Robert de Mortagne, Earl of Cornwall

Is your surname de Mortagne?

Research the de Mortagne family

Robert de Mortagne, Earl of Cornwall's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Robert de Mortagne, Earl of Cornwall

French: Robert de Mortain, Earl of Cornwall
Also Known As: "Robert de Conteville", "Robert Count of Mortain", "Earl of Cornwall", "Count of Mortain", "De Burgh"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Mortagne-sur-Sèvre, Pays de la Loire, France
Death: Died in Fatouville-Grestain, Haute-Normandie, France
Place of Burial: Fatouville-Grestain, Haute-Normandie, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Herluin, Count of Conteville and Herleva of Falaise
Husband of Almodis de Mortagne, comtesse consort de Mortain and Maud Matilda de Montgomery, Comtesse consort de Mortain
Father of NN de Mortagne; Aldhelm de Mortagne; Robert de Mortain; Lucia de Mortagne; Emma de Mortain, comtesse consort de Toulouse and 5 others
Brother of Rohesia de Conteville; Muriel De Copello; Isabella de Conteville and Eudes de Conteville, évêque de Bayeux
Half brother of Raoul Ralph de Conteville; William "The Conqueror", King of England and Adelaide of Normandy, countess of Aumale

Occupation: Earl of Cornwall-1090, 1st Earl of Cornwall, Comte de Mortain, Count of Mortain
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Robert de Mortagne, Earl of Cornwall

Robert de Mortain, came to England with William The Conqueror.

Parents: Herlève de Falaise and Herluin de Conteville Spouses: 1. Mathilde Montgommery 2. Almodis

Link to holdings of Robert de Mortagne from the Open Domesday book site http://opendomesday.org/name/451650/count-robert-of-mortain/

LINKS http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert,_Count_of_Mortain http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Mortain http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#HerluinConteville

ROBERT de Mortain (after 1040-8 Dec 1090, bur abbaye de Grestain). Guillaume de Jumièges names (in order) "Eudes et Robert" as the two sons of Herluin and Herlève[1893]. His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he was the half-brother of William I King of England [1894]. Named by Florence of Worcester as the brother of King William I "but only on his mother's side"[1895]. Guillaume de Jumièges records that his half-brother Guillaume II Duke of Normandy installed Robert as Comte de Mortain after expelling "Guillaume Guerlenc"[1896]. He was installed as Comte de Mortain in 1063 by his half-brother Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, after he dispossessed Guillaume Werlenc[1897]. King William I granted him nearly all the land of Cornwall as a reward for his participation at the battle of Hastings in 1066, but he does not seem to have been created Earl of Cornwall, continuing to be referred to as "comes Moritoniensis"[1898]. "Robertus Moretonii comes frater Villelmi Anglorum regis et Normannorum principis" granted property to the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire by charter dated 9 Jan 1083[1899]. He joined his brother Eudes in the 1088 rebellion against King William II but was pardoned[1900].

m firstly (before 1066) MATHILDE de Montgommery, daughter of ROGER Sire de Montgommery, Vicomte d'Hiémois [later Earl of Shrewsbury] & his first wife Mabel d'Alençon (-[1085], bur abbaye de Grestain). She is named and her parentage given by Orderic Vitalis, who lists her second among her father's daughters by his first marriage and names her husband[1901]. "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" by charter dated to [1087/91][1902]. “Willielmus comes Moritonii” founded Montcute Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti comitis et matris meæ Mathillidis comitissæ”, by undated charter[1903].

m secondly ALMODIS, daughter of ---. "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" with the consent of "Robert his son" by charter dated to [1087/91], which specifies that "William his other son has promised to grant it if Almodis should leave no heir"[1904]. Earl Robert & his first wife had five children:

a) ROBERT . "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" with the consent of "Robert his son" by charter dated to [1087/91], which specifies that "William his other son has promised to grant it if Almodis should leave no heir"[1905].

b) GUILLAUME de Mortain (-Bermondsey after 1140). Orderic Vitalis refers to him as nepos of Robert III Duke of Normandy[1906]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Guilelmi" as son of "Robertum comitem Moretonii"[1907]. Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis"[1908]. "Robert count of Mortain" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel for "his deceased wife Mathildis and his living wife Almodis" with the consent of "Robert his son…and William his other son" by charter dated to [1087/91][1909]. He succeeded his father in 1090 as Comte de Mortain, and in the latter's lands in Cornwall. He unsuccessfully claimed the earldom of Kent on the death of his uncle Eudes[1910]. “Willielmus comes Moritonii” founded Montcute Priory, for the souls of “patris mei Roberti comitis et matris meæ Mathillidis comitissæ”, by undated charter[1911]. "…Willelmi comitis de Moritun…" subscribed a charter dated 14 Sep 1101 under which Henry I King of England donated property to Bath St Peter[1912]. Florence of Worcester records that "Willelmus comes de Moreteon" rebelled against Henry I King of England, who confiscated all his English lands in [1104][1913]. Florence of Worcester also records that "comes Willelmus de Moretonio" fought with Robert Duke of Normandy against King Henry I at Tinchebrai in [1106], was captured, but later escaped and fled[1914]. Orderic Vitalis records that he was imprisoned for many years and all his honours forfeited[1915]. He became a Cluniac monk at Bermondsey in 1140. m ADILILDIS, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.

c) AGNES de Mortain . Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned first) married "Andreas de Vitreio"[1916]. A charter dated to [1110] records that "Andreas dominus Vitriaci castri et frater eius Philippus et uxor ipsius Andreæ…Agnes, cum filiis suis Roberto, Gervasio et Elia" confirmed the foundation of Sainte-Croix de Vitré[1917]. m ANDRE [I] Seigneur de Vitré, son of ROBERT [I] Seigneur de Vitré & his wife Berthe de Craon.

d) DENISE de Mortain ([1065/70]-1090). Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned second) married "Guido de Laval"[1918]. A charter dated to [1085] records that "Guy II fils de Hamon" withdrew claims against Ronceray relating to property donated by his father by charter dated to [1085] which names "Denise son épouse" and is witnessed by "Hugues, frère de Guy II"[1919]. A charter dated to [1080/90] records that "Guidone de Valle" sold "boscum…Monduluet" to "domnus Rivallonus monachus" at Marmoutier, with the consent of "Hugo frater eius…et Dionisia uxor eius"[1920]. "Guido de Lavalle" donated the priory of Parné to the church of Saint-Nicholas d'Angers "pro salute sua et uxoris sue Dionisie" by charter dated [1080/90][1921]. A charter dated 1090 records that "Guido junior" succeeded "in paternum…honorem" on the death of "Haimonis senioris de Valle Guidonis" and that when, after some time, "supradicti domni Guidonis conjugem" died, he granted further rights to Marmoutier when she was buried "juxta patrem suum Haimonem"[1922]. m [as his second wife,] GUY [II] Sire de Laval, son of HAMON Sire de Laval & his wife Hersende --- (before [1037/38]-after 1105, bur Marmoutier).

e) EMMA de Mortain . Robert of Torigny names "unum filium Guillermum et tres filias" as the children of "Robertus comes Moritonii uterinus frater Willermi regis", specifying that one unnamed daughter (mentioned third) married "comes Tolosanus frater Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii"[1923]. Her name is confirmed by the charter dated 1114 under which her daughter “Philippæ comitissæ…Emmæ filia” reached agreement with “Bernardus-Atonis filius Ermengardis”[1924]. m (before 1080) as his second wife, GUILLAUME IV Comte de Toulouse, son of PONS Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Almodis de la Marche (-killed in battle Huesca 1094).

Earl Robert & his second wife had one child:

f) ROBERT de Mortain . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.


Robert de Conteville dit Robert de Mortain[n 1] († peut-être un 9 décembre[1], en 1090[1] ou après 1095[1]), fut comte de Mortain, et un officieux comte de Cornouailles à partir de 1068. Il devint le troisième sujet le plus riche d'Angleterre après la conquête normande de l'Angleterre[2].

Biographie

Famille Il est le fils cadet de Herluin (v. 1001-v. 1066), vicomte de Conteville, et d’Arlette de Falaise[3] (v. 1010-v. 1050). Sa mère, ancienne « frilla » (ou épouse à la manière danoise[n 2]) du duc de Normandie Robert le Magnifique (v. 1010-1035) est la mère de Guillaume le Bâtard (plus tard le Conquérant) (v. 1027-1087). Son frère aîné est Odon, évêque de Bayeux et comte de Kent.

Il est souvent considéré que Odon était l'aîné, mais on ne sait pas quand ils sont nés. J. R. Planché[4] a proposé la date de 1031 comme année de naissance de Robert, mais sans preuves. Il est possible que Robert ne soit pas né avant 1040[5].

Ascension Robert de Mortain doit son ascension au duc de Normandie, Guillaume le Conquérant, son demi-frère. Après les années de trouble de son adolescence, celui-ci se constitue un réseau d'hommes de confiance dans le duché[6].

Vers 1049-1050 d'après Orderic Vital[7], ou peu après 1055 d'après des chartes qui nous sont parvenues[8], voire aux alentours de 1060 et peut-être pas avant 1063[6], le comte de Mortain Guillaume Guerlenc tombe en défaveur et est exilé. Il est assez probable qu'il soit déposé à la fin des années 1050, après les batailles de Mortemer (1054) et Varaville (1057)[6]. Robert de Mortain apparaît pour la première fois au commande du comté dans une charte datée de 1063[1]. On ne sait pas si la raison de cet évincement était réellement fondée. Orderic Vital raconte qu'il était impliqué dans un complot contre le duc[9] et qu'il est banni et doit s'exiler. Le duc le remplace par son demi-frère.

