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Richard York

Birthdate:
Birthplace: England (United Kingdom)
Death: April 23, 1672 (69-70)
Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Unknown Father York and Unknown Mother York
Husband of Elizabeth Graves
Father of Rachel Yorke; John York; Ruth York; Samuel York; Elizabeth Cartey and 3 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Richard York


Richard arrived here in the ship James. It arrived here Oct. 10, 1633 at Salem, Massachusetts. He came with Capt. Wiggings, agent for the Bristol Company of England, and a company of merchants from Bristol and Shrewsbury, England. Richard settled on Dover Neck, New Hampshire. Dover Neck was first called Bristol in 1634.

"Embarked for New England" p. 280.:"Ipswich [England--dy] A note of the names and ages of all the Passengers which tooke shipping In the Elizabeth of Ipswich M' William Andrews bound for new EngLand the last of Aprill 1634....Richard York, aged 32..."[citation needed]

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/York-699

Richard York

Born 1602 in England

Husband of Elizabeth (UNKNOWN) Graves — married 1642 in Dover, New Hampshire

Father of Rachel (York) Hull, Elizabeth (York) Cartey, Samuel York, John York, Benjamin York and Grace (York) Gilman

Died 23 Apr 1672 in Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire

Profile last modified 2 Oct 2019 | Created 26 May 2011

Richard York migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).

Richard arrived here in the ship James. It arrived here Oct. 10, 1633 at Salem, Massachusetts. He came with Capt. Wiggings, agent for the Bristol Company of England, and a company of merchants from Bristol and Shrewsbury, England. Richard settled on Dover Neck, New Hampshire. Dover Neck was first called Bristol in 1634.

"Embarked for New England" p. 280.:"Ipswich [England--dy] A note of the names and ages of all the Passengers which tooke shipping In the Elizabeth of Ipswich M' William Andrews bound for new EngLand the last of Aprill 1634....Richard York, aged 32..."[citation needed] He signed petition to the Massachusetts General Court in 1654.

Richard York lived in Dover on Low Street in 1640.[1]

Richard deposed that in 1652 to the fact that he was in Dover in 1635. He owned land on Dover Neck in 1642. He paid taxes there up to 1672. He had a grant of 100 acres in 1656 next to John Martin and adjoining the Lamprey River. He willed this to his son Benjamin April 23, 1672. The inventory of his estate was filed March 27, 1674. His widow Elisabeth remarried to William Graves, who was still living in Exeter in 1701. Elizabeth divided a parcel of planting ground that was left to her by her husband Richard, to her son John and herself. She divided it into thirds.[2]

"Whereas it do appear by evidence that in the year 1656 at a public town meeting Richard York had given and granted unto him and his heir and assigns one hundred acres of land by Lamprill River side next to John Martin Lot which said land is bounded as followeth, that is to say by lamprill river side North west 96 rods and form the marked tree betwixt John Martin and Richard York 200 Rods southwest and be west(?)and the head line 96 rods northwest & be northand from that marked tree to the River agian 200 Rods Southwest and be west. This lot was layed out and bounded by Roberd(Robert) Burnum(Burnham?) and Ensign John Saues(?) the 11th 1st month 1660. "John Alt and Richard York were appointed administrators of Branson's estate July 2, 1657. Branson's creek is on the Durham shore of the Great Bay, and is now known as Crummit's creek (See Long Creek).[3] 1661 Place: Lot on eastern shore of Dover Neck Bought of Wm. Hilton 50 acres at Littlejohn Creek, inlet of Back River on Eastern Shore of Dover Neck, NH. Sold same on Aug 7, 1661 to Joseph Austin. (Note on back of card: Northamn-Northam, England. Blood Pt. parallels Bloody Corner of Battle Farie--King Arthur's Time...dy.)

1665 July 26th Petition of the Inhabitants of the Eastward parts to his Majestie: Praying to be freed from ye Juristdiction of ye Massachusetts. Signers include John Yorke and Richard Yorke [4]

The records show him to have been a worthy settler who was in good standing in the town and church. He was a planter and had accumulated a respectable amount. He signed the church petition in 1669.

1669 : Petition to make Oyster River a separate township sent to General Court of Mass.

