Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford, Surety of the Magna Carta

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Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford, Surety of the Magna Carta

Also Known As: "3rd Earl of Oxford"
Birthdate: (57)
Birthplace: Hatfield, Broad Oaks, Essex, England
Death: October 25, 1221 (53-61)
Italy (alt date 1 November 1221)
Place of Burial: Hatfield, Broad Oaks, Essex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Alberic de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford and Agnes de Vere, Countess of Oxford
Husband of Margaret de Vere and Isabel de Bolbec, Countess of Oxford
Partner of NN de Vere, Unknown Mistress
Father of Roger de Vere; Robert de Vere; Joan De Vere; Isabel de Loch; Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford and 2 others
Brother of Aubrey de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford; Alice de Vere and Henry de Vere
Half brother of Roesia de Beauchamp

Occupation: LORD CHAMBERLAIN, EARL OF OXFORD (3RD), MAGNA CARTA SURETY, 3'rd Earl of Oxford, 3rd Earl of Oxford, Earl of Essex, 3rd Earls of Oxford, Hereditary Master Chamberlain of England
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford, Surety of the Magna Carta

The official Oxford Pedigree of the De Vere Society http://www.deveresociety.co.uk/pdf/OxfordPedigreeTree.pdf gives him only one wife (Isabel de Bolobec) and only two legitimate children:

  • Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford (1210-1263), m. Hawise de Quincy
  • Eleanor de Vere (dates etc. unknown)

No comment on any illegitimate offspring, but none of them would be entitled to the De Vere arms.

View Robert de Vere's gravesite:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=51609080&ref=wvr

Magna Charta Surety, 1215

Hereditary Master (Lord) Chamberlain of England

3rd Earl of Oxford.

In the 12th Century, Melusine's descendant, Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford, and legal pretender to the Earldom of Huntingdon, was appointed as King Richard's steward of the forest lands of Fitzooth. As Lord of the Greenwood, and titular Herne of the Wild Hunt, he was a popular people's champion , and, as a result, he was outlawed for taking up arms against King John. It was he who, subsequently styled Robin Fitzooth, became the prototype for the popular tales of Robin Hood.

(http://www.freewebs.com/weirfamilyorigins/)

The principal residence of the de VERES was Castle Headingham. The keep still stands sentry guard over the River Colne in the North of Essex, probably erected by Aubrey de Vere, who died in 1194. The Headingham keep ranks with that of Rochester as the finest of the square keeps in England.

Oxford Castle was the seat of the Earls de Vere. It now consists of little more than a Norman tower which stands inside the walls of a county jail. It was here that King Stephen laid siege to Matilda in 1141. She escaped by a rope ladder fashioned from bed sheets during the night and, fleeing, found refuge at Wallingford.

Oxford Castle is thought to be the oldest in all England. The Norman structure was built in 1071 by Robert d'Oilly. From what is left of it we can conclude that it was originally a pre-Norman motte and bailey fort. After the 1071 rebuilding, alterations were made by Henry II, between 1165 and 1173. He added the houses inside the shell keep, and also the well. He presumably built the diagonal keep on the motte, the foundations of which were discovered in the 18th Century.

ROBERT de VERE, the Surety, and Crusader, born after 1164, became heir to his brother, Aubrey de Vere, who died without issue before September of 1214, and who was reputed to be one of the "evil councillors" of King John. Although he was hereditary lord great Chamberlain of the kingdom, Robert pursued a different course in politics from that of his brother, and became one of the principal Barons in arms against King John, a party to that covenant which resigned the custody of the City and Tower of London to the Barons, and one of those excommunicated by the Pope. In the beginning of the reign of King Henry III, after he had made his peace with that young monarch following the Battle of Lincoln, Robert was received into his favor, and was appointed one of the judges in the Court of King's Bench, but he died only a few months afterward, 25~ October 1221, and was buried in the Priory of Hatfield, Broad Oak, in Essex. His wife was Isabel, who died 3 February 1248, daughter of Hugh, second Baron de Bolebec in Northumberland.