Au milieu du XIe siècle, le comté de Mortain est une zone stratégique du duché puisque frontalier du duché de Bretagne, du comté du Maine et de la seigneurie de Bellême. Il est aussi proche des importants centres ecclésiastiques d'Avranches et de Coutances[6]. Bellême est un territoire de loyauté douteuse, quasi-indépendant, aux confins du Maine, du Blésois, et du domaine royal[10]. Le duc a déjà arrangé le mariage de Roger II de Montgommery, un de ses hommes de confiance, avec Mabile de Bellême l'héritière de la seigneurie, afin de reprendre le contrôle de ce territoire. Avec le mariage de Robert à Mathilde de Montgommery, leur fille, il s'assure définitivement la loyauté de Bellême[6].

Par sa position, le comté est traversé par de nombreuses routes commerciales[1]. Comme il produit peu de produits agricoles, Robert créé dix foires, ce qui permet son développement économique[1]. Il renforce sa position par la construction de plusieurs châteaux à Mortain, Saint-Hilaire-du-Harcouët, Le Teilleul et Tinchebray, ces villes accueillent d'ailleurs des foires[1]. En 1082, il conquiert le château de Gorron dans le Maine, ce qui lui procure une position avancée idéale contre Foulque IV d'Anjou dit le Réchin[10].

Vers 1066, il hérite de son père les terres familiales dont la majeure partie se trouve autour de Conteville[1]. Il possède aussi plusieurs domaines dans le nord du Cotentin qui sont peut-être administrées depuis son château de La Haye-du-Puits[1]. Avant la conquête de l'Angleterre, il n'atteste que très peu de chartes ducales. L'une de ses rares activités connues lors de cette période est d'avoir été juge ducal dans une affaire concernant l'abbaye Saint-Magloire de Léhon, aux côtés de l'archevêque de Rouen et des évêques de Lisieux et d'Évreux[1].

Conquête de l'Angleterre Il participe au concile de Lillebonne[11] durant lequel les barons du duché sont consultés sur le projet d'invasion de l'Angleterre. Il y promet de contribuer pour 120 navires[12] à la flotte qui débarquera outre-manche. Il accompagne son demi-frère Guillaume dans sa conquête de l'Angleterre.

Il fournit un soutien militaire efficace à la bataille de Hastings et durant la soumission du royaume qui s'ensuit (1066-1069). Il y a peu de doute sur le fait qu'il est l'un des leaders d'une partie de l'armée sur le champ de bataille[6]. En 1069, il est chargé par le roi avec Robert d'Eu de surveiller les Danois dont la flotte mouille dans l'embouchure de l'Humber, pendant que celui-ci va réprimer la révolte initiée par Eadric le Sauvage dans l'ouest[13]. Quand les Danois sortent de leur lieu de retraite pour piller le voisinage, les deux hommes et leur armée leur tombent dessus à l'improviste, dans le nord du Lindsey, et les écrasent, les forçant à s'enfuir par la mer[6],[14].

Il est présent assez souvent en Angleterre durant les cinq premières années de Guillaume le Conquérant[1]. Ses activités nationales sont toutefois assez limitées. Il est par exemple juge à la cour royale dans trois procès, notamment ceux concernant les terres d'Ely[1]. Durant les années suivantes, il passe la majeure partie de son temps en Normandie[1]. Il est possible qui soit justicier du royaume en 1071[1].

En 1081, il est mentionné par une chronique contemporaine comme étant l'un des otages, avec son fils, donné pour garantir un accord entre le Conquérant et le comte Foulque IV d'Anjou[1].

Possessions anglaises Peu après, Robert reçoit d'importants domaines en Angleterre. Guillaume lui donne des terres réparties dans tout le royaume dont la plupart des terres de Cornouailles, et le rape de Pevensey dont il occupe le château depuis la bataille d'Hastings. Il est possible qu'il n'ait reçu une grande partie de ses terres en Cornouailles et dans le Yorkshire qu'après 1075[3]. Sa position dans le sud-ouest conduit à le considérer comme comte de Cornouailles, néanmoins, il n'y a pas de preuve qu'il ait reçu officiellement ce titre[15].

En 1086, à la compilation du Domesday Book, il a 797 manors répartis dans vingt comtés[n 3] qui rapportent 2100£ par an[1]. En Cornouailles, il détient aussi les châteaux de Launceston et Tremeton, qu'il a reçu après le retour de Brian de Penthièvre en Bretagne après 1072. Ses domaines forment cinq groupes régionaux distincts en Angleterre[1]. Il domine feudalement le sud-ouest où il a la majorité de ses terres : Cornouailles, Devon, Dorset, Somerset. Il administre ce territoire depuis les châteaux de Lauceston et Montacute (Somerset). Il possède aussi le rape de Pevensey dans le Sussex, qui a une grande importance stratégique et économique. Dans les Home Counties, le roi lui a donné des domaines stratégiquement placés qui permettent de contrôler les routes d'accès à Londres, et qui sont administrés depuis Berckhamsted (Hertfordshire). Les deux derniers groupes territoriaux sont dans le Northamptonshire et le Yorkshire[6].

Relations avec la Bretagne Robert est actif dans le duché de Bretagne après 1091. D'après Les chroniques de Vitré, une œuvre peu fiable, un jour que Robert et ses hommes effectuent un raid sur le territoire de Fougères (Ille-et-Vilaine), de l'autre côté de la frontière normande, il est capturé par André de Vitré et ses hommes tués ou pendus[1]. Robert offre à son geôlier la main de sa fille aînée, mais pendant qu'il réfléchit à la proposition, le comte Guillaume IV de Toulouse l'obtient[1]. Robert propose alors au seigneur de Vitré la main d'Agnès, sa fille cadette, avec une dot de six seigneuries dans les Cornouailles (Angleterre), et celui-ci accepte[1]. Les deux barons se jurent alors mutuelle assistance et s'échangent vingt otages en garantie[1]. Agnès reçoit d'André tout ce qu'il possède dans la ville de Rennes et le douaire de sa grand-mère Ynoguen de Fougères[1]. Le mariage est corroboré par Robert de Torigni, et un André de Vitré tient bien la seigneurie de Trigg dans les Cornouilles au début du XIIe siècle[1]. Robert de Mortain a d'ailleurs inféodés une partie de terres en Angleterre et en Normandie à des Bretons de la région de Fougères, et a certainement d'importants intérêts dans cette région[1].

Fin de vie et portrait Il reste loyal à son demi-frère pendant tout son règne, au contraire de son frère Odon, évêque de Bayeux, qui est emprisonné à partir de 1082 pour s'être rebellé. Sur le lit de mort du roi en 1087, il obtient difficilement la libération de son frère. Il est probablement de ceux qui se sont faits avocats de Robert Courteheuse pour que celui-ci lui succède en Normandie.

Il accepte initialement Guillaume le Roux pour roi d'Angleterre, mais complote ensuite avec son frère pour installer son neveu Courteheuse sur le trône. Durant la rébellion de 1088, il tient son château de Pevensey pour les rebelles, et soutient un siège de six semaines par le roi en personne. Après sa soumission, il est pardonné comme la plupart des rebelles, et se retire en Normandie.

Robert est le personnage le plus effacé d'une famille de personnalités hautes en couleur, un « guerrier décent aux vertus banales[3] ». Guillaume de Malmesbury le décrit méchamment comme « lent et stupide[16] ». Pourtant il fait de Vital, qui deviendra plus tard le fondateur de l'ordre de Savigny, son chapelain, ce qui montre qu'il n'est pas étranger aux choses de l'esprit[6]. La description de Guillaume de Malmesbury ne cadre pas avec la confiance que Guillaume le Conquérant avait en lui, même si elle pourrait expliquer pourquoi il n'est pas particulièrement impliqué dans les affaires du duché et du royaume[1]. Il lui avait donné des domaines vastes et stratégiques, et, sur son lit de mort, lui avait confié la mission de faire distribuer son trésor à ses fils et à des maisons écclésiastiques[1]. La description est aussi contredite par sa gestion agressive de ses terres en Angleterre et en Normandie[1].

Il s'implique très peu dans la politique anglo-normande, et semble plus intéressé par ses domaines normands. Il passe d'ailleurs beaucoup de temps en Normandie et très peu en Angleterre, ce qui peut peut-être expliquer pourquoi en 1088 il donne sa préférence à Robert Courteheuse[6].

La tradition écrite de Grestain situe sa mort en 1090, mais Brian Golding affirme qu'il ne meurt pas avant 1095, peut-être un 9 décembre comme mentionné dans l'obituaire de l'église Saint-Évroult de Mortain[1]. Il est inhumé à l'Abbaye Notre-Dame de Grestain à Grestain dans l'Eure, Haute-Normandie. Cette abbaye avait été fondée par son père en 1050, et Robert en a été le principal bienfaiteur, la dotant richement avec des bénéfices en Angleterre[6]. À la mort de Mathilde vers 1083, il donne à l'abbaye les 32 hides de terres anglaises qu'elle avait reçues de son père, peut-être comme dot[1]. Il est aussi le bienfaiteur de nombreuses maisons ecclésiastiques tant en Normandie qu'en Angleterre. À Mortain, sa première femme et lui établissent un prieuré bénédictin dédié à la Vierge Marie comme une dépendance de l'abbaye de Marmoutier, et fondent l'église collégiale Saint-Évroult dans le château de Mortain[1].