Richard died April 23, 1672.[5]

The will of Richard York, written April 23, 1672 is as follows:

To my son John the house I now live in and out house usage, and stock which shall remain on my farm after my death. Some stock such as sheep and swine sold and divided between my son John and my daughter Elizabeth. Also son Benjamin and Daughter Grace. to my wife Elizabeth during her life time one third of the estate and one cow. My son paying just debts to any person that justly appears. To my son Samuel five pounds. To my daughter Rachel Hall five pounds. To my son Benjamin that tract of land which I hold by town grant lying near second fall of the Lamprey River, together with one yoke of oxen. to my daughter Grace ten pounds and unto my two grandchildren, Richard and Benjamin. To my daughter Grace legacies to be paid the day of marriage or eighteen years of age." This was brought to court, held in Portsmouth, June 30th, 1674. Court appoints widow Elizabeth and son, John, administrators of the estate and will to be carried out as stated.[citation needed]

1679 : "Another Broad cove is on the Lubberland shore of Great Bay, adjacent to the Smith lands. (See Redrock.) It is mentioned Dec., 9, 1679, when John Alt's grant of 80 acres in the Great Bay was laid out, beginning at Richard York's marked tree in the Broad cove, and running thence by the water side forty rods towards Needham's Point. In the grant of this land to "John Olt" the 10th, 8 mo., 1653, this cove is spoken of as "the great cove above Needham's point." Mention is made of it July 17, 1705 when Roger Rose of Portsmouth conveyed to John Smith land and houses at Lubberland, in the town of Dover, bought of John York, beginning at a great white oak 2 or 3 poles above York's Marsh, in the creek commonly called Goddard's creek, then N. by E. 60 rods to the middle of a valley or gutter, thence to the N. E. bound tree marked R. Y. and then S. E. to a tree in the Broad cove. This cove is again mentioned Ap. 19, 1757, when Eleanor (Stevenson) McCalvey, window, conveyed to Joseph Footman all her rights to land between that of Footman and Pinder, extending along a channel to a great rock near the head of Broad Cove. (See Needham's Cove and Point)

23 Apr 1672

It was agreed between William Graves and John York, his son in law, that William receive of Richard York's estate to be used by William and Elizabeth, the widow of Richard York, during their lives the estate left to Elizabeth by Richard York. This was acknowledged at court in Dover, June 8th, 1681 The land Richard willed to his son, Benjamin, is now in New Market, some is still in Dover. House and land left to son John also contained two small islands. Part of John's land is called Goddard's Creek. John and Ruth Graves York sold October 14, 1680 land to John Pinder. The Pinder family lived there for several generations

Research Notes

Per Ruth York:[citation needed]

I found a marriage record for a Richard York of Melton and Ann Sterling of Wickham wid. dated married Sept. 1639 recorded in the Suffolk Marriages. But I can't be sure if this is the same Richard. (dy...believe too late as Richard was in America by this date45 145 Richard York is the common ancestor of all the Yorks in Northern New England with the exception of James York of Stonnington, Connecticut (whose descendants for the most part settled up the Connecticut River Valley...dy). It has been said that this James and Richard may have been brothers. Most of the Yorks were from Dover and Exeter, New Hampshire Of interest: All of Richard's sons excepting Benjamin [whose southern location was not reached by the Indian's attack called the Oyster River Massacre] were either killed or captured in different locations by the Indians during the wars. I believe that most of the family during this time, about 1690 to 1692 or so had the females move to relatives in Gloucester, Essex, MA. Births in Gloucester during this time were not just from Gloucester Yorks. One given place of birth is Dover, New Hampshire in 1617 without attribution; a very unlikely POB. One given date of birth is 1617 in North Wiltshire, England without documentation. Sources

↑ Colonial Era History of Dover, NH ↑ NH Prov. Deeds Vol. 1, page 167 ↑ Copy of the Old Book 1647 page 98 City Clerk's Office, Dover, NH Page 236 ↑ NH Archives Vol ??, p ?? ↑ Sumner, Edith B., Ancestry of Edward Wales Blake and Clarissa Matilda Glidden with ninety allied families, published 1948. Reference page 279 See also:

NH Prov. Deeds Vol. 1, page 167, Copy of the Old Book 1647, City Clerk's Office, Dover, NH Page 236. Colonial Era History of Dover, NH DJG Bullard, Edgar J., Bullard and allied families; the American ancestors of George Newton Bullard and Mary Elizabeth Bullard, published 1930. Reference page 270



'Richard York might have been born in Dover, NH. See http://griffdna.org/Trees/76756/ghtout/gp525.htm. His profile has two fathers assigned to it, one from England and the other from New Hampshire.