Robert participated in the ill fated Fifth Crusade with King John, probably as a penance/ peacemaking effort with the church who had excommunicated him during the Magna Carta struggles. It appears he was on Crusade in the company of his illegitimate son Roger at the Battle of Damietta, Egypt in 1221, the year they both died. Sources say he died in Italy of wounds sustained in this battle, on his way home. The crossed feet on his effigy represent he was on crusade in his lifetime. For more on this battle: http://the-orb.net/textbooks/crusade/fifthcru.html


Robert was born in 1170 in Hatfield, Essex, England.1 Robert's father was Earl of Oxford Aubrey de Vere III and his mother was Lucy de Abrincis. His paternal grandparents were Earl of Oxford, Justiciar of England Aubrey de Vere II and Adeliza (Alice) de Clare; his maternal grandparents were Henry de Abrincis and Cecily of Rayleigh. He had three brothers and two sisters, named Aubrey, Henry, William, Adeliza and Sarah. He had a half-sister named Alice. He died before October 25th, 1221 in Colne, Essex, England.2 Above are the arms of Sir Robert de Vere, circa 1164-1221; Magna Carta Surety Baron 1215, 3rd Earl of Oxford, hereditary Master Chamberlain of England; Chief Justice Itinerant in Herefordshire. His blazon is: Arms: quarterly gules and Or in the first quarter a mullet argent.

Sir Robert de Vere died in Italy returning from a crusade.  His body was brought home and buried in the Benedictine priory  founded by his grandfather, Hatfield Priory at Broadoak, Essex. The arms of Sir Robert de Vere are carved into the shield with his effigy on his tomb, created within fifty years of his death by order of his son Robert.  The tomb effigy is currently in the parish church, where it was moved from the priory circa 1546, after the dissolution of monasteries ordered by King Henry VIII. Sources:

1 http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jdp-fam&id=I8706

2 http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=jdp-fam&id=I24361&style=TABLE

3 http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jdp-fam&id=I8698


Surety to the Magna Carta

3rd Earl of Oxford

Master Lord Chamberlain of England



Robert de Vere (died 1221) was the second surviving son of Aubrey de Vere III, first earl of Oxford, and Agnes of Essex. Almost nothing of his life is known until he married in 1207 the widow Isabel de Bolebec, the aunt and co-heiress of his deceased sister-in-law. The couple had one child, a son, Hugh, later 4th earl of Oxford. When Robert's brother Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd earl of Oxford died in Oct. 1214, Robert succeeded to his brother's title, estates, castles, and hereditary office of master chamberlain of England (later Lord Great Chamberlain). He swiftly joined the disaffected barons in opposition to King John; many among the rebels were his kinsmen. He was elected one of the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of Magna Carta, and as such was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III in 1215.

King John besieged and took Castle Hedingham, Essex, from Robert in March 1216 and gave his lands to a loyal baron. While this prompted Robert to swear loyalty to the king soon thereafter, he nonetheless did homage to Prince Louis when the French prince arrived in Rochester later that year. He remained in the rebel camp until Oct. 1217, when he did homage to the boy-king Henry III, but he was not fully restored in his offices and lands until Feb. 1218.

At this time, aristocratic marriages were routinely contracted after negotiations over dowry and dower. In most cases, dower lands were assigned from the estates held by the groom at the time of the marriage. If specific dower lands were not named, on the death of the husband the widow was entitled to one-third of his estate. When Robert's brother Earl Aubrey married a second time, he did not name a dower for his wife Alice, for Robert determined the division of his estate by having lots drawn. For each manor his sister-in-law drew, he drew two. This is the sole known case of assigning dower lands in this manner.

Robert served as a king's justice in 1220-21, and died in Oct. 1221. He was buried at Hatfield Regis Priory, where his son Earl Hugh or grandson Earl Robert later had an effigy erected. Earl Robert is depicted in chain mail, cross-legged, pulling his sword from its scabbard and holding a shield with the arms of the Veres.


Robert de Vere (died 1221) was the second surviving son of Aubrey de Vere III, first earl of Oxford, and Agnes of Essex. Almost nothing of his life is known until he married in 1207 the widow Isabel de Bolebec, the aunt and co-heiress of his deceased sister-in-law. The couple had one child, a son, Hugh, later 4th earl of Oxford. When Robert's brother Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd earl of Oxford died in Oct. 1214, Robert succeeded to his brother's title, estates, castles, and hereditary office of master chamberlain of England (later Lord Great Chamberlain). He swiftly joined the disaffected barons in opposition to King John; many among the rebels were his kinsmen. He was elected one of the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of Magna Carta, and as such was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III in 1215. King John besieged and took Castle Hedingham, Essex, from Robert in March 1216 and gave his lands to a loyal baron. While this prompted Robert to swear loyalty to the king soon thereafter, he nonetheless did homage to Prince Louis when the French prince arrived in Rochester later that year. He remained in the rebel camp until Oct. 1217, when he did homage to the boy-king Henry III, but he was not fully restored in his offices and lands until Feb. 1218. At this time, aristocratic marriages were routinely contracted after negotiations over dowry and dower. In most cases, dower lands were assigned from the estates held by the groom at the time of the marriage. If specific dower lands were not named, on the death of the husband the widow was entitled to one-third of his estate. When Robert's brother Earl Aubrey married a second time, he did not name a dower for his wife Alice, for Robert determined the division of his estate by having lots drawn. For each manor his sister-in-law drew, he drew two. This is the sole known case of assigning dower lands in this manner. Robert served as a king's justice in 1220-21, and died in Oct. 1221. He was buried at Hatfield Regis Priory, where his son Earl Hugh or grandson Earl Robert later had an effigy erected. Earl Robert is depicted in chain mail, cross-legged, pulling his sword from its scabbard and holding a shield with the arms of the Veres.


Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Robert de Vere (d. 1221) was the second surviving son of Aubrey de Vere III, first earl of Oxford, and Agnes of Essex. Almost nothing of his life is known until he married in 1207 the widow Isabel de Bolebec, the aunt and co-heiress of his deceased sister-in-law. The couple had one child, a son, Hugh, later 4th earl of Oxford. When Robert's brother Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd earl of Oxford died in Oct. 1214, Robert succeeded to the title and hereditary office of master chamberlain of England (later Lord Great Chamberlain). He swiftly joined the disaffected barons in opposition to King John. Many among the rebels were his kinsmen. He was elected one of the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of Magna Carta, and as such was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III in 1215.

King John besieged and took Castle Hedingham, Essex, from Robert in March 1216 and gave his lands to a loyal baron. While this prompted Robert to swear loyalty to the king soon thereafter, he nonetheless did homage to Prince Louis when the French prince arrived in Rochester later that year. He remained in the rebel camp until Oct. 1217, when he did homage to the boy-king Henry III, but he was not fully restored in his offices and lands until Feb. 1218.[1]

Robert served as a king's justice in 1220-21, and died in Oct. 1221. He was buried at Hatfield Regis Priory, where his son Earl Hugh later had an effigy erected of his father.[2]

WHILE THIS ACCOUNT STATES ROBERT AND ISABEL HAD JUST ONE CHILD, MANY SOURCES LIST ELEANOR DE VERE AS A SECOND. TWO BELOW

From:

Title: "The Large Version of the Chew Family Tree"

Author: CHEW, Tim

Publication: http://​WC.​rootsweb.​com/​cgi-bin/​igm.​cgi​?db=TIMMYCHEW

Call Number: @S2952@

Media: Electronic

ID: I032444

Name: Sir Ralph de Gernon III 1 2

Sex: M

Birth: 1229 in Bakewell, Derbyshire, England 3 2

Death: 1274 3 2

Marriage fact: Lord of Great Birch and East Thorpe, Cambridgeshire . 4 3 2

Marriage fact: Fortified his castle at Birch. 4 3 2

Fact 2: Held the Hundred of Lexton, Essex. 4 3 2

Father: Sir William de Gernon Marshall of King's House b: ABT 1190 in Stansted, Exxex, England

Mother: Beatrix de Theydon

Marriage 1 Eleanor de Vere b: ABT 1235 in Bakewell, Derbyshire, England

Married: 5 3 2

Children

Sir William de Gernon II b: 1250 in Cambridgeshire, England

Marriage 2 Hawise de Tregoze

Married: AFT 1250 2

Children

Avice de Gernon

Sources:

Title: Garner, Lorraine Ann "Lori"

Publication: P.O. Box 577, Bayview, Idaho 83803

Note: Her sources included, but may not be limited to: Burke's Landed Gentry, Burke's Dormant & Extinct Peerage, Burke's Peerage of American Presidents, Debrett's Peerage, Oxford histories & "numerous other reference works"

Note: very good to excellent, although she has a tendency to follow Burke's

Repository:

Note: Hardcopy notes of Lori Garner Elmore.

Media: Letter

Page: Vere

Text: no parents

Title: Pullen010502.FTW

Repository:

Media: Other

Text: Date of Import: Jan 5, 2002

Title: soc.genealogy.medieval

Repository:

Media: Book

Page: Dave utz@aol.com

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America bef 1760

Author: Frederick Lewis Weis

Publication: 7th ed Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore 1992

Note: Same ref source as earlier ed, "Ancestral Roots of 60 Colonists who Came to New England 1623-1650" ed 1-6

Note: good to very good

Repository:

Note: J.H. Garner

Media: Book

Title: Garner, Lorraine Ann "Lori"

Publication: P.O. Box 577, Bayview, Idaho 83803

Note: Her sources included, but may not be limited to: Burke's Landed Gentry, Burke's Dormant & Extinct Peerage, Burke's Peerage of American Presidents, Debrett's Peerage, Oxford histories & "numerous other reference works"

Note: very good to excellent, although she has a tendency to follow Burke's

Repository:

Note: Hardcopy notes of Lori Garner Elmore.

