Ваша фамилия Woodson?

Исследование фамилии Woodson

Поделитесь своим генеалогическим древом и фотографиями с людьми, которых вы знаете и любите

  • Стройте своё генеалогическое древо онлайн
  • Обменивайтесь фотографиями и видео
  • Технология Smart Matching™
  • Бесплатно!

Robert Woodson, Jr.

Псевдоним: "Robert Ferris Woodson"
Дата рождения:
Место рождения: Curles, Henrico, Virginia
Смерть: Умер в Virginia
Ближайшие родственники:

Сын Col. Robert "Tater Hole" Woodson и Elizabeth Woodson
Муж Elizabeth Woodson; Sarah Woodson и Rachel Woodson
Отец Robert Woodson; Stephen Woodson; Elizabeth Povall; Joseph Woodson; Sarah Parsons и ещё 5
Брат John Woodson; Richard Ferris Woodson, Sr.; Joseph Richard Woodson; Stephen Woodson; Benjamin Lewis Woodson и ещё 5
Полукровный брат Benjamin Woodson

Менеджер: Private User
Последнее обновление:
открыть все 29

Ближайшие родственники

About Robert Woodson, Jr.

Robert Woodson, Jr. c.1662 Curles, Henrico, Virginia- February, 1729 Curles, Henrico, Virginia

Parents: Robert Woodson c.1634- October 1, 1707 and Elizabeth Sarah Ferris c. May 8, 1634-1689

Wives:

  1. Elizabeth Lewis
  2. Sarah Lewis
  3. Rachel Watkins

Children with Elizabeth:

  1. Stephen c.1682- m. Mary Woodson, daughter of Joseph Richard and Mary Jane Woodson
  2. Joseph c.1685- m. Elizabeth Mattox
  3. Robert c.1687-
  4. Elizabeth c.1689- m. John Povall

Children with Sarah:

  1. Sarah c.1692- m. Joseph Parsons
  2. Mary c.1695-
  3. Agnes c.1697- m. Richard Williamson

Children with Rachel:

  1. Jonathan b. 1711
  2. Elizabeth 1713-c.1734 m. John Knight
  3. Judith b. 1715 m. John Cooke

In 1662, Robert Woodson Jr. (1660-1729) was in Curles, Henrico County, Virginia, where he died in February 1729. Robert signed a will on 7/6/1729 in Henrico Co., Virginia, and the will was probated in February of the same year in Henrico Co., VA.

From: Patricia Smith (on web)

"He was married three times. 1. Elizabeth Lewis 2. Sarah Lewis 3. Rachel Watkins. I can name 7 of his 10 children: 1. Stephen 2. Joseph 3. Robert 4. Jonathan 5. Elizabeth 6. Judith 7. Agnes. Stephan m/ his first cousin, Mary Woodson. Joseph m/ Elizabeth Mattox. Robert died without issue. Elizabeth m/ John Povall. Sarah m/ Joseph Parson. Mary died a maid. Agnes m/ Richard Williamson. Jonathan. no news. Elizabeth II m/ John Knight and Judith m/ John Cooke. Rachel Watkins, believe to have been daughter of Henry Watkins of Malvern Hill. Her mother later married Robert's brother-in-law, Edward Mosby. Robert and Rachel proposed their intention of marriage before the Henrico Monthly Meeting on 12th day 10th month 1710. When Robert died, his son Stephan, the executor of his estate, placed his younger children under his care. His wife, Rachel, must have died earlier as he did not mention her in his will."

     Robert Woodson Jr., was first married to Sarah Lewis, who was the daughter of John Lewis and his wife, Isobel Warner . Sarah's paternal grandfather was Robert Lewis, an immigrant from Wales. Her maternal grandfather was Augustine Warner, an immigrant from Norwich, England. Sarah died before 1710.

Sarah Lewis was probably a sister of John Lewis of Warner Hall. John Lewis and Lydia, his wife, first settled on Poropotank Creek in 1653. To them were born, probably a number of children; one of whom was Major John Lewis, who married Isabella. To these last was born, November 30, 1669, John Lewis who married Elizabeth Warner, daughter of Col. Augustine Warner and wife, Mildred Read. It is probable that Sarah Lewis, wife of Robert Woodson, was a daughter of Major John Lewis and Isabella. This family became very prominent in colonial affairs in Virginia.

