Capt. Richard Lord

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Richard Lord

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Towcester, Northamptonshire, England
Death: Died in New London, (Present New London County), Connecticut Colony
Place of Burial: New London, New London County, Connecticut, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Lord; Thomas Lord and Dorothy Lord
Husband of Mary Lord and Sarah Lord
Father of Capt. Richard Lord II; Sarah Haynes and Dorothy Lord
Brother of Ann Stanton; Thomas Lord, Jr. Dr.; William Lord, Sr.; Robert Lord; Louisa Barnes and 20 others

Occupation: Captain of Hartford Company Troop of Horse c 1658, Merchant
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Capt. Richard Lord

Biographical Summary:

Captain Richard Lord, Cambridge, 1632; freeman, Massachusetts, March 4, 1635; came to Hartford in 1636, an original proprietor; his home-lot in 1639 was next west of his father's. He married in about 1635, Sarah ____ . He was one of the most energetic and efficient men in the colony; when the first troop of horse was organized, he was chosen commander, March 11, 1658, and distinguished himself in the Indian wars. He was constable, 1642; townsman, 1645; represented Hartford in the General Court from 1656 until his death. He was the captain relied on, in conjunction with John Pynchon, for securing the persons of the regicides Gofle and Whalley. He died in New London, May 17, 1662, in the 51st year of his age, and his gravestone may still be seen there, with the following epitaph :

"The bright Starre of our Cavallrie lyes here: Unto the State, a Counselour full Deare And to ye Truth a Friend of Sweet Content, To Hartford Towne a silver Ornament. Who can deny to Poore he was Reliefe, And in composing Paroxysmes was Chiefe. To Marchantes as a Patterne he might stand, Adventring Dangers now by Sea and Land."

His inventory taken May 10, 1662; amount, £539. 9. 5. His widow, Sarah, died in 1676.

Children

i. Richard, born 1636; married April 15, 1665, Mary, daughter of Henry and Ann (Pynchon) Smith, of Springfield; deputy, 1669, and often afterward; he was one of the wealthiest merchants of his time, made many trading voyages, and was lost at sea, November 5, 1685, aged 49, leaving a large estate to his widow and his only child; the inventory of his property amounted to £5,786, and was, with one exception the greatest up to that time in Hartford. His widow married (2) about 1686, Dr. Thomas Hooker, of Hartford, son of Rev. Samuel Hooker, of Farmington, died May 17, 1702, age 58. His only child, Richard, born 1669, married Jan. 14, 1692, Abigail, daughter of William Warren and his wife, Elizabeth Crow, afterward Mrs. Elizabeth Wilson. She, too, inherited a large property, and together they were one of the wealthiest couples of that period. Richard Lord was Treasurer of the Colony at the time of his death, Jan. 29, 1712, and the heaviest and costliest monumental table in the old burial ground is his. His widow married (2) Rev. Timothy Woodbridge, pastor of the First Church. Seven of Lord's ten children lived and married into prominent families. Asylum Hill was formerly called Lord's Hill, as a large portion of it was owned by the descendants of Elisha Lord, the oldest surviving son of Richard and Abigail. Their son Richard married Ruth, daughter of Hezekiah Wyllis, Esquire, apparently removed to Wethersfield, and died there about 1740. The youngest sons, Epaphras and Ichabod, removed to Colchester.

iii Sarah, born 1638 (daughter of Capt. Richard, who died 1662); married about 1668, Rev. Joseph Haynes, of Hartford; died November 15, 1705, aged 67.

iv. Dorothy, born 1640.

SOURCE: James Hammond Trumbull, editor, The memorial history of Hartford County, Connecticut, 1633-1884, Volume 1 (Boston, Massachusetts: Edward L. Osgood, 1886), page 249. Retrieved: 3 May 2011 from Google Books

Biograpical Summary #2:

In March 1635 he was listed as a Freedman of Cambridge. In 1636 he migrated to Hartford, Connecticut, where his home lot was adjacent to that of his father. In 1642 he served as Constable in Hartford, and in 1645 he was Townsman. Beginning in 1656, he represented Hartford in the Connecticut General Court (the administrative council), continuing until his death.