Mariages et descendance Avant 1058, il épouse Mathilde (ou Maud) de Montgommery (après 1039-1085), fille de Roger II de Montgommery, seigneur de Montgommery, et plus tard 1er comte de Shrewsbury, et de Mabile de Bellême. Elle est inhumée à Grestain. Ils ont pour descendance connue :

   * Guillaume (prob. v. 1060 – après 1140), comte de Mortain ;
   * Agnès, qui est promise d'abord à Guillaume de Grandmesnil, et épouse André, seigneur de Vitré en 1091[1] ;
   * Emma (v. 1058 – après 1080), épouse Guillaume IV (v. 1040-1092), comte de Toulouse. Leur fille Philippa épouse Guillaume IX de Poitiers, duc d'Aquitaine ;
   * Denise († 1090), épouse Guy II, sire de Laval, en 1078.

En secondes noces, avant 1088, il épouse Almodis, très probablement liée aux comtes de la Marche, peut-être une fille du comte Pons de Toulouse[1]. Ils ont un fils prénommé Robert qui meurt jeune[1].

Il a aussi une fille nommée Sybil qui est abbesse de Notre-Dame de Saintes[1].


Robert, Count of Mortain was the half-brother of William I of England. Robert was the son of Herluin de Conteville and Herleva of Falaise (who was also William's mother) and was full brother to Odo of Bayeux. The exact year of Robert's birth is unknown (perhaps ca. 1038), although it is generally thought that Odo was the elder of the two, and that Robert was probably not more than a year or so younger than his sibling: there is considerable doubt about the year of Odo's birth.

His name first appears in or about the year 1049 when he was made Count of Mortain in the Cotentin, in place of one William Warlenc, who had been banished by Duke William on suspicion of treason. The suspicion is that this William Warlenc was a grandson of Duke Richard I and therefore a potential rival to William the Bastard.

Five years later Robert was to be found supporting William against the French King Henri I's invasion of Normandy, although he does not appear to have taken part in the famous victory of the battle of Mortemer. He was however present at the council of Lillebonne in 1066, held to discuss the Duke's planned conquest of England when Robert agreed to contribute 120 ships to the invasion fleet. Robert was thus one of the undoubted Companions of the Conqueror, who fought at William's side at the battle of Hastings where he commanded a company of knights from the Cotentin, although he seems to have played no heroic role at the battle.

Robert's contribution to the success of the invasion was however regarded as fairly significant by William who awarded him a large share of the consequent spoil. He was granted the rape of Pevensey in Sussex and a total of 549 manors scattered across the country; 54 in Sussex, 75 in Devon, 49 in Dorset, 29 in Buckinghamshire, 13 in Hertfordshire, 10 in Suffolk, 99 in Northamptonshire, 196 in Yorkshire, and 24 in other counties. However the greatest concentration of his landed wealth was in Cornwall (where he held a further 248 manors at the time of the compilation of the Domesday book, together with the castles of Launceston and Trematon) although these Cornish estates were not granted to him until after 1072 when Brian of Brittany decided to return home. His position of authority in the south west has therefore led many to consider him as the Earl of Cornwall, although it appears uncertain whether he was formally created as such.

His one public act after the conquest took place in 1069, when together with his cousin and namesake Robert of Eu, he led an army against a force of Danes who had landed at the mouth of the Humber and laid siege to York. As the Norman forces approached the Danes decided to retreat to the Fens where they fancied they would be safe. The two Roberts however surprised the Danes whilst they were being entertained by the disaffected natives and ""pursued them with great slaughter to their very ships"".

After that there is little mention of Robert (who may well have spent much of his time in Normandy) until he appears at the deathbed of William I in 1087 pleading for the release of his brother Odo who had been imprisoned for revolt earlier in 1082. It is said that William was reluctant to accede to the request, believing that Odo was an incorrigible rogue. As it happens William was right, for as soon as the Conqueror was dead, Odo was soon fomenting a revolt against the Conqueror's successor William Rufus, and promoting the claims of Rufus' brother and rival Robert Curthose. Odo persuaded his brother to join in the rebellion which proved a failure. But whilst Odo was exiled to Normandy by William Rufus, Robert of Mortain was excused punishment and pardoned, most probably because his extensive English estates meant that it was worthwhile for the king to gain his support.

Nothing is known of Robert's life afterwards; it seems that he died sometime between the accession of William Rufus and the year 1103, by which time his son William, Count of Mortain had most certainly succeeded him, most probably sometime around the year 1095.

Robert was married to Matilda, daughter of Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, and by her left a son, the aforementioned William of Mortain, and three daughters; Agnes who married André de Vitry, Denise, married in 1078 to Guy, 3rd Sire de La Val; and Emma of Mortain, the wife of William IV of Toulouse.

"He is described by William of Malmesbury as a man of a heavy, sluggish disposition, but no foul crimes are laid to his charge. He had evidently the courage of his race, and his conduct as a commander is unassociated with any act of cruelty. Scandal has not been busy with his name as a husband. No discords are known to have disturbed his domestic felicity."

-------------------------------------

Robert, Count of Mortain "his character stands out in honourable distinction from those of his brothers, neither surrounded by the "guilty glory" of the King, nor blackened by the baseness of the Bishop." Robert was the son of Herluin de Conteville and Herleva of Falaise, he was full brother to the infamous Odo of Bayeux; he was also a half-brother to William the Bastard, Duke of Normandy and later king William I of England: Herleva was mother of both. The exact year of Robert's birth is unknown, although it is generally regarded that Odo was the elder of the two, and that Robert was probably not more than a year or so younger than his sibling. His name first appears in or about the year 1049 when he was made Count of Mortain in the Cotentin, in place of one William Warlenc, who had been banished by Duke William on suspicion of treason. The suspicion being that this William Warlenc was a grandson of Duke Richard I and therefore a potential rival to William the Bastard. Five years later Robert was to be found supporting William against the French King Henri I's invasion of Normandy, although he does not appear to have taken part in the famous victory of the battle of Mortemer. He was however present at the council of Lillebonne in 1066, held to discuss the Duke's planned conquest of England when Robert agreed to contribute 120 ships to the invasion fleet. Robert was thus one of the undoubted Companions of the Conqueror, who fought at William's side at the battle of Hastings where he commanded a company of knights from the Cotentin, although he seems to have played no heroic role at the battle. Robert's contribution to the success of the invasion was however regarded as fairly significant by William who awarded him a large share of the consequent spoil. He was granted the rape of Pevensey in Sussex and a total of 549 manors scattered across the country; 54 in Sussex, 75 in Devon, 49 in Dorset, 29 in Buckinghamshire, 13 in Hertfordshire, 10 in Suffolk, 99 in Northumberland, 196 in Yorkshire, and 24 in other counties. However the greatest concentration of his landed wealth was in Cornwall (where he held a further 248 manors at the time of the compilation of the Domesday book, together with castles of Launceston and Trematon) although these Cornish estates were not granted to him until after 1072 when Brian of Brittany decided to return home. His position of authority in the south west has therefore led many to consider him as the Earl of Cornwall, although it appears uncertain as to whether he was formally created as such. His one public act after the conquest took place in 1069, when together with his cousin and namesake Robert of Eu, he led an army against a force of Danes who had landed at the mouth of the Humber and laid siege to York. As the Norman forces approached the Danes decided to retreat to the Fens where they fancied they would be safe. The two Roberts however surprised the Danes whilst they were being entertained by the disaffected natives and ""pursued them with great slaughter to their very ships"". After that there is little mention of Robert (who may well have spent much of his time in Normandy) until he appears at the deathbed of William I in 1087 pleading for the release of his brother Odo who had been imprisoned for revolt earlier in 1082. It is said that William was reluctant to accede to the request, believing that Odo was an incorrigible rogue. As it happens William was right, for as soon as the Conqueror was dead, Odo was soon fermenting a revolt against the Conqueror's successor William Rufus, and promoting the claims of Rufus' brother and rival Robert Curthose. Odo persuaded his brother to join in the rebellion which proved a failure. But whilst Odo was exiled to Normandy by William Rufus, Robert of Mortain was excused punishment and pardoned, most probably because his extensive English estates meant that it was worthwhile for the king to gain his support. Nothing is known of Robert's life afterwards; it seems that he died sometime between the accession of William Rufus and the year 1103, by which time his son William, Count of Mortain had most certainly succeeded him, most probably sometime around the year 1095. Robert was married to Matilda, daughter of Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, and by her left a son, the aforementioned William of Mortain, and three daughters; Agnes who married André de Vitry, Denise, married in 1078 to Guy, 3rd Sire de La Val; and Emma of Mortain, the wife of William IV of Toulouse. "He is described by William of Malmesbury as a man of a heavy, sluggish disposition, but no foul crimes are laid to his charge. He had evidently the courage of his race, and his conduct as a commander is unassociated with any act of cruelty. Scandal has not been busy with his name as a husband. No discords are known to have disturbed his domestic felicity."


Robert, Count of Mortain From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search

Robert, Count of Mortain "his character stands out in honourable distinction from those of his brothers, neither surrounded by the "guilty glory" of the King, nor blackened by the baseness of the Bishop."

Robert was the son of Herluin de Conteville and Herleva of Falaise, he was full brother to the infamous Odo of Bayeux; he was also a half-brother to William the Bastard, Duke of Normandy and later king William I of England: Herleva was mother of both. The exact year of Robert's birth is unknown, although it is generally regarded that Odo was the elder of the two, and that Robert was probably not more than a year or so younger than his sibling.