In that year Robert Woodson (Jr.) requested to be “liberated” from his Henrico County Quaker community in order to marry Rachel Watkins, who was not of that Quaker community. In 1723, perhaps after Rachel's death, he requested to be received back into his earlier community of Friends.

Robert's 1729 will named only eight of his ten children, so two may have died before him.

The marriages of three of his children are of special interest:

     His son Joseph Woodson married Elizabeth Mattox, the daughter of Quaker immigrant, John Mattox, and his wife Margaret Kent.
     His daughter Sarah Woodson married Joseph Parsons.
     Elizabeth Woodson married John Knight.
     In the next generation, Joseph Woodson (son of Joseph Woodson and Elizabeth Mattox) married his cousin, Elizabeth Parsons (daughter of Sarah Woodson and Joseph Parsons): his aunt becoming his mother-in-law.
     The daughter of this marriage, Judith Woodson, married Jonathan Knight, the grandson of Robert Woodson Jr.'s second marriage: Judith was his great-granddaughter, whereas her husband was his grandson.
     Their daughter was Judith Woodson Knight who married William Amis.

_________________________________

Robert Woodson one of the Surveyors of the highways for this County having presented to this Court his warrant unexecuted pretending the unwillingness of his Company; Ordered that he take care to see sd. warrant fulfilled & returned according to law & that with the inhabitants above falling Creek the lower road be cleared to New Kent Co. (that being his precinct) & with his warrant he do present all persons appointed by him who refuse to assist him. April 1, 1685 . Ibid. p. 182.

Robert Woodson, Jr. , is granted Liberty untill ye next Court to bring in his discharge from ye portian due to his wife". Octr. 1, 1696 . Ibid. p. 119.

Robert Woodson, Jr. , Deft. vs Benjamin Hatcher Pltf. Trespass. Sd. Deft. on 17th Jany. last past (the same being the Lords day) wth force & arms did enter into one plantacon of the Pltf. in Henrico Parish in this Co. & did enter the Pltfs. house & take from it one half part of a back (or buck) and the skin, of the value of 40 shill. &c. To the Pltfs. Damage £40: sterl. Jury. Verdict, We find for Pltf. 5 s: damage: Judgt. awarded Pltf. agst. Deft. for sd. sum of 5 s. to be paid wth costs, also exc. Augt. 2, 1697 . Ibid. p. 153.

Robert Woodson Jr. , appointed constable of the Lower Precinct in this County on the North side of James River . Feb. 1, 1697. Ibid. p. 171.

Robert Woodson, Jr. , Constable in the Lower Precinct on N. side of James River in this County shewing that he hath duly executed the office of Constable aforsd. one whole year last past and praying to be discharged &c. Ordered that he be discharged from sd. office as soon as Tho. Carter (who is hereby ordered to serve in his stead) shall be sworn. Augt. 1, 1699 . Ibid. p. 230.

References and Sources:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=hagerj&id=I65859

http://www.juch.org/woodson/pafg03.asp


  • Robert Woodson Jr., (1660-1729), son of Robert WOODSON Sr. and Elizabeth FERRIS

MARRIAGE Married 1 Sarah, the daughter of John LEWIS and his wife, Isobel WARNER. Sarah's paternal grandfather was Robert LEWIS, an immigrant from Wales. Her maternal grandfather was Augustine WARNER, an immigrant from Norwich, England.

Sarah Lewis Woodson died before 1710.

2ND MARRIAGE In that year Robert Woodson (Jr.) requested to be “liberated” from his Henrico County Quaker community in order to marry 2 Rachel Watkins, who was not of that Quaker community.

QUAKER He requested to be received back into his earlier community of Friends in 1723, perhaps after her death.

WILL His 1729 will named only eight of his ten children, so two may have died before him.

CHILDREN Stephen,

Joseph Woodson, son of Rachel, married Elizabeth Mattox who was the daughter of Quaker immigrant, John Mattox, and his wife Margaret Kent

Robert,

Elizabeth Woodson, the daughter of Rachel, married John Knight.