Richard York was born in England . 1617. He married Elizabeth ? Richard york was in Dover , N. H. as early as 1635. Richard York owned 100 aceas in Dover, N.H. .Also owned 50 aceas at Little John Creek.

Children:

GEDCOM Source

@R300960519@ Ancestry Family Trees Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.

GEDCOM Source

Ancestry Family Tree http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=117850364&pi...


Richard arrived here in the ship James. It arrived here Oct. 10, 1633 at Salem, Massachusetts. He came with Capt. Wiggings, agent for the Bristol Company of England, and a company of merchants from Bristol and Shrewsbury, England. Richard settled on Dover Neck, New Hampshire. Dover Neck was first called Bristol in 1634.

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/York-699

Richard York

Born 1602 in England

Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]

[sibling%28s%29 unknown]

Husband of Elizabeth (UNKNOWN) Graves — married 1642 in Dover, New Hampshire

Father of Rachel (York) Hull, Elizabeth (York) Cartey, Samuel York, John York, Benjamin York and Grace (York) Gilman

Died 23 Apr 1672 in Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire

Profile last modified 2 Oct 2019 | Created 26 May 2011

Richard York migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).

Richard arrived here in the ship James. It arrived here Oct. 10, 1633 at Salem, Massachusetts. He came with Capt. Wiggings, agent for the Bristol Company of England, and a company of merchants from Bristol and Shrewsbury, England. Richard settled on Dover Neck, New Hampshire. Dover Neck was first called Bristol in 1634.

"Embarked for New England" p. 280.:"Ipswich [England--dy] A note of the names and ages of all the Passengers which tooke shipping In the Elizabeth of Ipswich M' William Andrews bound for new EngLand the last of Aprill 1634....Richard York, aged 32..."[citation needed] He signed petition to the Massachusetts General Court in 1654.

Richard York lived in Dover on Low Street in 1640.[1]

Richard deposed that in 1652 to the fact that he was in Dover in 1635. He owned land on Dover Neck in 1642. He paid taxes there up to 1672. He had a grant of 100 acres in 1656 next to John Martin and adjoining the Lamprey River. He willed this to his son Benjamin April 23, 1672. The inventory of his estate was filed March 27, 1674. His widow Elisabeth remarried to William Graves, who was still living in Exeter in 1701. Elizabeth divided a parcel of planting ground that was left to her by her husband Richard, to her son John and herself. She divided it into thirds.[2]

"Whereas it do appear by evidence that in the year 1656 at a public town meeting Richard York had given and granted unto him and his heir and assigns one hundred acres of land by Lamprill River side next to John Martin Lot which said land is bounded as followeth, that is to say by lamprill river side North west 96 rods and form the marked tree betwixt John Martin and Richard York 200 Rods southwest and be west(?)and the head line 96 rods northwest & be northand from that marked tree to the River agian 200 Rods Southwest and be west. This lot was layed out and bounded by Roberd(Robert) Burnum(Burnham?) and Ensign John Saues(?) the 11th 1st month 1660. "John Alt and Richard York were appointed administrators of Branson's estate July 2, 1657. Branson's creek is on the Durham shore of the Great Bay, and is now known as Crummit's creek (See Long Creek).[3] 1661 Place: Lot on eastern shore of Dover Neck Bought of Wm. Hilton 50 acres at Littlejohn Creek, inlet of Back River on Eastern Shore of Dover Neck, NH. Sold same on Aug 7, 1661 to Joseph Austin. (Note on back of card: Northamn-Northam, England. Blood Pt. parallels Bloody Corner of Battle Farie--King Arthur's Time...dy.)

1665 July 26th Petition of the Inhabitants of the Eastward parts to his Majestie: Praying to be freed from ye Juristdiction of ye Massachusetts. Signers include John Yorke and Richard Yorke [4]

The records show him to have been a worthy settler who was in good standing in the town and church. He was a planter and had accumulated a respectable amount. He signed the church petition in 1669.

1669 : Petition to make Oyster River a separate township sent to General Court of Mass.