Media: Letter

From:

Ancestors of Paul Bailey MCBRIDE

Eleanor de VERE [Pedigree]

Daughter of Robert de VERE 3rd Earl of Oxford (1164-1221) and Isabel de BOLBEC (1177-1245)

Married Sir Ralph de GERNON Lord of Great Birch and East Thorpe (1228-1274)

Children: [listed under entry for Ralph de GERNON]

References: [MCS4],[WallopFH]


Robert de Vere (died 1221) was the second surviving son of Aubrey de Vere III, first earl of Oxford, and Agnes of Essex. Almost nothing of his life is known until he married in 1207 the widow Isabel de Bolebec, the aunt and co-heiress of his deceased sister-in-law. The couple had one child, a son, Hugh, later 4th earl of Oxford. When Robert's brother Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd earl of Oxford died in Oct. 1214, Robert succeeded to his brother's title, estates, castles, and hereditary office of master chamberlain of England (later Lord Great Chamberlain). He swiftly joined the disaffected barons in opposition to King John; many among the rebels were his kinsmen. He was elected one of the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of Magna Carta, and as such was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III in 1215.

King John besieged and took Castle Hedingham, Essex, from Robert in March 1216 and gave his lands to a loyal baron. While this prompted Robert to swear loyalty to the king soon thereafter, he nonetheless did homage to Prince Louis when the French prince arrived in Rochester later that year. He remained in the rebel camp until Oct. 1217, when he did homage to the boy-king Henry III, but he was not fully restored in his offices and lands until Feb. 1218.

At this time, aristocratic marriages were routinely contracted after negotiations over dowry and dower. In most cases, dower lands were assigned from the estates held by the groom at the time of the marriage. If specific dower lands were not named, on the death of the husband the widow was entitled to one-third of his estate. When Robert's brother Earl Aubrey married a second time, he did not name a dower for his wife Alice, for Robert determined the division of his estate by having lots drawn. For each manor his sister-in-law drew, he drew two. This is the sole known case of assigning dower lands in this manner.

Robert served as a king's justice in 1220-21, and died in Oct. 1221. He was buried at Hatfield Regis Priory, where his son Earl Hugh or grandson Earl Robert later had an effigy erected. Earl Robert is depicted in chain mail, cross-legged, pulling his sword from its scabbard and holding a shield with the arms of the Veres.


Earl of Oxford

Magna Charta Surety


Robert de Vere (died 1221) was the second surviving son of Aubrey de Vere III, first earl of Oxford, and Agnes of Essex. Almost nothing of his life is known until he married in 1207 the widow Isabel de Bolebec, the aunt and co-heiress of his deceased sister-in-law. The couple had one child, a son, Hugh, later 4th earl of Oxford. When Robert's brother Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd earl of Oxford died in Oct. 1214, Robert succeeded to his brother's title, estates, castles, and hereditary office of master chamberlain of England (later Lord Great Chamberlain). He swiftly joined the disaffected barons in opposition to King John; many among the rebels were his kinsmen. He was elected one of the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of Magna Carta, and as such was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III in 1215.

King John besieged and took Castle Hedingham, Essex, from Robert in March 1216 and gave his lands to a loyal baron. While this prompted Robert to swear loyalty to the king soon thereafter, he nonetheless did homage to Prince Louis when the French prince arrived in Rochester later that year. He remained in the rebel camp until Oct. 1217, when he did homage to the boy-king Henry III, but he was not fully restored in his offices and lands until Feb. 1218.

At this time, aristocratic marriages were routinely contracted after negotiations over dowry and dower. In most cases, dower lands were assigned from the estates held by the groom at the time of the marriage. If specific dower lands were not named, on the death of the husband the widow was entitled to one-third of his estate. When Robert's brother Earl Aubrey married a second time, he did not name a dower for his wife Alice, for Robert determined the division of his estate by having lots drawn. For each manor his sister-in-law drew, he drew two. This is the sole known case of assigning dower lands in this manner.

Robert served as a king's justice in 1220-21, and died in Oct. 1221. He was buried at Hatfield Regis Priory, where his son Earl Hugh or grandson Earl Robert later had an effigy erected. Earl Robert is depicted in chain mail, cross-legged, pulling his sword from its scabbard and holding a shield with the arms of the Veres.


ROBERT WEIR

Robert Weir is noticed in the witness list of a charter by which his brother Ralph Weir confirms that he has given one bovate of land in Sprowestoun to the monks of Kelso, for the benefit of his own soul and the souls of his ancestors. The charter is undated but it belongs to the reign of William I, King of Scots. The editor of the Kelso Liber assigned it to the year 1180. Kelso Liber, charter number 215 on p. 177

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