Sarah Woodson, daughter of Sarah, married Joseph Parsons.

Mary

Agnes

GRANDCHILDREN LINEAGE In the next generation, Joseph Woodson (son of Joseph Woodson and Elizabeth Mattox) married his cousin, Elizabeth Parsons (daughter of Sarah Woodson and Joseph Parsons): his aunt becoming his mother-in-law.

The daughter of this marriage, Judith Woodson, married Jonathan Knight, the grandson of Robert Woodson Jr.'s second marriage: Judith was his great-granddaughter, whereas her husband was his grandson.

Their daughter was Judith Woodson Knight who married William Amis.

John Woodson (1586-1633) and his wife Sarah Winston were the immigrants of this family, arriving in Jamestown in 1619 on the ship George. Aboard was the new governor, Sir George Yeardley, about one hundred young Englishmen who would become settlers, and Woodson, a “surgeon” for the company of English soldiers protecting the new colony. He located on land owned by the governor, Flowerdew Hundred (named for his wife Temperance Flowerdew), thirty miles above Jamestown on the south side of the James River. According to Woodson family tradition, the two Woodson sons, John and Robert, were twelve and ten years old in 1644 when the Indian chief, Opechacanogh, led an uprising against the settlement. John Woodson, returning home after visiting a patient, was killed in sight of his house. The Indians then began attacking the cabin which was barred against them.It was defended by Sarah and Ligon, a friend who was visiting at the time. Using an old musket, Ligon managed to kill nine of the Indians. Two others attempted to enter the house by the chimney, but Sarah scalded one to death with boiling water then seized the iron roasting spit with both hands and brained the other. The boys had been hidden away: one under a wash tub and the other in a pit used for storing potatoes. For several generations descendants of these boys were called either Tub Woodsons or Potato Hole Woodsons.

In the 1650s, Robert Woodson (1634-1707)married Elizabeth Ferris (1638-1689), the daughter of immigrant Richard Ferris and his wife Mary Beaple of Curles plantation. Robert acquired a large estate and lived the life of a wealthy planter. His name appeared on many of the court records of the time as witness to documents, but his only public service was as Surveyor of Highways in Henrico County in 1685. In some papers he is given the title of Colonel.

The marriages of three of his children are of special interest:

His son Joseph Woodson, son of Rachel, married Elizabeth Mattox who was the daughter of Quaker immigrant, John Mattox, and his wife Margaret Kent.

His daughter Sarah Woodson, daughter of Sarah, married Joseph Parsons.

Elizabeth Woodson, the daughter of Rachel, married John Knight.

In the next generation, Joseph Woodson (son of Joseph Woodson and Elizabeth Mattox) married his cousin, Elizabeth Parsons (daughter of Sarah Woodson and Joseph Parsons): his aunt becoming his mother-in-law.

The daughter of this marriage, Judith Woodson, married Jonathan Knight, the grandson of Robert Woodson Jr.'s second marriage: Judith was his great-granddaughter, whereas her husband was his grandson.

Their daughter was Judith Woodson Knight who married William Amis.

John WOODSON "The Immigrant" (1586-1644) was among the early settlers of the Jamestowne, Virginia Colony and is a Jamestowne Society qualifying ancestor. He came to Virginia in the ship GEORGE on 19 Apr 1619, as surgeon to a company of British soldiers. A native of Dorsetshire, England, he was an Oxford Student in 1608. He brought with him his wife Sarah from Devonshire, England and they settled at now called Flowerdew Hundred‡, some 30 miles above Jamestown on the south side of James River in what is now Prince George County.