His name first appears in or about the year 1049 when he was made Count of Mortain in the Cotentin, in place of one William Warlenc, who had been banished by Duke William on suspicion of treason. The suspicion being that this William Warlenc was a grandson of Duke Richard I and therefore a potential rival to William the Bastard.

Five years later Robert was to be found supporting William against the French King Henri I's invasion of Normandy, although he does not appear to have taken part in the famous victory of the battle of Mortemer. He was however present at the council of Lillebonne in 1066, held to discuss the Duke's planned conquest of England when Robert agreed to contribute 120 ships to the invasion fleet. Robert was thus one of the undoubted Companions of the Conqueror, who fought at William's side at the battle of Hastings where he commanded a company of knights from the Cotentin, although he seems to have played no heroic role at the battle.

Robert's contribution to the success of the invasion was however regarded as fairly significant by William who awarded him a large share of the consequent spoil. He was granted the rape of Pevensey in Sussex and a total of 549 manors scattered across the country; 54 in Sussex, 75 in Devon, 49 in Dorset, 29 in Buckinghamshire, 13 in Hertfordshire, 10 in Suffolk, 99 in Northumberland, 196 in Yorkshire, and 24 in other counties. However the greatest concentration of his landed wealth was in Cornwall (where he held a further 248 manors at the time of the compilation of the Domesday book, together with castles of Launceston and Trematon) although these Cornish estates were not granted to him until after 1072 when Brian of Brittany decided to return home. His position of authority in the south west has therefore led many to consider him as the Earl of Cornwall, although it appears uncertain as to whether he was formally created as such.

His one public act after the conquest took place in 1069, when together with his cousin and namesake Robert of Eu, he led an army against a force of Danes who had landed at the mouth of the Humber and laid siege to York. As the Norman forces approached the Danes decided to retreat to the Fens where they fancied they would be safe. The two Roberts however surprised the Danes whilst they were being entertained by the disaffected natives and ""pursued them with great slaughter to their very ships"".

After that there is little mention of Robert (who may well have spent much of his time in Normandy) until he appears at the deathbed of William I in 1087 pleading for the release of his brother Odo who had been imprisoned for revolt earlier in 1082. It is said that William was reluctant to accede to the request, believing that Odo was an incorrigible rogue. As it happens William was right, for as soon as the Conqueror was dead, Odo was soon fermenting a revolt against the Conqueror's successor William Rufus, and promoting the claims of Rufus' brother and rival Robert Curthose. Odo persuaded his brother to join in the rebellion which proved a failure. But whilst Odo was exiled to Normandy by William Rufus, Robert of Mortain was excused punishment and pardoned, most probably because his extensive English estates meant that it was worthwhile for the king to gain his support.

Nothing is known of Robert's life afterwards; it seems that he died sometime between the accession of William Rufus and the year 1103, by which time his son William, Count of Mortain had most certainly succeeded him, most probably sometime around the year 1095.

Robert was married to Matilda, daughter of Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, and by her left a son, the aforementioned William of Mortain, and three daughters; Agnes who married André de Vitry, Denise, married in 1078 to Guy, 3rd Sire de La Val; and Emma of Mortain, the wife of William IV of Toulouse.

"He is described by William of Malmesbury as a man of a heavy, sluggish disposition, but no foul crimes are laid to his charge. He had evidently the courage of his race, and his conduct as a commander is unassociated with any act of cruelty. Scandal has not been busy with his name as a husband. No discords are known to have disturbed his domestic felicity."

--http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert%2C_Count_of_Mortain


Robert, comte de Mortaigne, was son of Herluin de Conteville and Harlève, mother of William the Conqueror. He was the full brother of Odo of Bayeux.

Robert was granted the county of Mortain by his brother William between 1048 and 1050. His work in the Mortaigne region was of critical importance in achieving harmony both with west Normans and their eastern counterparts, and between Normans and Bretons.

Robert was Vicomte of Conteville before 1055.

He was appointed by his half-brother, William, duke of Normandy, as count of Mortain in 1055 in Normandy.

He joined his half-brother William of Normandy in the invasion and conquest of England. He participated in 14 October 1066 in the Battle of Hastings and was portrayed in the Bayeux Tapestry (he is the 17th of 20 men known with certainty to have fought with William the Conqueror). He was in command of the chivalry of Côtentin and was given one of the important defensive Rapes of Sussex at Pevensey, where he built a castle.

Robert was created Earl of Cornwall by King William in 1067. He received extensive holdings throughout the country, with a notable predominance in the southwest, where some of his holdings in Cornwall came to him as a result the withdrawal of Count Brien of Brittany, brother of Alan Rufus, in 1069/70. He was the largest landholder in the country after the King, with holdings in nineteen counties by 1086.

He was the virtual Earl of Cornwall, which fief included the Honour of Berkhamsted with its castle there, in 1086.

Robert rebelled against the King, but was later pardoned, in 1088.

See "My Lines" ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p352.htm#i8202 ) from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )


Robert, Count of Mortain (died 1095) was a Norman nobleman and the half-brother of William I of England. Robert was the son of Herluin de Conteville and Herleva of Falaise (who was also William's mother) and was full brother to Odo of Bayeux. The exact year of Robert's birth is unknown (perhaps ca. 1038), although it is generally thought that Odo was the elder of the two, and that Robert was probably not more than a year or so younger than his sibling: there is considerable doubt about the year of Odo's birth.

His name first appears in or about the year 1049 when he was made Count of Mortain in the Cotentin, in place of one William Warlenc, who had been banished by Duke William on suspicion of treason. The suspicion is that this William Warlenc was a grandson of Duke Richard I and therefore a potential rival to William the Bastard.

Five years later Robert was to be found supporting William against the French King Henri I's invasion of Normandy, although he does not appear to have taken part in the famous victory of the battle of Mortemer. He was however present at the council of Lillebonne in 1066, held to discuss the Duke's planned conquest of England when Robert agreed to contribute 120 ships to the invasion fleet. Robert was thus one of the undoubted Companions of the Conqueror, who fought at William's side at the Battle of Hastings where he commanded a company of knights from the Cotentin, although he seems to have played no heroic role at the battle. When granting the monastery of St Michael's Mount to the Norman monastery on the Mont-Saint-Michel Robert recorded that he had fought under the banner of St Michael ("habens in bello Sancti Michaelis vexillum").[1]

Robert's contribution to the success of the invasion was however regarded as fairly significant by William who awarded him a large share of the consequent spoil. He was granted the rape of Pevensey in Sussex and a total of 549 manors scattered across the country; 54 in Sussex, 75 in Devon, 49 in Dorset, 29 in Buckinghamshire, 13 in Hertfordshire, 10 in Suffolk, 99 in Northamptonshire, 196 in Yorkshire, and 24 in other counties. However the greatest concentration of his landed wealth was in Cornwall (where he held a further 248 manors at the time of the compilation of the Domesday Book, together with the castles of Launceston and Trematon) although these Cornish estates were not granted to him until after 1072 when Brian of Brittany decided to return home.[citation needed] His position of authority in the south west has therefore led many to consider him as the Earl of Cornwall, although it appears uncertain whether he was formally created as such.[2] [edit] Later life

His one public act after the conquest took place in 1069, when together with his cousin and namesake Robert of Eu, he led an army against a force of Danes who had landed at the mouth of the Humber and laid siege to York. As the Norman forces approached the Danes decided to retreat to the Fens where they fancied they would be safe. The two Roberts however surprised the Danes whilst they were being entertained by the disaffected natives and ""pursued them with great slaughter to their very ships"".

After that there is little mention of Robert (who may well have spent much of his time in Normandy) until he appears at the deathbed of William I in 1087 pleading for the release of his brother Odo who had been imprisoned for revolt earlier in 1082. It is said that William was reluctant to accede to the request, believing that Odo was an incorrigible rogue. As it happens William was right, for as soon as the Conqueror was dead, Odo was soon fomenting a revolt against the Conqueror's successor William Rufus, and promoting the claims of Rufus' brother and rival Robert Curthose. Odo persuaded his brother to join in the rebellion which proved a failure. But whilst Odo was exiled to Normandy by William Rufus, Robert of Mortain was excused punishment and pardoned, most probably because his extensive English estates meant that it was worthwhile for the king to gain his support. [edit] Family life, character and death

Nothing is known of Robert's life afterwards; it seems that he died sometime between the accession of William Rufus and the year 1103, by which time his son William, Count of Mortain had most certainly succeeded him, most probably sometime around the year 1095.

Robert was married to Matilda, daughter of Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, and by her left a son, the aforementioned William of Mortain, and three daughters; Agnes who married André de Vitry, Denise, married in 1078 to Guy, 3rd Sire de La Val; and Emma of Mortain, the wife of William IV of Toulouse.

"He is described by William of Malmesbury as a man of a heavy, sluggish disposition, but no foul crimes are laid to his charge. He had evidently the courage of his race, and his conduct as a commander is unassociated with any act of cruelty. Scandal has not been busy with his name as a husband. No discords are known to have disturbed his domestic felicity."

On screen, Robert has been portrayed by Gordon Whiting in the two-part BBC TV play Conquest (1966), part of the series Theatre 625, and by Richard Ireson in the TV drama Blood Royal: William the Conqueror (1990). [edit]


Robert, Count of Mortain was the half-brother of William I of England.

Robert was the son of Herluin de Conteville and Herleva of Falaise (who was also William's mother) and was full brother to the infamous Odo of Bayeux. The exact year of Robert's birth is unknown, although it is generally regarded that Odo was the elder of the two, and that Robert was probably not more than a year or so younger than his sibling.