In March 1658, when the first troop of horses was organized in Connecticut, he was chosen commander. He distinguished himself in the Indian wars and was widely regarded as "one of the most energetic and efficient men in the colony."


Deputy to the General Court in March 1659.

Epitaph

"The bright Starre of our Cavallrie lyes here; Unto the State, a Counselour full Deare, Ant to the Truth a Friend of Sweet Content, To Hartford Towne a silver ornament. Who can deny to Poore he was Releise. And in composing Paroxymames was Cheife. To Marchantes, as a Patterne he might stand, Adventuring Dangers new by Sea and Land.

At a General Court held at Hartford, in 1643 "Richard Lord, for his miscariedge in draweing his word and using threatening speeches in contending with Tho. Stanton about tradeing for incean corne, is fyned to pay the County five pound."

CBW Notes


The Founders of Hartford

Captain Richard Lord, Cambridge, 1632; freeman, Mass., March 4, 1635 ; came to Hartford in 1636, an original proprietor ; his home-lot in 1639 was next west of his father's. He m. ab. 1635, Sarah -. He was one of the most energetic and efficient men in the colony ; when the first troop of horse was organized, he was chosen commander, March 11, 1658, and distinguished himself in the Indian wan. He was constable, 1642 ; townsman, 1645 ; represented Hartford in the General Court from 1656 until his death. He was the captain relied on, in conjunction with John Pynchon, for securing the persons of the regicides Goffe and Whalley. He d. in New London, May 17, 1662, in the 51st year of his age, and his gravestone may Still be seen there, with the following epitaph:

“The bright Starre of our Cavallrie Ives here Unto the State, a Counselour fall Dears And to ye Truth a Friend of Sweet Content, To Hartford Towns a silver Ornament. Who can deny to Poore he was Reliefe, And in composing Paroxysmes was Chiefe. To Marchantes as a Patterns he might stand, Adventring Dangers new by Sea and Land.” His inv. taken May 10, 1662; amount, f1,539. 9. 5. His widow, Sarah, d. in 1676. -Ch. : i. Richard, b. 1636 ; m. April 15, 1665, Mary, can. of Henry and Ann (Pynchon) Smith, of Springfield ; deputy, 1669, and often afterward ; he was one of the wealthiest merchants of his time, made many trading- voyages, and was lost at sea, Nov. 5, 1685, aged 49, leaving a large estate to his widow and his only child ; the inv. of his property amounted to 15,786, and was with one exception the greatest up to that time in Hartford. His widow m. (2) ab. 1686, Dr. Thomas Hooker, of Hartford, son of Rev. Samuel Hooker, of Farmington, died May 17, 1702, m. 58. His only child, Richard, b. 1669, m. Jan. 14, 1692, Abigail, dau. of William Warren and his wife, Elizabeth Crow, afterward Mrs. Elizabeth Wilson. She, too, inherited a large property, and together they were one of the wealthiest couples of that period. Richard Lord was Treasurer of the Colony at the time of his death, Jan. 29, 1712, and the heaviest and costliest monumental table in the old burial ground is his. His widow m. (2) Rev. Timothy Woodbridge, pastor of the First Church. Seven of Lord's ten children lived and married into prominent families. Asylum Hill was formerly called Lord's Hill, as a large portion of it was owned by the descendants of Elisha Lord, the oldest surviving son of Richard and Abigail. Their son Richard m. Ruth, dau. of Hezekiah Wyllis, Esq., - apparently removed to Wethersfield, and d. then ab. 1740. The youngest sons, Epaphras and Ichabod, removed to Colchester. iii. Sarah, b. 1638 (dau. of Capt. Richard, who d. 1662) ; m. ab. 1668, Rev. Joseph Haynes, of Hartford; d. Nov. 15, 1705, aged 67. iv. Dorothy, b. 1640.