It was, no doubt, at this place that their two sons, John (b.1632) and Robert (b.1634), were born. John and Sarah escaped unharmed during the Indian uprising in 1622. Flowerdew had very few casualties primarily because it was a palisaded settlement. Dr. John WOODSON was killed in the 1644 Indian uprising led by Chief Opechancano, son of Powhatan, at settlements along the James River

Flowerdew Hundred, located on the west/south side of the James River about twenty (20) miles upriver from Jamestowne and variously referred to as Flourdieu Hundred or Peirsey's Hundred, is probably named after Temperance FLOWERDIEU wife of Sir George YEARDLEY, VA's first Governor, who came to Virginia in January 1619 on the same ship with John and Sarah WOODSON. This about the time of the first legislative assembly in Jamestown - July 30, 1619-August 4, 1619. Flowerdieu was represented in the assembly, the first House of Burgesses, by Ensigne Roffingham and Mr. Jefferson.

The YEARDLEY'S owned the plantation and in 1624 sold it to Abraham PEIRSEY and it became Peirsey's Hundred. When counties were established in 1634 Flowerdew Hundred was part of Charles City County and in 1702 was included in the new Prince George County. Presently, Flowerdew Hundred Foundation (1716 Flowerdew Road, Hopewell, VA 23860) owns and maintains the plantation as a Public Trust.

The Flowerdieu Hundred post windmill, erected in 1621 was recontructed in 1978, stands on a ridge overlooking the James River. Flowerdew Hundred, one of the earliest original land grants in Virginia, has had abundant natural resources at this strategic bend in the James River that have attracted people since prehistoric times. Archaeological excavations at Flowerdew Hundred during the last three decades have uncovered over 200,000 artifacts.

Sarah WOODSON was a brave pioneer woman. In the absence of her husband during the Indian Uprising of April 18, 1644, aided by Robert LIGON, she resisted an attack by the Indians, killing nine. She loaded the gun while LIGON fired, and hearing a noise up the chimney she threw the bed upon the coals, the stifling smoke bringing two Indians down, whom she dispatched. Her sons, Robert in the potato hole and John under the tub, were saved. For many years they were called "Potato Hole" and "Tub." Over the years this story has been passed on from one WOODSON generation to the next and as passed among the various families has varied a bit in details but not in Sarah's bravery in defending her children. John WOODSON, caught in the open on his way home from visiting a patient, was killed. The old Woodson muzzle loading matchlock musket rifle, originally eight feet long and later modified to seven feet six inches, was preserved and now owned by The Virginia Historical Society and is on permanent exhibit in the Virginia Museum in Richmond. Woodson Rifle photo shown with permission of Kathy Hudson.

Most researchers believe that the WOODSONS were living at Flowerdew Hundred at the time of the 1644 massacre; although, there is apparently no record of whether they were living at Flowerdew Hundred or whether they had already settled on the north side of the James at "Curles". Robert and John WOODSON, were among Tythables at Curles Plantation in 1679. Curles Plantation was on the North side of the James River near Flowerdew Hundred. This plantation was once owned by Robert WOODSON's father-in-law Richard FERRIS, father of his wife Elizabeth FERRIS.

After John WOODSON'S death his Sarah married a DUNWELL and then a JOHNSON. On her death she left a combination inventory and nuncupative will which was recorded January 17, 1660/1. Bequests included John WOODSON, Robert WOODSON and Deborah WOODSON and Elizabeth DUNWELL. Henry Morton WOODSON in Historical Genealogy of the WOODSONS And Their Connections (published Memphis 1915) states that 20 of the 25 charter members of The First Families of Virginia are descendants of John WOODSON. Dr. John Woodson is the progenitor of the WOODSON Family in America. Among his descendants are Dolley Todd Madison, wife of President James Madison and the famous outlaw, Jesse Woodson James