His name first appears in or about the year 1049 when he was made Count of Mortain in the Cotentin, in place of one William Warlenc, who had been banished by Duke William on suspicion of treason. The suspicion being that this William Warlenc was a grandson of Duke Richard I and therefore a potential rival to William the Bastard.

Five years later Robert was to be found supporting William against the French King Henri I's invasion of Normandy, although he does not appear to have taken part in the famous victory of the battle of Mortemer. He was however present at the council of Lillebonne in 1066, held to discuss the Duke's planned conquest of England when Robert agreed to contribute 120 ships to the invasion fleet. Robert was thus one of the undoubted Companions of the Conqueror, who fought at William's side at the battle of Hastings where he commanded a company of knights from the Cotentin, although he seems to have played no heroic role at the battle.

Robert's contribution to the success of the invasion was however regarded as fairly significant by William who awarded him a large share of the consequent spoil. He was granted the rape of Pevensey in Sussex and a total of 549 manors scattered across the country; 54 in Sussex, 75 in Devon, 49 in Dorset, 29 in Buckinghamshire, 13 in Hertfordshire, 10 in Suffolk, 99 in Northamptonshire, 196 in Yorkshire, and 24 in other counties. However the greatest concentration of his landed wealth was in Cornwall (where he held a further 248 manors at the time of the compilation of the Domesday book, together with castles of Launceston and Trematon) although these Cornish estates were not granted to him until after 1072 when Brian of Brittany decided to return home. His position of authority in the south west has therefore led many to consider him as the Earl of Cornwall, although it appears uncertain as to whether he was formally created as such.

His one public act after the conquest took place in 1069, when together with his cousin and namesake Robert of Eu, he led an army against a force of Danes who had landed at the mouth of the Humber and laid siege to York. As the Norman forces approached the Danes decided to retreat to the Fens where they fancied they would be safe. The two Roberts however surprised the Danes whilst they were being entertained by the disaffected natives and ""pursued them with great slaughter to their very ships"".

After that there is little mention of Robert (who may well have spent much of his time in Normandy) until he appears at the deathbed of William I in 1087 pleading for the release of his brother Odo who had been imprisoned for revolt earlier in 1082. It is said that William was reluctant to accede to the request, believing that Odo was an incorrigible rogue. As it happens William was right, for as soon as the Conqueror was dead, Odo was soon fermenting a revolt against the Conqueror's successor William Rufus, and promoting the claims of Rufus' brother and rival Robert Curthose. Odo persuaded his brother to join in the rebellion which proved a failure. But whilst Odo was exiled to Normandy by William Rufus, Robert of Mortain was excused punishment and pardoned, most probably because his extensive English estates meant that it was worthwhile for the king to gain his support.

Nothing is known of Robert's life afterwards; it seems that he died sometime between the accession of William Rufus and the year 1103, by which time his son William, Count of Mortain had most certainly succeeded him, most probably sometime around the year 1095.

Robert was married to Matilda, daughter of Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, and by her left a son, the aforementioned William of Mortain, and three daughters; Agnes who married André de Vitry, Denise, married in 1078 to Guy, 3rd Sire de La Val; and Emma of Mortain, the wife of William IV of Toulouse.

"He is described by William of Malmesbury as a man of a heavy, sluggish disposition, but no foul crimes are laid to his charge. He had evidently the courage of his race, and his conduct as a commander is unassociated with any act of cruelty. Scandal has not been busy with his name as a husband. No discords are known to have disturbed his domestic felicity."

On screen, Robert has been portrayed by Gordon Whiting in the two-part BBC TV play Conquest (1966), part of the series Theatre 625, and by Richard Ireson in the TV drama Blood Royal: William the Conqueror (1990).

Walter G. Ashworth : copied from Wikipedia


Robert Count of Mortain
Aus dem Haus Conteville. War ein normannischer Edelmann und Earl of Cornwall.

  • Nahm an der Schlacht bei Hastings teil und erhielt durch seinen Halbbruder Wilhelm, König von England, mehrere Ländereien als Lehnen. Dadurch wurde er einer der größten und mächtigsten Landbesitzer in England und der Normandie.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Mortain

Robert de Mortain, parfois dit Robert de Contevillen 1 (mort peut-être un 9 décembre1, en 10902 ou après 10951), fut comte de Mortain, et un officieux comte de Cornouailles à partir de 1068. Il devint le troisième sujet le plus riche d'Angleterre après la conquête normande de l'Angleterre.

Il est le fils cadet de Herluin (v. 1001-v. 1066), vicomte de Conteville, et d’Arlette de Falaise4 (v. 1010-v. 1050). Sa mère, ancienne « frilla » (ou épouse à la manière danoisen 2) du duc de Normandie Robert le Magnifique (v. 1010-1035) est la mère de Guillaume le Bâtard (plus tard le Conquérant) (v. 1027-1087). Son frère aîné est Odon, évêque de Bayeux et comte de Kent.

Robert de Mortain doit son ascension au duc de Normandie, Guillaume le Conquérant, son demi-frère. Après les années de trouble de son adolescence, celui-ci se constitue un réseau d'hommes de confiance dans le duché7.

Vers 1049-1050 d'après Orderic Vital8, ou peu après 1055 d'après des chartes qui nous sont parvenues9, voire aux alentours de 1060 et peut-être pas avant 10637, le comte de Mortain Guillaume Guerlenc tombe en défaveur et est exilé. Il est assez probable qu'il soit déposé à la fin des années 1050, après les batailles de Mortemer (1054) et Varaville (1057)7. Robert de Mortain apparaît pour la première fois au commande du comté dans une charte datée de 10631. On ne sait pas si la raison de cet évincement était réellement fondée. Orderic Vital raconte qu'il était impliqué dans un complot contre le duc10 et qu'il est banni et doit s'exiler. Le duc le remplace par son demi-frère.

Au milieu du XIe siècle, le comté de Mortain est une zone stratégique du duché puisque frontalier du duché de Bretagne, du comté du Maine et de la seigneurie de Bellême. Il est aussi proche des importants centres ecclésiastiques d'Avranches et de Coutances7. Bellême est un territoire de loyauté douteuse, quasi indépendant, aux confins du Maine, du Blésois, et du domaine royal11. Le duc a déjà arrangé le mariage de Roger II de Montgommery, un de ses hommes de confiance, avec Mabile de Bellême l'héritière de la seigneurie, afin de reprendre le contrôle de ce territoire. Avec le mariage de Robert à Mathilde de Montgommery, leur fille, il s'assure définitivement la loyauté de Bellême7.

Par sa position, le comté est traversé par de nombreuses routes commerciales1. Comme il produit peu de produits agricoles, Robert créé dix foires, ce qui permet son développement économique1. Il renforce sa position par la construction de plusieurs châteaux à Mortain, Saint-Hilaire-du-Harcouët, Le Teilleul et Tinchebray, ces villes accueillent d'ailleurs des foires1. En 1082, il conquiert le château de Gorron dans le Maine, ce qui lui procure une position avancée idéale contre Foulque IV d'Anjou dit le Réchin11.

Vers 1066, il hérite de son père les terres familiales dont la majeure partie se trouve autour de Conteville1. Il possède aussi plusieurs domaines dans le nord du Cotentin qui sont peut-être administrées depuis son château de La Haye-du-Puits1. Avant la conquête de l'Angleterre, il n'atteste que très peu de chartes ducales. L'une de ses rares activités connues lors de cette période est d'avoir été juge ducal dans une affaire concernant l'abbaye Saint-Magloire de Léhon, aux côtés de l'archevêque de Rouen et des évêques de Lisieux et d'Évreux1.

Il participe au concile de Lillebonne12 durant lequel les barons du duché sont consultés sur le projet d'invasion de l'Angleterre. Il y promet de contribuer pour 120 navires13 à la flotte qui débarquera outre-manche. Il accompagne son demi-frère Guillaume dans sa conquête de l'Angleterre.

Il fournit un soutien militaire efficace à la bataille de Hastings et durant la soumission du royaume qui s'ensuit (1066-1069). Il y a peu de doute sur le fait qu'il est l'un des leaders d'une partie de l'armée sur le champ de bataille7. En 1069, il est chargé par le roi avec Robert d'Eu de surveiller les Danois dont la flotte mouille dans l'embouchure de l'Humber, pendant que celui-ci va réprimer la révolte initiée par Eadric le Sauvage dans l'ouest14. Quand les Danois sortent de leur lieu de retraite pour piller le voisinage, les deux hommes et leur armée leur tombent dessus à l'improviste, dans le nord du Lindsey, et les écrasent, les forçant à s'enfuir par la mer7,15.

Il est présent assez souvent en Angleterre durant les cinq premières années de Guillaume le Conquérant1. Ses activités nationales sont toutefois assez limitées. Il est par exemple juge à la cour royale dans trois procès, notamment ceux concernant les terres d'Ely1. Durant les années suivantes, il passe la majeure partie de son temps en Normandie1. Il est possible qui soit justicier du royaume en 10711.

En 1081, il est mentionné par une chronique contemporaine comme étant l'un des otages, avec son fils, donné pour garantir un accord entre le Conquérant et le comte Foulque IV d'Anjou1.

Peu après, Robert reçoit d'importants domaines en Angleterre. Guillaume lui donne des terres réparties dans tout le royaume dont la plupart des terres de Cornouailles, et le rape de Pevensey dont il occupe le château depuis la bataille d'Hastings. Il est possible qu'il n'ait reçu une grande partie de ses terres en Cornouailles et dans le Yorkshire qu'après 10754. Sa position dans le sud-ouest conduit à le considérer comme comte de Cornouailles, néanmoins, il n'y a pas de preuve qu'il ait reçu officiellement ce titre16.