______________________________________________________________________________________________

Capt Richard Lord Memorial

Birth: unknown Death: May 17, 1662 New London County Connecticut, USA

age 51 The bright Starre of our cavallrie lyes here, Unto the State a counsellour full deare, And to ye truth a friend of sweet content, To Hartford towne a silver ornament. Who can deny to poore he was releife, And in composing paroxysmes was chiefe, To Marchantes as a Patterne he might stand, Adventring dangers new by sea and land.

[Richard Lord was born in Townchester, Northampton, England in 1611, and baptized there on January 5, 1612, the son of THOMAS & DOROTHY (BIRD) LORD. He immigrated with his parents in 1633 at about 22 years of age, and became a freeman on March 4 1634/5. Between 1656 and 1661, he was a deputy to the general assembly at Hartford, served on the Connecticut petit jury in July of 1640, a constalble of Hartford in 1642, and a selectman in 1644..

Between 1639 and 1646, the Colonial Records of Conn. mention his name six times regarding legal issues. For example, in April 1642, during an argument with his brother-in-law, Thomas Stanton, regarding trading with the Indians in Long Island, Richard drew his sword and threatened Thomas. For this, he was ordered to pay a 5 pound fine.

On April 23, 1662, he was one of the patentees of the royal charter for Connecticut. He was elected Captain of a company of Troopers (the first cavalry of the colony) under the command of Major John Mason on March 11, 1657.

By 1635, he had received land in Cambridge, Mass. which included a homelot with a garden plot, one rod in "Cowyard Row", three acres on "Small Lot Hill", one rod in "Ox Marsh, and three acres in the "Great Marsh". He was one of the largest landholders in Hartford with nearly 50 parcels of land. On March 13, 1661/2 he was granted 350 acres of upland and 50 acres of meadow.

Richard & his father were merchants in Hartford and some of their dealing were in New London, Conn. It was there that he died and was buried even though his residence was in Hartford with his wife Sarah (married about 1635 in Hartford). Administration of his estate was granted on September 5, 1662 to Mrs. Lord, widow. The estate amounted to œ3488 11s 1 d. There were debts due him from a wide range of places including most towns in Connecticut, Long Island, Delaware, Virginia, "Indian debts", Barbados, & England. His widow died at Hartford in 1676.

The known children of Richard & Sarah Lord: Richard Lord, Sarah (Lord) Haynes, Dorothy Lord, & Jerusha (Lord) Whiting. -courtesy of Nareen Lake]


Family links:

Parents:
 Thomas Lord (1585 - 1678)
 Dorothy Bird Lord (1588 - 1676)

Spouse:
 Sarah Graves Lord (1615 - 1676)*

Children:
 Richard Lord (1635 - 1685)*
 Sarah Lord Haynes (1639 - 1705)*

Siblings:
 Richard Lord (____ - 1662)
 Anna Lord Stanton (1614 - 1688)*
 William Lord (1618 - 1678)*
 Thomas Lord (1619 - 1662)*
 Robert Lord (1625 - 1678)*
 Aymie Lord Gilbert (1626 - 1691)*
 Dorothy Lord Ingersoll (1631 - 1657)*
  • Calculated relationship

Burial: Ancient Cemetery New London New London County Connecticut, USA


Created by: Jan Franco Record added: Jul 11, 2005 Find A Grave Memorial# 11339681 _________________________________________________

Biographical Summary:

Captain Richard Lord, Cambridge, 1632; freeman, Massachusetts, March 4, 1635; came to Hartford in 1636, an original proprietor; his home-lot in 1639 was next west of his father's. He married in about 1635, Sarah ____ . He was one of the most energetic and efficient men in the colony; when the first troop of horse was organized, he was chosen commander, March 11, 1658, and distinguished himself in the Indian wars. He was constable, 1642; townsman, 1645; represented Hartford in the General Court from 1656 until his death. He was the captain relied on, in conjunction with John Pynchon, for securing the persons of the regicides Gofle and Whalley. He died in New London, May 17, 1662, in the 51st year of his age, and his gravestone may still be seen there, with the following epitaph :

"The bright Starre of our Cavallrie lyes here: Unto the State, a Counselour full Deare And to ye Truth a Friend of Sweet Content, To Hartford Towne a silver Ornament. Who can deny to Poore he was Reliefe, And in composing Paroxysmes was Chiefe. To Marchantes as a Patterne he might stand, Adventring Dangers now by Sea and Land."