was born in Devonshire, England in 1586

Dr. John Woodson, progenitor of the Woodson family in Campbell County, was born in Devonshire, England in 1586, and died at Fleur de Hundred, Virginia, some thirty miles above Jamestown, in what is now Prince George County, on April 19, 1644, he entered St. John's College, Oxford, on March 1, 1604. On January 29, 1619, the ship "George" sailed from England, and the following April landed at Jamestown, Va.. This ship brought the new Governor, Sir George Yeardley, and about one hundred passengers, among whom were Dr. John Woodson of Dorsetshire, his wife Sarah Winston. Dr. Woodson and Sarah Winston were married in Devonshire, England. Dr. Woodson came as a surgeon to a company of soldiers sent over for the better protection of the colonists from the Indians. In 1612 a vessel landed at Jamestown, having on board about 20 Negro captives, who had been kidnapped along the African coast by the Dutch Skipper. Dr. Woodson bought six of them, who were registered in 1623 as part of his household at Fleur de Hundred. We shall now relate the story of Dr. Woodson and his wife, Sarah, as they entered the harbor of Jamestown, written by Josephine Rich. It goes as such: "It was a sunny April morning in 1619. Sarah and her husband, Dr. John Woodson, stood at the rail of the sailing ship, George, as it put into Jamestown harbor. It was the first glimpse of their new homeland. "John's arm tightened about his wife's waist as he stood bracing them both against the stiff breeze. Sarah squeezed his hand in answer. At the moment it was the only answer she could manage, for suddenly their adventure in the New World was upon them. "On their three month voyage across the wintry Atlantic, their days and nights had been filled with constant talk of the settlement of Jamestown. But somehow all their talk had not prepared them for the sudden shock of the smallness of it. Jamestown was only a log stockade with plumes of black smoke curling up into the sky from the huts within its protection. Although they could see only one stockade there were ten other settlements behind similar stockade walls, 600 Englishmen in all. Now, for the first time, women were arriving. "This was the first time that the London Company had permitted women into the colony. And once they had accepted the importance of women to the new settlers they had gone to extremes about it, or so it seemed to Sarah. For the George carried some 60 women to be sold to the colonists as wives. The price was 120 pounds of tobacco, which was the cost of passage. "John Woodson had said that these women would make a difference to the new colonists. And he told Sarah not to wrinkle up her pretty nose at them, she'd be glad enough for their company once she'd sat beside her own lonely fireplace in her prim lace cuffs for a fortnight! "He said the women would tame the frontiersmen and put them into Sunday stiff collars and into church pews. They would want lace curtains for their windows and the best schools for their children. Trade would flourish. For profit was the reason for colonizing the new world. But Sarah thought the women looked anything but church going types! "Suddenly everybody was on deck. The anchor chains rattled down the anchor. Sail were struck. Sailors scrambled up the yardarms. "But it was less the rowdy frontiersmen who came out to the ship to greet their bartered brides than the Indians who rowed them out that held Sara's attention. "They were truly red men and even more furious appearing than any drawings of Indians that had appeared in the British newspapers. Fascinated, Sarah stared down at the fierce, bared-to-the-waist savages in the canoe bobbing in the choppy water below. As if feeling her gaze on him, one of the Indians suddenly glared up at Sarah and she gave a panic-stricken gasp and buried her face in her husband's heavy overcoat. John patted her shoulder and laughed at her fears. He was later to learn that the Indians were not their friends, as he told Sarah, then, so assuringly. "As an incentive to colonize America, men received 100 acres of free land when they came to the new world, and that year of 1619, at the first House of Burgess session, Virginia passed a law that wives, too, would receive 100 acres of free land. So Sarah and John chose their 200 acres about 30 miles from Jamestown, across the James River at a place called Fleur de Hundred, now in Prince George County. John and Sarah and their six slaves registered there in 1623. "They had lived first in Jamestown and had come safely through the