En 1086, à la compilation du Domesday Book, il a 797 manors répartis dans vingt comtésn 3 qui rapportent 2100£ par an1. En Cornouailles, il détient aussi les châteaux de Launceston et Tremeton, qu'il a reçu après le retour de Brian de Penthièvre en Bretagne après 1072. Ses domaines forment cinq groupes régionaux distincts en Angleterre1. Il domine feudalement le sud-ouest où il a la majorité de ses terres : Cornouailles, Devon, Dorset, Somerset. Il administre ce territoire depuis les châteaux de Lauceston et Montacute (Somerset). Il possède aussi le rape de Pevensey dans le Sussex, qui a une grande importance stratégique et économique. Dans les Home Counties, le roi lui a donné des domaines stratégiquement placés qui permettent de contrôler les routes d'accès à Londres, et qui sont administrés depuis Berkhamsted (Hertfordshire). Les deux derniers groupes territoriaux sont dans le Northamptonshire et le Yorkshire7.

Robert est actif dans le duché de Bretagne après 1091. D'après Les chroniques de Vitré, une œuvre peu fiable, un jour que Robert et ses hommes effectuent un raid sur le territoire de Fougères (Ille-et-Vilaine), de l'autre côté de la frontière normande, il est capturé par André de Vitré et ses hommes tués ou pendus1. Robert offre à son geôlier la main de sa fille aînée, mais pendant qu'il réfléchit à la proposition, le comte Guillaume IV de Toulouse l'obtient1. Robert propose alors au seigneur de Vitré la main d'Agnès, sa fille cadette, avec une dot de six seigneuries dans les Cornouailles (Angleterre), et celui-ci accepte1. Les deux barons se jurent alors mutuelle assistance et s'échangent vingt otages en garantie1. Agnès reçoit d'André tout ce qu'il possède dans la ville de Rennes et le douaire de sa grand-mère Ynoguen de Fougères1. Le mariage est corroboré par Robert de Torigni, et un André de Vitré tient bien la seigneurie de Trigg dans les Cornouilles au début du XIIe siècle1. Robert de Mortain a d'ailleurs inféodés une partie de terres en Angleterre et en Normandie à des Bretons de la région de Fougères, et a certainement d'importants intérêts dans cette région1.

Il reste loyal à son demi-frère pendant tout son règne, au contraire de son frère Odon, évêque de Bayeux, qui est emprisonné à partir de 1082 pour s'être rebellé. Sur le lit de mort du roi en 1087, il obtient difficilement la libération de son frère. Il est probablement de ceux qui se sont faits avocats de Robert Courteheuse pour que celui-ci lui succède en Normandie.

Il accepte initialement Guillaume le Roux pour roi d'Angleterre, mais complote ensuite avec son frère pour installer son neveu Courteheuse sur le trône. Durant la rébellion de 1088, il tient son château de Pevensey pour les rebelles, et soutient un siège de six semaines par le roi en personne. Après sa soumission, il est pardonné comme la plupart des rebelles, et se retire en Normandie.

Robert est le personnage le plus effacé d'une famille de personnalités hautes en couleur, un « guerrier décent aux vertus banales4 ». Guillaume de Malmesbury le décrit méchamment comme « lent et stupide17 ». Pourtant il fait de Vital, qui deviendra plus tard le fondateur de l'ordre de Savigny, son chapelain, ce qui montre qu'il n'est pas étranger aux choses de l'esprit7. La description de Guillaume de Malmesbury ne cadre pas avec la confiance que Guillaume le Conquérant avait en lui, même si elle pourrait expliquer pourquoi il n'est pas particulièrement impliqué dans les affaires du duché et du royaume1. Il lui avait donné des domaines vastes et stratégiques, et, sur son lit de mort, lui avait confié la mission de faire distribuer son trésor à ses fils et à des maisons ecclésiastiques1. La description est aussi contredite par sa gestion agressive de ses terres en Angleterre et en Normandie1.

Il s'implique très peu dans la politique anglo-normande, et semble plus intéressé par ses domaines normands. Il passe d'ailleurs beaucoup de temps en Normandie et très peu en Angleterre, ce qui peut peut-être expliquer pourquoi en 1088 il donne sa préférence à Robert Courteheuse7.

La tradition écrite de Grestain situe sa mort en 1090, mais Brian Golding affirme qu'il ne meurt pas avant 1095, peut-être un 9 décembre comme mentionné dans l'obituaire de l'église Saint-Évroult de Mortain1. Il est inhumé à l'Abbaye Notre-Dame de Grestain à Grestain dans l'Eure, Haute-Normandie. Cette abbaye avait été fondée par son père en 1050, et Robert en a été le principal bienfaiteur, la dotant richement avec des bénéfices en Angleterre7. À la mort de Mathilde vers 1083, il donne à l'abbaye les 32 hides de terres anglaises qu'elle avait reçues de son père, peut-être comme dot1. Il est aussi le bienfaiteur de nombreuses maisons ecclésiastiques tant en Normandie qu'en Angleterre. À Mortain, sa première femme et lui établissent un prieuré bénédictin dédié à la Vierge Marie comme une dépendance de l'abbaye de Marmoutier, et fondent l'église collégiale Saint-Évroult dans le château de Mortain1.

Avant 1058, il épouse Mathilde (ou Maud) de Montgommery (après 1039-1085), fille de Roger II de Montgommery, seigneur de Montgommery, et plus tard 1er comte de Shrewsbury, et de Mabile de Bellême. Elle est inhumée à Grestain. Ils ont pour descendance connue :

   Guillaume (prob. v. 1060 – après 1140), comte de Mortain ;
   Agnès, qui est promise d'abord à Guillaume de Grandmesnil, et épouse André, seigneur de Vitré en 10911 ;
   Emma (v. 1058 – après 1080), épouse Guillaume IV (v. 1040-1092), comte de Toulouse. Leur fille Philippa épouse Guillaume IX de Poitiers, duc d'Aquitaine ;
   Denise († 1090), épouse Guy II, sire de Laval, en 1078.

En secondes noces, avant 1088, il épouse Almodis, très probablement liée aux comtes de la Marche, peut-être une fille du comte Pons de Toulouse1. Ils ont un fils prénommé Robert qui meurt jeune1.

Il a aussi une fille nommée Sybil qui est abbesse de Notre-Dame de Saintes1.

Il est souvent considéré qu'Odon était l'aîné, mais on ne connaît pas avec précision la date de leur naissance. J. R. Planché5 a proposé celle de 1031 pour Robert, mais sans preuves tangibles. Il est possible que Robert ne soit pas né avant 10406.


http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Mortain

Robert de Mortain, parfois dit Robert de Contevillen 1 (mort peut-être un 9 décembre1, en 10902 ou après 10951), fut comte de Mortain, et un officieux comte de Cornouailles à partir de 1068. Il devint le troisième sujet le plus riche d'Angleterre après la conquête normande de l'Angleterre.

Il est le fils cadet de Herluin (v. 1001-v. 1066), vicomte de Conteville, et d’Arlette de Falaise4 (v. 1010-v. 1050). Sa mère, ancienne « frilla » (ou épouse à la manière danoisen 2) du duc de Normandie Robert le Magnifique (v. 1010-1035) est la mère de Guillaume le Bâtard (plus tard le Conquérant) (v. 1027-1087). Son frère aîné est Odon, évêque de Bayeux et comte de Kent.

Robert de Mortain doit son ascension au duc de Normandie, Guillaume le Conquérant, son demi-frère. Après les années de trouble de son adolescence, celui-ci se constitue un réseau d'hommes de confiance dans le duché7.

Vers 1049-1050 d'après Orderic Vital8, ou peu après 1055 d'après des chartes qui nous sont parvenues9, voire aux alentours de 1060 et peut-être pas avant 10637, le comte de Mortain Guillaume Guerlenc tombe en défaveur et est exilé. Il est assez probable qu'il soit déposé à la fin des années 1050, après les batailles de Mortemer (1054) et Varaville (1057)7. Robert de Mortain apparaît pour la première fois au commande du comté dans une charte datée de 10631. On ne sait pas si la raison de cet évincement était réellement fondée. Orderic Vital raconte qu'il était impliqué dans un complot contre le duc10 et qu'il est banni et doit s'exiler. Le duc le remplace par son demi-frère.

Au milieu du XIe siècle, le comté de Mortain est une zone stratégique du duché puisque frontalier du duché de Bretagne, du comté du Maine et de la seigneurie de Bellême. Il est aussi proche des importants centres ecclésiastiques d'Avranches et de Coutances7. Bellême est un territoire de loyauté douteuse, quasi indépendant, aux confins du Maine, du Blésois, et du domaine royal11. Le duc a déjà arrangé le mariage de Roger II de Montgommery, un de ses hommes de confiance, avec Mabile de Bellême l'héritière de la seigneurie, afin de reprendre le contrôle de ce territoire. Avec le mariage de Robert à Mathilde de Montgommery, leur fille, il s'assure définitivement la loyauté de Bellême7.

Par sa position, le comté est traversé par de nombreuses routes commerciales1. Comme il produit peu de produits agricoles, Robert créé dix foires, ce qui permet son développement économique1. Il renforce sa position par la construction de plusieurs châteaux à Mortain, Saint-Hilaire-du-Harcouët, Le Teilleul et Tinchebray, ces villes accueillent d'ailleurs des foires1. En 1082, il conquiert le château de Gorron dans le Maine, ce qui lui procure une position avancée idéale contre Foulque IV d'Anjou dit le Réchin11.