His inventory taken May 10, 1662; amount, £539. 9. 5. His widow, Sarah, died in 1676.

Children

i. Richard, born 1636; married April 15, 1665, Mary, daughter of Henry and Ann (Pynchon) Smith, of Springfield; deputy, 1669, and often afterward; he was one of the wealthiest merchants of his time, made many trading voyages, and was lost at sea, November 5, 1685, aged 49, leaving a large estate to his widow and his only child; the inventory of his property amounted to £5,786, and was, with one exception the greatest up to that time in Hartford. His widow married (2) about 1686, Dr. Thomas Hooker, of Hartford, son of Rev. Samuel Hooker, of Farmington, died May 17, 1702, age 58. His only child, Richard, born 1669, married Jan. 14, 1692, Abigail, daughter of William Warren and his wife, Elizabeth Crow, afterward Mrs. Elizabeth Wilson. She, too, inherited a large property, and together they were one of the wealthiest couples of that period. Richard Lord was Treasurer of the Colony at the time of his death, Jan. 29, 1712, and the heaviest and costliest monumental table in the old burial ground is his. His widow married (2) Rev. Timothy Woodbridge, pastor of the First Church. Seven of Lord's ten children lived and married into prominent families. Asylum Hill was formerly called Lord's Hill, as a large portion of it was owned by the descendants of Elisha Lord, the oldest surviving son of Richard and Abigail. Their son Richard married Ruth, daughter of Hezekiah Wyllis, Esquire, apparently removed to Wethersfield, and died there about 1740. The youngest sons, Epaphras and Ichabod, removed to Colchester.

iii Sarah, born 1638 (daughter of Capt. Richard, who died 1662); married about 1668, Rev. Joseph Haynes, of Hartford; died November 15, 1705, aged 67.

iv. Dorothy, born 1640.

SOURCE: James Hammond Trumbull, editor, The memorial history of Hartford County, Connecticut, 1633-1884, Volume 1 (Boston, Massachusetts: Edward L. Osgood, 1886), page 249. Retrieved: 3 May 2011 from Google Books

Biograpical Summary #2:

In March 1635 he was listed as a Freedman of Cambridge. In 1636 he migrated to Hartford, Connecticut, where his home lot was adjacent to that of his father. In 1642 he served as Constable in Hartford, and in 1645 he was Townsman. Beginning in 1656, he represented Hartford in the Connecticut General Court (the administrative council), continuing until his death.

In March 1658, when the first troop of horses was organized in Connecticut, he was chosen commander. He distinguished himself in the Indian wars and was widely regarded as "one of the most energetic and efficient men in the colony."

Deputy to the General Court in March 1659. Epitaph

"The bright Starre of our Cavallrie lyes here; Unto the State, a Counselour full Deare, Ant to the Truth a Friend of Sweet Content, To Hartford Towne a silver ornament. Who can deny to Poore he was Releise. And in composing Paroxymames was Cheife. To Marchantes, as a Patterne he might stand, Adventuring Dangers new by Sea and Land.

At a General Court held at Hartford, in 1643 "Richard Lord, for his miscariedge in draweing his word and using threatening speeches in contending with Tho. Stanton about tradeing for incean corne, is fyned to pay the County five pound."

CBW Notes

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Capt. Richard Lord's Timeline

1611
January 5, 1611
Towcester, Northamptonshire, England
January 5, 1611
Towchester, Northampton, England
January 5, 1611
Towcester, Northampton, England
January 5, 1611
Towcester, Northamptonshire, England, United Kingdom
January 5, 1611
Towchester, Northampton, England
January 5, 1611
Towchester, Northampton, England, Great Britain
January 5, 1611
Towchester, Northampton, England
January 5, 1611
Towchester, Northamptonshire, England
January 5, 1611
Towcester, Northamptonshire, England, United Kingdom
November 15, 1611
Towcester, Northamptonshire, England