Jamestown massacre of 1622, and after that John said there would be no further Indian trouble. In fact, they did live without Indian incident for several years at Fleur de Hundred. A son was born to them there in 1632 and another son in 1634. "The Woodson's, like all settlers, owned several guns. The doctor always carried a gun with him on his medical calls and frequently brought home game in his medical saddle bags. The gun that hung over the Woodson log cabin mantelpiece was seven feet six inches long, and had a bore large enough to admit a man's thumb. How anyone could lift it, much less fire it to kill, Sarah had no idea. But she was one day to learn! "The Woodson boys were eight and ten years old on that fateful April 18, 1644. And the boys might have been out in the tobacco fields working that morning, except for the visit of an itinerant shoemaker named Ligon, who was there for his yearly visit to measure the entire household for their year's supply of shoes. Sarah hoped that the doctor would return from his medical call before Ligon the shoemaker had to leave, for the doctor needed a new pair of riding boots. "The spring planting had taken the slaves into the fields so that Sarah and Ligon and the two boys were alone in the cabin when the Indians attacked. "The blood-curdling war whoops rang out and Sarah froze as she looked through the cabin window and saw the feather headdresses come pouring out of the woods. Automatically, Sarah dropped the heavy cross-bar on the cabin door. Ligon lifted the seven-foot gun down from the mantelpiece. "An arrow hit a window ledge. Sara bolted the inside shutters on the windows. At the half-story window above in the sleeping loft Ligon poised the giant gun on the window ledge, ready. A powder horn and extra balls lay within hand's reach, ready. "She must hide the boys, Sarah thought. But where? The potato bin hole beneath the cabin floor! It was half-empty and tar-kettle dark! It ought to be safe! She lifted the trap door and told one frightened boy to jump, and not to utter a sound. "There was an empty wash tub in the corner of the built-in shed. Eight-year-old Robert might be able to squeeze inside it. He wasn't very big. Sarah told him to squat on the floor. She upturned the wash tub over the boy and then hurried to the hearth to build up the fire under the cooking kettle hanging from the fireplace crane. The kettle held the family's supper soup. She added water to fill it to the top and pushed it over the hottest coals. If one of the demon Indians tried to come down the chimney she had a scalding bath ready. "Looking through a chink in the window shutter Sarah counted nine savages in the howling mob about the cabin. Suddenly her husband appeared, riding out of the forest with his gun ready to fire. Sarah saw him before the Indians did. She let out a cry and then held her breath as she watched. "Before the doctor could shoot, one of the Indians turned and saw him. He aimed and shot his arrow. It struck the doctor and his gunfire went astray. He fell from his horse and several of the Indians rushed at him waving their battle axes. Sarah covered her eyes. "Ligon's rifle kept cracking. He had gotten three Indians. Sarah watched them fall. Ligon killed five Indians before Sarah heard the noise in the chimney. "They had killed her husband. She was ready to die defending the lives of her sons! "Sarah stood to one side of the hearth with her hand on the kettle. The water scalding, the coals red hot. the Indian came down feet first. Sarah tipped the kettle and gave it to him in full force. He screeched in agony and lay writhing on the floor. "There was more noise up the chimney. Another one was coming down. Sarah grabbed the heavy iron roasting spit. She raised it above her head, holding it with both hands. "As the second Indian stooped to come out of the chimney, Sarah brought her weapon down on his head. It sounded like a pumpkin splitting. He fell heavily to the floor, killed instantly. "She looked up from the bloody bodies to see Ligon unbolting the cabin door. "'I'm going to fetch the doctor's body,'" he told her. 'The red devils are finished.' "Sarah counted seven dead Indians in the clearing. The heavy Woodson rifle had served them well. "Although John Woodson had been killed by the Indians, his sons lived to carry on the Woodson name. today, some 300 years later, it is a proud family tradition among theWoodson descendants to be known as either the potato hole Woodsons or the wash tub Woodsons." [Edit Bio] Family links: [Edit] Children: Robert Woodson*