Vers 1066, il hérite de son père les terres familiales dont la majeure partie se trouve autour de Conteville1. Il possède aussi plusieurs domaines dans le nord du Cotentin qui sont peut-être administrées depuis son château de La Haye-du-Puits1. Avant la conquête de l'Angleterre, il n'atteste que très peu de chartes ducales. L'une de ses rares activités connues lors de cette période est d'avoir été juge ducal dans une affaire concernant l'abbaye Saint-Magloire de Léhon, aux côtés de l'archevêque de Rouen et des évêques de Lisieux et d'Évreux1.

Il participe au concile de Lillebonne12 durant lequel les barons du duché sont consultés sur le projet d'invasion de l'Angleterre. Il y promet de contribuer pour 120 navires13 à la flotte qui débarquera outre-manche. Il accompagne son demi-frère Guillaume dans sa conquête de l'Angleterre.

Il fournit un soutien militaire efficace à la bataille de Hastings et durant la soumission du royaume qui s'ensuit (1066-1069). Il y a peu de doute sur le fait qu'il est l'un des leaders d'une partie de l'armée sur le champ de bataille7. En 1069, il est chargé par le roi avec Robert d'Eu de surveiller les Danois dont la flotte mouille dans l'embouchure de l'Humber, pendant que celui-ci va réprimer la révolte initiée par Eadric le Sauvage dans l'ouest14. Quand les Danois sortent de leur lieu de retraite pour piller le voisinage, les deux hommes et leur armée leur tombent dessus à l'improviste, dans le nord du Lindsey, et les écrasent, les forçant à s'enfuir par la mer7,15.

Il est présent assez souvent en Angleterre durant les cinq premières années de Guillaume le Conquérant1. Ses activités nationales sont toutefois assez limitées. Il est par exemple juge à la cour royale dans trois procès, notamment ceux concernant les terres d'Ely1. Durant les années suivantes, il passe la majeure partie de son temps en Normandie1. Il est possible qui soit justicier du royaume en 10711.

En 1081, il est mentionné par une chronique contemporaine comme étant l'un des otages, avec son fils, donné pour garantir un accord entre le Conquérant et le comte Foulque IV d'Anjou1.

Peu après, Robert reçoit d'importants domaines en Angleterre. Guillaume lui donne des terres réparties dans tout le royaume dont la plupart des terres de Cornouailles, et le rape de Pevensey dont il occupe le château depuis la bataille d'Hastings. Il est possible qu'il n'ait reçu une grande partie de ses terres en Cornouailles et dans le Yorkshire qu'après 10754. Sa position dans le sud-ouest conduit à le considérer comme comte de Cornouailles, néanmoins, il n'y a pas de preuve qu'il ait reçu officiellement ce titre16.

En 1086, à la compilation du Domesday Book, il a 797 manors répartis dans vingt comtésn 3 qui rapportent 2100£ par an1. En Cornouailles, il détient aussi les châteaux de Launceston et Tremeton, qu'il a reçu après le retour de Brian de Penthièvre en Bretagne après 1072. Ses domaines forment cinq groupes régionaux distincts en Angleterre1. Il domine feudalement le sud-ouest où il a la majorité de ses terres : Cornouailles, Devon, Dorset, Somerset. Il administre ce territoire depuis les châteaux de Lauceston et Montacute (Somerset). Il possède aussi le rape de Pevensey dans le Sussex, qui a une grande importance stratégique et économique. Dans les Home Counties, le roi lui a donné des domaines stratégiquement placés qui permettent de contrôler les routes d'accès à Londres, et qui sont administrés depuis Berkhamsted (Hertfordshire). Les deux derniers groupes territoriaux sont dans le Northamptonshire et le Yorkshire7.

Robert est actif dans le duché de Bretagne après 1091. D'après Les chroniques de Vitré, une œuvre peu fiable, un jour que Robert et ses hommes effectuent un raid sur le territoire de Fougères (Ille-et-Vilaine), de l'autre côté de la frontière normande, il est capturé par André de Vitré et ses hommes tués ou pendus1. Robert offre à son geôlier la main de sa fille aînée, mais pendant qu'il réfléchit à la proposition, le comte Guillaume IV de Toulouse l'obtient1. Robert propose alors au seigneur de Vitré la main d'Agnès, sa fille cadette, avec une dot de six seigneuries dans les Cornouailles (Angleterre), et celui-ci accepte1. Les deux barons se jurent alors mutuelle assistance et s'échangent vingt otages en garantie1. Agnès reçoit d'André tout ce qu'il possède dans la ville de Rennes et le douaire de sa grand-mère Ynoguen de Fougères1. Le mariage est corroboré par Robert de Torigni, et un André de Vitré tient bien la seigneurie de Trigg dans les Cornouilles au début du XIIe siècle1. Robert de Mortain a d'ailleurs inféodés une partie de terres en Angleterre et en Normandie à des Bretons de la région de Fougères, et a certainement d'importants intérêts dans cette région1.

Il reste loyal à son demi-frère pendant tout son règne, au contraire de son frère Odon, évêque de Bayeux, qui est emprisonné à partir de 1082 pour s'être rebellé. Sur le lit de mort du roi en 1087, il obtient difficilement la libération de son frère. Il est probablement de ceux qui se sont faits avocats de Robert Courteheuse pour que celui-ci lui succède en Normandie.

Il accepte initialement Guillaume le Roux pour roi d'Angleterre, mais complote ensuite avec son frère pour installer son neveu Courteheuse sur le trône. Durant la rébellion de 1088, il tient son château de Pevensey pour les rebelles, et soutient un siège de six semaines par le roi en personne. Après sa soumission, il est pardonné comme la plupart des rebelles, et se retire en Normandie.

Robert est le personnage le plus effacé d'une famille de personnalités hautes en couleur, un « guerrier décent aux vertus banales4 ». Guillaume de Malmesbury le décrit méchamment comme « lent et stupide17 ». Pourtant il fait de Vital, qui deviendra plus tard le fondateur de l'ordre de Savigny, son chapelain, ce qui montre qu'il n'est pas étranger aux choses de l'esprit7. La description de Guillaume de Malmesbury ne cadre pas avec la confiance que Guillaume le Conquérant avait en lui, même si elle pourrait expliquer pourquoi il n'est pas particulièrement impliqué dans les affaires du duché et du royaume1. Il lui avait donné des domaines vastes et stratégiques, et, sur son lit de mort, lui avait confié la mission de faire distribuer son trésor à ses fils et à des maisons ecclésiastiques1. La description est aussi contredite par sa gestion agressive de ses terres en Angleterre et en Normandie1.

Il s'implique très peu dans la politique anglo-normande, et semble plus intéressé par ses domaines normands. Il passe d'ailleurs beaucoup de temps en Normandie et très peu en Angleterre, ce qui peut peut-être expliquer pourquoi en 1088 il donne sa préférence à Robert Courteheuse7.

La tradition écrite de Grestain situe sa mort en 1090, mais Brian Golding affirme qu'il ne meurt pas avant 1095, peut-être un 9 décembre comme mentionné dans l'obituaire de l'église Saint-Évroult de Mortain1. Il est inhumé à l'Abbaye Notre-Dame de Grestain à Grestain dans l'Eure, Haute-Normandie. Cette abbaye avait été fondée par son père en 1050, et Robert en a été le principal bienfaiteur, la dotant richement avec des bénéfices en Angleterre7. À la mort de Mathilde vers 1083, il donne à l'abbaye les 32 hides de terres anglaises qu'elle avait reçues de son père, peut-être comme dot1. Il est aussi le bienfaiteur de nombreuses maisons ecclésiastiques tant en Normandie qu'en Angleterre. À Mortain, sa première femme et lui établissent un prieuré bénédictin dédié à la Vierge Marie comme une dépendance de l'abbaye de Marmoutier, et fondent l'église collégiale Saint-Évroult dans le château de Mortain1.

Avant 1058, il épouse Mathilde (ou Maud) de Montgommery (après 1039-1085), fille de Roger II de Montgommery, seigneur de Montgommery, et plus tard 1er comte de Shrewsbury, et de Mabile de Bellême. Elle est inhumée à Grestain. Ils ont pour descendance connue :

   Guillaume (prob. v. 1060 – après 1140), comte de Mortain ;
   Agnès, qui est promise d'abord à Guillaume de Grandmesnil, et épouse André, seigneur de Vitré en 10911 ;
   Emma (v. 1058 – après 1080), épouse Guillaume IV (v. 1040-1092), comte de Toulouse. Leur fille Philippa épouse Guillaume IX de Poitiers, duc d'Aquitaine ;
   Denise († 1090), épouse Guy II, sire de Laval, en 1078.

En secondes noces, avant 1088, il épouse Almodis, très probablement liée aux comtes de la Marche, peut-être une fille du comte Pons de Toulouse1. Ils ont un fils prénommé Robert qui meurt jeune1.

Il a aussi une fille nommée Sybil qui est abbesse de Notre-Dame de Saintes1.

Il est souvent considéré qu'Odon était l'aîné, mais on ne connaît pas avec précision la date de leur naissance. J. R. Planché5 a proposé celle de 1031 pour Robert, mais sans preuves tangibles. Il est possible que Robert ne soit pas né avant 10406.


in Notes and Queries: A Medium of Intercommunication for Literary Men, General Readers, Etc. Ninth Series, Volume VIII, July-December 1901 [online on Googlebooks]

WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR’S HALF BROTHERS AND SISTERS. (9".1 S. viii. 199, p. 293.)