Richard died April 23, 1672.[5]

The will of Richard York, written April 23, 1672 is as follows:

To my son John the house I now live in and out house usage, and stock which shall remain on my farm after my death. Some stock such as sheep and swine sold and divided between my son John and my daughter Elizabeth. Also son Benjamin and Daughter Grace. to my wife Elizabeth during her life time one third of the estate and one cow. My son paying just debts to any person that justly appears. To my son Samuel five pounds. To my daughter Rachel Hall five pounds. To my son Benjamin that tract of land which I hold by town grant lying near second fall of the Lamprey River, together with one yoke of oxen. to my daughter Grace ten pounds and unto my two grandchildren, Richard and Benjamin. To my daughter Grace legacies to be paid the day of marriage or eighteen years of age." This was brought to court, held in Portsmouth, June 30th, 1674. Court appoints widow Elizabeth and son, John, administrators of the estate and will to be carried out as stated.[citation needed]

1679 : "Another Broad cove is on the Lubberland shore of Great Bay, adjacent to the Smith lands. (See Redrock.) It is mentioned Dec., 9, 1679, when John Alt's grant of 80 acres in the Great Bay was laid out, beginning at Richard York's marked tree in the Broad cove, and running thence by the water side forty rods towards Needham's Point. In the grant of this land to "John Olt" the 10th, 8 mo., 1653, this cove is spoken of as "the great cove above Needham's point." Mention is made of it July 17, 1705 when Roger Rose of Portsmouth conveyed to John Smith land and houses at Lubberland, in the town of Dover, bought of John York, beginning at a great white oak 2 or 3 poles above York's Marsh, in the creek commonly called Goddard's creek, then N. by E. 60 rods to the middle of a valley or gutter, thence to the N. E. bound tree marked R. Y. and then S. E. to a tree in the Broad cove. This cove is again mentioned Ap. 19, 1757, when Eleanor (Stevenson) McCalvey, window, conveyed to Joseph Footman all her rights to land between that of Footman and Pinder, extending along a channel to a great rock near the head of Broad Cove. (See Needham's Cove and Point)

23 Apr 1672

It was agreed between William Graves and John York, his son in law, that William receive of Richard York's estate to be used by William and Elizabeth, the widow of Richard York, during their lives the estate left to Elizabeth by Richard York. This was acknowledged at court in Dover, June 8th, 1681 The land Richard willed to his son, Benjamin, is now in New Market, some is still in Dover. House and land left to son John also contained two small islands. Part of John's land is called Goddard's Creek. John and Ruth Graves York sold October 14, 1680 land to John Pinder. The Pinder family lived there for several generations

Research Notes

Per Ruth York:[citation needed]

I found a marriage record for a Richard York of Melton and Ann Sterling of Wickham wid. dated married Sept. 1639 recorded in the Suffolk Marriages. But I can't be sure if this is the same Richard. (dy...believe too late as Richard was in America by this date45 145 Richard York is the common ancestor of all the Yorks in Northern New England with the exception of James York of Stonnington, Connecticut (whose descendants for the most part settled up the Connecticut River Valley...dy). It has been said that this James and Richard may have been brothers. Most of the Yorks were from Dover and Exeter, New Hampshire Of interest: All of Richard's sons excepting Benjamin [whose southern location was not reached by the Indian's attack called the Oyster River Massacre] were either killed or captured in different locations by the Indians during the wars. I believe that most of the family during this time, about 1690 to 1692 or so had the females move to relatives in Gloucester, Essex, MA. Births in Gloucester during this time were not just from Gloucester Yorks. One given place of birth is Dover, New Hampshire in 1617 without attribution; a very unlikely POB. One given date of birth is 1617 in North Wiltshire, England without documentation. Sources

↑ Colonial Era History of Dover, NH ↑ NH Prov. Deeds Vol. 1, page 167 ↑ Copy of the Old Book 1647 page 98 City Clerk's Office, Dover, NH Page 236 ↑ NH Archives Vol ??, p ?? ↑ Sumner, Edith B., Ancestry of Edward Wales Blake and Clarissa Matilda Glidden with ninety allied families, published 1948. Reference page 279 See also:

NH Prov. Deeds Vol. 1, page 167, Copy of the Old Book 1647, City Clerk's Office, Dover, NH Page 236. Colonial Era History of Dover, NH DJG Bullard, Edgar J., Bullard and allied families; the American ancestors of George Newton Bullard and Mary Elizabeth Bullard, published 1930. Reference page 270

view all 17

Richard York's Timeline

1602
1602
England (United Kingdom)
1632
1632
Age 30
Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire
1641
1641
Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire, USA
1642
1642
Probably Casco Bay, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1644
1644
Yarmouth, Cumberland County, Maine, United States
1645
June 16, 1645
Dover, Strafford County, New Hampshire
1649
1649
New Hampshire, United States
1650
1650
Dover, Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States
1654
1654
Oyster River, Strafford County, New Hampshire, British Colonial America