the Dutch came as a result of Magistrate Gilder- sleeve's activity.

During the Dutch-Indian War, he lived in Newtown, L. I., as one of the first proprietors and magistrates, 1652-1656. In 1664, when New York was captured by the English, he was appointed colonial commissioner by Connecticut. However, by the Duke of York's patent he became a royal subject once more. In 1669, he was one of that notable gathering of deputies from the English towns of Long Island who framed a petition, which fairly breathed the spirit of liberty manifested in the Declaration of Independence later. Lovelace, the Royal governor, had oppressed the towns severely. Mr. Gildersleeve, as deputy of Hempstead, refused absolutely to pay taxes without representation. It is impossible to say what would have happened, if, in 1673, New York had not been captured by the Dutch.

In 1674, New York was restored to the English. Richard Gildersleeve was deputy to New York to the Dutch Council. He also held very many offices of trust and honor in the town besides figuring in many of the exchanges of vast tracts of land. His main occupation lasting through life was that of surveyor. He was a Puritan of Puritans, fiery, and intolerant, strict and harsh n his official duties, but then the times were harsh enough to try the most heroic soul amidst the early settlements of the United States. He represented the town in all its dealings with the Indians, especially with Tackapousha, Sachem of the Marsapeage Indians. His wife was born in 1601 and witnessed in 1676 the final Indian exchange. He had three children, Richard, Samuel and Anna, the wife of John Smith, Nant., who came from Nantucket.


"[C]ame from England in 1635 to Wethersfield, CT. surveyor, Puritan Magistrate 1647-1664, Hempstead. Wife, age 76 in 1677, Indian treaty witness" (from Willard H. Gildersleeve letter, 1965).

From "Gildersleeves of Gildersleeve, Conn." by Willard Harvey Gildersleeve (Meriden, CT: Press of the Journal Publishing, 1914):

[Note that some dates differ from those in the letter above.]

After Wethersfield, Richard Gildersleeve moved to Stamford, CT, in 1941, "where he was deputy to the General Court at New Haven. In 1641, he moved to Hempstead, Long Island, NY, where was "schepen" or Dutch magistrate, 1644-1664. As such, he initiated Dutch persecution of the Quakers.

Richard moved to Newtown, Long Island, where he lived during the Dutch-Indian War. In 1664, he became colonial commissioner of Connecticut after the English captured New York. In 1669, he participated in a gathering of colonial deputies who drafted a petition that "fairly breathed the spirit of liberty manifested in the Declaration of Independence later." Richard refused to pay taxes without representation and was possibly saved from consequences when New York was captured by the Dutch in 1673.

After New York was restored to the English the following year, Richard held many offices, though his main occupation was surveyor. WHG describes him as "a Puritan of Puritans, fiery, and intolerant, strict, and harsh in his official duties" during times that were equally harsh.

He represented the town of Hempstead in its dealings with Indians, and his wife (whose name is not recorded) served as a witness to the final Indian treaty in 1676.

Richard had three children, Richard Jr., Samuel, and Anna, the wife of John Smith of Nantucket (pp. 7-8).

Sources

  1. Gildersleeve, Willard H. Gildersleeves of Gildersleeve, Conn: And Descendants of Philip Gildersleeve. Meriden, Conn: Press of the Journal Pub. Co, 1914.

Source: Gildersleeve Pioneers, by Willard Harvey Gildersleeve, 1941: The Gyldensleve-Gildersleeve Family is one of the oldest English families on record - almost seven hundred years from Roger Gyldensleve, in 1273 land-holder in Norfolk, whose name was derived from "sleeves braided with gold."

Richard Gildersleeve, Puritan, born in 1601 in Suffolk, England, came to New England in 1635, and was a pioneer in the settlements of Connecticut, Dutch New York and Long Island, as was his son, Richard 2d.

The grandson, Richard 3d of Northport, founded the older line of Gildersleeve families that has spread all over America, while his brother Thomas was founder of the more numerous younger line and very prominent in St. George's Church of Hempstead.

Source: Genealogical Guide to the Early Settlers of America, Henry Whittemore, 1967: Richard Gildersleeve, of Stamford, one of the first settlers in 1641; representative 1643; had been 5 years before at Wethersfield, removed about 1646 to Hempstead, L.I., where he was 1663; had commission for administering justice.

Richard is said to have been born at Aldeburgh Parish, on the North Sea Coast of England, in County Suffolk. He was at Wethersfield, Connecticut by 1636, and was a founder of Stamford in 1641. About 1644 he joined the group that settled Hempstead, Long Island. In 1652 he moved to Middlesburg (later Newtown), Long Island, and was Magistrate. He returned to Hempstead where he was magistrate in 1658. He was on the Hempstead 1683 tax list.

Above is from the Ancestry of Thomas Jefferson Wood.

Emigrated to America, probably sometime around 1660, arriving in New York city with his three grown children.

http://hausegenealogy.com/gildersleeve.html

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Richard Gildersleeve I, "The Immigrant"'s Timeline

1601
1601
Little Wallingford, Suffolk, England
1681
1681
Age 80
Hempstead, Long Island, NY, USA
????