  • In the 1650s, Robert Woodson (1634-1707)married Elizabeth Ferris (1638-1689), the daughter of immigrant Richard Ferris and his wife Mary Beaple of Curles plantation. Robert acquired a large estate and lived the life of a wealthy planter. His name appeared on many of the court records of the time as witness to documents, but his only public service was as Surveyor of Highways in Henrico County in 1685. In some papers he is given the title of Colonel.

curles

Curles Neck Plantation (also known as Curles Neck Farm) is located between State Route 5 and the north bank of the James River in the Varina district of Henrico County, Virginia. One of the great James River Plantations, Curles Neck has remained in active use for almost 400 years and remains a privately owned working farm which is not currently open to the public.

As "Curles Neck Farm", a 5600 acre property was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 2009.[1][2]

In November of 1635, a year after the formal designation of Henrico County as one of 8 shires (or counties) in the Virginia Colony, a land patent for 750 acres (3.0 km2) was granted to Captain Thomas Harris, who had apparently served under Sir Thomas Dale. The tobacco farm was referred to by early settlers as "Longfield", but soon thereafter became known as Curles Neck. Captain Harris served in the House of Burgesses at Jamestown as a Burgess for Curles Neck.

The source of the name Curles Neck in unknown. Many people thought that the name derived from the meandering sweeping curves of the tidal James River in the area, which can clearly be seen by map. However, the family name of Curle is recorded in various grants over a span of one hundred years in the books at the State Land Registry Office. A prominent representative of that family was the patriot Wilson Roscow Curle of the Revolutionary era.

Seat of Nathaniel Bacon[edit]

In the early 1670s, the property was owned by Nathaniel Bacon. The colonists in outlying locations such as those in Henrico and the Northern Neck came into conflict with the Colony's Royal Governor, Sir William Berkeley over taking reprisal action for alleged thefts by the Native Americans. In 1676, the tension erupted into a conflict between the colonists known as Bacon's Rebellion. Governor Berkeley was forced to retreat from Jamestown to the join loyalists on the Eastern Shore. Bacon fell ill and died in Gloucester, and the rebellion fell apart. In the aftermath, two dozen colonists were tried and hanged by Governor Berkeley. After Nathaniel Bacon was found guilty of treason post-mortem, his property was confiscated by the Crown, and later resold to William Randolph.

Revolutionary and Civil War periods[edit]

During the mid-18th century, John Pleasants donated the first Quaker meeting house at Curles Neck and was one of the trustees appointed to represent the newly formed Town of Richmond. In 1771, his slaves were granted their freedom under the terms of his will. In 1852 Charles Senff, a New York sugar merchant, purchased the then 3,250 acre Curles tract from William Allen. He also purchased two adjoining farms increasing his holdings to over 5,000 acres. Seniff built the 15-room brick Georgian Revival mansion that exists today to replace the antebellum house which had fallen into disrepair during the Civil War.

Curles Neck Farm is a large plantation style farm located on the northern banks of the James River. It was first owned by Captain Thomas Harris in 1635. He served as a burgess (or representative) for this area in the House of Burgesses at Jamestown. It was owned by Nathaniel Bacon in the 1670s. Nathaniel was upset with the governor of Virginia for being too friendly towards the American Indians and led Bacon’s Rebellion in 1676. His land at Curles Neck was confiscated (taken away) and resold to the well-known Randolph family (whose descendants were Thomas Jefferson and Robert E. Lee). The Randolph family grew tobacco and built a large mansion on the property which fell into disrepair after the Civil War. In 1894 an enterprising farmer named Charles Sneff purchased the land. He started raising cattle, sheep, and horses, and he built the mansion which is there today. After his death in 1913, a horse-lover named CK Billings acquired the property and opened a horse racing track. The Strawberry Hill Horse Races were held here during this time. The next owner, AB Ruddick, started the famous Curles Neck Dairy farm here in 1933 which was one of the largest dairy farms in the area. The milk was processed and bottled at a factory in Richmond which still exists and is called the Dairy Bar. Curles Neck is no longer a dairy farm and is being mined for sand and gravel

Burial: Body lost or destroyed

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=136737174


From page 55 of The William and Mary Quarterly, Volume 11 edited by Lyon Gardiner Tyler, Richard Lee Morton. "Woodson Family"

Robert (son of first Robert) married Sarah Lewis. Had sons, Stephen, Joseph and Robert; and daughters, Elizabeth, married to John Povall, Sarah to Joseph Parsons, Mary died a maid, and Agnes married Richard Williamson.

By Rachael Watkins, his second wife, Jonathan, and daughters, Elizabeth and Judith. Elizabeth married John Knight, and Judith married John Cook, and she was mother to all the money-making Cooks.

открыть все 16

Хронология Robert Woodson, Jr.

1662
1662
Virginia
1687
1687
Возраст 25
Henrico, Virginia, USA
1690
1690
Возраст 28
1692
1692
Возраст 30
Henrico, Virginia, United States
1693
1693
Возраст 31
Henrico, Virginia, USA
1697
1697
Возраст 35
Henrico County, Province of Virginia
1698
1698
Возраст 36
Henrico, Virginia, USA