Orderic Vital (bk. vii. chap. xvi.) calls Harlowen de Burgo Herluin de Conteville. This place is Conteville-sur-Mer, near the mouth of the Risle. He states that he married Harleve, and had two sons. Mr. Cobbe gives him two sons, Odo and Robert, and a daughter named Adelaide, who married Eudes de Champagne for her first husband. and secondly Lambert Count of Lens. Her daughter Judith married Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria. Planché says there were two daughters—Emma, who became wife to Richard, Viscount of the Avranchin, whose son was the Earl of Chester; and Muriel, who married Eudo do Capello or al Chapel; but he states in vol. i. (‘Conqueror and his Companions ’) that there was also a sister of Muriel who became the wife of the lord of Ferté Macé, who was called nephew of Odo in a charter. But he says (vol ii p. 286) that a sire de Ferté Macé, either Mathias or William, married a sister of Odo, and William, his son, was Odo's nephew. He does not know which sister of Odo, or by which father, or whether a child of Herleve and Herluin.Here lies a doubt which I have been seeking to solve, but at the present I am totally in the dark.

WHB Chesterton, Cambs.

Reply by Frances Selena Vade-Walpole, Stagsbury, Banstead, pp. 525-526

THE ‘Dictionnaire de la Noblesse ’ of 1774, by M. De la Chenaye-Dubois, says, under ‘La Haye du Puis,’ that early in the eleventh century it was in the possession of Richard Turstin called Bardouf, who founded in 1056, with his sister Anne and his son Yvon Capel, the Abbey of Lessay two leagues south of the Haye du Puis. Under ‘De la Haye,’ another family, it gives references to La Roque’s ‘Histoire de Harcourt,’ tome ii. p. 1101, c. This ancient noblesse descends from Renaud I, Sovereign Count of Burgundy, and Alix, daughter of Richard II, Duke of Normandy and Judith of Brittany, and is a branch of the Counts of Vernon.

Robert de la Haye, third son of Guy of Burgundy, Count of Vernon and Brione, accompanied William the Conqueror at the battle of Hastings, and confirmed the foundation of the Abbey of Lessay by the advice and with the consent of his wife Muriel and his two sons. He married Muriel daughter and heiress of Eudes au Capel, Grand Maitre d’Hotel to the Duke of Normandy, son of Richard Turstin “dit" Bardouf, or Haldup, and Emma, daughter of one of the Dukes of Normandy. According to the charters and La Roque. tome ii. p. 267. Henry I recommended the Abbey of St. Evroult to the Bishop of Lisieux, the Count of Mortain, and Robert de la Haye.

Count Robert of Mortain founded St. Evroult in 1082 with Matilda de Montgoméri, his first wife. Eudo de Capel’s estates went to his grandson, according to the French ‘Noblesse,’ for his daughter and heiress Muriel de la Haye du Puis married Robert de la Haye, of another family, and had Richard and Raoul.

Richard had only three daughters: he married a cousin, Matilda de Vernon heiress of Varanguebec. The eldest daughter had for her share the barony of La Haye du Puis, also Varanguebec from her mother. She married Richard, Baron du Hommet.

Odo Bishop of Bayeux, had a son John, who had for his preceptor Roger (see Sauvage, ‘ Recherches sur l’arrondissement de Mortain’).

Robert, Earl of Mortain and Cornwall, married first Matilda de Montgoméri daughter of Roger de Montgoméri, Earl of Shrewsbury, by whom he had William and four daughters. He married second Almodis, and had a son Robert.

William, second Earl of Mortain and Cornwall, married Adelidis, called “de Ou ” in a charter (‘ Calendar of Documents preserved in France,’ by J. H. Round, Charter No. 1209, date 1100-6). He became a monk at Bermondsey in 1140. Taken prisoner at Tinchebray and blinded.

Emma married William, Earl of Toulouse, and was great - grandmother to Eleanor, heiress of Aquitaine, who married first Louis, King of France, then Henry II, King of England.

Agnes married Andre de Vitre; her daughter Hawisa married Robert de Ferrers, first Earl of Derby.

Denise, so called by La Roque and Moreli, or Agatha by Anselm, married Guy, Sieur de Laval.

Barbe married Baudouin du Bose, fourth son of Antoine de Cluny; she had four sons, and died 1127. (French ‘Noblesse’ under ‘ Radeport,’ vol. xi. p. 662.)

Maude, Matilda, or Adelais.—Anselm says Eudes de Champagne, son of Henry, called Stephen, Count of Troyes and Meaux, second son of Eudes II, called Champénois, Count of Blois, Troyes, and Meaux, and of his wife Ermengarde of Auvergne, married Adelais de Mortaing, widow of a Norman seigneur, daughter of Helvin, Seigneur de Conteville and Herleve. Adelais founded the priory of St. Martin d’Aumale.

Brooke calls her Matild, half-sister by the mother to the Conqueror, and Vincent does not correct him. ‘L’Art de Verifier les Dates’ calls her “ soeur utérine." Maseres, ‘ Selects. Monumenta,’ in pedigrees, p. 389, calls her “soror uterina Gulielmi I ” TIn notes, p.316, she is called half-sister to the king, by Harleva or Arlotta and Herluin, “probus miles.” Also p. 250 says the same: p. 254 (in Latin), Orderic Vital says, “Odoni vero Campaniensi nepoti Theobaldi Comitis, qui sororem habebat ejusdem Regis (filiam scilicet Rodberti Ducis) dedit idem Comitatum Hildernessae.” She married first Enguerraud or Ingleram, Sire d’Aumale, killed 1053, leaving one daughter, Adelaide, supposed d. s.p.; married second, before a year of widowhood, Lambert, Count of Lens, brother to Eustace II, Count of Boulogne, who was killed next year, leaving one daughter, the “wicked” Judith, married to Waltheof ; her third husband was Odo of Champagne, by whom she had one son, Stephen, who became Count of Aumale.

Harlowen de Conteville married first Frédégonde, and had by her Raoul de Conteville, who came to England and had posterity (see House of Ivry).

Secondly he married Arlotta, or Herleva, and had by her Robert, Earl of Mortain; Odo, Bishop of Bayeux; Maud, or Adelais (perhaps), Countess of Albemarle.

Emma married Richard Goz, Earl of Avranches ; she was mother to Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester. Brooke calls her Margaret. Vincent does not correct him.

Isabel married Guilbert, son of the Earl of Corbeil.

Muriel married Eudes al Chapel.

The ancestry of Harlowen is so far unknown. There is no trace of a John, Earl of Comyn, and the descent through Godfrey de Bouillon, who lived a century after, is of course absurd. The mistake has arisen most likely from Baldwin IL, King of Jerusalem, being called “Du Bourg ” (see ‘Art de Verifier les Dates’). He was father of Millicent, Queen of Jerusalem, whose jewelled prayer book is in the British Museum. Baldwin II was a “parent" (may mean nephew or cousin) to the brothers Godfrey and Baldwin I; he was son of the Count de Rethel, in Champagne.

Pére Anselm, vol. ii. p. 470. says Harlouin de Conteville is by some called Gilbert de Crépon.


Robert of Mortain

Robert of Mortain, the son of Herluin of Conteville and Herleva of Falaise, was born in about 1038. Herleva was also the mother of William of Normandy, Richard Fitz Gilbert and Odo of Bayeux.

In 1048 William of Normandy had a dispute with William of Warling. William began to doubt the loyalty of William of Warling and gave his land in Mortain to Robert.

When William the Conqueror decided to invade England in 1066, he invited his three half-brothers, Robert, Richard Fitz Gilbert and Odo of Bayeux to join him. One Norman chronicler claims that Robert of Mortain contributed 120 ships to William's invasion fleet.

After his coronation in 1066, William the Conqueror claimed that all the land in England now belonged to him. William retained about a fifth of this land for his own use. The rest was distributed to those men who had helped him defeat Harold at the Battle of Hastings.

Robert of Mortain was granted manors in Cornwall (248), Yorkshire (196), Northamptonshire (99), Devon (75), Sussex (54), Dorset (49) and Buckinghamshire (29). He also had manors in ten other counties. His 793 manors made him the second largest landowner in England.

In exchange for this land. Robert had to promise to provide the king with sixty knights. In order to supply these knights, barons divided their land up into smaller units called manors. These manors were then passed on to men who promised to serve as knights when the king needed them.

Robert Curthose, William's eldest son, was expected to become king of England when his father died. However, William preferred William Rufus, who, unlike Robert, had remained loyal to his father. William Rufus became king of England in 1087 and the following year, Robert, Geoffrey of Coutances, Odo of Bayeux and Richard Fitz Gilbert led a rebellion against his rule. Many Normans remained loyal and William Rusfus defeated the rebels.

Robert of Mortain died in 1091.

Source:

http://spartacus-educational.com/NORmortain.htm

view all 44

Robert de Mortagne, Earl of Cornwall's Timeline

1031
1031
Mortagne-sur-Sèvre, Pays de la Loire, France
1054
1054
Age 23
Appeville-Annebault, Eure, Upper Normandy, France
1058
1058
Age 27
Bretagne, France
1060
1060
Age 29
1060
Age 29
1063
1063
- 1090
Age 32
France
1065
1065
Age 34
1088
1088
Age 57
Cardinham, Cornwall, England